Clippings by stewbrew

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African Blood Lily - repot or not?

posted by: stewbrew on 10.25.2014 at 10:26 am in Florida Gardening Forum

This beautiful plant produced one great bloom and many babies in only one year in the pot. Should they be repotted one per pot or leave them alone? Thanks, Stan

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clipped on: 10.25.2014 at 10:27 am    last updated on: 10.25.2014 at 10:27 am

RE: Mango Tree Info (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: jofus on 08.17.2014 at 02:59 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Wow, what a beautiful tree ! Dunno about other mango aficionados Diane, but I'd need more info.

1. Is that your tree as it looks today ? With all that fruit still on it ? Or was the pic taken at another time ?

2. Can you post a close up of the fruit ? It's general size/weight ? And when it starts to ripen & fall off the tree ?

3. And last, give us a general description of the tree size.

Even with the above info it may come down to a guessing game.

Easiest of course, would be to give the previous owner a call and ask if he knows, but imagine you'd have already done that if it was feasible.

As to tree care, do not fertilize the tree until all the fruit is off. Then in late fall, give it a good dose of 10 - 10 - 10 general fertilizer, two treatments, one month apart. Do not fertilize after Jan 1st as a general rule. Also keep a close eye out for anthracnose, if it comes on the tree you'll need to give it 2 or even 3 sprayings of copper fungicide, about 2 weeks apart, in the early spring, right after the small fruits start to appear. If all that goes well, your next chore will be to watch out for fruit flies which show up in many areas around late June, but July is a deadly month if they are there and not prepared for. I use the old apple cider vinegar trick,..works for me. I usually don't bother with that on my Glenn tree as its an early season one, and fruits are all gone by July 4th or so.

That's all I can contribute, am sure others will have some cool ideas. 700 mango's eh ? You may have to guard against the two-legged fruit rats with a harvest like that every year. lol

I live in Englewood, not far from Pt Charlotte,..both good mango areas. Hope this all helps. Good luck !

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clipped on: 08.18.2014 at 10:59 am    last updated on: 08.18.2014 at 11:00 am

Cladium flower. What about seeds?

posted by: stewbrew on 06.12.2014 at 05:36 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

This is my first caladium flower and I'm wondering if anybody uses the seeds or not?

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clipped on: 06.13.2014 at 11:30 am    last updated on: 06.13.2014 at 11:30 am

RE: Found Pine Bark Fines South Florida (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: garyfla on 06.02.2014 at 04:59 am in Florida Gardening Forum

Hi
Here's my two cents lol I get mine from Walmart "Timberline" brand comes in a purple bag Costs under 3 bucks for 2cf. I found the quality to be more consistant than
the type I bought from Bushel stop. You'll have to check out the website for Walmart while all the stores carry Timberline not all carry the smaller size
My basic mix for dirt plants is 3/1 using top soil .
i'm now using this on my terrestrial and semi epi orchids
Use crushed lava for epis
Works for me and I save a fortune lol gary

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clipped on: 06.02.2014 at 04:41 pm    last updated on: 06.02.2014 at 04:41 pm

RE: Found Pine Bark Fines South Florida (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: love_the_yard on 06.02.2014 at 09:58 am in Florida Gardening Forum

Walmart purple bag - $2.68 - it's all I use:

 photo IMG_2874Large.jpg

Carol in Jacksonville

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clipped on: 06.02.2014 at 04:40 pm    last updated on: 06.02.2014 at 04:40 pm

RE: Found Pine Bark Fines South Florida (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: jane__ny on 06.01.2014 at 10:04 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Bark does not hold up well in Florida heat and humidity. I would not use 'fines' as they will break down quickly. If you don't mind repotting yearly, its okay. You would be better off going with straight gritty mix which will hold up.

I'm in Sarasota and grow orchids and some dirt plants. I use orchid bark for the orchids and inexpensive Timberlane (Walmart) pine bark pieces with dirt plants. I only use about 1/3 to perlite and miracle gro potting mix. I've had no problem with this as most of the dirt plants outgrow their pots after about a year or two.

I find orchid bark holds up the best (good orchid bark, not the cheap stuff) but most of my orchids are getting moved to rock because I can't afford to repot hundreds of plants each year using bark.

Just my experience and opinion.

Jane

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clipped on: 06.02.2014 at 04:38 pm    last updated on: 06.02.2014 at 04:39 pm

RE: ID this flower (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: Thedecoguy on 05.21.2014 at 02:07 pm in Name That Plant Forum

Chrysanthemum

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clipped on: 05.21.2014 at 04:07 pm    last updated on: 05.21.2014 at 04:07 pm

WANTED: Plants to trade

posted by: stewbrew on 03.18.2014 at 02:58 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

I have a list on my member's page to trade. Now is time to trim much of it, so tip cuttings are noted on the list. There are a few I'm looking for if you happen to have any to trade.

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clipped on: 03.19.2014 at 10:47 am    last updated on: 03.19.2014 at 10:47 am

RE: Lady Palms - why is one shiny and othes are not? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: plantsman56 on 03.14.2014 at 11:16 am in Florida Gardening Forum

Raphis palms do vary a lot, even within the species, so shiny or not shiny leaves will also be a part of this. They have been cultivated for 100s of years. As Eric mentioned, there are also many small cultivars that are given Japanese names that indicate leaf form, or form of variegation. If I can get a picture to work, here is one of my " Zukonishiki" plants.

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clipped on: 03.14.2014 at 01:23 pm    last updated on: 03.14.2014 at 01:23 pm

RE: Lady Palms - why is one shiny and othes are not? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: eric_9b on 03.14.2014 at 08:04 am in Florida Gardening Forum

Rhapis excelsa is a variable palm. There are many forms. Some have very glossy leaves, others very dull. Height varies from just 1-2 ft to around 8-10ft. Some tend to cluster very densely others spread out more.

There are many dwarf and variegated forms that are very popular in Japan. When new ones are released small pups can go for thousands of dollars.

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clipped on: 03.14.2014 at 10:38 am    last updated on: 03.14.2014 at 10:39 am

Plant ID

posted by: stewbrew on 02.22.2014 at 05:26 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Hi,

I found this little plant volunteer under a Privet tree, and thought it might be an offspring. Wrong: now, about 6 months after diging it up, and potting it, it looks nothing like the privet plant!

It is very glossy and the small trunk looks like a type of schefflera plant.

Does this look familiar to anyone?

Thanks, Stewbrew

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clipped on: 02.23.2014 at 02:25 pm    last updated on: 02.23.2014 at 02:25 pm

RE: Plant ID (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: bboy on 02.22.2014 at 05:29 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Brassaia actinophylla (Schefflera actinophylla).

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clipped on: 02.23.2014 at 02:24 pm    last updated on: 02.23.2014 at 02:24 pm

RE: Plant ID please (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: carol23 on 01.03.2014 at 10:56 am in Name That Plant Forum

Crinum amabile ?

Here is a link that might be useful: Chicago Botanic Gardens

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clipped on: 01.03.2014 at 05:08 pm    last updated on: 01.03.2014 at 05:09 pm

Plant ID please

posted by: stewbrew on 01.03.2014 at 10:28 am in Name That Plant Forum

Hi, This plant is common in this area. The photo is from an old, beautiful plant about 7 fit tall and as wide.

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clipped on: 01.03.2014 at 05:07 pm    last updated on: 01.03.2014 at 05:07 pm

RE: Iron Plant - long and windy, so grab a cup of coffee (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: theficuswrangler on 01.10.2013 at 08:44 pm in House Plants Forum

As a commercial interior horticulturist, I have often cared for cast iron plants (Aspidistra), as well as their fellow low-light plant, the snake plant (Sanseveria). No the plants are not related, and the light you describe does not sound really low, but bear with me a moment, you might be able to use something here.

The first thing I noticed about them is that they - more specifically their roots - can be damaged by not aerating sufficiently between waterings, but the damage doesn't show up for weeks or months. Correspondingly, one may make adjustments when problems are noticed, but not see improvements for weeks or months.

The second thing I noticed is that the moisture/aeration level IN THE VERY BOTTOM OF THE POT is what you need to be aware of, not just a couple of inches down. Before watering, use a probe to investigate that moisture, pushing your probe all the way to the bottom. For low light, the probe should feel completely dry; for low moderate light, there should be only the slightest trace of moisture. If the soil has not reached that level, DON'T WATER. Test again in a few days, or even a week, and don't water until that aeration level is reached. When you water, water enough that you get a run off from the drainage hole, 1/4" will be sufficient. Let it sit for a day, and if there's any water still in the saucer, you can dump it out.

I'm making the assumption that you're using some kind of conventional potting soil or soilless mix, not a coarse potting medium like "gritty mix" or 5-1-1. I can't talk with much confidence about those, as I'm just beginning to experiment with them myself.

As to whether you should repot now, trimming off damaged roots, doing general root pruning, and using an improved draining mix, or try to improve the health of the roots (leaching the soil was a good first step) by letting them aerate more first, allowing them to regrow, then repot in maybe a year - that's your choice. Some people will advise the former, some the latter. Doing something drastic to an ailing plant is sometimes not a good idea, however. I would recommend that when you do repot, try a coarse, quick draining mix - I think your Grandma would have been very interested.

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clipped on: 12.30.2013 at 01:48 pm    last updated on: 12.31.2013 at 11:22 am

RE: when to repot a cutting from perlite to "adult" mix (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: tapla on 12.26.2013 at 10:52 pm in House Plants Forum

In the cutting above, there are roots growing from 3 nodes. It's much easier to repot and keep roots pruned properly if the vertical growth (below the soil line) that supports roots is limited to one node, instead of 3. If we look at the cutting above and imagine it's July, I would snip the lower 2 nodes off by cutting through the stem just below the upper cluster of roots. To balance the loss of the lower roots, I would remove the two large lower leaves and pot the cutting, placing it in open shade until I saw evidence of new growth, then move it to sun.

This will set the cutting back a week or so until it gets its feet back under it, but that's a small price to pay for an easy to manage root system. It's much easier to maintain a root system if you start working at it immediately, than it is if you wait and are forced to do remedial work down the road.

Four - when working with fresh woody cuttings, it's usually better to have at least 2-3 leaf nodes buried below the surface. This helps to ensure that even if the top inch or so of soil dries out, the cutting can still move water from deeper in the container to support the top of the cutting. Then, when you do the first repot, or better yet when you move it into it's first real pot, you can eliminate roots on all but 1 node. There's no rule that says you have to follow that formula, but it will make things much easier for you down the road.

Tip: If you're using a soil that supports quite a bit of perched water (soggy layer at the bottom), it's important that the bottom of the cutting is always above that layer. Cuttings need lots of oxygen to turn their stored photosynthate into the fuel that drives root growth. If roots don't grow and form a vascular connection to the top, rot will "plug the plumbing" and spoil your efforts.

Al

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clipped on: 12.31.2013 at 10:59 am    last updated on: 12.31.2013 at 10:59 am

RE: when to repot a cutting from perlite to "adult" mix (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: four on 12.26.2013 at 07:17 pm in House Plants Forum

> Posted by tapla
> reduced the amount of vertical growth that supports roots.
> all your main roots to emerge from the trunk at the same ht

I want to understand it correctly.
I take it to mean that cutting should be inserted such that
one leaf node is below surface.

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clipped on: 12.31.2013 at 10:56 am    last updated on: 12.31.2013 at 10:56 am

RE: How to capture bamboo seeds (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: bamboo_rabbit on 12.30.2013 at 04:36 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

As Wallisadi said above it is a bamboo palm....just a palm that looks like bamboo.

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clipped on: 12.31.2013 at 10:32 am    last updated on: 12.31.2013 at 10:32 am

RE: Iron Plant - long and windy, so grab a cup of coffee (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: theficuswrangler on 01.19.2013 at 09:27 pm in House Plants Forum

Ooooh, that doesn't look good, does it? Those leaves that are half brown, they're done for, you might as well cut them off. Those yellow streaks - you're sure it's not a variegated variety, right? Yes, I know you are, just kidding. Two things they make me think of, iron defficiency, and spider mites. Have you fertilized much? Does your fert have iron in it? If not, you maybe could try just a touch of iron sequestrine, or some such thing.

Do you know what mites would look like? You don't always see webbing, and they're so small, if you don't know what to look for, you might not see them. Try this. Grip a leaf firmly between thumb and first finger, and slide your fingers all the way from one end to the other. Look at your fingers, if you see tiny, very tiny, greenish or reddish smears, you have mites. If you do, you can easily get rid of them by spraying a solution of 1 tablespoon mild lidquid detergent, 1 teaspoon canola oil, in 1 pint of water, then wiping both leaf surfaces with paper towels. Do this once a week for a month.

If this were my plant, I would pull it out of the pot and inspect the roots. Aspidistra have fat, tannish rhizomes with firm,whitish roots hanging down from them and filling the soil. I really suspect you have a bunch of rotted roots. Cut away all the mushy, dried, brown or black stuff, and repot. Your soil mix doesn't sound too bad, though you might want to research the "gritty mix" and "5-1-1" mix talked about on this forum. And ditto on eliminating the "drainage layer." The key to saving this plant may be in allowing it to go very dry between waterings; the place you have it does sound like pretty low light, you should probably be watering something on the order of once a month - always testing the soil, of course.

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clipped on: 12.30.2013 at 01:45 pm    last updated on: 12.30.2013 at 01:45 pm

RE: Plant ID Is it a lily variety? (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: purpleinopp on 12.30.2013 at 09:08 am in Florida Gardening Forum

When I see them around here, they are always used as a 'ring around the tree,' sometimes with, sometimes without a border. I've never had any in a pot either, not a plant I find interesting. House plant forum might be a better place to ask.

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clipped on: 12.30.2013 at 01:16 pm    last updated on: 12.30.2013 at 01:17 pm

RE: Plant ID Is it a lily variety? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: zackey on 12.27.2013 at 01:39 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Aspidistra. A very easy care plant that doesn't need much water. You can put it in the ground in semi shade if you are in south Florida and it will spread. To repot it I would take it out of the pot and bare root it. See if it pulls apart or if you need to cut it apart leaving as many roots as possible on each piece.

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clipped on: 12.27.2013 at 02:29 pm    last updated on: 12.30.2013 at 01:15 pm

Plant ID Is it a lily variety?

posted by: stewbrew on 12.27.2013 at 10:56 am in Florida Gardening Forum

Hi, Found this potted plant in deep shade. My old friend probably started the three pots by seed, and just set them in the shade. Now that he is gone I'm doing a plant rescue. If it gets large I'll need to seperate these plants. Any advice? Thanks, Stan

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clipped on: 12.27.2013 at 02:28 pm    last updated on: 12.30.2013 at 01:13 pm

RE: Mango spots are Anthracnose fungus? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: morningloree on 12.19.2013 at 08:46 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

I have the same thing on my mango tree, spraying with a fungicide makes a difference. I have my tree potted and having good circulation helps, too. Keeping the debris cleaned up under the tree takes away a growing medium for the fungus.

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clipped on: 12.20.2013 at 10:56 am    last updated on: 12.20.2013 at 10:56 am

RE: Mango spots are Anthracnose fungus? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: jofus on 12.19.2013 at 12:31 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Sure looks like a fungus to me. I now have eight mango trees, first started planting & growing 12 yrs ago, so am familiar. In each of the two locations ( Upper Keys & here in SW Florida ), I have grown mango trees I have faced the fungus problem. But not to worry, Home Depot and most gardening centers sell a blue colored " Liquid Copper Fungicide ", usually in one pint plastic bottles. i just bought two yesterday, will be spraying my trees in next 2, 3 days,..the 3rd spraying this year ! Thats it, should make your leaves nice an healthy in no time, just follow the directions and use a plastic sprayer that attaches to the end of a garden hose, Home Depot sells them also. The two bottles should last me for four to five years.
Hey, if I can do it, anyone can. After one spraying just play it by ear, - spray again if the fungus returns or is stubborn and hangs on after initial spray. I usually spray my trees 2 or 3 times a year. Good luck !

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clipped on: 12.20.2013 at 10:55 am    last updated on: 12.20.2013 at 10:55 am

Mango spots are Anthracnose fungus?

posted by: stewbrew on 12.19.2013 at 10:53 am in Florida Gardening Forum

These black spots are anthracnose fungus? I don't know, but last year the tree had a lot of it including on the fruit. There is very little of it now and I need to get ahead of it this year. Any suggestiions on treatment?

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clipped on: 12.20.2013 at 10:54 am    last updated on: 12.20.2013 at 10:55 am

RE: ID this pest: is it mealybug/ (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: rhizo_1 on 11.11.2013 at 05:17 pm in Garden Clinic Forum

They are pupae of one of the whitefly species. Not mealybug and not scale insects (as would be easily mistaken for) .

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clipped on: 11.12.2013 at 11:56 am    last updated on: 11.12.2013 at 11:56 am

ID this pest: is it mealybug/

posted by: stewbrew on 11.11.2013 at 12:05 pm in Garden Clinic Forum

This plant, mexican petunia, is infected with what pest? It is only on the underside of the leaf and the leaf looks normal from the top, i.e. it is not "wrinkled or puckered".

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clipped on: 11.11.2013 at 12:06 pm    last updated on: 11.11.2013 at 12:06 pm

RE: Is this mealybug on hibiscus? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: jean001a on 11.07.2013 at 11:18 am in Garden Clinic Forum

Probably so.

Direct hits of insecticidal soap work well on soft-bodied wax-producing critters. Repeat as needed.

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clipped on: 11.08.2013 at 09:33 am    last updated on: 11.08.2013 at 09:33 am

Is this mealybug on hibiscus?

posted by: stewbrew on 11.06.2013 at 05:27 pm in Garden Clinic Forum

The hibiscus leaves are crinkled and wrinkled, and this white bug (mildew?) is all over them. Is it mealybug? How do I treat it? Thanks.

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clipped on: 11.06.2013 at 05:27 pm    last updated on: 11.06.2013 at 05:28 pm

RE: Need help ID this bromeliad (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: bboy on 10.30.2013 at 03:33 pm in Name That Plant Forum

They all do, although sometimes the flowering head sits down in the center of the leaf rosette. There are many kinds and some look different from one another but are actually in the same genus - when there aren't even flowers present accurate identification may not be very likely.

A good hint that flowering has occurred is when the rootstock produces multiple new rosettes around the original one, which eventually then collapses. One idea is that this Doctor Who style cycle serves to provide some organic matter to a plant that is otherwise gripping a more or less bare tree branch in nature.

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clipped on: 11.03.2013 at 09:46 am    last updated on: 11.03.2013 at 09:46 am

Need help ID this bromeliad

posted by: stewbrew on 10.29.2013 at 05:29 pm in Name That Plant Forum

This plant is 3 ft across and has saw teeth leaves. Will this variety produce desirable flowers? Thanks

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clipped on: 10.30.2013 at 02:08 pm    last updated on: 10.30.2013 at 02:08 pm

RE: ID this plant please (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: purpleinopp on 10.15.2013 at 12:08 pm in Name That Plant Forum

I'd say Syngonium.

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clipped on: 10.16.2013 at 03:05 pm    last updated on: 10.16.2013 at 03:05 pm

RE: ID this plant please (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: carol23 on 10.15.2013 at 12:04 pm in Name That Plant Forum

The leaf shape looks like some type of aroid.

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clipped on: 10.16.2013 at 03:04 pm    last updated on: 10.16.2013 at 03:04 pm

ID this plant please

posted by: stewbrew on 10.15.2013 at 11:27 am in Name That Plant Forum

Dark green climber growing on a fence in deep shade.

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clipped on: 10.16.2013 at 03:03 pm    last updated on: 10.16.2013 at 03:03 pm

RE: venting: mow and blow guys (Follow-Up #22)

posted by: stewbrew on 08.09.2013 at 05:46 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Thanks for starting this thread. I realize it is not just me being persnikety(?) Last spring I finally had it up to here with my mow and blow guys after they weed whacked some of my new plants and the trunks of some plams. So, I gathered them together (with the boss) next to the damaged plants and explained the problem. Then I explained the meaning of the Dr's. oath, "first do no harm...", and warned that the next time they harmed my property they would be fired on the spot. Since then there have been no "accidents' with the weed whacker.

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clipped on: 08.09.2013 at 05:47 pm    last updated on: 08.09.2013 at 05:47 pm

Bromeliad Mildew or... What is it?

posted by: stewbrew on 08.09.2013 at 05:34 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

This white stuff brushes off easily with a toothbrush. Any suggestions on how to treat the plant?

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clipped on: 08.09.2013 at 05:35 pm    last updated on: 08.09.2013 at 05:35 pm

RE: Please ID this bamboo (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: eric_9b on 08.02.2013 at 05:14 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

That is a palm, Dypsis cabadae.

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clipped on: 08.02.2013 at 06:04 pm    last updated on: 08.05.2013 at 08:43 pm

Please ID this bamboo

posted by: stewbrew on 08.02.2013 at 11:30 am in Florida Gardening Forum

Appreciate your help to ID this bamboo. Thanks.

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clipped on: 08.02.2013 at 11:31 am    last updated on: 08.02.2013 at 11:31 am

ID shrub help

posted by: stewbrew on 08.01.2013 at 10:43 am in Florida Gardening Forum

What is this shrub? Appreciate any help. Thanks.

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clipped on: 08.01.2013 at 10:44 am    last updated on: 08.01.2013 at 10:44 am

RE: Cover drain holes with cloth or newspaper? (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: tapla on 03.24.2013 at 02:52 pm in Container Gardening Forum

Good Idea, Al.

I use old Fiberglas window screen or the plastic canvas used for needlepoint projects that you can find at hobby stores. Some use inexpensive Fiberglas drywall mesh available at home improvement stores & hardwares.

Al

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clipped on: 07.28.2013 at 01:20 pm    last updated on: 07.28.2013 at 01:20 pm

RE: What is really in that rain water? (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: cribscreek on 08.19.2005 at 01:46 pm in Carolina Gardening Forum

Here is a pasted in portion of that article referred to above. Very Interesting.

Helps Plants
It is this hydrogen peroxide in rainwater that makes it so much more effective than tap water when given to plants. With the increased levels of atmospheric pollution, however, greater amounts of H202 react with air-borne toxins and never reach the ground. To compensate for this, many farmers have been increasing crop yields by spraying them with diluted hydrogen peroxide (5 to 16 ounces of 35% mixed with 20 gallons of water per acre). You can achieve the same beneficial effect with your house plants by adding 1 ounce of 3% hydrogen peroxide (or 16 drops of 35% solution) to every quart of water you give your plants. (It can also be made into an excellent safe insecticide. Simply spray your plants with 8 ounces of 3% peroxide mixed with 8 ounces of white sugar and one gallon of water.)

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clipped on: 07.28.2013 at 01:05 pm    last updated on: 07.28.2013 at 01:05 pm

RE: Can I prune or trim oleander (Follow-Up #14)

posted by: buttoni on 04.12.2010 at 01:38 pm in Texas Gardening Forum

My yard when I lived in Texas City was surrounded by 52 oleanders. They would usually freeze back to the ground if we got a freeze, but I liked to prune them down to the ground every year even if we didn't get a freeze, just so they would be fuller and bloom more. My neighbor in Galveston for 15 years was the president of the Oleander Society and said pruning hard like that is the very best thing you can do for oleanders. If you don't, they tend to get leggy, thin and bloom less and less over the years.

Mine were healthy beyond words for all the pruning I gave them annually.

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clipped on: 07.22.2013 at 08:50 pm    last updated on: 07.22.2013 at 08:50 pm

RE: Can I prune or trim oleander (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: jardineratx on 04.07.2009 at 09:59 pm in Texas Gardening Forum

I have a row of oleanders that I grew from cuttings....as a matter of fact, I have never purchased an oleander in my life. I usually take about a 6" inch cutting, remove the lower leaves and root in water or soil.
Molly

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clipped on: 07.22.2013 at 08:45 pm    last updated on: 07.22.2013 at 08:45 pm

Easy Propagation Chamber

posted by: little_dani on 10.05.2005 at 08:34 pm in Plant Propagation Forum

I make a little propagation chamber that is so easy, and so reliable for me that I thought I would share the idea. I have not seen one like it here, and I did look through the FAQ, but didn't find one there either. I hope I did not miss it, and I hope I do not offend anyone by being presumptive in posting this here.

That said....

This is what you will need.
A plastic shoebox, with a lid. They come in various sizes, any will do.


Soil less potting mix, half peat, half perlite, or whatever is your favorite medium.
A little clay pot, with the drain hole plugged with caulking or silicone. If this is a new pot, scrub it with some steel wool to be sure it doesn't have a sealer on it. You want the water to seep through it.
Rooting hormone powder or liquid, or salix solution from the willow tree.
Plant material, snippers. I am going to pot some Plectranthus (a tall swedish ivy) and a Joseph's Coat, 'Red Thread'. I already have some succulents rooted in this box. I will take them out and pot them up later, DH has a new cacti pot he wants to put them in.
You can see here, I hope, that I fill the clay pot to the top with rain water, well water, or distilled water. I just don't use our tap water, too much chlorine and a ph that is out of sight.

I pour a little of the hormone powder out on a paper plate or a piece of paper, so that I don't contaminate the whole package of powder. And these little 'snippers' are the best for taking this kind of cuttings.


This is about right on the amount of hormone to use. I try to get 2 nodes per cutting, if I can. Knock off the excess. It is better to have a little too little than to have too much.
Then, with your finger, or a pencil, or stick, SOMETHING, poke a hole in the potting mix and insert your cutting. Pull the potting mix up around the cutting good and snug.

When your box is full, and I always like to pretty much fill the box, just put the lid on it, and set it in the shade. You don't ever put this box in the sun. You wind up with boiled cuttings. YUK!

Check the cuttings every few days, and refill the reservoire as needed. Don't let it dry out. If you happen to get too wet, just prop the lid open with a pencil for a little while.
This is a very good method of propagation, but I don't do roses in these. The thorns just make it hard for me, with my big fingers, to pack the box full. All kinds of other things can be done in these. Just try it!

Janie

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clipped on: 07.22.2013 at 08:42 pm    last updated on: 07.22.2013 at 08:42 pm

RE: Easy Propagation Chamber (Follow-Up #75)

posted by: little_dani on 05.13.2007 at 10:48 am in Plant Propagation Forum

Heheehe, I hadn't thought of using them. I just use clear plastic shoeboxes with lids.

Just about anything can be put under the bed. Light is not generally a requirement for cuttings making roots. I take them out and check them fairly often, and when they start offering resistance, I take them out from under the bed.

Light is required for growth of plants and for blooms and producing fruit. Not for making roots. I could be wrong on this, but this has been my experience.

Janie

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clipped on: 07.22.2013 at 11:50 am    last updated on: 07.22.2013 at 11:50 am

RE: Plant ID, please (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: gardenbysarasota on 07.12.2013 at 11:34 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

It looks like a Yucca Elephantipes. I bought one for just
$4.00 at my local walmart 7 years ago, put it into the
ground it has spread out to several branches. I left the
main one alone, and it's now about 15 feet tall. It also
once in awhile will get a cluster of white flowers on it. It's
a great plant, grows well and takes very little care except
taking off some dead lower leaves every once in awhile.

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clipped on: 07.13.2013 at 08:43 am    last updated on: 07.19.2013 at 08:44 pm

Plant ID, please

posted by: stewbrew on 07.12.2013 at 09:06 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

This is one tough plant that will not go away even cutting the parent off at ground level. Two or three new suckers spring up every year.

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clipped on: 07.19.2013 at 08:43 pm    last updated on: 07.19.2013 at 08:43 pm

RE: Air-layer firecracker bush and wild coffee? (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: stewbrew on 06.21.2013 at 11:25 am in Florida Gardening Forum

Here is the plant picture. I think it is Firebush (Hamelia Patents).

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clipped on: 07.19.2013 at 11:49 am    last updated on: 07.19.2013 at 11:49 am