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RE: Old Hobart-made or newer Kitchenaid? (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: therustyone on 01.05.2013 at 11:53 am in Cooking Forum

Trudy, here's the Oatmeal Bread recipe.
It comes from a very old Pillsbury cook book.

The first amounts are as the recipe was published,
The amounts in parenthesis after
Are the amounts I use for 3 loaves.
(9 1/2 X 5 loaf pans)

Oatmeal Bread

Ing:

2 tsp salt (3 tsp)
2 C boiling water (3 C)
1 C rolled oats (1 1/2 C)*
1 Tbsp shortening (1 1/2 Tbsp)
1 Cake compressed yeast (1 1/2 cakes)**
1 tsp sugar (1 1/2 tsp)
1/4 C lukewarm water (3/8 C)
1/2 C brown sugar (3/4 C)
5 C flour (7 1/2 C)

Directions:

Add salt to boiling water.
Stir in shortening and rolled oats.
Let stand until lukewarm (about an hour).
Crumble yeast in large bowl.
Add white sugar and 1st amount lukewarm water.
Let stand to 'proof' yeast.
Dissolve brown sugar in 2nd amount lukewarm water.
Add to yeast mixture.
Stir in 1/2 of the flour.
Beat until smooth.
Add remaining flour and oats.
Continue to beat until smooth.***
Let rise in warm place until double in bulk.
"Punch" down and knead by hand until smooth and elastic.
Divide into 2 (or 3) loaves,
Place in prepared pans.

Bake at 425 for about 15 min.
Reduce oven to 375
And bake about 25 to 30 minutes.
Until done.

*I use only the old fashioned oats.
** yeast cakes are nowhere to be found around here,
So I use active dry yeast.
As per directions on the jar.
2 1/4 tsp (3 3/8) tsp
Or 1 packet (1 1/2 packets)
*** I don't hand knead at all before the 1st rise,
My K A does it all.

I've found the amount of yeast for the 3 loaves
doesn't have to be absolutely exact.
The bread will be good, no matter.

This is a soft, almost moist bread.
Makes wonderful sandwiches, toast and french toast.
I have also rolled the dough out
after the first rise and dividing it,
to about a half inch thickness,
The width slightly shorter than the length of my pans,
And lightly buttered it.
Sprinkled with cinnamon & sugar
and rolled up,
Then placed in the pans.
Raisins and/or nuts can be added here, too.

Enjoy!

Rusty

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.10.2013 at 02:04 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2013 at 02:04 pm

RE: Boston Cream Pie.....in need of rescue (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: ann_t on 04.13.2011 at 10:54 am in Cooking Forum

Susy, not sure which recipe Sharon uses, but this is my favourite Boston Cream recipe. I've been making this recipe since before I was married.

If you have a chance to make the cake either early in the day or the day before it gives the custard a chance to really meld with the cake.

Ann

Home Cookin Chapter: Recipes From Thibeault's Table

Boston Cream Pie
================

1/3 cup butter
1 cup sugar
1 egg
1-1/2 cups sifted all-purpose flour
2-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup milk
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
. Cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffly. Add the egg and
beat until creamy.

Sift the flour, baking powder, and salt together. Add alternately with
the combined milk and vanilla.

Turn the batter into a greased and floured 9-inch round layer cake pan.
Bake in a 350� oven for about 30 minutes, or until the cake springs
back when lightly touched in the center.

Cool on a rack for 5 minutes, then turn out and cool completely; Place
the cake on a serving plate and split horizontally into two layers with
a serrated knife. Carefully remove the top layer.

Fill with the chilled Cream Filling. Replace the top half and pour the
warm Chocolate Icing over the top, spreading only to the edges. Chill.
(When allowed to stand for several hours, the filling seeps into the
cake, making the cake and filling seem almost as one.)

Cream Filling

1/2 cup sugar
3 egg yolks
3 tablespoons flour
1 tablespoon butter
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/2 cups milk


Combine the sugar, flour, and salt in a saucepan. Gradually stir in the
milk. Cook over low heat, stirring until the mixture comes to a boil.
Boil, stirring for 1 minute. Beat the egg yolks slightly. Gradually
stir in about half the thickened sauce. Return to the heat and cook.
stirring 2 or 3 minutes longer to take away the flour taste. Remove
from the heat and blend in the butter. Strain into a bowl. Cool for a
few minutes, then blend in the vanilla. Cover and cool, then chill.


Chocolate Icing

2 squares of chocolate
1 cup sifted icing sugar
2 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoons hot water
1 teaspoon vanilla

Melt the chocolate and butter the microwave on medium low power. Stir
until smooth, and blend in the icing sugar and hot water. Stir until
smooth and slightly thickened (do not beat). Stir in the vanilla. Use
immediately.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 04.14.2011 at 02:01 pm    last updated on: 04.14.2011 at 02:01 pm

RE: Rye Bread - a happy medium? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: partst on 12.28.2010 at 09:40 pm in Cooking Forum

I use the recipe from the Outback Steak House. I make it a couple times a month DH loves this bread. If I remember I do add caraway seeds but I forget most of the time. It�s dark and moist bread perfect with a salad.

Ingredients
2 packages dry yeast
1/2 cup warm water
1 tablespoon sugar
1 cup warm water
1/2 cup dark molasses
1 tablespoon salt
2 tablespoons oil
2 cups rye flour
2 1/2 -3 cups bread flour
Directions

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees.


Soften yeast in 1/2 cup warm water.


Stir in the sugar and let stand 6 minutes or until it�s bubbly.


In large mixing bowl combine the yeast/water combo above along with 1 cup warm water the molasses, salt, oil and rye flour.


Mix this until it makes a nice smooth batter.


Work in the bread flour until the dough is smooth and no longer sticky. It should be very pliable and elastic.


Knead the dough for a few minutes and then let it rise in a greased bowl until it�s doubled.

Punch the dough down and shape into 2 large round loaves.


Placed the loaves a few inches apart on a greased and cornmeal dusted cookie sheet. Sprinkle a bit of the cornmeal over the top of the loaves as well.


Let loaves rise in a warm place until doubled.


Bake loaves at 375 for about 30 minutes or until the crust makes hollow sound when tapped.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 02.15.2011 at 08:46 am    last updated on: 02.15.2011 at 08:46 am

RE: Rye Bread - a happy medium? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: ann_t on 12.28.2010 at 08:47 pm in Cooking Forum

Becky, this is a tried and true recipe. I've also made a sourdough version.

If you don't care for caraway seeds, just leave them out. No need to make any substitutions.

Home Cookin Chapter: Recipes From Thibeault's Table

Rye Bread
=========
1-1/2 cups rye flour
3 cups bread flour
1/2 cup whole wheat
2 teaspoons yeast
2 to 3 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon molasses
2 tablespoons melted butter
Approximately 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 cups water

Egg Wash

Stir together all the dry ingredients. Add the molasses, butter and 1
1/4 cups of water. Mix until dough comes together. Add more water if
needed. Knead until dough is smooth and supple. Dough should not be
too stiff.

I used the Food Processor to knead the dough.

Oil a large bowl and roll the dough to coat it wth the oil. Cover with
plastic wrap.

Let rise until double, approximately 1 1/2 hours.

Knock dough down, divide in half and form two loaves. Free form or in
a loaf pan.

Dust the loaves with a little flour and cover with a tea towel.

Heat oven to 350°F.

Slash loaves and brush with an egg wash. Bake on a stone or on a
parchment covered baking sheet for approximately 45 minutes or until an
instant read thermometer reads 190°F.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 02.15.2011 at 08:45 am    last updated on: 02.15.2011 at 08:45 am

Dirt Bombs...

posted by: solsthumper on 03.06.2007 at 08:41 pm in Cooking Forum

Stacy and Annie, kids of all ages love these, it's a cross between a cinnamom sugar doughnut and a muffin. Enjoy.


Dirt Bombs
Yields: 12 muffins*

3 cups AP flour, minus 3 tablespoons
1 tablespoon baking powder
� teaspoon salt
� teaspoon ground nutmeg
� teaspoon ground cardamon
� cup (1 � sticks) unsalted butter
1 cup granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1 cup whole milk **

Topping ***

� cups unsalted butter, melted
� cup granulated sugar
1 � teaspoons ground cinnamon

Preheat oven to 400� F. Place the rack in the center position. Generously grease a 12-cup standard muffin pan.

Sift the flour, baking powder, salt, nutmeg and cardamon into a mixing bowl. In another bowl, cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Scrape the bowl down half way through. Mix in the eggs. Add the dry ingredients alternately with the milk in two additions, mixing gently by hand to incorporate all the flour. The batter will be on the stiff side, but airy. Don�t over mix or beat the batter as this will make the muffins tough. Spoon the batter into the prepared pan, without smoothing the tops. Bake for about 25 minutes or until a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean. As soon as the muffins are cool enough to handle, turn them out onto a wire rack.

Add the melted butter to a bowl. In another bowl, mix the sugar and cinnamon.
Dip the muffins (top, sides and bottom) in the butter, using a pastry brush -if necessary- to cover areas not buttered by dipping. Immediately roll the muffins in the cinnamon sugar mixture. Serve warm or at room temperature.

*I've made this twice, and both times, this recipe has yielded 16 muffins instead of 12.
**I substituted whole buttermilk for whole milk because I always have it on hand and prefer it for baking.
*** The amounts listed for the sugar and cinnamon are not quite enough to coat all the muffins, so I recommend you double it.

Sol

NOTES:

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clipped on: 10.30.2010 at 02:25 pm    last updated on: 10.30.2010 at 02:26 pm

RE: Yogurt-making question (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: grainlady on 06.09.2010 at 05:35 pm in Cooking Forum

There are a number of yogurt cheese makers on the market, which are a great gadget for draining the whey out of the curd from both yogurt or kefir.

I have a Galloping Gourmet Yogurt Cheese Maker I've used for years. I also use a permanent coffee basket (they have a fine mesh screen that works well for the purpose), and it works for 2 cups of yogurt/kefir and fits perfectly in my glass 2-cup measuring cup. I can toss either of these in the dishwasher after using it. Much less mess than using layers of paper towels or cheesecloth for draining yogurt.

Some general information from "The Yogurt Gourmet" by Anne Lanigan.

One cup of yogurt gives up 25% of it's volume in 5 minutes (of draining); 2 cups gives up 18% and a quart only 12% after 5 minutes.

DRAINED YOGURT - Yogurt that has drained for about 10 minutes.

THICK YOGURT - Yogurt that has drained for at least 30 minutes. It will be thick but still soft -- it will not retain its shape on a flat surface or the mark of a finger indentation. One hour's draining is ideal if you want thick yogurt.

YOGURT CHEESE - Yogurt that has drained for 8 hours or longer. It is the consistency of cream cheese, will hold its shape and retain the mark of a finger indentation.

YOGURT CREAM - Heavy cream made into yogurt by the addition of 1 t. yogurt to 1-cup of cream. Works well as a substitute for creme fraiche.

Note: One quart of yogurt will yield approximately 1-1/3 cups of yogurt CHEESE (about 2 cups of whey is drained off). One quart of yogurt will yield about 2-1/2 cups of THICK yogurt (about 1-1/4 cups of whey is drained off).

-Grainlady

NOTES:

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clipped on: 06.12.2010 at 09:57 am    last updated on: 06.12.2010 at 09:57 am

RE: Yogurt-making question (Follow-Up #14)

posted by: rachelellen on 06.09.2010 at 07:22 am in Cooking Forum

Yogurt sieves? I'll have to look about. I'm intrigued by the yogurt cheese cheesecake.

A bit off topic, but since yogurt cheese has been mentioned, I'm posting the recipe for one of my favorite party nibbles. You gotta love hors d'oeuvres that you can make days or weeks ahead of time and just whip out on 5 minutes notice and still impress people.

I'm including my yogurt recipe 'cause it was attached for the sake of anyone who hasn't made it yet:

Yogurt

Heat 1 quart of milk to the boiling point for just 1 minute. Cool to 115 degrees (lukewarm to the touch). Pour into a heavy ceramic bowl. Mix in 2 T of fresh, plain yogurt (must have active cultures). Cover tightly with plastic wrap and set in a warm place. An oven with a pilot light is good, I use a goose-neck desk lamp bent low over the bowl. I know some people who use a heating pad set on low under the bowl. According to the recipe, 110 is the ideal temperature, but remember that people have been making yogurt for thousands of years without benefit of thermometers. Essentially, it should be warmer than youd like a bath to be if you were going to spend a half an hour in it, but as warm as youd like a bath to be if you came home on a cold winter night and wanted to warm up.


The yogurt should be ready in about 5 to 8 hours. Tilt the bowl to see if it holds together. The longer you allow the yogurt to sit, the more sour it will be.

Line a colander with a thin cloth, such as a dish towel or muslin. Pour the yogurt into the colander and allow it to drain for at least an hour. Refrigerate.

Note: It does not help speed or improve the process to add extra yogurt starterin fact, it can make for a lower quality product. The cultures have to have enough food to poop enough yogurtsorry, I couldnt help myself.

You can make yogurt with 2 % milk if you like, but it takes longer and you need to strain it more.

Yogurt Cheese in Olive Oil

Pour home made yogurt into a sieve lined with a thin cloth, such as a dish towel or muslin. Fold the ends of the cloth over the top of the yogurt, top with a plate big enough to mostly cover the yogurt but small enough that it wont get hung up on the sides of the strainer as the yogurt gets pressed down. Weigh the plate down with a large jar or lidded tupperware bowl full of water and set the sieve over a bowl to drain. Be sure and empty the bowl from time to time so that the yogurt isnt sitting in its own whey.

I generally do this overnight, but times can vary depending on the weight etc.

You want a product about the texture of cream cheese.

Form the yogurt cheese into balls about 1 " in size, rolling them in your hands.

Pack the balls into sterilized jars with an herb mix sprinkled over each layer. Fill the jar with extra virgin olive oil. Store for at least 2 days to moogle the flavors, and up to about 3 weeks in the fridge.

For the herb mix, I usually use dried red chilli pepper flakes, fresh rosemary & oregano (minced), fresh garlic sliced paper thin and salt. Then I add other things to suit my fancy. Herbs, minced onions, spices etc. Get playful. I dont know how to measure amounts, but remember that only a bit of the flavored oil will make it onto the cracker or bread with the cheese, so you almost cant put too much "stuff" in the oil.

The "cheese" balls should be served with their spiced oil.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 06.12.2010 at 09:56 am    last updated on: 06.12.2010 at 09:56 am

RE: Yogurt-making question (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: grainlady on 06.08.2010 at 03:49 pm in Cooking Forum

I just made a quart of yogurt yesterday in a Yogourmet Yogurt Maker, one of many yogurt makers I've owned over the 30+ years I've made yogurt. I've also used the heating pad and the cooler method, but I'm a gadget person - hence a yogurt maker. I also use my Yogourmet Yogurt Maker to keep the starter for Salt-Rising Bread at a constant temperature when I make it, so that's my secondary use for it.

As the other said, pick a method or gadget, they generally all work well, yogurt is pretty forgiving. If one method doesn't suit you, try another one. Do you want to make a quart or two (all one flavor) at a time? Would you rather make several 8-oz. containers at once? With the 8-oz. containers you can make each container a different flavor (i.e., use 1 T. Quik Chocolate Milk Powder for chocolate milk yogurt; 1 T. plain or crunchy peanut butter for peanut butter yogurt; 1 t. vanilla extract and 2-3 t. sugar for vanilla yogurt; 3 T. grated cucumber - drained - plus 1/8 t. dill weed and a dash of garlic salt for cucumber yogurt, add some jam, jelly, fruit....)

I'd suggest a good thermometer over a digital yogurt maker. I have an instant-read yogurt thermometer which highlights the temperature window to heat your milk to, and temperature window when you add your starter. Any candy or instant read thermometer will work just as well.

The important temperatures to remember are:

-Heat your "milk" to 190-210F.

-Cool to 110-115F (then add your culture/starter)

-Incubate between 105-120F.

The lower the temperature is when you add the starter (110F), the more mild your yogurt will be. The higher the temperature (115F or more) the more tart your yogurt will be. Neither is right or wrong, just a choice. I like mild yogurt when I make flavored yogurt or a dessert yogurt, and tart yogurt when using it for yogurt cheese.

The cooler the incubating temperature (below 105F), the bacteria in the starter becomes less active and takes longer to grow. Temperatures over 120F. will kill the bacteria.

-It usually takes about 4-hours to ferment.

-The longer you ferment it, the more tart it will be.

-Don't giggle or move it during fermentation or it can destroy the curd and you'll have yogurt "soup".

-Stirring the yogurt after it's done will also destroy the curd.

You can purchase dry powder packets of culture, which cost a LOT, or use store-bought yogurt or a portion from your last batch. I suggest using Stonyfield Farm Yogurt as a starter, if it's available, because it's the only brand of yogurt that contains SIX live, active cultures. Most other yogurt products, as well as the powder cultures, contain only 2 lactic acid bacteria.

I use 3 T. yogurt per quart of "milk" and put the remainder of the purchased yogurt in the freezer in small containers containing 3 T. for when I need a new starter. I just thaw it in the refrigerator before using it.

If you get really excited about making yogurt, check your local library for yogurt-specific books. You'll find lots of recipes for making yogurt, as well as recipes to use it in. I've worn out a copy of "Yogurt Cookery" by Sophie Kay (copyright 1978). I made a recipe from that book with cornstarch in it yesterday, which is very smooth and creamy to use as a dessert yogurt. You can make "Sweet Vanilla Yogurt" with sweetened condensed milk as a portion of the milk. Yogurt made with whipping cream is also great used as a dessert yogurt along with fruit. If you prefer non-fat yogurt, use non-fat dry milk powder (possibly add some unflavored gelatin to give it some "body"). There are all kinds of recipes for yogurt, so try a bunch of them.

If you make a sweetened yogurt, you can't use a portion to culture your next batch. You can only use plain yogurt as a culture.

A great cookbook for using yogurt is "Stonyfield Farm Yogurt Cookbook" by Meg Cadoux Hirshberg.

I don't often make yogurt these days, but make kefir with real kefir grains and milk-of-choice. The curd in kefir is easier to digest than yogurt. Kefir is made at room temperature in a quart jar and less fickle than yogurt; and is also much better for you than yogurt.

You use the kefir grains over and over and never need a new culture/starter. The grains grow and you have more to share with others. I use kefir everyday for it's whey, as a substitute for buttermilk, drained and used as a substitute for plain yogurt, sour cream and cream cheese. It's the base for our smoothies each morning. So consider kefir as another cultured milk product.

-Grainlady

NOTES:

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clipped on: 06.12.2010 at 09:56 am    last updated on: 06.12.2010 at 09:56 am

Ebinger's Blackout Cake

posted by: michaelmaxp on 03.28.2010 at 01:56 pm in Cooking Forum

Having been married to a Brooklyn girl for over 30 years, I've been hearing about the mythical Blackout Cake from
Ebinger's every time chocolate cake enters a discussion.

From what I have been able to deduce, all chocolate cakes seem to be measured against Ebinger's by anybody that had the pleasure to eat the real thing prior to there bankrupsty and closure in 1972. People have been trying to duplicate that hidden recipe since it went out of business.

This year, for her birthday, Suzanne produced a recipe that is claimed to be as close to the original as any that have surfaced over the years. This recipe was published in Cooks Country magazine about a year ago.

Here's the recipe. In case that's not enough to get your juices flowing, I took some pictures this morning. The link below will take you to them.

By the way, this recipe uses 8 inch round pans. i couldn't find mine so I made a 1 and a 1/2 size batch of cake batter and used 9 inch pans. It was a good decision. I used a single batch of filling/frosting and that worked out well for two thick layes and a decent outside coating. Because cake crumbs surround the finished cake, your frosting technique does not have to be bakery quality to produce a jaw dropping result.

Ebinger's Blackout Cake

Pudding (filling/frosting):
2 cups of half and half
1 cup milk
1 + 1/4 cups sugar
6 ounces unsweetened chocolate
1/4 cup cornstarch
2 teaspoons vanilla
Dash of salt
In a small saucepan, whisk together the half and half, milk, sugar, cornstarch, and salt
Add the chocolate and whisk constantly over medium heat for about 20 minutes, until the chocolate melts and the mixture starts to bubble
Stir in vanilla and transfer pudding to a bowl
Place plastic wrap directly on the surface of the pudding to avoid creating a skin, and let chill for at least four hours until cold

Cake:
2 eggs
1 1/2 cups flour
1 cup brewed coffee, at room temperature
1 cup buttermilk
1 cup white sugar
1 cup light brown sugar
1 stick of butter
3/4 cups cocoa powder
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
Dash of salt
Preheat oven to 325, and prepare two 8-inch cake pans with parchment
In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt
Melt the butter in a saucepan. add cocoa and stir 1 minute, then take off heat
Whisk in coffee, buttermilk and sugars to the saucepan
Whisk in eggs and vanilla
In 3 additions, add flour mixture to saucepan
Bake 30-35 minutes

To Assemble Cake:
Let each cake cool completely, then cut each cake in half horizontally
Take one layer of cake and crumble it into cake crumbs (leaving you with 3 cake layers)
Frost your cake with the pudding, then press the cake crumbs all over the outside of the cake
Be prepared for massive nostalgia!

Enjoy!

michaelp

Here is a link that might be useful: Blackout Cake

NOTES:

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clipped on: 03.28.2010 at 04:14 pm    last updated on: 03.28.2010 at 04:14 pm

RE: Empire Muffins (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: dirtgirl07 on 03.14.2010 at 09:50 am in Cooking Forum

Here it is Beverly - I only got 22 muffins but I filled all the way to the top of pans and they were done in just 20 mins. in my toaster oven.

Apple cranberry carrot Muffins Empire Muffins
Posted by Debbie814

I also made a recipe that has been in my "to try" file since 2005! LOL The recipe makes a lot of muffins and they are wonderful! I took a dozen to work on Monday and the girls in my office loved them. One of them told me it was the best muffin she had ever had!

I don't know what ever happened to Debbie_814, but if you are lurking, Debbie, thanks for a great recipe!

2 cups shredded, unpeeled apples (used 2 lg Granny Smiths including juice)
1-1/3 c sugar
1 c chopped cranberries
1 c chopped carrots
1 c chopped walnuts or pecans
2-1/2 c AP flour
1 T baking powder
2 tsp soda
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp ground cinnamon
2 eggs, slightly beaten
1/2 c vegetable oil (substitute cup oil plus cup applesauce)

In large mixing bowl, combine apples and sugar. Gently fold in cranberries, carrots and nuts. Combine dry ingredients, add to mixing bowl. Mix well to moisten dry ingredients. Combine eggs and oil, stir into apple mixture. Fill greased muffin tins 2/3 full. Bake at 375F for 20-25 minutes. Cool 5 minutes before removing from tins.
Makes 2 dozen
Linda

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clipped on: 03.21.2010 at 05:20 pm    last updated on: 03.21.2010 at 05:20 pm

RE: It's here! . . . New waffle iron!! (pics) (Follow-Up #23)

posted by: goldgirl on 03.14.2010 at 11:48 am in Cooking Forum

lpink - thanks to you, I bought a waffle iron! I got the old-fashioned Black & Decker one, which is a bit difficult to find. The waffles came out a little flat, so I guess I need to use more batter.

Made the Waffles of Insane Greatness that folks were raving about, and they were sooooooo good. Thanks Joan! Here's the recipe in case anyone wants it without having to search:

* Posted by joanm (My Page) on
Sun, Jan 24, 10 at 11:45

I have a new favorite waffle recipe. It came from one of those Rachael Ray travel shows. These are the lightest waffles I have ever had. They sort of melt on your tongue.

Waffles of Insane Greatness
Recipe courtesy Aretha Frankensteins

3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup whole milk or buttermilk
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 egg
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
Butter and syrup, for serving

In a medium bowl, combine the flour, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, and salt; mix well. Add the milk, vegetable oil, egg, sugar and vanilla and mix well. Let the batter sit for 30 minutes.

Preheat a waffle iron. Do not use non-stick spray on the waffle iron; the oil in the batter will allow the waffle to release easily. Follow the directions on your waffle iron to cook the waffles. Serve immediately with butter and syrup.

This recipe was provided by professional chefs and has been scaled down from a bulk recipe provided by a restaurant. The Food Network Kitchens chefs have not tested this recipe, in the proportions indicated, and therefore, we cannot make any representation as to the results.

I made this with buttermilk. One batch makes two grids of 4 waffles.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 03.14.2010 at 07:56 pm    last updated on: 03.14.2010 at 07:56 pm

RE: It's here! . . . New waffle iron!! (pics) (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: michaelmaxp on 02.21.2010 at 03:11 pm in Cooking Forum

You listened to Mr. Brown's waffle iron advice so you might also like to try a great waffle recipe from one of his early shows. Sweet Potato Waffles- I've been making these for several years now. It's a pain to make big batches but I typically spend a morning making a 3 or 4 times batch because they freeze so well.

Ingredients
1 1/2 cups peeled and cubed sweet potatoes
2 cups all purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
6 egg whites, at room temperature
1 cup milk
1/4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
1/4 cup butter, melted
1 tablespoon grated orange rind
Vegetable spray, for waffle iron

Special equipment: steamer basket and waffle iron

Directions
Put cubed sweet potatoes in a steamer basket.Place the basket in a large pot of simmering water that is no closer than 2 inches from the bottom of steamer. Allow potatoes to steam for 20 minutes of until fork tender. Mash cooked potatoes and set aside.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt and set aside.

In another bowl combine the sweet potatoes, milk, brown sugar, butter, and grated orange rind. Stir the sweet potato mixture into the flour mixture and thoroughly combine. Beat egg whites until stiff peaks form. Gradually fold egg whites into batter 1/3 at a time. The batter will be thick. Using a No. 20 disher (scoop), place 2 scoops of batter onto a preheated, oiled waffle iron, and cook until lightly browned, about 5 to 6 minutes.

Use your judgement about the readiness of these. My waffle iron always requires a few minutes longer then it's built in "ready alarm".

michaelp

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clipped on: 03.14.2010 at 07:55 pm    last updated on: 03.14.2010 at 07:55 pm

RE: It's here! . . . New waffle iron!! (pics) (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: lpinkmountain on 02.21.2010 at 12:26 pm in Cooking Forum

I tried out the whole grain recipe that came with the waffle iron. It was a little spongy for my taste, but maybe that was the new iron.

Nutty Whole Grain Waffles with Fresh Fruit and Honey (I used maple syrup) from Calphalon

Ingredients:
1/2 cup AP flour
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/4 cup quick cooking oats
1 TBLSP yellow corn meal (fine ground kind)
2 TBLSP brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1 cup low fat milk
1/4 cup plain low fat yogurt
1 TBLSP vegetable oil
1 large egg, lightly beaten

In a large mixing bowl, combine dry ingredients. In a small mixing bowl, whip together wet ingredients. Add wet ing. to dry, mixing until just incorporated. Don't over mix! Make waffles according to instructions on waffle iron. This batter is thick!

Topping:
1 cup sliced strawberries
1 cup blueberries
1/4 cup toasted pecans (I never use pecans, too pricey. I use walnuts)
1/2 cup honey (I used about 1/4 cup maple syrup)

I didn't have enough blueberries or strawberries, only about 1/4 cup. So I combined that with the maple syrup and a big glop of home canned cranberry conserve, which had nuts in it. It made enough for just me.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 03.14.2010 at 07:54 pm    last updated on: 03.14.2010 at 07:54 pm

RE: Veggie Burger Recipe (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: katiec on 02.17.2010 at 01:02 am in Cooking Forum

I think I got this recipe off a display at a Safeway store. We ate a lot of these 'back when' because lentils were cheap and we were (not very strict) vegetarians. DH still asks for lentil burgers or lentil burritos every now and then.

* Exported from MasterCook *

Surprise Burgers

Recipe By : Katie, from a grocery store recipe card
Serving Size : 10 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Vegetarian

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 1/4 cups lentils
3 cups water
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup chopped carrots
2 cups whole wheat bread crumbs -- more if necessary
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon oregano -- * see note
1 egg -- optional
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons butter, margarine, or oil
cheese slices

Wash lentils. Add water and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer about 15 minutes.

Add onions and carrots. Cook 15 minutes or more until lentils and vegies are tender.

Stir in bread crumbs, seasoning and egg.

Drop lentils by rounded 1/3 cupfuls into hot oil. Flatten with pancake turner. Cook until firm and brown on both sides. Top with cheese slice and cook until cheese is melted.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

NOTES : * I use sage and a little thyme...use whatever herbs you like for meatloaf.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 03.13.2010 at 10:54 am    last updated on: 03.13.2010 at 10:54 am

RE: Veggie Burger Recipe (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: suzyqtexas on 02.16.2010 at 05:07 pm in Cooking Forum

These are my favorite, easy to fix and stay together more or less, which seems to be my biggest complaint about homemade veggy (vegan) burgers:
New York Times Veggie Burgers
1 can black beans, rinsed and drained
1 can tomatoes with zesty mild chilies, drained
1 garlic clove, minced or pressed, or 1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
2 green onions, chopped
1 cup chopped carrots
1 cup parsley or cilantro
2 cups quick rolled oats
8 whole grain buns
Fresh veggie toppings and healthy condiments
Preheat oven to 450.

Process the first seven ingredients using an immersion or a regular blender or food processor.

Remove contents into a large bowl and stir in the oats.

Form into patties, place on a sprayed baking sheet, and bake for 8 minutes.

Turn oven up to broil and cook for 2 more minutes, until the tops are nicely browned.

Toast the buns and pile on your favorite toppings.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 03.13.2010 at 10:52 am    last updated on: 03.13.2010 at 10:52 am

RE: Lettuce wraps (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: terri_pacnw on 02.13.2010 at 05:43 pm in Cooking Forum

Probably AnnT's..

Here is a link that might be useful: Asian Lettuce Cups

NOTES:

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clipped on: 02.13.2010 at 07:20 pm    last updated on: 02.13.2010 at 07:20 pm

RE: What's for Dinner ? #297 (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: ann_t on 08.11.2009 at 12:17 pm in Cooking Forum

Annie, the lasagna was soooo good even if I do say so myself. Moe and I actually ate the leftovers the next day. I used the zucchini in place of the pasta and didn't miss the pasta layer at all.

Funny, I had a couple of comments on my blog from some "expert" that wanted to debate whether this was actually a lasagna.

The one thing I will do differently next time is to either do a quick par boil of the zucchini slices or maybe just presalt them and then press to release some of the liquid. The zucchini did give off quite a bit of liquid when baked.


Home Cookin Chapter: Recipes From Thibeault's Table

Zucchini Lasagna
================
2 pounds ground pork
1 onion chopped
1 stalk celery chopped
2 to 3 cloves garlic
Italian parsley
1 to 2 tablespoonsbasil
1 teaspoon oregano
salt,
pepper
2 cans tomatoes
1/2 cup cream

1 pint ricotta
1/2 cup fresh grated parmesan cheese
1 egg mixed together.

2 cups shredded mozzarella

2 medium size zucchini sliced into thin rounds

Bechamel Sauce (seasoned with a garlic clove and fresh grated Parmesan)
. Saute onions and celery in olive oil. When tender add the garlic and
the ground pork. Cook until meat starts to brown and is no longer
pink. Add the salt, pepper, basil, oregano and parsley. Add the
cream and simmer until evaporated. Add the tomatoes and simmer for at
least one hour.

Spoon meat sauce into the bottom of a deep casserole.

Place layer of zucchini over sauce. Top with 1/3 or 1/2 of the
ricotta mixture (depending on whether you are making two or three
layers). Sprinkle with mozzarella. Top with more meat sauce and
another layer of zucchini. Repeat. Finish with a layer of the meat
sauce and then top with the bechamel. Bake in a 375F oven for 45 to
60 minutes. Cover the top with foil if the lasagna starts to brown to
much.

Home Cookin Chapter: Recipes From Thibeault's Table

Blueberry Upside-Down Cake
===========================
Source:

Canadian Living Magazine, August 1983

Often called gateau aux bleuets or pouding aux bleuets, this cake and its many variations are popular in Quebec. Taken warm from the oven and turned upside-down, it becomes a delicious pudding to serve with whipped cream; left in the pan to cool, it becomes a cake. Add cinnamon it you like a pleasant spiciness; omit for a plain white cake.

1/4 cup melted butter
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 cups blueberries (fresh or Frozen)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 cup butter
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
3/4 cup milk
. In 9 inch square cake pan, combine melted butter and brown sugar;
spread evenly on bottom. Spread blueberries evenly over top. Sprinkle
with lemon juice.

Cream butter; gradually add sugar, beating until light. Beat in egg
and vanilla. Sift or mix together flour, baking powder, salt and
cinnamon if using. Add dry ingredients alternately with milk to
creamed mixture. Spread batter evenly over blueberry layer. Bake in
350F oven for 45 to 50 minutes or until toothpick inserted in centre
comes out clean. Let cool 10 minutes in pan, then turn out on to large
flat plate.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 08.13.2009 at 07:38 am    last updated on: 08.13.2009 at 07:38 am

RE: Sue's Roadhouse Ribs.... (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: chase on 08.02.2009 at 01:47 pm in Cooking Forum

Here you go Linda! This was my "go to" rib recipe for quite awhile. Now that I have the smoker I'm experimenting with other recipes but this has to be one of my favourites.

Roadhouse Grill Baby Back Ribs

2 large racks pork baby back ribs
salt
coarse ground black pepper

SAUCE:
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/4 cup minced fresh onion
1 1/2 cups water
1/2 cup tomato paste
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon worcestershire sauce
1 3/4 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon liquid smoke flavoring
1 teaspoon Jim Beam whiskey
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper -- coarse
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon paprika

To make the ribs, cut each large rack of ribs in half so that you have 4 half-racks. Sprinkle a light coating of salt and a more generous portion of coarse pepper over the top and bottom of each rack. Wrap the ribs in aluminum foil and bake in a preheated 300 degree oven for 2 1/2 hours.

As the ribs cook, make the sauce by heating the oil in a medium saucepan over medium/high heat. Saut the onions for 5 minutes or until they start to brown. Add the remaining ingredients and bring mixture to a boil then reduce heat and simmer for 1 1/4 hours, uncovered, or until sauce thickens. Remove from heat and set aside until the ribs are ready. Preheat your barbecue grill.

When ribs are finished in the oven, the meat should have pull back about 1/2-inch from the cut-ends of the bones. Remove the ribs from the oven, let them sit for 10 minutes or so, then remove the racks from the foil and put them on the grill. Grill the ribs for 3 to 4 minutes per side. They should be slightly charred in a few spots when they're finished. Brush barbecue sauce on the ribs while they're grilling, just before you serve them. Don't add the sauce too early or it will burn.
Cookingrvc (Sue)

NOTES:

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clipped on: 08.04.2009 at 08:50 am    last updated on: 08.04.2009 at 08:50 am

RE: RECIPE: Delicious Pork Tenderloin Recipe (Follow-Up #22)

posted by: lindac on 09.07.2007 at 07:10 pm in Recipe Exchange Forum

Well, since every one's talking about it but no one has posted the recipe...I'll take that liberty. Sounds lovely!!

Pork Roasted the Way the Tuscan Do
This is a wonderful and easy technique for pork roasted inside a baguette with wonderful fresh herbs and of course garlic and olive oil! I'm sure this will become a favorite of yours too - it's great to bring on a picnic lunch!

2 teaspoons fresh chopped sage
2 teaspoons fresh chopped rosemary
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 cloves garlic, minced
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon fennel pollen
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 pork tenderloin, trimmed
1 loaf crusty baguette

On a work surface, mince the sage, rosemary, pepper, garlic, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, and fennel pollen together.

Heat a frying pan over medium high heat. Add 1 tablespoon of the oil. Cook the pork, turning occasionally, until golden on all sides, 8 to 10 minutes. Roll the pork in the herb mixture and set aside. Cut the baguette in half the long way and scoop out the soft insides. Brush the inside of the baguette with the remaining 3 tablespoons olive oil. Place the pork on the inside of the baguette so that the pork is completely enclosed. Trim off the excess ends of the bread. Tie, at 1 to 2-inch intervals, with kitchen string.

Preheat an oven to 375F. Place the pork on a baking sheet and roast until done, 155 to 160F when an instant read thermometer is inserted into the thickest part, 25 to 35 minutes.

Remove from the oven, let rest 10 minutes. Remove the strings and cut into slices. Serve.

Serves 4



2007 joanneweir.com

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.30.2009 at 10:46 am    last updated on: 07.30.2009 at 10:46 am

RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #113)

posted by: gardengrl on 07.29.2009 at 03:13 pm in Harvest Forum

This is a favorite of mine and I'm pretty sure it came from "Small Batch Preserving". This also is amazing with goat cheese (or any cheese really), some crusty bread, and a glass of wine. It doesn't last long in our house!

I'm sorry, I wish I had noted what the yield was for this, but didn't copy it over. I think it makes 4 half pints.

Roasted Red Pepper Spread

6 lb. large red sweet peppers
1 lb. Roma tomatoes
2 large garlic cloves
1 small white onion
2 Tbsp. minced basil
1 Tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. coarse salt
1/2 cup red wine vinegar

Roast peppers under broiler or on a grill at 425 degrees until skin wrinkles and chars in spots. Turn over and roast other side. Remove from heat. Place in a paper bag, secure opening, cool 15 minutes. Roast tomatoes, onion, and garlic under broiler or grill 10 - 15 minutes. Place tomatoes in a paper bag. Peel onion and garlic. Finely mince onion and garlic.
Measure 1/4 cup and set aside. Peel and seed tomatoes and peppers. Puree in food processor or blender. Combine in a large pan. Bring to a boil over med.high heat, stir to prevent sticking. Reduce heat, simmer until spread thickens. Ladle hot spread into hot jars, leave 1/4 inch headspace. Process in water bath canner for 10 minutes.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.29.2009 at 03:38 pm    last updated on: 07.29.2009 at 03:38 pm

Canning Recipe for tomatoes - Chunky basil pasta sauce

posted by: junelynn on 07.26.2009 at 09:08 am in Harvest Forum

I came across this recipe posted in one of the forums where you list what you canned for the year, plus various other recipes. Not sure which one it came from, but I want to tell you it's very good and pretty rich! The taste is just fantastic! It will be great for pizza sauce, as it comes out a bit sweet, or you could use it as a starter when you make spagetti sauce from scratch. I let mine cook down longer than 40 minutes to actually make it more of a sauce and I had used more tomatoes so it took longer. I think it's the 1/2 cup of fresh basil that it requires that makes it sweet, as you really don't use that much sugar, and possibly the wine. It's not sweet in the sugary sense, just sweet in the mix of flavors I taste. I had a little bit left over and I ate it with some odds and ends that I threw together for supper. It was DELICIOUS! The tomato paste I used was from Aldi's. Nothin' special. The wine I used was from Trader Joe's "Charles Shaw, Shiraz" as I buy it by the case. (3.99 a bottle). It's a dry red wine, but not overly tart. "Regina" red wine vinegar and fresh basil cut from my garden. Oh, and sweet vidalia onions. I did have a mix of tomatoes, Park's Whopper, Celebrity and another one I can think of the name at the time. Could be why it took longer to simmer into more thickness as the P.Whopper is really more for eating. I used the tomatoes I had. One makes do with what they've got. By the way guys, it's supposed to get in the mid 90's here in the piedmont of N.Carolina today (Charlotte area). Hot and humid! Tomatoes and squash, cukes and corn plants love it!!!

I ended up with 5 half pints of sauce.


Exported from MasterCook *

Chunky Basil Pasta Sauce

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
8 cups (2 L) coarsely chopped peeled tomatoes -- (about 9-12 tomatoes or 4 lb/2 kg)
1 cup chopped onion -- (250 mL)
3 cloves garlic -- minced
2/3 cup red wine -- (150 mL)
1/3 cup red wine vinegar (5 % strength) -- (75 mL)
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil -- (125 mL)
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley -- (15 mL)
1 teaspoon pickling salt -- (5 mL)
1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar -- (2 mL)
1 6-oz/156 mL) can tomato paste

Combine tomatoes, onion, garlic, wine, vinegar, basil, parsley, salt, sugar and tomato paste in a very large non-reactive pan. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 40 minutes or until mixture reaches desired consistency, stirring frequently.

Remove hot jars from canner and ladle sauce into jars to within 1/2 inch (1 cm) of rim (head space). Process 35 minutes for pin (500 mL) jars and 40 minutes for quart (1 L) jars in a BWB.

Yield:
"8 cups"

Note: This sauce also makes an excellent base for a quick pizza.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.26.2009 at 09:21 am    last updated on: 07.26.2009 at 09:22 am

RE: Annie's Salsa (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: digdirt on 07.16.2009 at 10:59 am in Harvest Forum

Here is one recent post of the recipe.

* Posted by digdirt 6 -7 AR (My Page) on
Mon, Jan 19, 09 at 10:43

Here you go:

ANNIES SALSA

8 cups tomatoes, peeled, chopped and drained
2 cups chopped onion
1 cups chopped green pepper
3 5 chopped jalapenos
6 cloves minced garlic
2 tsp cumin
2 tsp pepper
1/8 cup canning salt
cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/3 cup sugar
1/3 cup vinegar
16 oz. tomato sauce
16 oz tomato paste
Mix all ingredients, bring to a boil, boil 10 minutes. Pour into hot jars, process at 10 lbs of pressure for 30 minutes for pints.

Makes 6 pints

if I want to process in a BWB up the vinegar to one cup and process 10 minutes in BWB.

You can safely leave out the cumin abd/or the green peppers but do not increase the cilantro

NOTE: To repeat what Annie said, the Extension agency no longer recommends canning in quarts or pressure canning her salsa (probably because they don't have the resources to test it). For those who have made it in the past, the pressure canned recipe called for a smaller amount of vinegar.

So, to update, make Annie's salsa with a full cup of vinegar, can only in pints and boiling water bath for 15 minutes. (From Carol)

Dave

If you use the Harvest forum search at the bottom of the front page and note the date on the "Most recent post" on the Annie's salsa discussions you'll find several recent (July 09) posts on it too - some from Annie.

Dave

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.25.2009 at 07:42 pm    last updated on: 07.25.2009 at 07:42 pm

RE: Ice Cream or Gelato? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: petra on 07.13.2009 at 05:31 pm in Cooking Forum

I am a Marzipan addict and I LOVE the following recipe for Almond Gelato:

Almond Gelato
Makes about 1 quart (can be doubled for half-gallon machines)

2 3/4 cups whole milk
1/4 cup heavy cream
One 7 ounce tube almond paste (found in the baking aisle--should be soft and moist)
2/3 cup sugar
5 large egg yolks, at room temperature
1/2 teaspoon almond extract (real extract, not imitation)
1/4 teaspoon salt

1. Heat the milk and cream in a medium saucepan set over medium heat until tiny bubbles fizz around the pan's inner rim. Adjust the heat so the mixture stays this hot but does not come to a boil.

2. Place the almond paste and sugar in a large food processor fitted with the chopping blade; process until the texture of find sand, about 1 minute. Stop the machine, add the yolks all at once, and process until light and thick, about 2 minutes. (note: if you don't process enough, the end result will taste grainy from the almond paste--still delicious, but a weird texture.)

3. With the machine running, dribble in about half of the hot milk mixture through the feed tube; process until smooth. Then whisk this mixture back into the pan with the remaining hot milk mixture. Instantly reduce the heat to very low--if you have electric burners, place the pan on a second burner just now set on low. Cook slowly, stirring all the while, until the mixture thickens to the consistency of wet but smooth pancake batter and can coat the back of a wooden spoon, a little less than 2 minutes. Strain through a fine mesh strainer into a clean bowl to get rid of any extraneous bits of scrambled egg (and almond paste debris that makes the finished product a bit gritty); stir in the almond extract and salt. Refrigerate until cold, for at least 4 hours, or overnight.

4. Just before making the gelato, place the almond custard in the freezer for about 10 minutes. (we're trying this on our second batch which is being made tonight and tomorrow--it took a long time for this gelato to set up the first time.)

5. Freeze the custard in your ice cream machine according to the manufacturer's directions. Serve at once--or transfer to a large container or several smaller containers, seal tightly and store in the freezer for up to one 1 month. (if this gelato lasts a month at your house, you're a better person than I. ) Soften at room temperature for up to 10 minutes before serving.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.14.2009 at 08:09 am    last updated on: 07.25.2009 at 09:07 am

RE: What's for dessert-#1 2009 (Follow-Up #76)

posted by: lorijean44 on 07.19.2009 at 10:35 pm in Cooking Forum

I've been on jag making ice cream and sorbet lately. My most recent experiment was with Birthday Cake Ice Cream with crushed malted milk balls mixed in. It's my favorite flavor at Marble Slab Creamery.

Birthday Cake Ice Cream Recipe
Philadelphia Style

Prep Time: 12 minutes
Chill Time: at least 2 hours
Ice Cream Maker Time: Approximately 20-25 minutes
Makes: 1 1/2 quarts
Servings: Ten 1/2 cup servings

1 1/2 cups milk
1/2 cup granulated sugar
2/3 cup cake mix
1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/3 to 1/2 cup add-ins

In a saucepan over medium low heat, combine milk, sugar, and cake mix. Stir constantly until mixture starts to bubble. Remove from heat and cool completely in refrigerator (about 2 hours). Stir in cream and vanilla. Pour into ice cream maker. Mix approximately 15-20 minutes or according to manufacturer's instructions. Pour in add-ins. Mix in ice cream maker for 5 more minutes. Scoop it out and enjoy!

Source: serving-ice-cream.com

Lori

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.25.2009 at 09:03 am    last updated on: 07.25.2009 at 09:03 am

RE: pickled green beans too harsh (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: linda_lou on 10.24.2006 at 01:27 am in Harvest Forum

Awm03, congratulations on the weight loss ! I know how hard it is. I have lost the same amount. Keep up the good work. I know, I eat dill pickles when I get really hungry. That and sugar free jello.
I use this recipe from USDA.
Pickled Dilled Beans
4 lbs fresh tender green or yellow beans (5 to 6 inches long)
8 to 16 heads fresh dill
8 cloves garlic (optional)
1/2 cup canning or pickling salt
4 cups white vinegar (5 percent)
4 cups water
1 tsp hot red pepper flakes (optional)
Yield: About 8 pints

Procedure: Wash and trim ends from beans and cut to 4-inch lengths. In each sterile pint jar, place 1 to 2 dill heads and, if desired, 1 clove of garlic. Place whole beans upright in jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Trim beans to ensure proper fit, if necessary. Combine salt, vinegar water, and pepper flakes (if desired). Bring to a boil. Add hot solution to beans, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

Adjust lids and process 5 min.
If you want to skip the boiling of the jars first, then process in the BWB for 10 min. I do it, and they are good and crisp still. You can also use Pickle Crisp if you want pickled things really crunchy. Cider vinegar will seem less tart, but it will make the brine darker. Adding a pinch of sugar is a good idea, too.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.25.2009 at 08:59 am    last updated on: 07.25.2009 at 08:59 am

summer torte

posted by: jojoco on 07.04.2009 at 12:08 pm in Cooking Forum


Photobucket



Photobucket


This is, without question, one of my all time favorite recipes. It is also one of the easiest recipes I've ever made. It originally was printed in the New York Times on Labor Day, in 1981. For many years it would run on that same day and always heralded the end of summer. One year, in the '90's, the recipe was accompanied by a plea from the NYT to clip and save as it would not be run again in the paper. Thank goodness for the internet. It is not too sweet and freezes beautifully.

Summer Torte by Marion Burros

1 stick butter, softened (I always use unsalted)
3/4 cup sugar
1 cup flour; sifted
1 tsp baking powder
2 eggs
pinch of salt
fruit of choice; sliced into wedges (I used about 7 plums. Peaches, nectarines,strawberries all work great and in combination)
cinnamon sugar for top

Preheat oven to 350. Cream butter and add sugar. Beat well. Add eggs and beat. Mix together flour, baking powder and salt. Add to batter. Mix. Spoon globs to greased 9 or 10 inch springform. Use a knife to spread batter to cover entire pan. Arrange fruit on top. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar (amount depends on the sweetness of the fruit).
Bake for 45 min.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.14.2009 at 05:40 pm    last updated on: 07.14.2009 at 05:41 pm

Buttermilk Oatmeal Pancakes

posted by: ann_t on 06.22.2009 at 07:56 pm in Cooking Forum

Moe declared these the best pancakes he has ever had. I found this recipe in the March 1991 issue of Bon Appetit. I finally decided to part with my collection of magazines. Some date back to the early 1970's. I'm going through them a box at a time and tearing out any recipes that I might actually make.

Rather than add the berries to the batter as the recipe calls for I just served them on the side. The pancake is good enough on its own without the berries.

Home Cookin Chapter: Recipes From Thibeault's Table

Blackberry Oatmeal Pancakes
===========================
Source: Bon Appetit March 1991

2 cups rolled oats
2 cups buttermilk

2 eggs, beaten to blend
1/4 cup butter, melted
1/2 cup all purpose flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
pinch of ground nutmeg
pinch of salt
vegetable oil
2 cups fresh blackberries or forzen blackberries, thawed, drained
warm maple sryup

Mix oats and buttermilk in large bowl. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Whisk eggs and butter into oatmeal mixture. Mix in flour , sugar, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. Heat griddle or heavy large skillet over medium-high. Lightly brush with oil. Ladle batter by 1/2 cupfuls onto griddle. Sprinkle some berries over. Cook
until batter bubbles and bottom is deep golden brown, about 3 minutes. Turn pancakes and cook until second sides are deep golden brown. Transfer to plates. Repeat with remaining batter and berries. Serve with warm maple syrup.

Here is a link that might be useful: Thibeault's Table

NOTES:

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clipped on: 06.23.2009 at 10:37 am    last updated on: 07.12.2009 at 09:01 am

RE: Fruit flavored ice cream (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: rob333 on 07.07.2009 at 05:22 pm in Cooking Forum

Oh my. Now I am thinking about making ice cream with pineapple and coconut milk. Bet it's been done, but I hadn't thought it until just now.

I know the recipes westelle posted said add sugar with the strawberries. Here's what she said:

by westelle (My Page) on Tue, Jun 23, 09 at 21:46
This was on Martha's website today -- don't know if it's old or new. I hope you can understand my to-myself-notes under "choice of flavorings. The basic recipe had 5 different recipes each using a different flavoring -- but essentially the same recipe with same instructions.
Easy Ice Cream - Martha Stewarts

Homemade ice cream is delicious and surprisingly easy. With just 20 minutes of prep, create frosty treats ready for cones, floats, and more -- or use our ideas for your favorite store-bought flavor!

Pick your flavor: Chocolate, Strawberry, Vanilla
Ginger, or Orange.

Prep: 20 minutes
Total: 50 minutes, plus freezing

Ingredients
Makes 1 1/2 quarts
8 large egg yolks
1 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon coarse salt
2 cups skim milk
Choice of flavoring:
(Vanilla bean - added at step one; seeds added at step 3 if desired)
(1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder - add at step 1)
(4 cups sliced strawberries + 1/4 sugar - mashed -- add at middle of step 3)
(2-inch piece peeled fresh ginger, cut into matchsticks -add at *)
(6 strips orange zest add at *)
2 cups heavy cream

Directions
1. In a medium saucepan, off heat, whisk together egg yolks, sugar, and salt until blended. Gradually whisk in milk.

2. Cook over medium, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until custard thickens slightly and evenly coats back of spoon (it should hold a line drawn by your finger), 10 to 12 minutes.

* (Stir Ginger or Orange zest into custard. Cover and let stand 30 minutes.)

3. Pour custard through a fine-mesh sieve into a bowl set over ice. Stir in cream. Let stand, stirring occasionally, until chilled. Churn in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer's instructions. Transfer ice cream to a resealable plastic container and freeze until firm, about 2 hours (or up to 3 months).

Here is a link that might be useful: easy ice cream with fruit

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.10.2009 at 08:32 am    last updated on: 07.10.2009 at 08:32 am

Claire, I made your pizza!

posted by: doucanoe on 07.02.2009 at 09:15 am in Cooking Forum

Last night I tried Claire de Luna's Amazing Thin Crust Pizza recipe that I had saved from recipezaar a couple of years ago. It truly is amazing!

I went to take a photo and found my camera battery was dead....sorry.

The only changes, I used provolone on the crust instead of mozz slices, and I added a little grated parm to the top. My toppings were italian sausage, fresh mushrooms and vidalia onion. It was superb!

I questioned the 550 oven temp, but it turned out perfectly! Nice, crispy crust, evenly cooked toppings. YUM!

I certainly may try other recipes in the future, but I think I have found my "go to" recipe for most future pizza making!

Here is her recipe, if you haven't tried it, I would encourage you to.

Amazing Thin Crust Pizza
Claire de Luna
May 26, 2005

I finally mastered pizza making at home! It was a day to celebrate, since this pizza is actually better than you often go out for. When I make this my husband says it's always the best part of his day. It's a combination of recipes and techniques that I put together from Cook's Illustrated, a very good cook I know, and some "serious" pizza guys. This recipe makes a 13x18 inch half-sheet size medium crust pizza, OR two traditional round thin crust pizzas, and the crust is crispy/tender. (I find I can get a thinner crust from a round pizza, since there's a little more room to spread the dough out.) The sauce is very flavorful and I've tried to include all my tips for success! You MUST have a pizza stone for this, and pulling the pizza on the parchment onto an upside-down half sheet pan makes it easy to transfer the pizza to the stone. The sauce recipe will make enough for 3 medium pizzas, OR 6 thin crust pizzas, so reserve the extra for another pie. Layers for the topping need to be thin enough to allow the crust to crisp. (I know it goes against all instinct, but it's very important to please practice restraint!) I've revised the recipe to include a little less of the toppings for better success. Preparation time includes rising time for the dough and may seem like a little work, but once you've tried this you may never go out for pizza again!

DOUGH
2 cups bread flour, plus
more bread flour, for dusting the work surface
1 teaspoon instant yeast
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon olive oil, plus
more olive oil, for brushing the dough
1 cup warm water
PIZZA SAUCE
1 (28 ounce) can crushed tomatoes
2 minced garlic cloves
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon oregano
1 teaspoon ground fennel
salt and pepper, to taste
ORDER OF INGREDIENTS
1 full recipe pizza dough
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 teaspoons dried basil (or 8-10 leaves minced fresh)
8 ounces mozzarella cheese, slices
8 ounces provolone cheese, slices
3/4 cup tomato sauce
1/2 cup sausage (precooked and browned in a skillet)
1/3 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
1/3 cup shredded mild cheddar cheese

Directions

DOUGH: In the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the plastic dough blade, pulse the flour, yeast, and salt to combine; about five 1-second pulses. With the machine running, slowly add the oil, then the water through the feed tube; continue to process until the dough forms a ball, about 15 seconds. Generously dust the work surface with flour. Using floured hands, transfer the dough to the work surface and knead lightly, shaping the dough into a ball. Lightly oil a 1-quart measuring cup with cooking spray, place the dough in the measuring cup and cover tightly with plastic wrap. Set aside in a draft free place until doubled in volume, 1 to 1 - 1/2 hours.

PIZZA SAUCE: Mix this up while the dough is rising, giving the flavors some time to meld.
Preheat the oven to 550 degrees F. This may take as long as 30 minutes, so allow enough time for the oven to get hot. Remove all racks except the one holding your baking stone, for easier positioning of pizza onto the stone.

BUILDING: When the dough has doubled, grease hands with olive oil and remove it from the measuring cup, placing into the middle of a lightly floured board. (A silpat placed on the work surface makes cleaning up easier.) Being careful not to deflate all the air in the dough, roll dough into a ball and set aside. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, cut parchment paper and set aside. Do NOT cut parchment larger than your pizza stone, to mimimize risk of the paper catching fire.

Oiling hands again, gently stretch the dough, shaping it into a large rectangle on the parchment paper. With palms, stretch and flatten the dough until it takes the shape you want it to have, keeping a slightly thicker edge for the crust. Dock the surface of the dough with your fingers to "texture" the surface and hold the toppings. Oil the dough before building the pizza.

Place finely cut (or dried) basil across the top of the dough. Add Mozzarella and Provolone cheese slices on top of the basil. Spread a thin, even layer of the pizza sauce, adding pork sausage, shredded Mozzarella and mild cheddar over the top of the dough. (You can really use any toppings you'd like.).

BAKING: Position the baking stone on the bottom rack of your electric oven, or on the floor of your gas oven. Lift the parchment paper and slide onto the bottom of a sheet pan, then quickly slide pizza onto the baking stone. Shut the oven door, and reset your oven for 500 degrees. Bake for 10-12 minutes, until the edges of the crust are browned. Check the bottom of the pizza for doneness before removing from the oven. Using tongs, transfer pie onto oven rack and set aside to cool a few minutes. Cut with a pizza cutter and enjoy!

Linda

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.03.2009 at 07:01 pm    last updated on: 07.03.2009 at 07:02 pm

RE: Beer Batter? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: chase on 06.06.2009 at 06:56 pm in Cooking Forum

I am a bit of a fish and chips "aficionado" , halibut being the only fish I will cook/eat for fish and chips.

Joe's recipe for tempura batter is by far the best batter for halibut that I have ever made. I think that you could easily sub beer for the soda. I think the secret is a cold and bubbly liquid so beer or soda does the same thing.

Tempura Batter - Garden Guru

1 Cup flour*
Cup cornstarch
Tsp salt
Tsp sugar
1 Tsp
baking powder
<1 cup Soda water (= Club soda
as cold as possible) -- more as needed

Oil for deep-frying (I like 3 parts Wesson "Best blend" oil, 1 part peanut oil, and a good splash of sesame oil)

Sharon's notes: I only use vegetable oil.

Mix flour, cornstarch, salt, sugar, and baking powder.

Add soda water gradually, stirring with a fork, first to create a paste and then until mixture is like a thick pancake batter.

Sharon's notes: Do as Joe says, add the soda slowly and do not let the batter get thin.

Heat oil for frying to 375 F - 400 F.

Dip prepared veggies/meats/fish in batter, coating completely. Shake off excess.

Fry a few pieces at a time, until light brown and crispy.

Do not crowd pan, or oil temperature will drop. No more than will cover of the surface of the oil.

Drain on paper towels.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 06.09.2009 at 05:32 pm    last updated on: 06.09.2009 at 05:32 pm

RE: Help with Sticky Finger Chicken (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: teresa_nc7 on 05.29.2009 at 01:36 pm in Cooking Forum

If you are referring to the Sticky Chicken recipe I posted over on the Recipe Exchange, it is hard to say not knowing the size of your oven or the size of the chickens. If you can put two chickens side by side in a 13x9 pan, you should be able to get two pans on one oven rack at the same time. I think that a foil lined pan will hold all the juices from 2 chickens.

Can't help with the convection oven, but I don't think I would lower the temp. The birds may cook a little faster, but that wouldn't hurt anything. Do check them with a thermometer so they don't over cook.

I'm going to fix a bird myself this weekend. Here is the recipe I posted:

A high heat roasted chicken is indeed delicious, but I tried a new recipe for slow/low roasted chicken yesterday that is really good also - and won't smoke up your house!

Roasted Sticky Chicken
Recipe By :Sharon Worster Personal Chef's Network

3 pounds whole chicken
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon paprika
3/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon thyme
1/4 teaspoon white pepper
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 large onion -- quartered

Combine all spices together in a small bowl. Rub mixture into chicken WELL, inside & out, patting into the skin & try to make it evenly distributed. Put in a large bag & refrigerate overnight. If you don't have time for this step it will still be delicious!
Just before roasting, stuff the cavity w/ onions. If the onion will fit into the cavity whole, I do it this way as we love baked onions.
Roast uncovered @ 250* (YES, THAT'S 250*) X 5 hours (YES, THAT'S 5 HOURS). Baste often w/ pan juices until they caramelize in the pan. Chicken will turn golden brown.

Sharon's NOTES : These freeze GREAT & I recommend you make several of them at one time since your oven is on for so long! This chicken is to die for & falls off the bone!!!

For Heating: You can bring these straight from the freezer if you want! I've done this for years in my own home & here's how I do it. From the freezer: Put in the microwave on a plate covered w/ papertowels & heat on high X 5-7 minutes. Then, place in a 350* oven X 15-20 minutes or until hot throughout.

Or, you can thaw in the refrigerator overnight, wrap in foil and heat in a low oven for 20-30 minutes.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 06.04.2009 at 10:00 am    last updated on: 06.04.2009 at 10:00 am

RE: Knox gelatin in soup? (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: grainlady on 01.28.2009 at 07:29 am in Cooking Forum

Perhaps the link below will add some information....

-Grainlady

Here is a link that might be useful: Broth Is Beautiful

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.28.2009 at 10:14 am    last updated on: 01.28.2009 at 10:14 am

New Sourdough 'Mother'...............

posted by: ann_t on 01.23.2009 at 11:06 am in Cooking Forum

After we moved I neglected the sourdough starter I had been babying for almost two years. (They die when you don't feed them at least once in a while.)

I finally got around to starting a new one last week. Again, I used the recipe from Amy's Breads. I love this starter because it is "pure" made only from rye flour and water. No additives. It was finally ready to use Wednesday. So I mixed up a Biga and a Levain using the starter and then yesterday morning kneaded up two different batches of bread. The levain went into Amy's Bread recipe for Country Sourdough Boule and the Biga into sourdough baguettes. The Dough had a slow 9 hour rise in the fridge and then late yesterday afternoon, when we got back from the movies, I put both doughs out on the counter to come to room temperature. The last loaf came out of the oven around 9:30 last night.

If anyone is thinking of growing a sourdough starter I can highly recommend the recipe from Amy's Breads. It is amazing how much better bread made with a sourdough starter is. More in depth flavour and a wonderful crust.

The starter is easy to make and requires very little attention. If you are interested , here are the directions:

Home Cookin Chapter: Recipes From Thibeault's Table

Amy's Bread Sourdough Starter
=============================

Sourdough

Amy's Bread Sourdough Starter
Amy Scherber & Toy Kim Dupree Cookbook

For artisan bakers, using a sourdough starter is the ultimate way to create a perfect loaf of bread with the most complex flavor, the best-textured crumbs, the crunchiest crust and the longest shelf life. By using a sourdough starter, you are going back to the source, using pure, wholesome ingredients to capture yeast in its wild state and then encouraging it to thrive and multiply by creating the most favorable environment for it. With regular feeding, you can eventually tame it enough to be used for leavening bread. Like all of the best things in life, this process requires patience and careful attention to detail, but the end result is definitely worth the effort.

When most Americans think of sourdough, they picture the crusty, assertively sour loaves that are produced in the bread mecca of America, San Francisco. But bread made from a sourdough starter doesn't have to be intensely sour. The level of acidity that produces the sour taste depends to a large extent on the consistency and maturity of the starter that is used. If you're one of those people who dislikes sourdough bread, don't stop reading here. We're going to show you how to make a starter that will produce a loaf as mild or as sour as you like.

These instructions are for making a quick and easy starter that begins as a rye culture and is then divided in half. One portion remains a rye culture that is refreshed with pumpernickel flour to become a "rye mother"; the other portion is transformed into a white culture, refreshed with unbleached white flour, to become a "white sourdough mother". You store the mothers in the refrigerator and feed them on a regular basis. Then, when you want to make bread you use part of one of the mothers to make a starter for the dough. Each time you remove part of the mother, it must be fed again so you'll always have enough when you need it.

Use organic flour and spring water to start, to ensure that the yeast and bacteria you are trying to cultivate haven't been damaged by pesticides and fungicides and that they won't be inhibited by the chemicals and/or fluoride in your tap water. Once you get your culture going, you can go back to non-organic flour and tap water to maintain it if you prefer.

Rye flour loves to ferment. Once you've completed Stage One, use containers that are large enough to let the batter quadruple in volume. Do not use containers with airtight lids, as the lids need to pop up easily to release pressure from the gases produced during the fermentation process. The first time we tested this recipe, one of our containers that was covered with a tight plastic lid literally exploded - that's why we call it "dynamite" sourdough starter. (We're still finding little globs of dried rye sour in unexpected places.). If necessary, cover your container with a double layer of cheesecloth, secured with a rubber band, or punch lots of little holes in the lid.

(This section is just to get you started. If you want more detailed information and some alternative methods for making sourdough starters, see page 168)

Stage One

cup (2 ounces generous) organic rye flour, at room temperature
cup ( 4 ounces) spring water

(equipment: one 1-pint clear plastic container with lid; instant read thermometer)

1. Put the flour and spring water in a 1-point clear plastic container and stir together vigorously until well combined. (The batter should be about the consistency of very thick pancake batter; if necessary, add more water or flour to achieve the desired consistency). Taste the batter now so you can appreciate how the taste changes as your sourdough culture develops. Check the temperature of the batter with an instant-read thermometer. Ideal temperature is 75F to 77F; a little cooler is okay, but a little warmer is not. If the temperature of the batter is over 80F, you'll incubate the wrong kind of bacteria and your culture will have an unpleasant bitter taste. If the temperature is over 80F, put the batter in the refrigerator for about 20 minutes, or until the temperature has dropped into the desired range.

2. Cover the container with a lid (At this early stage an airtight lid is okay, but don't use cheesecloth, because mold seems to grown more readily with a cheesecloth cover than it does with a plastic one. Once the batter really begins fermenting, cheesecloth is fine.) Use a marker or a piece of tape to mark the level of the batter on the outside of the container so you can tell when it has doubled in volume. Set it aside at room temperature (75F to 77F) to ferment for 36 to 48 hours. You should start to see tiny bubbles forming in the batter after about 24 hours. By the time it has doubled, there will be a noticeable network of small bubbles throughout the batter (you can see them through the sides of the clear plastic container), and it will be bubbling and foaming on top.

If mold forms on the top of the batter, discard it all and begin again. If the batter has not doubled within 48 hours, feed it with cup (2 ounces) spring water and cup (2 generous ounces) rye flour (or more of either ingredient if necessary to achieve the consistency of thick pancake batter). Stir it vigorously, cover it, and let it sit for 24 hours, or until you see some definite activity. Proceed with Stage Two.

Stage Two


cup (2 ounces generous) organic rye flour, at room temperature
cup ( 4 ounces) spring water

Equipment: One 1-quart clear plastic container with lid

1. If there is a dry crust on top of the batter, carefully scrape it off and discard it. Stir the culture down with a wooden spoon. Notice how soupy it has become (water is one of the by-products of fermentation). The batter should have a noticeably sour smell and a mild tangy taste at this point. Add the additional flour and water to refresh it and stir vigorously until well combined. (The yeasts in the culture like the energetic stirring. It redistributes their food supply and provides them with fresh oxygen to help them multiply.

2. Transfer the refreshed culture to a 1-quart clear plastic container. The temperature should be under 80F . It is not, refrigerate until it is 75F to 77F. Mark the outside of the container with a marker or tape to show the level of the culture, and cover it (not tightly) with a lid. The culture should be showing a fair amount of activity at this point. You should see lots of foaming and bubbling through the sides of the container, as well as on top if you lift the cover. Let it ferment for 12 hours to develop its acidity (sour taste). If it threatens to overflow the container, stir it down, transfer it to a larger container, and let it continue fermenting for the remainder of the 12-hour period. Don't be concerned if the culture deflates and loses volume. This means the yeast has exhausted its food supply, but it will continue to increase in acidity. Don't worry if your culture isn't dramatically active yet. As long as there is some noticeable activity going on and the mixture smells and tastes sour, you're on the right track.


Stage Three


cup (6 ounces) cool spring water (75F to 77F)
2/3 cup (3 ounces) pumpernickel rye flour
2/3 cup (3 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour

Equipment: Two 1 quart clear plastic containers with lids or cheesecloth and rubber bands.

1. The culture should now have a pronounced sour, fruity taste and smell; it should not taste musty or bitter (if it does, discard it and start again, paying close attention to the temperature of the culture at all times). Using a wooden spoon (the acid in the sourdough reacts with metal utensils, divide the culture between two 1-quart clear plastic containers, putting approximately 6 ounces in each one. The next step is to thicken the culture by increasing the proportion of lour to water, this time using equal weights of each ingredient. You're also going to "customize" the cultures by feeding one with pumpernickel rye flour (which has a coarser grind than regular rye flour) and the other with unbleached all purpose flour. (We prefer to maintain our rye sour with pumpernickel flour because we like the texture and flavour it gives to our breads). After repeated feedings with unbleached flour, the second culture will eventually be "all white", unless you choose to throw in an ounce of pumpernickel rye flour now and then again for extra flavour.

2. Add cup plus 2 tablespoons (3 ounces) each of the spring water and the pumpernickel flour to one of the cultures. Add the remaining cup plus 2 tablespoons (3 ounces) spring water and the unbleached flour to the other culture. Stir each one vigorously. Check the temperature, as in the preceding stages. Cover each container with a loose-fitting lid or a double layer of cheesecloth (secured with a rubber band), and mark the level of the cultures with a marker or tape. Let them ferment for another 12 hours.

3. You now have two healthy sourdough cultures, approximately 12 ounces in each container. At this point you need to refresh them again, setting up a maintenance level of 12 ounces for the rye culture and 8 ounces for the white sourdough culture. (You could maintain larger amounts but it's not necessary for the recipes in this book and they would only take up extra space in your refrigerator.) These will be the "mothers" that you use to build the sourdough starters needed in individual recipes. Each time you take part of the mother out to build a starter, you must refresh it with equal weights of flour and water to bring it back up to its maintenance level. We describe how to do this below. ( in recipes that include small amounts of a sour starter just for its flavour, you can use some of the mother instead of building a separate starter.)

Maintaining the Rye Mother

6 ounces (2/3 cup) rye culture
2/3 cups (3 ounces) pumpernickel Rye flour
cup plus 2 tablespoons (3 ounces cool spring water (75F to 77F)

Equipment: One 1 quart clear plastic container with lid

1. Place 6 ounces (2/3 cup) of the rye culture in a clean 1-quart clear plastic container. Discard the rest of it. (Unless you plan to make larger batches of dough using the rye sourdough starter, you only need to maintain a mother with a total weight of 12 ounces- 6 ounces of mother, plus 6 ounces of fresh flour and water; any more is just surplus and takes up unnecessary space in the refrigerator). Add the flour and water and stir vigorously to combine. Cover the container and mark the level of the mother with a marker or tape. Let it sit at room temperature until it has doubled in volume. A strong mother will double in 8 hours. If yours doesn't do that , let it continue to sit out until it has a nice tangy taste and smell; discard all but 6 ounces and repeat this step again. (Flour that has been sitting on the shelf too long, or flour that has not been stored properly, does not contain as much potentially active yeast as fresher flour, so it takes a little longer for starters made with older flour to build up strength.) Repeat this procedure as many times as necessary until the mother doubles within 8 hours. It may take several days. Don't get discouraged, it's worth the effort.

2. Store the refreshed rye mother in the refrigerator. Repeat the refreshing procedure, using 6 ounces (2/3 cup) of the mother and 3 ounces each of flour (2/3 cup) and water (1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons), at least once a week-twice a week is best - so the mother will be active when you need to use it. Be sure to refresh the mother the same way, with equal weights of flour and water, whenever you remove some of it to build a rye sour starter to use in a recipe.

Building a Rye Sour Starter

Generous (5 ounces Rye Mother (Cold from the refrigerator)
2/3 cup (3 ounces) pumpernickel flour
cup plus 1 tablespoon (2 ounces) warm water (85F to 90F)

Equipment: One 1-quart clear plastic container

1. Place all the ingredients in a 1-quart clear plastic container and stir vigorously to combine. The mixture will be stiffer than the rye mother. Cover the container with a lid or plastic wrap and mark the level of the starter with a marker or tape. Let it sit at room temperature until it has doubled in volume. (If the starter hasn't doubled with 8 hours, discard all but 5 ounces (generous cup) of it, and feed it again in the same manner. Sometimes it takes more than one feeding if you haven't been refreshing the rye mother often enough.)

2. When the starter has doubled, it is ready to use in a recipe. Measure out the amount needed and discard any that remains. If you're not ready to use the starter right away, you can store it for up to 24 hours in the refrigerator.

Maintaining the White Sourdough Mother

cup less 1 tablespoon (2 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour
cup (2 ounces) cool spring water (75F to 77F)

Equipment: One 1-quart clear plastic container with lid

1. Place 4 ounces (2/3 cup) of the white sourdough, culture in a clean 1-quart clear plastic container. Discard the rest of it. (Unless you plan to make large batches of dough using the white sourdough starter, you only need to maintain a mother with a total weight of 8 ounces - 4 ounces of mother plus 4 ounces of fresh flour and water; any more is just surplus and takes up unnecessary space in the refrigerator). Add the flour and water and stir vigorously to combine. Cover the container and mark the level of the mother with a marker or tape. Let it sit at room temperature until it has doubled in volume. A strong mother will double in 8 hours. If yours doesn't do that, let it continue to sit out until it has a nice tangy taste and smell; discard all but 4 ounces and repeat this step again. (Flour that has been sitting on the shelf too long, or flour that has not been stored properly, does not contain as much potentially active yeast as fresher flour, so it takes a little longer for starters made with older flour to build up strength). Repeat this procedure as many times as necessary to get the mother to double with 8 hours. It may take several days. Don't get discouraged; it is worth the effort.

2. Store the refreshed white sourdough mother in the refrigerator. Repeat the refreshing procedure using 4 ounces (2/3 cup) of the mother and 2 ounces each of lour (1/2 cup less 1 tablespoon) and water (1/4 cup) at least once a week-twice a week is best - so the mother will be active when you need to use it. Be sure to refresh the mother the same way, with equal weights of flour and water, whenever you remove some of it to build a starter to use in a recipe.

The White Sourdough Mother is used to build a Levain starter, which is used in the Country Sourdough Boule recipe on page 141.

Building a Levain Starter

cup (2 ounces) White Sourdough Mother (cold from the refrigerator)
cup (2 ounces) warm water (85 to 90F)
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour
1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

Equipment: One 3-cup clear plastic container with lid

1. Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and use your hand to stir and knead them together until a shaggy mass of dough has formed. It will be very dry and stiff.

2. Remove the mass from the bowl and knead it on a lightly floured worktable until you hae a smooth, cohesive ball of dough. This is your levain.

3. Place the levain in a 3-cup clear plastic container, and mark the level of the dough with a marker or tape. Cover with a lid or plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature until it has doubled in volume. (If the starter hasn't doubled within 8 hours, discard all but 2 ounces of it and feed it again in the same manner. If it is very stiff and dry, you may have to add another tablespoon of water. Sometimes it takes more than one feeding if you haven't been refreshing the mother often enough.)

4. When the starter has doubled, you have a levain that is ready to use in a recipe. Measure the amount needed and discard any that remains. If you're not going to use it right away, you can store it for up to 24 hours in the refrigerator.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.23.2009 at 11:14 am    last updated on: 01.23.2009 at 11:14 am

Really good new bread recipe!

posted by: teresa_nc7 on 01.16.2009 at 11:23 am in Cooking Forum

Okay all you bread bakers, here is a new recipe I have tried twice and it's a winner. I found the recipe on the Sufficient Self web site, posted by prairiegirl. Her notes follow and then my suggestions for variations.

Old Fashioned Oatmeal Bread (makes 2 loaves)

1 cup oats, old fashioned
2 cups boiling water
2 Tab. yeast
1/2 cup warm water (115 degrees)
1/4 cup oil
1/2 cup honey
2 tsp. salt
1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
3 - 4 cups all purpose flour

glaze:
1 egg, beaten
1 Tab. cold water

In a small saucepan, bring 2 cups water to a boil; add oats, stir, cover and let set until it's lukewarm.

In a large bowl; dissolve yeast in 1/2 cup warm water. Let set 5 min. Add lukewarm oats, oil, honey, salt, whole wheat flour and 2 cups flour. Beat for 2 minutes. Add flour 1/4 cup at a time until dough begins to form a ball, pulling away from side of bowl.

Knead on floured surface until smooth and elastic. Use lard to grease a large glass bowl. Place kneaded dough into bowl, turning to coat entire surface with lard. Cover with a cotton towel and let rise in warm place until double - about 1 hour.

Punch dough down, cut in half, and shape each half into a loaf. Place into greased loaf pans. Cover and let rise until double - about 45 minutes.

To make glaze, beat egg and add water. Beat well. Brush each loaf with glaze and sprinkle with about 1 Tab. oats.

Bake in a preheated 375 degree oven for about 30 minutes.
When done, remove from pans and cool.

***I use a kitchen aid mixer to mix and knead dough.
I use lard to grease bowl and non-stick spray to grease the loaf pans.
I test bread for doneness using a thermometer. Bread should be 190 degrees.
Can't wait for bread to cool, so cut and eat right away.

Teresa's variations:

used 1/2 cup rolled oats and 1/2 cup Bob's Red Mill grain cereal (5 grain, 6 grain, 7 grain, 8 grain, 10 grain) - pour the 2 cups boiling water over oats and grain cereal mixed together

used 1/4 cup honey plus 1/4 cup molasses

next baking I'm going to increase the salt by 1/2 t. and use half whole wheat flour and half a-p flour

I use safflower oil as my vegetable oil. Canola or corn oil would be fine. I also drizzle oil in the bowl used to rise the bread.

I used shortening to grease the pan, but plan to try to find a small package of lard as I want to get away from the non-stick sprays.

This recipe has a great taste; the oats help keep it moist and it makes really good toast.

Teresa

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.22.2009 at 10:36 am    last updated on: 01.22.2009 at 10:36 am

RE: Terri, I am going to try enchiladas with your recipe.... (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: terri_pacnw on 09.26.2008 at 04:40 pm in Cooking Forum

Trixie,
The recipe is linked below. :o)

Here is a link that might be useful: Three Cheese Chicken Enchiladas

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.14.2009 at 12:31 pm    last updated on: 01.14.2009 at 12:31 pm

RE: Lynda Reeves makes her air pancakes (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: mustangs on 01.13.2009 at 01:37 pm in Cooking Forum

Thanks for pointing us to this. I'm going to try this as I have been searching for a good pancake recipe. I cut and pasted the recipe from the video website:

Lyndas Light-as-Air Pancakes

  • 4 large eggs
    I cup low-fat cottage cheese
    1/2 cup flour
    7 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
    Canola oil for frying
    Mix eggs, cottage cheese, flour and unsalted butter in a blender until smooth.

    You can make this batter up to one hour ahead and store in the fridge.

    For breakfast pancakes: Heat a nonstick frying pan over medium heat and
    add a little canola oil. The pan is ready when a drop of water sizzles up.
    Drop a generous spoonful of batter onto the pan. When batter starts to bubble, flip pancakes.

    The more oil you use, the crispier the pancakes will be. You may have to adjust the temperature, and expect to throw away the first pancake or two. Keep pancakes warm on a platter lined with paper towels either in the oven or under warming lights. These are great for breakfast served with fresh berries and light maple syrup. They are so moist you don't need butter.

  • NOTES:

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    clipped on: 01.14.2009 at 12:18 pm    last updated on: 01.14.2009 at 12:18 pm

    RE: What sauce did I make last year? pic (Follow-Up #3)

    posted by: caliloo on 12.21.2008 at 01:19 pm in Cooking Forum

    I've made this one several times and have probably posted it in the past. Could this be the right one?

    Alexa

    *****************************************************
    Beef Tenderloin with Roasted Shallots, Bacon and Port
    Bon Apptit : December 1997


    Pour a full-bodied red wine, such as a Bordeaux, Merlot or Cabernet Sauvignon.

    Yield: Serves 12


    1 1/2 pounds large shallots (about 24), halved lengthwise, peeled
    3 tablespoons olive oil

    6 cups canned beef broth
    1 1/2 cups tawny Port
    1 tablespoon tomato paste

    2 3- to 3 1/4-pound beef tenderloins (large ends), trimmed
    2 teaspoons dried thyme
    7 bacon slices, chopped
    6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) butter
    1 1/2 tablespoons all purpose flour

    1 large bunch watercress


    Position rack in center of oven and preheat to 375F. In 9-inch-diameter pie pan, toss shallots with oil to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Roast until shallots are deep brown and very tender, stirring occasionally, about 30 minutes.

    Boil broth and Port in large saucepan until reduced to 3 3/4 cups, about 30 minutes. Whisk in tomato paste. (Shallots and broth mixture can be made 1 day ahead. Cover separately; chill.)

    Pat beef dry; sprinkle with thyme, salt and pepper. In large roasting pan set over medium heat, saut bacon until golden, about 4 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer bacon to paper towels. Add beef to pan; brown on all sides over medium-high heat, about 7 minutes. Transfer pan to oven; roast beef until meat thermometer inserted into center registers 125F for medium-rare, about 45 minutes. Transfer beef to platter. Tent loosely with foil.
    Spoon fat off top of pan drippings in roasting pan. Place roasting pan over high heat. Add broth mixture and bring to boil, scraping up any browned bits. Transfer to medium saucepan; bring to simmer. Mix 3 tablespoons butter and flour in small bowl to form smooth paste; whisk into broth mixture and simmer until sauce thickens, about 2 minutes. Whisk in 3 tablespoons butter. Stir in roasted shallots and reserved bacon. Season sauce with salt and pepper. Cut beef into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Spoon some sauce over. Garnish with watercress. Pass remaining sauce.

    Spoon fat off top of pan drippings in roasting pan. Place roasting pan over high heat. Add broth mixture and bring to boil, scraping up any browned bits. Transfer to medium saucepan; bring to simmer. Mix 3 tablespoons butter and flour in small bowl to form smooth paste; whisk into broth mixture and simmer until sauce thickens, about 2 minutes. Whisk in 3 tablespoons butter. Stir in roasted shallots and reserved bacon. Season sauce with salt and pepper. Cut beef into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Spoon some sauce over. Garnish with watercress. Pass remaining sauce.

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 01.02.2009 at 06:56 pm    last updated on: 01.02.2009 at 06:56 pm

    RE: What sauce did I make last year? pic (Follow-Up #1)

    posted by: ann_t on 12.21.2008 at 01:02 pm in Cooking Forum

    Was it Sue's recipes?

    Home Cookin Chapter: Recipes From Thibeault's Table

    Filet Mignon With Blue Cheese/Fresh Breadcrumb Topping
    ======================================================
    BEEF

    Sue Hulse's recipe

    6 1.5-2"-thick filet steaks
    6 slices of fine-quality white bread - toasted
    1.5 Cups crumbled mild blue cheese
    1/2 Cup parsley, chopped

    For wine reduction sauce (if desired):
    3 T. olive oil
    1 small onion - chopped (optional)
    1 celery stalk - chopped (optional)
    1 carrot, peeled and chopped (optional)
    2 Garlic cloves - chopped fine
    2 C. Port wine (optional)
    2 C. Burgundy wine (optional)

    .
    Can do this a day before:
    Heat oil in skillet and saute vegetables and garlic until onions are
    deep brown (not burnt, but caramelized).
    Add Port wine and burgundy into a saucepan and simmer for approx 2
    hours, or until sauce is reduce to approx 1/3 cup.

    Can do this early in the day:
    Tear toasted bread into small pieces and combine with blue cheese and
    parsley to make a almost pastey mixture.

    >>>Take out 2 hours before cooking steaks.

    Salt and pepper the steaks, then grill or roast until 10 before
    desired doneness (check with an instant-read thermometer).
    Remove at 125 for medium rare, 140 for medium/well.

    While steaks are cooking, gently heat the wine reduction.

    Split breadcrumb topping evenly for each filet and mound on top.

    In a broiler, broil about 4 inches from heat source for 3-4 minutes, or
    until topping as a rich golden/brown color.
    Watch the steaks carefully while they are in the broiler!!

    Please each steak and drizzle the reduction around it.
    Serve immediately.

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 01.02.2009 at 06:56 pm    last updated on: 01.02.2009 at 06:56 pm

    RE: Canning homemade tomato soup, HELP!!? (Follow-Up #5)

    posted by: missem on 09.15.2006 at 09:40 am in Harvest Forum

    This one is great! I was a little concerned about the allspice but it just adds a depth of flavor that does not say "allspice".

    Tomato Bisque

    20 lbs tomatoes, cored and coarsely chopped (about 3 doz large)
    2 tablespoons celery seed
    2 tablespoons whole allspice
    1 tablespoon dried tarragon
    4 cloves garlic, crushed
    1 cup sugar, or to taste (I used Splenda)
    1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons lemon juice
    2 tablespoons salt

    Simmer tomatoes about 30 minutes. Press through sieve or food mill. Return puree to pot. Put celery seed, allspice, tarragon, and garlic in spice bag. Add spice bag, sugar, lemon juice and salt to pot. Simmer, covered, for 20 minutes. Remove spice bag. Put soup in jars, leaving 1/2 inch headspace. BWB 45 minutes for quarts - makes about 5 quarts

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 07.18.2008 at 09:47 am    last updated on: 07.18.2008 at 09:47 am

    Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #57)

    posted by: whynotmi on 07.17.2008 at 05:38 pm in Harvest Forum

    Dilly Beans (from USDA, original poster Linda Lou)

    4 lbs fresh tender green or yellow beans (5 to 6 inches long)
    8 to 16 heads fresh dill
    8 cloves garlic (optional)
    1/2 cup canning or pickling salt
    4 cups white vinegar (5 percent)
    4 cups water
    1 tsp hot red pepper flakes (optional)
    Yield: About 8 pints

    Procedure: Wash and trim ends from beans and cut to 4-inch lengths. In each sterile pint jar, place 1 to 2 dill heads and, if desired, 1 clove of garlic. Place whole beans upright in jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Trim beans to ensure proper fit, if necessary. Combine salt, vinegar water, and pepper flakes (if desired). Bring to a boil. Add hot solution to beans, leaving 1/2-inch headspace.

    Adjust lids and process 5 min.
    If you want to skip the boiling of the jars first, then process in the BWB for 10 min. I do it, and they are good and crisp still. You can also use Pickle Crisp if you want pickled things really crunchy. Cider vinegar will seem less tart, but it will make the brine darker. Adding a pinch of sugar is a good idea, too.

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 07.18.2008 at 09:37 am    last updated on: 07.18.2008 at 09:37 am

    RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #10)

    posted by: Readinglady on 07.30.2005 at 02:13 pm in Harvest Forum

    Here are two tomato sauce recipes we really enjoy. Both are from the "Complete Book of Small-Batch Preserving."

    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Chunky Basil Pasta Sauce

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    8 cups (2 L) coarsely chopped peeled tomatoes -- (about 9-12 tomatoes or 4 lb/2 kg)
    1 cup chopped onion -- (250 mL)
    3 cloves garlic -- minced
    2/3 cup red wine -- (150 mL)
    1/3 cup red wine vinegar (5 % strength) -- (75 mL)
    1/2 cup chopped fresh basil -- (125 mL)
    1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley -- (15 mL)
    1 teaspoon pickling salt -- (5 mL)
    1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar -- (2 mL)
    1 6-oz/156 mL) can tomato paste

    Combine tomatoes, onion, garlic, wine, vinegar, basil, parsley, salt, sugar and tomato paste in a very large non-reactive pan. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 40 minutes or until mixture reaches desired consistency, stirring frequently.

    Remove hot jars from canner and ladle sauce into jars to within 1/2 inch (1 cm) of rim (head space). Process 35 minutes for pin (500 mL) jars and 40 minutes for quart (1 L) jars in a BWB.

    Yield:
    "8 cups"

    Note: This sauce also makes an excellent base for a quick pizza.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Multi-Use Tomato Sauce

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    10 plum tomatoes -- (about 2 1/2 lbs./1 kg)
    10 large tomatoes -- peeled and chopped (about 4 lbs./2 kg)
    4 large garlic cloves -- minced
    2 large stalks celery -- chopped
    2 medium carrots -- chopped
    1 large onion -- chopped
    1 large zucchini -- chopped
    1 large sweet green pepper -- chopped
    1/2 cup sun-dried tomatoes -- (125 mL)
    2/3 cup dry red wine -- (150 mL)
    1/2 cup red wine vinegar (5% strength or more) -- (125 mL)
    2 bay leaves
    1 tablespoon pickling salt -- (15 mL)
    2 teaspoons dried oregano -- (10 mL)
    2 teaspoons dried basil -- (10 mL)
    1 teaspoon granulated sugar -- (5 mL) (optional)
    1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon -- (2 mL) (optional)
    1/4 teaspoon ground pepper -- (2 mL)
    1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley -- (50 mL)

    Combine tomatoes, celery, garlic, onion, zucchini and green pepper in a very large non-reactive pan. Add 1 cup (250 mL) water. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat and boil gently, covered, for 25 minutes or until mixture begins to thicken, stirring occasionally.

    Soak sun-dried tomatoes in boiling water until softened. Drain and dice. Add to sauce with wine, vinegar, bay leaves, salt, oregano, basil, sugar, cinamon and pepper. Continue to boil gently until desired consistency, stirring frequently. Discard bay leaves and stir in parsley.

    Remove hot jars from canner and ladle sauce into jars to within 1/2 inch (1 cm) of rim (head space). Process in a BWB 35 minutes for pint (500 mL) jars and 40 minutes for quart (1 L) jars.

    Yield:
    "12 cups"
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    I'm the second generation to make this pickle recipe. It originally appeared in an old USDA bulletin: "Making Pickles and Relishes at Home," but it can still be found on several Extension Service sites.

    Crosscut Pickle Slices
    (Bread & Butter Pickles)
    4 quarts sliced medium cucumber, about 6 pounds
    1 1/2 cups sliced onions
    2 large garlic cloves
    1/3 cup salt
    2 quarts crushed ice or ice cubes
    4 1/2 cups sugar
    1 1/2 teaspoons ground turmeric
    1 1/2 teaspoons celery seed
    2 tablespoons mustard seed
    3 cups vinegar
    Wash cucumbers thoroughly, using a vegetable brush; drain on rack. Slice unpeeled cucumbers into 1/8 to 1/4-inch slices; discard ends. Add onions and garlic. Add salt and mix thoroughly; cover with ice; let stand 3 hours. Drain thoroughly; remove garlic cloves. Combine sugar, spices and vinegar. Heat just to boiling. Add drained cucumber and onion slices and heat 5 minutes. Pack hot pickles loosely in clean, hot pint jars to 1/2 inch of top. Adjust jar lids. Process in boiling water bath for 5 minutes (jars will cool the water, so start to count processing time as soon as water in canner returns to boiling). Remove jars and complete seals, if necessary. Set jars upright to cool. Yield: 7 pints.
    Note: Process 10 minutes BWB for elevations 1001 feet and above.

    Carol

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 07.18.2008 at 09:33 am    last updated on: 07.18.2008 at 09:33 am

    RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #7)

    posted by: annie1992 on 07.28.2005 at 11:38 pm in Harvest Forum

    OK, here are my favorites. The salsa is my own recipe, the soup is Katie C's and the Habanero Gold is wonderful, but I don't know where in the world I got the recipe.

    ANNIES SALSA

    8 cups tomatoes, peeled, chopped and drained
    2 cups chopped onion
    1 cups chopped green pepper
    3 5 chopped jalapenos
    6 cloves minced garlic
    2 tsp cumin
    2 tsp pepper
    1/8 cup canning salt
    cup chopped fresh cilantro
    1/3 cup sugar
    1/3 cup vinegar
    16 oz. tomato sauce
    16 oz tomato paste
    Mix all ingredients, bring to a boil, boil 10 minutes. Pour into hot jars, process at 10 lbs of pressure for 30 minutes for pints.

    Makes 6 pints

    Roasted Tomato Garlic Soup
    Recipe By :Katie
    12 tomatoes -- *see Note
    2 carrots -- cut in 1" pieces
    1 large onion -- quartered
    2 whole heads garlic -- peeled (or more, to taste)
    olive oil
    2 cups chicken broth -- (or 3)

    1/2 cup chopped fresh basil -- (or 1 Tbsp. dried)
    Core tomatoes and cut in half. Place, cut side up, on foil covered cookie sheet with carrots, onion and garlic. Brush with olive oil. Bake at 400F for about an hour, or until vegies are roasted and a little blackened. Place in a large saucepan with the chicken broth and basil and simmer for about 10 minutes. Blend with a stick blender (or in small batches in a blender) until almost smooth. To can: Process in a pressure canner, pints for 60 min. and quarts for 70 min.For dial gauge canners use 11 pounds pressure at 0-2000 ft., 12 lbs. at 2001-4000 ft., 13 lbs. at 4001-6000 ft. and 14 lbs. above 6000 ft. For weighted gauge canners use 10 lbs. pressure at 0-1000 ft., and 15 lbs. over 1000 ft. *Note: These measurements are approximate...I use whatever it takes to cover the cookie sheet. This makes 1 1/2 to 2 quarts of soup. Cream may be added to taste when the soup is served.

    Habanero Gold Jelly

    1/3 cup finely sliced dried apricots
    3/4 cup white vinegar
    1/4 up finely diced red onion
    1/4 cup finely diced sweet red pepper
    1/4 cup finely diced habanero peppers, including seeds
    OR 1/4 cup diced, combined jalapeno and Scotch Bonnet peppers
    3 cups granulated sugar
    1 pouch Certo liquid pectin

    Cut apricots into 1/8 inch slices. Measure into a large deep stainless steel saucepan with vinegar; let stand 4 hours. Individually, cut onion and seeded peppers into 1/8 inch slices; cut slices into 1/4 inch dice. Measure each ingredient; add to apricots. Stir in sugar.
    Over high heat, bring to a full roiling boil. Stirring constantly, boil hard 1 minute. Remove from heat. Immediately stir in pectin, mixing well.
    Pour jelly into hot jar, dividing solids equally among jars and filling each jar to within 1/4 inch of top rim. Wipe rims. Apply lids.

    Process 10 minutes in BWB. Cool upright, until lids pop down, about 30 minutes. When lids are concave but the jelly is still hot, carefully grasp jar without disturbing lid and invert, twist, or rotate each jar to distribute solids throughout jelly. The jar can be inverted temporarily but do not allow it to stand upside-down for prolonged periods.

    Repeat as necessary during the cooling/setting time, until solids remain suspended in the jelly.

    Annie

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 07.18.2008 at 09:32 am    last updated on: 07.18.2008 at 09:32 am

    RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #5)

    posted by: booberry85 on 07.28.2005 at 07:53 pm in Harvest Forum

    Someone had started a post of favorite recipes a day or two ago. I posted these there too but they're worth repeating. These are two of my favorites I got off of the Harvest forum. Grape jam (Ball Blue Book) is a favorite too. The roasted red pepper spread recipe is Linda Lou's too.

    Linda Lou's Apple Pie Jam
    4 cups tart apples, peeled and finely chopped
    2 tablespoons lemon juice
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
    4 cups sugar
    1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
    1 box pectin
    1/2 teaspoon butter
    Add water to chopped apples to measure 4 cups. Place apples and water into large, heavy saucepan. Stir in lemon juice, cinnamon and allspice. Measure sugars. Stir pectin into fruit. Add butter. Bring mixture to full rolling boil on high heat, stirring constantly. Quickly stir in both sugars. Return to full rolling boil and boil exactly 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam with metal spoon. Ladle quickly into hot, clean jars, leaving 1/4" headspace. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with two-piece lids. Screw bands on finger tight. Process in boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

    Roasted Red Pepper Spread
    6 lb. large red sweet peppers
    1 lb. Roma tomatoes
    2 large garlic cloves
    1 small white onion
    2 Tbsp. minced basil
    1 Tbsp. sugar
    1 tsp. coarse salt
    1/2 cup red wine vinegar
    Roast peppers under broiler or on a grill at 425 degrees until skin wrinkles and chars in spots. Turn over and roast other side. Remove from heat.Place in a paper bag, secure opening, cool 15 minutes. Roast tomatoes, onion, and garlic under broiler or grill 10 - 15 minutes. Place tomatoes in a paper bag. Peel onion and garlic. Finely mince onion and garlic.
    Measure 1/4 cup and set aside. Peel and seed tomatoes and peppers. Puree in food processor or blender. Combine in a large pan.Bring to a boil over med.high heat, stir to prevent sticking. Reduce heat, simmer until spread thickens. Ladle hot spread into hot jars, leave 1/4 inch headspace. Process in water bath canner for 10 minutes.

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 07.18.2008 at 09:30 am    last updated on: 07.18.2008 at 09:31 am

    RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #3)

    posted by: SuzyQ2 on 07.28.2005 at 01:58 pm in Harvest Forum

    Here are two of my favorites that I haven't seen posted recently.

    Shoot, I did not print out the name of the original poster of this recipe. It's not canning, but it is pretty wonderful...

    Sour Cream Walnuts

    1 cup brown sugar
    1/2 cup white sugar
    1/2 cup sour cream
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    3 cups walnuts

    Cook and stir sugars and sour cream to soft ball stage (240 degress F on candy thermometer). Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Add walnuts stirring gently til coated. Spread on pan to cool [no stick wax paper helps later removal]

    This next recipe came from KatieC & Annie....

    Plum Sauce

    4lbs plums
    2 cups brown sugar
    1 cup white sugar
    3/4 cup chopped onion
    2 tbls mustard seed
    2 tbls chopped green chili peppers (I used jalapeno)
    1 1/4x1 piece of fresh ginger (I used 1/2 tsp ground ginger)
    1 tbls salt
    1 clove mined garlic
    1 cup cider vinegar

    Pit & chop plums [don't peel], Combine remiaining ingredients in a large pot, bring to boil, reduce heat. Add plums, cook until thick and syrupy, about 1 1/2 hrs. Ladle hot sauce into hot jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Adjust caps and process 20 minutes in a BWB.

    Yeild: about 4 pints.

    I adore this on egg rolls and chicken fingers (I don't even like chicken). I also like a bit of it mixed w/ balsamic vinager and over a salad.

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 07.18.2008 at 09:29 am    last updated on: 07.18.2008 at 09:30 am

    RE: Summer Beverages (Follow-Up #9)

    posted by: minsue67 on 05.05.2008 at 03:28 pm in Cooking Forum

    Here's one that I always have mixed up in a bucket in the freezer.

    Frozen Chi-Chi's:

    6 oz lemonade concentrate
    6 oz limeade concentrate
    1 can of coconut syrup
    lg can of pineapple juice
    1/5 vodka

    mix all ingredients in lg. container (I use ice cream buckets). Freeze for at least 24 hours. Scoop into a glass and top off with 7-up or Sprite to make it slushy.

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 07.17.2008 at 08:25 pm    last updated on: 07.17.2008 at 08:26 pm

    RE: Summer Beverages (Follow-Up #11)

    posted by: ann_t on 05.05.2008 at 09:13 pm in Cooking Forum

    About the only summer drink I really enjoy outside of a good glass of wine is Sangria. And it is wine too.

    This is my favourite.


    Home Cookin Chapter: Recipes From Thibeault's Table

    Spanish Sangria
    ===============
    Source: Barbara Hansen's Mexican Cookery (1981)

    1 bottle, dry full bodied red wine
    (Make sure it is a decent wine. One good enough to drink on its own.)

    2 tablespoon orange liqueur (Grand Marnier)
    1/3 cup of simple syrup
    1 lime thinly sliced
    1 orange thinly sliced
    1 lemon thinly sliced
    Juice of one orange
    1 cup club soda

    Combined wine, syrup, brandy and orange juice and stir. Add sliced fruit and just before serving add the soda water.

    Do not let the fruit slices sit in the Sangria for more than one hour before serving as the peels can cause the drink to be bitter.

    Simple Syrup

    1 cup sugar
    1 cup water

    Bring water and sugar to a boil and simmer until liquid is clear and the sugar has dissolved. Pour in to jar and refrigerate. Keep for 3 weeks.

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 05.08.2008 at 04:20 pm    last updated on: 05.08.2008 at 04:20 pm