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Scrap Quilt Class - Block #1

posted by: teresa_nc7 on 11.12.2007 at 07:46 pm in Quilting Forum

Before we make our first block, I thought of some additional notes:

~ it is suggested to use a medium neutral color when piecing scrap blocks - I like medium gray and taupe the best, a medium beige will also blend nicely

~ it is very important to have as many different scraps as you can when making a scrap quilt of any type; 12 or 15 different fabrics are not enough for a scrap quilt and you will probably not be happy with the results; I used over 40 fabrics in the controlled colors of the Aunt Sukie's Choice quilt shown in the Gallery

~ when making your blocks, use a 1/4" seam or a scant 1/4" seam (which is just a few threads shy of measuring 1/4"); no matter which size seam you use, always aim to be consistent

~ when pressing the seams during construction, you can press to the darkest fabric or you can press the seams open if you prefer, just always aim to be consistent!

I suggest you make one block of each offered in these classes, print out the block instructions, note the web source if there is one, and pin your finished block to the instructions, then put all your scrap blocks with their instructions in a file folder or some other container where you can easily find them.

Now..... onto the block!

The first block we will make is called "Stitched Scraps" and makes a 10" finished block when sewn into the quilt.

A quilt set 5 blocks across and 6 blocks down with a 6" border added will need 30 blocks and will measure 62" x 72".

Scraps needed:

3"x3" squares (each block needs 4)
3"x5 1/2" rectangles ( each block needs 2)
3"x10 1/2" rectangles (each block needs 2)

Be sure that each piece of the block is a different fabric.

1. Make a 4-patch unit of the 4 3" squares. Press.

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2. Sew a 3"x5 1/2" rectangle to the top and to the bottom of the 4-patch unit. Press.

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3. Sew a 3" x 10 1/2" rectangle to the sides of the unit. Press.

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That's it! You've made one block! Wasn't that one easy?

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The source recommends that you flip-flop the blocks when laying them out:

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This block could easily be made smaller by cutting the squares and rectangles only 2 1/2" wide. This block could be a good use for those "noodles" you're collecting.

Source: www.rosiescalicocupboard.com

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.14.2008 at 08:39 am    last updated on: 01.14.2008 at 08:39 am

Scrap Quilt Class - Block #2

posted by: teresa_nc7 on 11.14.2007 at 07:08 pm in Quilting Forum

Next we will make the wonderfully innovative block from our own Fran - Fran's Five Across and Five Down!

This block is easy and can be fast if you do a lot of cutting before you begin. I am using 2 1/2" squares and strips cut 2 1/2" wide here in my lesson. This results in a block size that is approximately 10 1/2" unfinished.

If you want a bigger block, you can cut 3" squares and cut your strips 3" wide. It's up to you.

You will need:

10 2 1/2" squares, all different fabrics
3 strips, 2 1/2" x 10 1/2" - all the same

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Make one patched strip by sewing 5 squares together, end to
end. Press seams all in one direction.

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Then make a second patched strip with the other 5 squares in the same manner as the first. Press.

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Sew one 2 1/2" x 10 1/2" rectangle to one patched strip. Repeat with one more patched strip and one plain. Sew the four strips together so that you have alternating plain, patched, plain, patched. Finally sew the last plain strip to the last patched strip.

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Square up your block if needed by trimming the strips just a little. And your block is done.

Here is my quilt top made with this block. Again, we flip-flop the blocks when they are sewn together.

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IMO, the printed plaid I used in the block for this class is too busy. I just wanted to see how it would look.....so now I know. This quilt will look better with read-as-solid, tiny check, small dot, or even a solid. So, think about your fabric choice before you commit to cutting out lots of strips.

Now.......
I'll show you mine if you show me yours?


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NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.14.2008 at 08:39 am    last updated on: 01.14.2008 at 08:39 am

Scrap Quilt Class - Block #3

posted by: teresa_nc7 on 11.17.2007 at 12:25 pm in Quilting Forum

Our next two blocks will be string-pieced, a very easy and tried-and-true technique.

My source is "Spectacular String-Pieced Quilts: A Pattern Book" by the editors of Traditional Quiltworks and Quilting Today magazines.

First a little background: traditionally, string quilts are constructed from narrow strips of fabric (or strings) left over from clothing or other sewing projects. Here is a case for the more fabrics the better! String quilts are about contrast and value than color coordination. The quilters who came before us used newspaper or phone book papers to piece many of their quilts. Today we can use vellum, deli paper, blank newsprint, old sheets, muslin, or thin regular interfacing as our foundation.

Note: keep in mind how you plan to finish your string quilt; paper will need to be removed, old sheets are difficult to hand quilt through and will add more weight to the finished quilt. For this class, I have used very lightweight regular (not fusible) interfacing - probably bought on sale!

Our block for this class uses the same print for the center string of each block as well as the borders and the binding. I am using a navy small print; the picture in the book uses a medium dark gray print; a brown print, red, or any other medium dark print could be used. Use of the same print serves as a unifying factor in this very busy quilt.

For a quilt 72 1/2" x 91 1/2" made of 63 blocks, you need 2 3/4 yards of the print used in the center of the blocks, the borders, and the binding.

To make one block:

Cut a foundation of 11" square of your chosen foundation.

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Cut a string 1 7/8" x 15" of your medium dark print. Cut other strings in various widths.

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Center the medium print strip diagonally, right side up, on a foundation.

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Stitch a random width strip to one side of the center strip using a 1/4" seam allowance. Don't be concerned if the strip is too long and hangs off the ends of the foundation; just make sure the strip is long enough. Press strip right side up when finished.

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Continue to add strips to one side of the foundation and press each one right side up.

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Then add strips in the same manner to the other side of the block, pressing as you go to cover the foundation.

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Trim the foundation to 10" square.

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I think it wise to stitch/baste 1/8" around the entire string-pieced block after trimming. This holds down the strings on the edges and helps the block not to distort when tearing out paper.

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And your string-pieced block is finished!

Here is a photo of the finished quilt:

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This type of scrap block is a great place to hide those "not so pretty scraps" and even put in a part-polyester string now and then. You can even make pieced strings if you want to get really scrappy and sew some strings with wonky seams to add a vintage appeal.

Scraps of bindings will make easy string blocks - just be sure to cut them in varying widths; string-pieced blocks should not be too accurately done!

Have fun!

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.14.2008 at 08:39 am    last updated on: 01.14.2008 at 08:39 am

Scrap Quilt Class - Block #4

posted by: teresa_nc7 on 11.17.2007 at 02:22 pm in Quilting Forum

Our second string-pieced block we will call Crazy Strings.

You will need:

an 8" square foundation (muslin, paper, interfacing, etc.)
assorted pieces and strings of fabric
fabric glue - optional

Start with your 8" square of foundation.

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For some of the blocks you may place a bright print or solid roughly in the center of your foundation, right side up. A bit of glue stick helps to hold the center piece in place.

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Stitch assorted scraps and strings to the foundation working around the center scrap.

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When the foundation is completely covered, trim block to 7".

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Finally, stitch/baste around the block about 1/8" in from the edge to secure the edges and provide stability when removing the paper foundation if using.

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And another scrap block is completed!

These Crazy Strings blocks look great set on point with plain 7" squares and setting triangles in a read-as-solid or marbled fabric.

Source: "Spectacular String-Pieced Quilts: A Pattern Book" by the editors of Traditional Quiltworks and Quilting Today magazines.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.14.2008 at 08:38 am    last updated on: 01.14.2008 at 08:39 am

Scrap Quilt Class - Final Block

posted by: teresa_nc7 on 12.01.2007 at 12:17 pm in Quilting Forum

This will be the final lesson in our Scrap Quilt Class. Our block is called Roman Stripe or Roman Bar and is paper pieced. This is an easy block to make and can be made with totally random scraps or with more control of the color or style of fabrics. Today I am using a White-On-White (WOW) and shades of blue from dark to light. The blues all came from my scrap bin - NO stash fabrics were cut for this demonstration! Ha!

You will notice that this FPP pattern has all the scrap strips the same size. Also, I would not use fewer than 5 or 6 strips in each block no matter what size quilt you are using. It just won't look scrappy enough.

There is a link to this Foundation Paper Pieced (FPP) pattern at the end of this post. More than one size is given in the link. I am using the 6-inch (finished) pattern which is a good size for a lap quilt. You could use a smaller block for a baby/crib quilt. My personal preference is to use smaller blocks for baby quilts. I think the smaller blocks are more in scale with a smaller quilt - but that's just my preference.

To prepare for the block you need to assemble your scrap strips:

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Then take your printed pattern copy and trace it to thinner paper if desired, tracing paper, vellum, used dryer sheets, thin interfacing, or sheets used in the deli that I use.

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Cut a triangle slightly larger than the one on the pattern labeled #1 and pin it to the back side of your traced pattern - RIGHT SIDE UP. Place your first scrap strip on the area between area #1 and area #2. Flip your paper pattern over so the numbers are right side is up and stitch on the line between 1 and 2.

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Trim the seam if needed to 1/4", press strip over and press.

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Continue in this same manner with the rest of the scrap strips all the way to the corner of the pattern.

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I double check the placement of my strips with pins on the corner before I sew the strip on the previous one.

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When all the scrap strips are sewn and pressed, stitch the entire block in the block seam allowance.

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Trim the block to the correct unfinished size - in this case, 6 1/2-inches. And your block is done!

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Here is a baby quilt I made for a gift using the 1930s reproduction prints.

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I quilted all the large triangles with a rising sun motif.

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Here are more digital versions of this block made into quilts:

Here is a link that might be useful: PC Piecers patterns

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.14.2008 at 08:38 am    last updated on: 01.14.2008 at 08:38 am

Scrap Quilt Class - Scrappy Border

posted by: teresa_nc7 on 11.26.2007 at 06:35 pm in Quilting Forum

A scrap quilt can really be finished to a "T" with a scrappy border, so here you go:

Scrap Border

1. Cut nine strips 15" (one each of nine different fabrics) that vary in width from 1 " to 3". Sew together to make a 15" strip set. Change sewing direction with each strip sewn and press seams in one direction.

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Using a rotary cutter, ruler and mat, cut 3 1/2" (or however wide your border is to be) segments from this strip set.

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2. Add two or three different prints (not used in the strip set) to the beginning and ending of the set, if desired to add more "scrappiness"

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3. Make some more strip sets using different fabrics than what was used in the first strip set. Sew enough of these segments together for the 2 side borders and top and bottom borders for your quilt.

A Nine Patch baby quilt using the controlled scraps of 1930s reproduction fabrics - with a scrappy border.

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NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.14.2008 at 08:38 am    last updated on: 01.14.2008 at 08:38 am

Scrap Quilt Class - Block #5

posted by: teresa_nc7 on 11.18.2007 at 03:17 pm in Quilting Forum

Our next scrap block is called Shooting Star. It's a very easy block and goes together quickly, but can make a very colorful and delightful scrap quilt.

We will make one 12-inch (finished) block in this lesson. You will need:

9 squares @ 4 1/2" each background fabric (BG)

18 squares @ 2 1/2" each various colored fabrics for the star points (SP)

To begin, take 1 4 1/2" BG square and 2 2 1/2" SP squares.

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Mark each small SP block on the wrong side with a diagonal line from left to right.

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Align the SP small square with the top right corner of the BG large square. Sew on the line you marked, then trim 1/4" from the seam.

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Press the trimmed corner out and repeat with another small SP square in the opposite corner.

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Press out the second corner.

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Make eight more units like the one you just made. Chain piecing will help the work go fast!

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Arrange your 9 units so you have a pleasing color contrast of the Star Points:

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Sew the units together by rows, press alternating the rows, to make one Shooting Star block that measures 12 1/2" unfinished.

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You can turn the block around to slant the star in the other direction if desired.

A quilt made of 4 blocks across and 4 blocks down will measure 48" x 48" before you add any borders - a nice size for a baby quilt.

Here again is a baby quilt I made - challenging myself to finish it in one weekend - which I did!

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I love this Smokey Mountain Star quilt at Quiltville.com!
You see that you can use different backgrounds to make a quilt that sings. You could even use various neutral beiges for scrappy backgrounds or many WOW fabrics for a scrappy white background.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.14.2008 at 08:37 am    last updated on: 01.14.2008 at 08:37 am

Scrap Quilts #1

posted by: teresa_nc7 on 11.11.2007 at 05:48 pm in Quilting Forum

I thought those of you following the Scrap Quilt Class would like to see some of my scrap quilts. I'll post a few here in #1 and post some additional quilts in subsequent threads.

If you have any questions about any of the quilts, just post on the Gallery thread where the quilt appears.

Teresa

Four Patch Baby Quilt in 1930's Repro fabrics and bleached muslin.

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Not Quite Bowties lap quilt in controlled colors, blue, russet red, forest green and gold.

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Shooting Star baby quilt with pieced solid border and scrappy binding.

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Baby Nine Patch in controlled colors of green, yellow, and white.

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Aunt Sukie's Choice baby quilt in medium blues, russet reds, taupe, and beige.

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NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.14.2008 at 08:36 am    last updated on: 01.14.2008 at 08:36 am