Clippings by sunflower101

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RE: raised beds infested with nematodes (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: treefrog_fl on 12.11.2006 at 12:51 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Castorp,
I'd like to know too how deep your organic soil is in your raised beds.
Just a guess, but maybe as soon as the roots reach the sandy soil they're getting into hostile territory.

Last year and again this year I'm growing several in the now famous DC Postholes. With good results.
I dig deep (nearly 2'), relatively narrow holes, line them thickly with wet newspaper, and fill them with a potting soil and compost mixture. And plant the maters deeply.
Some roots did penetrate the side newspaper walls last year, and were attacked by nematodes.
The rootballs inside the "pots" were thick and healthy.
The plants stayed healthy and productive well into the hot weather.
This method uses less organic mix cuz it's only where you want it, and eventually gets incorporated into the garden to use for different plants the next year.

I did carpet the whole garden with 'Nemagone' marigolds this summer. And worked them into the soil. They never did flower and were sprawly and ugly to boot, and I have no way of knowing if they're helping. Hope so!

Wish I knew of a source for lots of shrimp and crab shells locally and at a reasonable price.

As for summer maters Everglades and Burbank kept putting out fruit until September, in pots, morning sun and afternoon shade. Eventually whiteflies and mealybugs got 'em. I was just surprised they set fruit in the humidity and heat.

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clipped on: 06.24.2007 at 06:05 pm    last updated on: 06.24.2007 at 06:06 pm

RE: thinking of summer vegetable garden... need advice! (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: zorba_the_greek on 02.04.2007 at 08:57 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

New Zealand spinich, lambs quarters (chinpodium albums) sweet potatoes (the leaves are edible, too) sweet 100 cherry tomatoes, cow peas, aparagus beans aka yard long beans, luffa -- edible when young -- peppers --sweet and hot -- eggplant, many bitter gourds such as charantia, and orach.

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clipped on: 02.10.2007 at 01:01 pm    last updated on: 02.10.2007 at 01:02 pm

RE: Post Hole Gardening? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: treefrog_fl on 02.06.2007 at 11:14 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Try searching this forum for DC's posthole method, or Delta Charlie's , since I learned this from him.
Here's a brief description of how I've adapted it.
I dig a two foot deep, but narrow hole, line the sides and finally the bottom with thick, wet newspaper or tarpaper, being sure not to let any garden soil into my "pot". Then I fill it with a mix of potting soil, compost and composted Kow Manure, a handful of lime, some bonemeal, and time release fertilizer. Then I plant the tomato deeply, water in with fish emulsion and kelp. Fertilize again when fruit begins to set.
All the plants I grew that way this year were very healthy for a long time.
Hope this helps.

TF

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clipped on: 02.10.2007 at 12:59 pm    last updated on: 02.10.2007 at 01:00 pm

RE: raised beds infested with nematodes (Follow-Up #20)

posted by: tony_k_orlando on 01.11.2007 at 12:54 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Bill,

Here is a shot of the corn. I recall some 13 stalks in the little tote and each produced several ears. It was amazing!
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Here is a pic of the tomato plant in a haybale, the first time I tried it. It was a real eye-opener to see the results.
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

I always find it amazing that we can repeat the same steps and hope to get great results and it without fail the outcome is different each yr.

Tony

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clipped on: 01.13.2007 at 04:12 pm    last updated on: 01.13.2007 at 04:13 pm

RE: raised beds infested with nematodes (Follow-Up #23)

posted by: tony_k_orlando on 01.11.2007 at 04:33 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Hi Bill,

The ears were full and tasty. The variety was called something like 'now and again' or 'now and later' and I am pretty sure it was a Burpee seed.

There was sooo much pollen in the air it was amazing.

Because I too heard so many stories where a lot of pollen is required at times I would take a sheet of white paper out to the corn and shake a tassel over it and then hand pollinate all the others. BUT I dont think it would be necessary to do this.

The white plastic on top sort of created a moisture barrier underneath and so I had to place a pvc pipe in from the top and water that way.

It worked and it was fun.

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corn planted in a tupperware bin and covered with white plastic -
clipped on: 01.13.2007 at 04:10 pm    last updated on: 01.13.2007 at 04:11 pm