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The color of a melted Hershey kiss

posted by: scwren on 01.09.2008 at 10:48 pm in Home Decorating Forum

This forum has been so, so helpful to me in my house-building process. Here's yet another plea for help!

I found the yummiest shade of brown.
BM Davenport tan.

I'm considering painting my whole great room/entry/dining room this color but am concerned b/c it really is a dark color. What do you think?(Excuse the construction mess)

Here's a pic of the color. It's the big swatch of brown(not the lighter tans)
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Here's the room. This is the front of the room, the entrance.
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This is the back of the room, what you see when you walk in the front door.

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The things I have to coordinate with are: the floor color, which will be natural white oak.
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THe trim will be all painted white. The fireplace will have a dry stack stone fireplace w/ an oak mantle and white bookcases on either side. The ceilings are painted white.
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Do you think I can pull off a dark color in this space? DO you have any other color suggestions for me? Pizzaz? I'm not scared of color...at least I don't think so. I started out looking at SW Ivorie, but it was too bland. Plus too yellow to go well with the floor. I've tried SW Dormer brown and SW Mexican sand, but they just look like a yucky tan. Any other suggestions? I'm starting from scratch on this room. I don't have furniture for it yet. It gets lots of natural filtered light, it's a southernish exposure. It's not going to be a formal room, but a comfortable family-filled room...

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clipped on: 06.09.2010 at 02:44 pm    last updated on: 06.09.2010 at 02:46 pm

Finished Kitchen creamy white, lacanche, calacatta

posted by: tearose21 on 07.13.2009 at 07:37 pm in Kitchens Forum

Posted earlier but pictures were too small. Hope this works.
Trisha

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clipped on: 08.23.2009 at 12:50 pm    last updated on: 08.23.2009 at 12:51 pm

Prettykitty's Classic Vintage White Victorian Lacanche Kitchen

posted by: prettykitty1971 on 10.06.2008 at 09:22 pm in Kitchens Forum

This is double posted from the Kitchen discussions page

I have been asked by several to post my kitchen redo so, here goes...forgive the repeats...forgive the length...

We began designing a rework of our home in 2004. We actually got started in September 2006 and moved back in April 2007 under duress - it was not completely finished, but we could not stand living on top of each other anymore. It was finished by August of 2007 with me having to throw tantrums every few days at my contractor to get workers here to finish the kitchen. At one point I threatened to wear a sandwich board up and down our street, reading "you would have to been crazy to use (my contractor)"

Okay, back to 2004: The back of the house (where the kitchen is located) was okay and livable, but it did not flow or have any stylistic continuity to the front of the house, which is so amazing in itself. I felt like I was in a different house when in the kitchen. The main part of the house was built in 1890 and still has a Victorian feel, the kitchen and breakfast room and porches were built about 1920 in the Craftsman era and kept being added onto and changed � to the point that an "extra" half bath had been added jutting out into a hallway and disrupting important flow. There were a few things that had been done that would make me stare and say "why???" The kitchen also felt very far away from the living areas of the house.

I have slipped in "before" shots where appropriate on the web album. Here is the link to my photo album http://picasaweb.google.com/quapaw/Our1890HomeAndKitchenRemodelRestoration#

or click on any photos below and it will take you to my album containing photos of our entire house.

before:

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

after: same view
From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

The house was near museum quality in the front rooms, but it was like entering the twilight zone in the kitchen and breakfast room, breakfast room (yes, 2 of them) and bathroom(s). Our house had 2 nightmarish half baths downstairs, one of which had been built in the middle of a major passage way and was so small a space that the previous owner who had built it bumped out the opposite wall just a funky bit to accommodate the space. I would not even allow people to use that bath as it was not vented properly (think smelly) and would not flush well (think plunger). Mainly, we wanted to restore the architectural integrity to the back of the house, which included removing a diagonal path and countertop that was the main path to the kitchen, raising doorways up to 10 feet to match the doorways in the original house � kitchen doorways etc, were all 7 & 8 feet, one directly behind a 10 foot opening, so it was readily apparent something was amiss. Another goal was getting a back door and opening up our back porch which had been totally enclosed and door removed � the room that went nowhere with a window looking into the current kitchen. I also was determined to have French doors from the kitchen that went out to a deck which was the same elevation as the kitchen floor, to the North, shady side of our property.

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

We hired an architect that we had worked with previously with great success - we saw eye to eye on everything. After several attempts, he fired ME - not the other way around. He would not draw what I wanted, kept giving me drawings of what he thought we should do, that we should work with what had been done to the house - "don't open the old back porch, build on a new one; put the bathroom in the old porch," etc. That was $3000 down the tubes, we were already starting out in the negative! A dear architect friend of mine said she would work on the design. She drew what I wanted. I would ask for suggestions, but she assured me that my ideas made sense and would be really improving our home. The drawings were not cheap, but it was well worth it and we are even better friends, although, I was afraid I would be fired at any moment!

Our cabinet maker said he was going to get me a nice "johnny-back" cabinet for over the toilet, I said no, you're going to make this...

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

A word about the bathroom: I loved this apron sink but knew I could not use it in the kitchen with the island we wanted, so I came up with this cabinet. The floor is American Restoration Tile and includes encaustic tiles. I almost went with white subway tile, but I felt it would be too utilitarian for the space, so these are travertine stone cut into bricks. They are the kind with holes and I paid a large fortune for the tiler not to fill the holes with grout! Many like the bathroom more than the kitchen. We had a family member who was very much a sportsman and inherited all his fishing and hunting items and gear and have chosen to use it in decorating to add a bit a masculinity to the house and we loved him very much so we enjoy having it around us.

I have to say that I am proud of myself for coming up with this design, the architect drew it, but it was all me and my husband thinking it out and after living a year in the house, we knew what we needed and how we need it to look. I am picky if you haven't figured it out.

The basis for the design was figuring out where the openings had to be in the rooms. I wanted the French doors on the north wall, we had to have the passage to the dining room, and we needed a double opening to the breakfast room. So with all that, that dictated where we could and couldn't have cabinets, a stove, a sink, etc. We were also returning the flow to the back of the house, so that made it easier to figure out where the back hall need to go and what was left over would become the new full bath. I will admit that in the days leading up to the wreaking crew coming, I was still trying to figure out if we could get a better layout out of the space.

after receiving yet another delivery from ebay, my husband asked how many historic fixtures I had purchased, my quiet response "I don't know..."

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

How I came to have a Lacanche range (www.frenchranges.com): One day I was researching Thermador rangers and ended up on the Gardenweb forums. Someone had written that if you are considering a Thermador then you should take a look at one of these and provided a link to a photo of what turned out to be a Lacanche range. I showed the photo to our neighbor, who we had been taking care of everyday for the past 2 years, just to show him. He was always taking cooking classes, taking photos of his food, practicing garnishes, buying every kitchen gadget on the market, etc. He had a digital Wolf range that he was in love with so I knew he would appreciate seeing this beautiful stove - I didn't know such a thing even existed. Paul saw the French Range - the Lacanche - and said "You NEED that in your kitchen!" I said "No, I don't need anything of the sort" (our previous range was 30 years old, so anything would have been better, a camping stove would have been an improvement!) and he said "You NEED that stove!" He insisted on buying me that stove as his gift to the kitchen, it was also his idea that our cabinets go all the way up the 12 foot walls - "you might as well go all the way with this." My husband likes to say he had to pay for the kitchen to go with the Lacanche!

Given how my main hobby has to do with historic preservation, I knew I wanted a classic kitchen. I wanted marble countertops and inset cabinet doors and those French doors! I spent hundreds of dollars buying kitchen magazines and found several key ideas from that process. The glass front cabinets and the stainless steel countertop on either side of the French Lacanche range came from one layout I found, the open shelves from another and the pink pantry from yet another photo from a magazine (theirs was bright yellow!). Our butler's pantry was actually in our historic house plans from 1920, so we just recreated it. About our butler's pantry: the bottom 2 cabinets on the left are false fronts - they don't open - they are where the air return in located. The vents are on the opposite side in the back stair hall, so this just camouflages the box of the air return.

air return in the bottom cabinets

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

The glass cabinets, I thought about that problem of food storage and how unattractive that is and how to make glass front cabinets work for me. I just felt glass would be more appropriate for the look I wanted - it just looks elegant to me and says "original" although I'm sure that most true Victorian cabinets had wood fronts. I planned what would go in the cabinets before we got too far in design. I have about 3 complete sets of china in addition to two sets of everyday dishes and needed a place to put/display them, so then I needed a place for food. It's hard to visualize how much space you need for food when your food is all packed up for construction! I happened to have a little nook (it was our downstairs half bath, you could get your knees knocked off if someone tried to enter the bathroom while you were on the toilet!) that we originally designed as a desk area, that I made into "the pink pantry" which actually goes around a corner and is behind the refrigerator, where all the mess of the pantry is along with microwave and toaster oven. The part of the pantry that is visible (if you're at the main sink or range)stays neat and tidy given the way that it is designed - narrow shelves for spices, baking ingredients and display. I saw it in a magazine with its Victorian-ish trim and gave it to my carpenter and he just went to work. The counter in the pantry is just wood - out of money for any other surface and since there is not a sink in there it is not a problem. It is painted pink as that is the color that my 4 year old picked out - it was a compromise as she wanted the entire kitchen to be pink! She also wanted Dora the Explorer knobs - yes, there is such a thing - but I put my foot down on that!

the pink pantry

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

Where the "extra bathroom" had been removed at the back stairs and other demolition had taken place near the new/old back door, we found exterior sub walls under the plaster and sheetrock. In old houses this material is something like 1 x 6 set on the diagonal. I had been thinking about paint colors and what I was going to do with all this extra wall and I decided how wonderful it would be if it were returned to its exterior foundations - wood siding. I love texture and my contractor thought I was nuts, but he did do the siding for me and milled corner pieces for near the back door. We painted the siding the cream trim color like the rest of our interior house. This really added a wonderful historic and unique quality to the project. The house really looks like it's evolved and been added on to in a rather careful way.

Exterior siding and trim on the inside

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

For our back hallway we mimicked the wainscoting that is in our foyer and dining room, but on a cheaper level - we used bead board and MDF. The bead board wainscoting is the cheaper stuff: it does not have as deep cuts/lines/beads as the good stuff and the flat vertical and cross pieces are not wood, they are that MDF that they are always making stuff out of on HGTV. The top piece is wood trim.

bead board wainscoting

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

When I was picking out materials for our kitchen I finally reached a moment where I was afraid that the kitchen would be nicer than the rest of the house - which I did not want at all - so I began to try to pick out elements from the original house that could be reproduced in the kitchen, if only in variation, like the wainscoting and the slider doors instead of pocket doors.

We have 4 countertop surfaces(it works because you can only see 2 at anyone time), one of which is unpolished black granite, which looks a lot like soapstone, then marble, polished granite and stainless steel. I really wanted a veined marble for the island and despite everyone, even the marble contractor telling me I did not want that as my island, I got it.

I chose polished marble on the back splash so the gray veining would pick up the gray of the stainless steel, but I also considered bead board (we used it on our butler's pantry, I really love the look and it can be an economical choice if you get the "fake" stuff) and painted pressed tin. We have the marble island and love it and all of it's etchings that my 3 kids inflict upon it. They are not really noticeable unless you look for them.

We have slider doors on reproduction barn door hardware (www.barndoorhardware.com) that divide our kitchen and breakfast room. Our house has pocket doors, but we could not afford to build 2 walls, so this was another research project and something we are really happy with and that everyone marvels over. I really think it turned out better than pocket doors would have and it is unexpected, which I like.

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

Our cabinets are creamy white with feet for an unfitted look. I did choose to get appliances that will take a custom panel, to be hidden into the cabinetry - careful if you get inset cabinet doors (where the door closes flush into the cabinet box) appliances that take a panel are designed to take full overlay doors - we just barely avoided a crisis situation that would have required me to be tried for murder. The main cabinets go all the way up the 12 foot walls, it is quite impressive looking, but fits the style of our home. Our bathroom cabinet is painted a red to give the impression of old wood - I could not afford to have "good wood" so came up with a color that happened to work really well for us. I bought most of my reproduction hardware from Van Dyke's restorers, Historic House Parts, and Rejuvenation, all online. Also Lee Valley Hardware Catalogue has some great hardward, my drop pull came from them. I have different types of drawer and door pulls, just one or two in key areas, to help the kitchen look as if it evolved (Two are fish pulls, I love them!). Our kitchen finally feels like it goes with the rest of our home.

drop pull

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

fish handle - everyone loves this one handle in the middle of all our Victorian cup pulls and amethyst knobs!

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

some other creative things that worked out really well for us: you will notice in the web pictures that originally there were 2 windows on the wall where the stove goes. The outside of our house is a rough stucco (it was "smothered" in stucco about 1920, the Victorian gingerbread and elements are under the stucco - visible in our attic!) and I doubted that my contractor could match the stucco to my specifications - we had already had previously unsuccessful attempts on other stucco repairs. On the outside of our house, the windows appear to be there - I had wood shutters installed in the openings, the windows simply look shuttered. It-s a nice touch to our exterior and I did not have to worry about the stucco being less than perfect.

On our new deck/Mayan temple, we had the steps wrapped around it - I did not want unsightly deck railings - my kids did for the pirate ship they have always dreamed of! On two sides there are plain built in benches - no backs - that provide a barrier on the sides that are butted up to the house.

From Our 1890 home and kitchen remodel/restoration

We had a TON of ups and downs with our project. We were supposed to be in construction for 4 months, but it really took a year and we were out of our home 9 months (we moved in with Paul our next door neighbor - all 5 of us!) Toward the end, May 2007, I actually said to our contractor over the phone, in my most stern and reprimanding voice "it's hard to appreciate how beautiful you have made my kitchen when you keep screwing up even the new stuff that you put in!" His response, "I know." He did not want to put the siding on the wall, but later came back and asked me if "he" hadn't had a good idea(he was kidding, telling me I had done good). Ask me sometime about what happens when the concealed appliances don't fit far enough back into their holes!

Lacanche Range, Sully Model - High performance, dual-fuel, double-oven stoves from France, one oven is electric, the other gas, top is gas and has the French cast-iron simmer plate over one of the two 18,000 BTU burners.
16 colors and finishes available www.lacancheusa.com
Bosch Dishwasher
Kitchenaid refrigerator drawers
Range vent-a-hood: Rangecraft
Ice maker - Marvel Industries
Compactor - Kitchenaid
Shaws Original Fireclay Apron Front Farm Sink by Rohl
Blanco stainless steel bar sink
Perrin and Rowe nickel plated sink faucets and sprayers Stainless Steel Countertops and range shelf by Bray Sheet
Antique fixtures bought on ebay, polished and wired by local craftman

Here is a link that might be useful: Prettykitty's Kitchen and House photos

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clipped on: 08.23.2009 at 12:49 pm    last updated on: 08.23.2009 at 12:49 pm

November's finished kitchen for FKB

posted by: november on 03.05.2008 at 01:18 pm in Kitchens Forum

Here are the details:

Cabinets: Plain & Fancy, Dove White, Shaker inset doors, slab drawers
Pulls: ORB from Home Expo
Countertop: Honed Absolute Black granite
Island top: Maple butcher block from Grothouse Lumber, 52"x96" with oiled finish
Ovens: Kitchenaid Architect II Series 30" double wall oven
Cooktop: Kitchenaid 36" Architect II
Dishwasher: Kitchenaid Architect II
Refrigerator: Kitchenaid Architect II
Vent Hood: GE Profile
Main Sink: Elkay 30" undermount
Prep Sink in island: Elkay
Main Faucet: Kohler Fairfax
Prep Faucet: Kohler Fairfax
Paint Color: Benjamin Moore Moonshadow

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butler pantry

view from mudroom doorway

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refrigerator

View from breakfast nook

breakfast nook

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clipped on: 08.23.2009 at 12:46 pm    last updated on: 08.23.2009 at 12:47 pm

Anyone?? Pics of dark cabinets with SS or Black honed counters???

posted by: repaintingagain on 06.01.2009 at 07:33 pm in Kitchens Forum

I can't seem to find any good pictures of dark cabinets with soapstone or dark honed granite. I'm trying to visualize an idea I have for my kitchen. I've checked out several kitchen gallery places and no luck...

I have darker cherry (actually maple stained to resemble an older darker cherry cabinet) and am thinking about black counters around the perimeter.

Thanks for any pics you have!!

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clipped on: 06.22.2009 at 10:04 pm    last updated on: 06.22.2009 at 10:04 pm

Natural stone primer/ granite 101 by stonegirl

posted by: mary_in_nc on 11.04.2007 at 09:22 pm in Kitchens Forum

Found this through google search- apparently this was a previous thread in KF by Stonegirl. Felt it worth repeating.
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Hi folks -

This is a little article I wrote on another forum and in reply to a few questions regarding the selection of natural stone and stone fabricators.

In an industry that has no set standards, there are a lot of unscrupulous people trying to palm themselves off as fabricators. There are also a number of people with odd agendas trying to spread ill rumors about natural stone and propagate some very confusing and contradictory information. This is my small attempt at shedding a little light on the subject

On the selection of the actual stone slabs - When you go to the slab yard to choose slabs for your kitchen, there are a few things you need to take note of:

Surface finish: The finish - be it polished, honed, flamed antiqued or brushed should be even. There should be no spots that have obvious machine marks, scratches or other man made marks. You can judge by the crystal and vein pattern of the stone if the marks you see are man made or naturally occurring. It is true that not all minerals will finish evenly and if you look at an angle on a polished slab with a larger crystal pattern, you can clearly see this. Tropic Brown would be a good example here. The black spots will not polish near as shiny as the brown ones and this will be very obvious on an unresined slab, looking at an acute angle against the light. The black specks will show as duller marks. The slab will feel smooth and appear shiny if seen from above, though. This effect will not be as pronounced on a resined slab. Bottom line when judging the quality of a surface finish: Look for unnatural appearing marks. If there are any on the face of the slab, it is not desirable. They might well be on the extreme edges, but this is normal and a result of the slab manufacturing process.

Mesh backing: Some slabs have a mesh backing. This got done at the plant where the slabs were finished and is to add support to brittle materials or materials with excessive veining or fissures. A number of exotic stones will have this. This does not necessarily make the material one of inferior quality, though. Quite often these slabs will require special care in fabrication and transport, so be prepared for the fabricator to charge accordingly. If you are unsure about the slabs, ask your fabricator what his opinion of the material is.

On cracks and fissures: Yes - some slabs might have them. One could have quite the discussion on whether that line on the slab could be one or the other, so I'll try to explain it a little Fissures are naturally occurring features in stone. They will appear as little lines in the surface of the slabs (very visible in a material like Verde Peacock) and could even be of a different color than the majority of the stone (think of those crazed white lines sometimes appearing in Antique Brown). Sometimes they could be fused like in Antique Brown and other times they could be open, as is the case in the Verde Peacock example. They could often also go right through the body of the slab like in Crema Marfil, for instance. If you look at the light reflection across a fissure, you will never see a break - i.e. there will be no change in the plane on either side of a fissure. A crack on the other hand is a problem... If you look at the slab at an oblique angle in the light, you will note the reflection of the shine on the surface of the stone. A crack will appear as a definite line through the reflection and the reflection will have a different appearance on either side of the line - there will be a break in the plane. Reject slabs like this. One could still work around fissures. Cracks are a whole nother can of worms.

On resined slabs: The resin gets applied prior to the slabs being polished. Most of the resin then gets ground off in the polishing process. You should not be able to see just by looking at the surface of a slab whether it was resined or not. If you look at the rough sides of the slab, though, you will see some drippy shiny marks, almost like varnish drips. This should be the only indication that the slab is resined. There should never be a film or layer on the face of the stone. With extremely porous stones, the resining will alleviate, but not totally eliminate absorption issues and sealer could still be required. Lady's dream is an example. This material is always resined, but still absorbs liquids and requires sealer. Test the material you have selected for absorption issues regardless - it is always best to know what your stone is capable of and to be prepared for any issues that might arise. Some stones indeed does not require sealer - be they resined or not. Baltic Brown would be an example here. It will not absorb one iota of anything, but gets resined to eliminate a flaking issue.

Now for some pointers on recognizing good craftsmanship and quality fabricators:

Most stone installations will have seams. They are unavoidable in medium or large sized kitchens. One hallmark of a good fabricator is that they will keep the seams to a minimum. It seems that a good book could be written about seams, their quality and their placement and still you will have some information that will be omitted! For something as seemingly simple as joining two pieces of stone, seams have evolved into their own universe of complexity far beyond what anybody should have fair cause to expect!

A generic good quality seam should have the following characteristics:

- It should be flat. According to the MIA a minimal amount of lippage is acceptable (1/32"), but conscientious fabricators all strive for a perfectly flat and smooth joint.

- It should be narrow - as in smaller than 1/16". (I think the MIA stipulates no larger than 1/8", but that is pushing it - and only if the fabricator bevels the edges of the seam, almost similar to the edge of a stone tile. This is, thank goodness, not a standard practice any more!)

- The color on either side of the seam should match as close as possible. On regularly patterned stones like Ubatuba for example - there should be no variation. On stones with variation in colors or veins, the match should be made as close as was humanly possible.

- Vein direction should flow. The MIA suggests a single direction of vein flow, but it is acceptable IF DISCUSSED WITH THE CLIENT to change vein direction on a seam if no other option is available. This would happen in book matched slabs - you will have a "butterfly" seam in this case. In other cases the fabricator could put a miter seam in a corner and change vein direction 90 degrees. This is usually done with extremely linear veining like Bamboo Green, for example, but this is something that should be discussed with the fabricator and agreed upon by the client.

- The seam on the finished edge of the stone should NOT dip in and create a divot in the edge. When you run your fingers over the edge you should not be able to feel the location of the seam at all.

- The thickness of the slabs on either side of the seam should be equal (or feathered out so that there is no discernible difference)

- The glue in the seam should be of a color that matches the stone as close as possible. Glue joints that are too light or too dark will show up something terrible. The idea behind tinting the glue is to try an make the seam "disappear" or something relatively close to it

Seam placement: Yet another kettle of fish (or can of worms, depending on how you look at it, I guess!) Seam placement is ultimately at the discretion of the fabricator. I know it is not a really popular point of view, but that is just the way it is. There really is more to deciding where the seam would go than just the size of the slab or where the seam would look best in the kitchen.

Among the things the fabricator needs to look at when deciding on the seam placement are:

- The slab: size, color, veining, structure (fissures, strength of the material an other characteristics of the stone)

- Transport to the job site: Will the fabricated pieces fit on whatever vehicle and A-frames he has available

- Access to the job site: Is the house on stilts? (common in coastal areas) How will the installers get the pieces to where they need to go? Will the tops fit in the service elevator if the apartment is on the 10th floor? Do the installers need to turn tight corners to get to the kitchen? There could be 101 factors that will impact seam placement here alone.

- Placement and size of undermount (or other) cut-outs. Some fabricators like to put seams in undermount sinks, some don't. We, for instance will do it if absolutely necessary, and have done so with great success, but will not do so as general practice. We do like to put seams in the middle of drop-in appliances and cut-outs and this is a great choice for appearances and ease of installation.

- Location of the cabinets: Do the pieces need to go in between tall cabinets with finished sides? Do the pieces need to slide in under appliance garages or other cabinetry? How far do the upper cabinets hang over? Is there enough clearance between the vent hood and other cabinets? Again the possibilities are endless and would depend on each individual kitchen lay-out and - ultimately -

- Installability of the fabricated pieces: Will that odd angle hold up to being moved and turned around to get on the peninsula if there is no seam in it? Will the extra large sink cut-out stay intact if we hold the piece flat and at a 45 degree angle to slide it in between those two tall towers? Again a 1001 combinations of cabinetry and material choices will come into play on this question.

You can ask your fabricator to put a seam at a certain location and most likely he will oblige, but if he disagrees with you, it is not (always) out of spite or laziness. Check on your fabricator's seams by going to actual kitchens he has installed. Do not trust what you see in a showroom as sole testament to your fabricator's ability to do seams.

With modern glues and seaming methods a seam could successfully be put anywhere in an installation without compromising the strength or integrity of the stone. If a seam was done well, there would be - in theory - no "wrong" location for it. A reputable fabricator will also try to keep the number of seams in any installation to a minimum. It is not acceptable, for instance to have a seam in each corner, or at each point where the counter changes direction, like on an angled peninsula.

Long or unusually large pieces are often done if they can fit in the constraints of a slab. Slabs as a rule of thumb will average at about 110"x65". There are bigger slabs, and quite often smaller ones too. Check with the fabricator or the slab yard. They will be more than happy to tell you the different sizes of slabs they have available. Note, though, that the larger the slabs, the smaller the selection of possible colors. Slab sizes would depend in part on the capabilities of the quarry, integrity of the material or the capabilities of the machinery at the finishing plant. We have had slabs as wide as 75" and as long as 130" before, but those are monsters and not always readily available.

Rodding is another issue where a tremendous amount of mis-information and scary stories exist: The main purpose for rodding stone would be to add integrity to the material around cut-outs. This is primarily for transport and installation and serves no real purpose once the stone is secured and fully supported on the cabinets. It would also depend on the material. A fabricator would be more likely to rod Ubatuba than he would Black Galaxy, for instance. The flaky and delicate materials prone to fissures would be prime candidates for rodding. Rodding is basically when a fabricator cuts slots in the back of the stone and embeds steel or fiberglass rods with epoxy in the slots in the stone. You will not see this from the top or front of the installation. This is an "insurance policy" created by the fabricator to make sure that the stone tops make it to your cabinets all in one piece.

Edges: The more rounded an edge is, the more stable it would be. Sharp, flat edges are prone to chipping under the right (or rather wrong) circumstances. Demi or full bullnose edges would almost entirely eliminate this issue. A properly milled and polished edge will be stable and durable regardless of the profile, though. My guess at why ogee and stacked edges are not more prevalent, would be purely because of cost considerations. Edge pricing is determined by the amount of work needed to create it. The more intricate edge profiles also require an exponentially larger skill set and more time to perfect. The ogee edge is a very elegant edge and can be used to great effect, but could easily look overdone if it is used everywhere. We often advise our clients to combine edges for greater impact - i.e. eased edge on all work surfaces, and ogee on the island to emphasize the cabinetry or unusual shape.

Like I said earlier - edge profiles are largely dependent on what you like and can afford. There is no real pro or con for regular or laminated edges. They all have their place in the design world Check with your fabricator what their capabilities and pricing are. Look at actual kitchens and ask for references.

A good edge should have the following characteristics:

- Shine: The edge polish should match the top polish in depth and clarity. The edge should not be milky, dull or waxy.

- The edge should not have "waves". Eyeball along the edge. A good edge should have a mirror like reflection and be fairly flat. Waves that you can see or feel are not a good thing.

- The aris (very top of the edge) should be crisp and straight, even on a bullnose edge. Once again you can see this by eyeballing along the very top end of the edge profile. A wavy, dippy aris is poor craftsmanship.

- A good edge will have a consistent profile. It will not be larger in some spots or smaller in others.

- A good edge should also have NO tooling lines. These will be fine lighter/white lines running along the edge. This is a mark of a poor edge polish, of a CNC machine that is not set correctly and a lack of hand finishing. This is common when a company has only mechanised fabrication (i.e. CNC macines or line polishers) and no skilled hand fabricators to finish the work properly.

We have seen some terrible edges in jobs done by our competitors.

Do your research and look at actual kitchens. Talk to clients and ask them about the fabricator. Most good fabricators will not hesitate to supply the names and numbers of clients willing to provide referrals. Do your homework.

Regards,
Adriana

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clipped on: 06.14.2009 at 02:55 pm    last updated on: 06.14.2009 at 02:55 pm

Okay, so I think I'm done...Thank you ! (PICS)

posted by: margieb2 on 07.29.2008 at 10:38 pm in Kitchens Forum

So I think we're pretty much done except for the bar stools and a couple of other small items. The process went much more quickly than we anticipated. Demo began First week in March and the kitchen was complete by the end of May. The contractor was a dream and there were no major problems or surprises (other than the electrical safety hazards that were uncovered during demolition!)

I owe the resourceful, knowlegeable, creative, and talented members of this forum my heartfelt thanks for sharing your wealth of knowledge and inspirational kitchens.

In particular, thank you to Zolablue, rococogurl, sharb, jamesk, allison0704, bella_4, charlie 123, momto4kids deanna1949, and artteacher, AMONG MANY OTHERS...for sage advice and kitchens that helped shape my kitchen vision. We had a number of setbacks, one big one due to DH's job loss. But I have to say, everything's worked out for the best.

We kept the original footprint of the room but swapped a peninsula for the island. We were a bit apprehensive aobut this as the trend is to do the revers but this setup works really well for us, creates better zones and a better flow.

SO here's a before:Before: From great room

And After:
After

Before

After

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Pantry cabinet

Spice storage

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Knife drawer

Super susan

Julien Classic 30 x 18x 10

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clipped on: 06.14.2009 at 02:53 pm    last updated on: 06.14.2009 at 02:54 pm

Lissa711's finished kitchen_Cream Cabinets, Dark Cherry Island

posted by: lissa711 on 09.26.2008 at 07:07 am in Kitchens Forum

kitchen from butler's pantry entrance
view to breakfast room from kitchen

href="http://s246.photobucket.com/albums/gg92/mhamesny/finished%20kitchen%200908/?action=viewt=DSC_0008.jpg" target="_blank">view to kitchen from breakfast room

bookshelf side of island
butler's pantry
mudroom (purple cabinets)
mudroom cubbies either side of garage door

Kitchen Information:
Cabinets Crystal Cabinets
Perimeter - Frosty White with Van Dyke Brown Glaze
Island & Butler's Pantry - Cherry with Black Highlights
Country Classic Door Style

Appliances:
Fridge: Subzero 642 - 42" side by side with cabinetry panels
Dishwasher: Miele G2180SCVI with panel
Rangetop: Wolf SRT366 36" Sealed Rangetop
Ovens: Thermador POD302 Double Electric Ovens (Top is convection)
Hood Liner: Vent a Hood 600 CFM Liner BH234SLDSS
Microwave: Sharp Microwave Drawer 24" KB6024MS
Sink: Ticor (learned about on this forum) SS508 30 5/8 x 18 1/8
Faucet: Steamvalveoriginal.com

Hardware: Top Knobs Satin Nickel. Pulls M808-96, Knobs M326, Fridge Handles M808-12

Lighting:
Hudson Valley Pelham Pendants in Aged Brass from Croft and Little.com
Ceiling High Hats are LR6 LED lights from Lightingonthenet.com. We're very happy with the lighting from these. Indistinguishable from incandescent and still dimmable.

Countertops: honed Absolute Black granite on perimeter and honed Imperial Danby on island. Perimeter is eased edge and island is ogee.

Floor - wood to match rest of house. Varied plank with pegs. Stain is a mix of Minwax Provincial with Jacobean.

Backsplash - Sonoma Tile Makers. Field tile is Otter color shiny with crackle glaze.

Paint - Benjamin Moore HC81 Manchester Tan. Trim is Linen White

Butler's Pantry: Same cabinetry as kitchen. Counters also honed Imperial Danby. Sink is Ticor bar sink, smallest they had, don't remember number.

Faucet is Blanco 157-106-ST Terra Single Lever Bar Faucet in Satin Nickel from Faucet Depot

Filtered Instant Hot/Cold is InSinkErator F-HC2215SN Country Series Satin Nickel from Faucet Depot

Wine Fridge is Marvel - bought as a sample from appliance store

Undercounter Beverege(sp) Fridge from ULine with Crystal IceMaker, CLRC02175B00 - with cabinetry panel. Don't like this at all. The back keeps freezing up and then melting (have had service call) and the ice maker is incredibly noisy.

Lighting: Chandelier is Corbett Venetian 1 Light Ceiling Pendant 78-41 from Capitol Lighting. I love the Capitol Lighting website (1800lighting.com) I ordered quite a few lights from them throughout the house and was very happy with their pricing and customer service.

Mudroom: Cabinets custom built and painted in semi-gloss BM Shadow (eggplant color). Washer and Dryer are Maytag Epic. Very happy with these. Floor is Charcoal Gray Slate from boxes of slate I picked up at Expo. Also very happy with this. The cubbies were custom built by my contractor.

Still have to get switch/outlet covers and window treatments and wall art. Otherwise so happy to be done!

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clipped on: 06.14.2009 at 02:44 pm    last updated on: 06.14.2009 at 02:46 pm

What was your best bathroom remodeling decision?

posted by: ashlander on 02.19.2007 at 12:40 am in Bathrooms Forum

We're having a difficult time making decisions for our bathroom remodel: choice of shower stall, toilet, flooring, counter, and perhaps even a fireplace. This will be the first and only remodel for our bathroom, so we hate to mess up.
Would appreciate any words of wisdom or advice.
What do you regret? What would you change? What was your best decision concerning the bathroom?

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clipped on: 06.14.2009 at 02:43 pm    last updated on: 06.14.2009 at 02:43 pm

99% Finished Kitchen--creamy white w/soapstone

posted by: jbrodie on 03.01.2009 at 06:59 pm in Kitchens Forum

Finally! Our kitchen is finished! I never thought the day would come, and boy am I enjoying it. I owe so much to this forum. I can't tell you how much you all helped me. Thank you!!! I hope I can help others in return.

Hope I'm not putting too many pictures!

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Island
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soap stone

Quick description (feel free to contact me if you have questions)
-Soapstone: Julia
-Cabinets: Custom, inset/flush shaker style with single bead (waiting to see if we get some issues resolved before I recommend the cabinet maker)
-Bookcase and desk tops: walnut
-Sharp microwave oven drawer (love it!)
-GE fridge
-Shaw 30 inch apron sink
-Wolf range top
-Thermador double ovens
-Vent-a-hood hood
-Dal tile
-potfiller: Newport Brass
-hot/cold faucet Newport Brass
-Main faucet: Mico
-Door to garage: one panel painted with chalkboard paint...fun! The kids love this and it's fun to put messages to guests, each other, holiday wishes, etc.
-Pull out baskets (love these...I keep bread in one and potatoes, onions, etc. in the other)
-Wine shelf--love it!
-Bar stools from Sturbridge Yankee Workshop (love these and they were so reasonable!)
-What would I do differently? More than 12 inch overhang on seating area of island (maybe 14-16 inch). And I might skip the bead board in the backs of the bookshelfs and glass cabs.

Happy kitchen designing to all! Thank you again!

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clipped on: 06.14.2009 at 02:37 pm    last updated on: 06.14.2009 at 02:37 pm

3 Year Kitchen: Bigger Photos - as requested

posted by: bebe_ct on 05.04.2009 at 09:21 pm in Kitchens Forum

Hello all,
Wow, I knew that I loved how my kitchen came out, but I had no idea that so many others would love it too. Thanks for all of the compliments! It almost makes it worth the 3 year wait ;)
I promise to post more pics when we decide on a backsplash, and when we get the table and bench for the banquette.

Mythreesonsnc: We considered locating pendants on the trusses, but decided not to for a couple of reasons. We wanted the eye to be drawn up when entering the room. We were worried that pendants would detract from this as a focal point, and preferred the simplicity and unobstructed view of nothing hanging down. I love the pendants you picked out, by the way. We probably would have ended up with something very similar to the one you chose if we had decided to use pendants.

Pickle2 and Scootermom: Since my husband's business is building timber frame barns, he knows a lot of men in the trades. One of our friends, Jeff, is an top-notch carpenter and craftsman. He and my husband designed the storage benches, and then Jeff built them in place for us. He also did all of our wainscotting and trim work. There will be a table in front of the banquette along with a bench for extra seating. We just haven't found one we like yet.

Lisa A: Something I knew right from the get-go was that I wanted a gas cooktop with an electric oven. When we started this whole thing, I don't think they had ranges with this combination (if they did, I was not aware of them). So, we ended up with the oven underneath the cooktop simply because that was the best location for the oven in our layout. I don't mind it, though it is a bit low - lots of bending over.
PS. I so wanted a double oven, but alas, it was not to be. :(

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clipped on: 06.14.2009 at 02:36 pm    last updated on: 06.14.2009 at 02:36 pm

whose beautiful wood counter is this (6 glass/white cabs)

posted by: fern4 on 06.07.2009 at 06:46 pm in Kitchens Forum

I foolishly copied this picture without noting whose it is! I would very much like to know what kind of wood it is and what kind of finish (and any other helpful information). Any help is appreciated!

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clipped on: 06.11.2009 at 10:16 pm    last updated on: 06.11.2009 at 10:16 pm

white granite

posted by: gabeach on 04.02.2007 at 07:57 pm in Kitchens Forum

I apologize if this is a repeat post; it does not appear my first one posted.

Please post if you have white granite with a small bit of black or grey.

I went to W.Zanger today and they only had one possibility.
It was, of course, one of their most expensive slabs. The color was called Seafoam green.
It looked more white outside in the sun, but when we went inside and cleaned a scrap,it got a lot greener than I would want.

The rep was very nice and told me they get a lot of people in who are looking for white granite, but there is not a lot if it around. The yard literally had rows and rows of slabs, but the whiites were absent, and the creams were very busy with lots of black or brown or gold mottled in with the cream.

Also, they are closed for the upcoming 3 day weekend. So, if you plan to go look at granite this weekend, you may want to call first.

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clipped on: 06.10.2009 at 09:51 pm    last updated on: 06.10.2009 at 09:51 pm

virginia jet mist granite -pics, anyone?

posted by: shanghaimom on 03.20.2009 at 09:20 pm in Kitchens Forum

We are considering using this as a soapstone alternative. If anyone has used this, I would love to see installed pics. TIA!!

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clipped on: 06.10.2009 at 09:50 pm    last updated on: 06.10.2009 at 09:50 pm

If you could do it again...what WOULDN'T you do

posted by: repaintingagain on 05.30.2009 at 03:29 pm in Kitchens Forum

I am working on my kitchen and soliciting great advice so far on what I can possibly do.

But here is another thought...what shouldn't I do?! I would welcome any thoughts on the subject of, "If I had only known..." in the whole realm of kitchen countertops, kitchen cabinet paint and/or layout.

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clipped on: 06.02.2009 at 09:30 pm    last updated on: 06.02.2009 at 09:30 pm

Kitchen Islands - Lets See Your Pics

posted by: cookpr on 12.31.2008 at 08:19 pm in Kitchens Forum

Searched and could not find a massive thread devoted to ALL islands, any shape, color, size or form.

Planning a kitchen for a new construction and want to see what all you creative people came up with.

Lets see those islands!! The more pics, the better!!

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clipped on: 06.02.2009 at 09:28 pm    last updated on: 06.02.2009 at 09:28 pm

Paint Recommendation - Kitchen Cabinets - Color/Brand

posted by: euphorbia on 06.01.2009 at 10:00 am in Kitchens Forum

Hi, I'm looking for recommendations for a paint color and brand to use on my kitchen cabinets.

I'm planning to use oil based paint and primer. I'm looking for a nice white shade and a good durable brand.

I'd like white and not cream.

Any ideas??

Thanks

Also, do I use semi-gloss finish or satin?

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clipped on: 06.02.2009 at 09:27 pm    last updated on: 06.02.2009 at 09:28 pm

BM paint - have some questions, please

posted by: katiee511 on 05.28.2009 at 11:29 am in Kitchens Forum

After reading venice_2008's post about using Matte paint, I think this is the way I want to go after all the positive posts. I went to our local hardware store and got 4 sample colors to try. Hoping ONE of those will be 'the one' my questions are:

Our store only sells the Regal line. When I asked about Aura they said they are working on getting it but it could be 30 days or more. I can drive 30 min to another store that carries the Aura line. Is there enough of a difference to get the Aura over the Regal?

In a Goggle search, I read some posts that someone was charged an add'l $8.00 to have the Regal tinted, but the Aura was included in the price??? I have never heard of this. Has anyone experienced this?

Our local price for Regal is $42/gallon. How much could I expect to pay for Aura?

The Color sample states it is Regal AquaVelvet premium quality. Will the color be different in the Matte finish, or just the sheen?

I apologise for these seemingly 'stupid' questions...... but I am so tired of being at a standstill on our kitchen and looking at the white primed walls. Any other hints, words of wisdom or any advice I can get will be much appreciated. Thanks!

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clipped on: 06.02.2009 at 09:25 pm    last updated on: 06.02.2009 at 09:25 pm