Clippings by suziehomeowner

 Sort by: Last Updated Post Date Post Title Forum Name 

rejuvenation latches and icebox latches - with beaded inset cabs

posted by: aokat15 on 11.05.2010 at 06:00 pm in Kitchens Forum

Hi all - our cabinetry was delivered recently and we were talking with our cabinet maker about the hardware. He said that doing the latches with beaded inset cabs was really troublesome on the cabinet doors that are not doubled up (so the latch would need to be fastened on the bead). Did you guys find this as well? What did you do for hardware on single cabinets? Are the icebox latches better for this issue than traditional latches? Hope this post makes sense... thanks!

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 11.06.2010 at 11:22 pm    last updated on: 11.06.2010 at 11:22 pm

led ucl diy

posted by: jem199 on 06.17.2010 at 12:19 am in Lighting Forum

Instructions for LED DIY
1. Measure the inside bottoms of the front width of your cabinets, between the sides (called fences). This assumes that the upper cabinets are completely flat bottomed.
2. Create a box diagram of your pper cabinet layout on paper and include the measurements.
3. Decide how many lighting zones (circuits) you�d like (groupings with their own switch or dimmer). Decide if you want dimming in each zone. You will need a transformer and a switch for each zone. Purchase dimmable transformers and switches for the zones that require dimming.
4. If you have lighting levels in your current kitchen you like, determine the lumens (light output) of those lights to be sure you are adding similar brightness. I used the following
� Incandescent are typically 14 lumens per watt.
� Fluorescents are typically 60 lumens per watt.
The lighting should be determined by a desired lumens per linear ft basis. The type of lighting (xenon, halogen, fluorescent, led, EL) possible could be dictated by conformance to local laws (eg - title24) FWIW, http://www.greentorch.com/LED-Strip-lights.htm has a claimed output of 83 lumens per watt. Environmental lights has their lumens here:
https://www.environmentallights.com/categories/1306_2402_3417/under-cabinet-light-bars
5. Determine the lengths of lights for each cabinet. You want at least one light every 30". Many have suggested getting the widest you can for each cabinet and then putting them on a dimmer to give you the most flexibility for task and ambient lighting. You can stack two or more lightbars parallel and connect them with jumpers for more lumens over a high-task area, such as a sink.
6. For each zone, add up the volts for the lights in the zone so you can select the appropriate transformer. Add 15% to your total. Here are the conversions I used (This is specific to the environmentallights type light bar)
� 15 cm = 5.9" = 1.65w
� 30 cm = 11.8" = 3.3w
� 60 cm = 23.6" = 6.6w
� 90 cm = 35.4" = 9.9w
7. Decide where you will place your transformer(s). Transformers should be placed in a wall, but in a cabinet, basement or attic where there is circulation and you can access it, if needed. You need one transformer for each lighting zone. By code, the transformer(s) have to be in an accessible location. One transformer per lighting zone is required if independent control of each zone is required. If multiple transformers are required, you need to ensure that there is adequate electrical branch wiring to the locations where each transformer is located. The necessary switch controls need to be planned for.
8. Add your lights to your box diagram. This will help you determine the accessories needed and where to place the wires. The lights in each zone must connect to each other and each cable must reach the transformer. For new installs, you can pull the wires back through the wallboard. For existing installs, bring the cables over the tops of the cabinets. You need at least 2 mounting clips per light. You may also need seamless connectors and/or right angle cords for tight spaces between the lights and fence where the cord needs to travel to the back of the cabinet. Interconnected zones should be wired in parallel not series so that a problem in one light bar/ zone would not cause all the lights to go out.

Parts List
1. In wall wiring - Ideal brand low voltage wiring (from HD or Lowes).
2. Ideal Plug disconnects (from HD or Lowes).
3. Lights - depends on how much light you want, total length of cabinets.
4. Transformer(s) - depends on cummulative consumption + 15% margin.
5. Inter-connect wiring.
6. Lightbars from http://stores.ebay.com/LEDpro-Lighting Email sales@photonier.com for pricing sheet.
7. Transformer from environmentallights.com
8. Leviton 6613 magnetic dimmers � 1 for each circuit/zone. Check with transformer supplier if you�d like to use a different one. Incompatible dimmer switches can void your transformer warranty. This particular dimmer reco assumes that low voltage (12V or 24V) LED lighting will be installed and contains many details specific to environmentallights type lightbars. Magnetic dimmers from various vendors could be used, but require some testing first. If you use a different transformer, check with the manufacutuer if there are known problems with certain dimmers. You can Hook up the system prior to installation for a test run if possible - switch(es).Things to look out for
1. There is no buzzing/ humming sound from the transformer when everything is hooked up and powered on.
2. All lights are equally bright, especially at the ends.
3. No flickering
4. No problems when dimming.

Tips specifics to this type of environmental lights type lightbar:
1. It�s a waste to buy the long length 3 prong interconnects. Just cut the interconnect wires and attach to a disconnect.
2. Two adjacent prongs are actually connected to the same DC line. The third is connected to the other DC line.
3. The right angle interconnects are probably more useful for connecting bars set at an angle to each other.
4. You could use flat wire under the cabinets as it comes with double side sticky tape. Some DIY work would be necessary with a soldering iron + heat shrink tubing.
http://www.flatwirestore.com/mm5/merchant.mvc
The flat wire is useful in situations where you do not like to see standard low voltage wiring.
5. The plug disconnects would be used to connect the in-wall low voltage wiring to the lighting power cords which connect the lights. It would also connect the in-wall low voltage wiring to the transformer. This way, if you ever decide to change out all the lighting bars to another make, it would be a simple matter of disconnecting from the plug disconnects and perhaps the transformer.

Thanks to davidtay for this information! Be sure to watch both parts of the DIY video below. It�s shows how to wire these to household current.

Here is a link that might be useful: UCL Install Video

NOTES:

Re: under cabinet LED lighting info.
clipped on: 11.05.2010 at 03:21 pm    last updated on: 11.05.2010 at 03:22 pm

undercounter lighting ,what to buy??

posted by: tkme4ard on 03.20.2010 at 07:57 pm in Lighting Forum

I'm at a loss. It all sounds so confusing. Can someone steer us in the correct direction? We're wanting LED under cabinet lighting that is hardwired. Only the corner on the bottom right will have upper cabinets. We had the electrician wire it but we have to do the rest.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v251/tkme4ard/?action=view&current=tkme4ardforgw.png

thanks!
Angela

NOTES:

Re: LED under cabinet lighting
clipped on: 11.05.2010 at 03:15 pm    last updated on: 11.05.2010 at 03:15 pm