Clippings by tspitzer

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RE: Suggestions for a climbing plant in shady spot (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: chinacat_sunflower on 05.11.2005 at 03:12 pm in Edible Landscape Forum

I got my kiwis from a girl who had them growing in full dappled shade- they may have gotten a flutter or two of direct sunlight, but that's about it. and hers fruited just fine (cute little things, I might add, since they're a third the size of the supermarket kind)

and I'm all the way up where zone 6 becomes zone 5, so you should be fine...

you might want to check the passiflora forum to see if there's a shade- tolerant passion flower for you (one of my favorite fruits in the whole world!)

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clipped on: 05.10.2009 at 10:55 pm    last updated on: 05.10.2009 at 10:55 pm

RE: Are raspberries and blackberries invasive? (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: vixenmoon on 02.08.2005 at 02:32 am in Edible Landscape Forum

Blackberries are the most invasive plant that I could ever imagine... They grow fast, and you have to get up every little bit of the root or they'll keep comming back... over and over and over!!!! AAAHHHH!!!!

I love the taste of blackberries... they just aren't conductive to compactness.

I honestly don't know that I'd even try it in a container... if it's outside, a single root, or shoot could get away from you.. then it's all over!!!!

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clipped on: 05.10.2009 at 10:46 pm    last updated on: 05.10.2009 at 10:47 pm

RE: Scarlet Runner beans? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: Rosa on 04.07.2002 at 11:41 am in Edible Landscape Forum

I'm with cccatcrazy. Absolutely my favorite bean. I like them raw, but they do have to be small-I don't like the fuzz as they get older. They're great for stirfry, braised in chicken both. Wonderful!!

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clipped on: 05.10.2009 at 10:45 pm    last updated on: 05.10.2009 at 10:46 pm

alpine strawberry care

posted by: newinva on 01.10.2005 at 09:45 pm in Mid-Atlantic Gardening Forum

Hi,
i just bought ruegen alpine strawberries from pinetree, and was very disappointed that they contained NO care info. When do I plant them. how? what's the cold treating deal?

thanks!!!!

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clipped on: 05.10.2009 at 10:18 pm    last updated on: 05.10.2009 at 10:18 pm

RE: Shade loving edibles? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: gardenpaws_va on 07.23.2006 at 09:52 pm in Edible Landscape Forum

Alpine strawberries will take quite a lot of shade, and it will help keep the plants in better condition in hot climates.

Regular strawberries will grow in partial shade, but will not fruit as well as they do in at least a half-day's sun. I've used day-neutral strawberries to replace vinca under an ash tree, and they work pretty well (but aren't my main strawberry source).

Serviceberries are actually an understory tree, and do just fine in the shade of a building or a much taller tree.

The next one is my personal view, but I find that the best blackberries come from plants which are growing in the shade, if only because the ground is more likely to stay moist. The slower ripening also means that even wild berries get plump before they ripen.

Most mints are shade-tolerant, up to a point, but need good air circulation to ward off disease.

In general, leafy edibles (lettuce, other tender greens, parsley) do better in shade than fruiting edibles, and may even need some shading to permit a summer harvest in hot climates (which seems to be most of us now).

Robin

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clipped on: 05.08.2009 at 08:53 pm    last updated on: 05.08.2009 at 08:53 pm

RE: looking for partial sun/shade edibles (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: painterbug on 04.27.2005 at 07:51 pm in Edible Landscape Forum

Check you're zone but how about.

Quince: Here it is evergreen, makes an apple like fruit and mine produces coral flowers. I trim mine to a hedge. It has thorns so beware. A very resilant bush here.

Camila: There is a variety used in tea. Evergreen and pretty flowers.

Blueberry: I just planted 10 bushes I can't wait to see them grow. Beware of soil needs. They may lose foliage in winter but put on a fall show.

You may want to also consider some herbs if you go with a mixed hedge, they are relatively inexpensive and propagated easily, most thrive on neglect. Rosemary is a wonderful evergreen hedge if you can grow it up there. Sage is evergreen. Alot of herbs are periennal and you can research what thrives in you're area.

Good luck to you.

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clipped on: 05.08.2009 at 08:52 pm    last updated on: 05.08.2009 at 08:52 pm

Wood Strawberry (F. vesca) as groundcover?

posted by: vegangirl on 05.15.2005 at 07:18 pm in Edible Landscape Forum

Has anyone used this as a groundcover under shrubs or on a bank under tall trees? It grows there naturally now but I was thinking of transplanting all the wood strawberries that are taking over my woodland beds to one spot instead of just digging them up. If I plant them as a solid groundcover will they stay solid or do they wander off and tend to die out in the middle areas?

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clipped on: 05.08.2009 at 08:49 pm    last updated on: 05.08.2009 at 08:49 pm

RE: Day lilies are edible. (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: sunshineboy on 10.14.2008 at 06:59 am in Edible Landscape Forum

They are definetly edible...I eat them every season. The red or orange daylilies are more bitter, while stella d oros and other yellows are not. The flower petals are great on salads and have buttery flavor. I love walking through the garden giving a tour and pluck some petals and pop in my mouth.
Also, I have chopped the flower buds up and used in a stir fry.
I have never eater the roots, tubers or leaves so I cannot comment about that.
Enjoy your new found eats...sunshineboy

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clipped on: 05.08.2009 at 08:48 pm    last updated on: 05.08.2009 at 08:48 pm

RE: Edible ground covers (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: arugula on 08.05.2008 at 01:43 pm in Edible Landscape Forum

Low-growing thyme like elfin is lovely and walkable, to some extent.

Could someone say more about the lingonberries? Are they really low enough for a groundcover? How much maintenance to they need, meaning, are they finicky with moisture, soil?

Thanks!

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clipped on: 05.08.2009 at 08:47 pm    last updated on: 05.08.2009 at 08:47 pm

RE: Edible ground covers (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: passion4perennials on 05.21.2008 at 04:10 pm in Edible Landscape Forum

Hartmanns Plant Company has groundcover blueberries. They are supposed to be for zones 3-7, so they might work in your area. They have lingonberries too. One Green World has a wide variety of unusual plants, including lingonberries. I think both sources have groundcover raspberries...tiny little plants about 6' tall with wonderfully flavored berries.

Here is a link that might be useful: blueberry source

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clipped on: 05.08.2009 at 08:46 pm    last updated on: 05.08.2009 at 08:46 pm

RE: Edible ground covers (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: stoloniferous on 05.08.2008 at 10:46 am in Edible Landscape Forum

How shady and moist a spot is this? Unless this slope is at the edge of a body of water, cranberry probably isn't an option. Wintergreen might be an option if the spot isn't in full sun. A lowbush blueberry might be an option, but you may have trouble finding a source, since most cultivated varieties are highbush - meaning tall.

If the area is contained by buildings or sidewalk, you could go with mint or strawberry, which are agressive growers. (Or plant both, and watch them do battle.)

You might find something you like at the link below, but unfortunately it looks like most of what they sell are shrubs or trees.

Here is a link that might be useful: yummy plants

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clipped on: 05.08.2009 at 08:46 pm    last updated on: 05.08.2009 at 08:46 pm