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RE: need inty help pls! (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: daisyduckworth on 12.09.2007 at 04:27 am in Herbs Forum

CANOLA OIL SPRAY:
Mix 1 part canola oil into 50 parts water (approximately 1 tablespoon oil to 1 litre water). Add a few drops of diswashing detergent and shake well. Spray tops and bottoms of leaves and stems generously to get rid of aphids, mealy bugs, spider mites, soft scale or earwigs. Most cooking oils can be used instead of Canola.

Neem is an insecticidal herb - a tree, actually. Azadirachta indica, Melia azadirachta. Often called the Wonder Tree, Indian Lilac, Bead Tree, Holy Tree, Margosa Tree, Pride of China. Neem oil, extracted from the seeds, is an effective insecticide when used as a garden spray. It is also used in skin and hair lotions, anti-tartar toothpaste and soaps. Look for the oil in garden centres.

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clipped on: 06.26.2009 at 09:46 pm    last updated on: 06.26.2009 at 09:46 pm

RE: need inty help pls! (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: daisyduckworth on 12.07.2007 at 05:55 pm in Herbs Forum

I'm not acquainted with Indonesian bugs either, but you could try spraying your plants with a garlic spray, which is effective against a large range of bugs - also fungi.

GARLIC SPRAY:
Soak 1/2 cup crushed garlic cloves in 1/2 cup vegetable oil for one week. Add a little liquid soap and dilute the mixture - 1 part mixture to 10 parts water. Garlic spay will kill and repel aphids, woolly aphids, bean fly, stink bugs, crickets, grasshoppers, red spider mite, sawfly larvae, scale, snails, slugs, thrips and caterpillars, mosquitoes and ticks, the adult moths of leaf-miners and mealy bugs. It is an effective fungicide when used 3-4 times a week against potato blight and damping off.
OR
Crush 100g garlic, 2 chillies and 2 onions and cover with water for 24 hours. Strain and add enough water to make up 2 litres.

As for watering, don't do it by the clock, do it by the needs of the plant. The soil should be constantly moist, not soggy, and should never be allowed to dry out completely. Poke your finger as far as it will go into the soil. If the tip of your finger feels cold and moist, it doesn't need water. If dry, give it a drink. Do not judge soil moisture by the appearance of the surface of the soil.

Mint is another plant that does best outside (in hot climates, partial shade is best for mints), where there are predator bugs which prey on the plant-destroying bugs. Let Nature do some of the work for you!

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clipped on: 06.26.2009 at 09:45 pm    last updated on: 06.26.2009 at 09:45 pm

RE: No beans or flowers what wrong (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: digdirt on 06.20.2009 at 07:32 pm in Vegetable Gardening Forum

So these were transplanted seedlings rather than direct seeded as is normally done, only in the ground for 3 weeks and they are already 5 feet tall? That is a very different situation. Details. Knew I should have asked questions!

Are they really 5 feet or is that just a guesstimate? How tall were they when transplanted? Have you been fertilizing them besides the MG mix?

Sorry but 5' tall Kentucky Wonders that were direct seeded in plain dirt should easily have bloomed some by now, sorry to disagree with farmerdilla. Ours are 6' tall and while the vines will easily reach 10 feet or more, we have been picking and canning beans all week and will be for weeks more.

But bean transplants, especially tall bean transplants, will be delayed by a good 2-3 weeks and the excess nitrogen situation will delay them further.

Dave

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clipped on: 06.21.2009 at 09:36 pm    last updated on: 06.21.2009 at 09:36 pm

RE: photos (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: tedln on 06.20.2009 at 12:11 pm in Vegetable Gardening Forum

I dont use the dinky editor provided with this forum when I want to post photos. The links seem to run together when I do and they are hard to edit.
I typically will start with a blank (new) MS word document and type in the following symbols < i m g s r c = > without the spaces except between the g and s. (I then save the document and simply open it each time I want to post in the future.)

I then acquire the url of the photo I want to post and insert by typing or cut and pasting the url into the characters between the = and > symbols.
The URL for the photo would then be in the position of the xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx"s in the following line
img src=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX >.

After inserting the url, it should become an active link and the url should turn blue in your word document. If it turns blue, it will become a photo in your post as follows.

If I post multiple photos, I can type between each url containing line; resulting in photos with descriptive text between them.
When I complete the document, I cut and paste the entire document from MS Word into the forum editor.
You must perform a preview of the document before the post and the photos should display instead of the
Active link.

(this post was created in MS word and cut and pasted to the editor)

Ted

NOTES:

I dont use the dinky editor provided with this forum when I want to post photos. The links seem to run together when I do and they are hard to edit.
I typically will start with a blank (new) MS word document and type in the following symbols < i m g s r c = > without the spaces except between the g and s. (I then save the document and simply open it each time I want to post in the future.)
I then acquire the url of the photo I want to post and insert by typing or cut and pasting the url into the characters between the = and > symbols.
The URL for the photo would then be in the position of the xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx"s in the following line
img src=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX >.

After inserting the url, it should become an active link and the url should turn blue in your word document. If it turns blue, it will become a photo in your post as follows.

clipped on: 06.20.2009 at 06:25 pm    last updated on: 06.20.2009 at 06:28 pm

Sharing a tip about bush beans I learned long ago

posted by: momamamo on 07.01.2008 at 11:58 am in Beans, Peas & Other Legumes Forum

This tip may be well known, but I want to share it at this time of year because now's the time folks are wondering about new plantings, succession plantings, etc.

I read this in some book - can't remember which one, though - so I can't give the originator credit. I can at least say that I've used this technique and was quite pleased with the results.

Once you harvest bush beans, cut the plants back so that there are just a few inches of growth and a few growth nodes. Then fertilize them and watch them grow! In the year that I did this, I thought it would be a fun experiment and didn't know what to expect. I ended up with very good yields and had enough time to cut the plants back once more. So I got 3 periods of growth and a lot of green beans! I was shocked at the end of the season to see how thick the stems had become.

There's probably plenty of time for some of you to start new seeds, but for others this may be worth a try. Happy gardening! Maureen

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clipped on: 06.19.2009 at 12:53 pm    last updated on: 06.19.2009 at 12:53 pm

RE: 'Keep Off Grass' sign & neighbors (Follow-Up #18)

posted by: ppod on 06.09.2009 at 05:30 pm in Lawn Care Forum

I'd cap those rebars, that're holding the warning tape, with tennis balls or with caps that can be purchased for this very purpose.

Reason: Eliminate the hazard of impalement. Someone on the public sidewalk could stumble and poke out an eye; reach for something on the ground and accidently poke out an eye (i.e., someone walking a dog drops the leash and reaches to pick it up); or when pulling rebars out of the ground, they can stick at first and then all of a sudden pull out and cause injury.

Rebars are great helpers in the yard but need to be capped for everybody's protection, including the homeowner's (and the homeowner's insurance company's).

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clipped on: 06.09.2009 at 05:30 pm    last updated on: 06.09.2009 at 05:30 pm

RE: found a horse manure source (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: ppod on 06.09.2009 at 03:32 pm in Soil Forum

"I have terrible, hard, clay dirt here."

Even your hard clay dirt can be made into fertile loam by sheet composting on top of it. Sheet composting goes by many names, Ruth Stout method, Lasagna, and probably some others.

"Ruth Stout" search
sheet composting

And, yes, use a tarp, or other strong water-proof material, to cover your piles to keep rain off, (unless the piles are dry, in which case they need water). But only so much (water), not to the point of the manure washing away. Worms don't work if the material's too dry, so the presence of worms is an indicator that everything is just fine in the water department. Too wet, and flies begin to breed in the piles, and you'll have lots of protein wriggling about, plus the piles won't heat up.

Cover the piles, but do not make them airtight. Tarp can be tied to stakes (outside the frame), some feet above ground, to let in air. Make piles highest in middle to ensure rain runs off and doesn't pool on tarp.

If rain pools, build a ridge (think 'roof' or 'tent') to support tarp.

Let tarp extend over a wider area then the pile itself (to protect from driving rains) (like the rain guard of a tent). Your piles need rain-proof cover, as well as good air circulation.

Something else: huge piles of raw materials end up being much, much smaller piles of finished compost, so you should keep that in mind if you want to fill your frames.

To end up with filled frames of finished compost:
You could temporarily extend the height of your frames (say, quadruple the height) with chicken wire attached to stakes, rebars, or other easily installed & removed supports.

Then, line the inside walls with cardboard to contain the raw materials. First, cut airholes in cardboard.

Then fill the now much heigher frames "to the rafters" with raw materials.

Some people say that the more varied the raw materials, the more nutritious the compost. So in addition to lots of manure(s), add your kitchen vegetable waste, used coffe grounds (Starbucks), supermarket produce waste, dry leaves, cut grass clippings, old hay and straw, etc.

Composters have redefined the term "hunters and gatherers."

Last but not least, insert old tennis balls onto rebars (to prevent accidently poking out an eye if slipping and falling, or just bending over to pick up something on the ground). Rebars are dangerous in that sense.

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clipped on: 06.09.2009 at 03:33 pm    last updated on: 06.09.2009 at 03:33 pm

RE: Using The Ruth Stout Gardening (Follow-Up #18)

posted by: macmex on 06.03.2009 at 07:08 am in Oklahoma Gardening Forum

My dad used to purchase 50 bales of straw to mulch then entire garden, when I was a kid. Every year we'd start out with 8 inches of fluffy mulch over the whole thing. It worked well. By the time I left for college we had over 4' of rich black top soil. I could push a spade into the ground right up to the handle. (Keep in mind this was NJ where land fill soil is better than the best soil in much of the rest of the country).

Last winter I tried two things. When leaves were readily available I did a real deep mulch in part of my garden... and left it there. This spring I planted through it. It's working a lot like my dad's purchased hay bales. Also, all during the fall and winter, whenever we cleaned out the goat pens (spoiled hay, manure, etc.) I piled it about 2' deep, in a large rectangular swath of the main garden. It is still almost a foot deep. This spring I sent right down the middle and planted our winter squash, cantalope and watermelons there. Everything seems to be doing fabulous, except one hill of cantaloupe, which is yellow and stunted. They must be sitting on top of something they really don't like.

The problem with compost piles I've done here, in Tahlequah, is that they are overrun with Bermuda by the time the compost is finished. So our composting largely takes place "en sitio," right in the garden, as mulch.

George

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clipped on: 06.09.2009 at 02:02 pm    last updated on: 06.09.2009 at 02:02 pm

RE: sheet mulching (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: terrene on 10.01.2008 at 03:59 pm in Soil Forum

I wouldn't use plastic or landscape fabric as a layer in sheet composting. Both are inorganic and would be a real pain to dig through, weed around, or remove at a future point. I've used clear pastic by itself to solarize, but only for 1-2 months, and then removed it.

For lasagne beds, I always put down a paper layer first, such as cardboard, newspapers, paper leaf bags, pizza boxes etc. Then I layer organic materials on top like coffee grounds, leaves, and grass clippings. That works pretty well to smother the weeds I'm dealing with - most Vinca and crabgrass.

For really intractable weeds, how about adding an additional layer of cardboard in the middle of the lasagne bed? After putting down the first layer of cardboard followed by organic materials, you could then add a 2nd layer of cardboard and more organics. This will not only double smother the weeds, but have the additional benefit of holding in the moisture in the organic material below the cardboard. That is the idea behind Interbay mulch.

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clipped on: 06.09.2009 at 01:22 am    last updated on: 06.09.2009 at 01:22 am

RE: sheet mulching (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: led_zep_rules on 10.01.2008 at 02:10 am in Soil Forum

Disagreeing with the infamous Annpat, do I have the nerve? If you put the nice juicy stuff on the bottom, the weeds grow right up through it, very happily. You need the thick impenetrable cardboard sort of thing on the bottom to smother what is below. After it mostly dies off, the cardboard is rotted through and everything is beautiful.

Where I live the weeds are pretty serious (especially the quack grass). So even with raised beds with solid sides and lots of cardboard on the bottom you have to be vigilant for shoots growing under the edge and up through the cardboard. But still it is so much easier than weeding every bit of the weeds out by hand. (I am organic so no weed killer for me in the garden.)

Marcia

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clipped on: 06.09.2009 at 01:20 am    last updated on: 06.09.2009 at 01:20 am

RE: Minimal cost, maximum results for large-scale sheet mulching (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: digdirt on 11.24.2008 at 06:23 pm in Soil Forum

I'd agree with Wayne, do it in strips or chunks at a time and used the unimproved strips for walkways next year. End of that season the soil beneath them will be better and you can turn it over onto the unimproved strips and go to work on them. Good soil improvement takes time so there is no way you can do it all and get ready for next season but within 3 years you'd should be in good shape.

With that approach you can use all the items you list, even the green manure plantings, and anything else you can get your hands on - straw or hay bales, bags of leaves, grass clippings, can you get seaweed?, manure, the stuff from the grocery store, etc. Basically anything that can go into a compost pile can go into sheet composting so check out all the "What have you fed your compost?" discussions here for ideas.

Good luck.

Dave

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clipped on: 06.09.2009 at 12:50 am    last updated on: 06.09.2009 at 12:50 am

RE: Huge collection of bean seeds! (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: zeedman on 06.25.2008 at 04:39 pm in Beans, Peas & Other Legumes Forum

An impressive selection of beans. They even have a few of the non-commercial heirlooms in my collection. I may order a couple from them myself... although it is too late to plant them this year, I'd like to get them while I can. Many Canadian seed companies have stopped filling U.S. orders, often with little advance notice.

Ppod, there is a great HTML tutorial here.

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clipped on: 06.08.2009 at 12:07 pm    last updated on: 06.08.2009 at 12:08 pm

Online Image Editor for resizing pictures

posted by: bestlawn on 06.23.2007 at 03:41 am in Lawn Care Forum

Hoping everyone will consider using an image editor to resize photos before posting. Pictures that are too large throw the forum threads out of whack and make it difficult to read written responses. I realize not everyone has an editing program installed on their computer, but there are many on the internet to use for free like this one.

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

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clipped on: 06.07.2009 at 08:36 pm    last updated on: 06.07.2009 at 08:36 pm

How to post pictures

posted by: bestlawn on 07.05.2007 at 12:47 pm in Lawn Care Forum

Some people have their own server where they store pictures and post from there. If you don't have your own server, you'll need an online hosting site like Photobucket.com or Imageshack.us. Both are free, but you do have to setup an account with Photobucket. There is also a pay account option if you want to take advantage of the perks, but you don't have to just for posting pics here on the forums.

To post pics using Photobucket.......

1. Click on Browse and navigate your hard drive to where your picture is.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

2. Double click your picture, and it will appear on the Browse line.
The name of my picture here is 1.jpg
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

3. Click on
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

4. After a brief moment, the screen will change and display your picture with four different posting options underneath it. You want the third option that says "HTML Tag."
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
When you click inside that line, it will be highlighted (as shown) and automatically copied to your clipboard.

5. Paste it right into your message box above or under your typed message. If you paste more than one pic, paste them under one another in the message box, not on the same line. So, you'll want to hit your Enter/Return key two times, then paste the next picture. You can type in between the pastings if you want.

Photobucket archives pictures for you, meaning they will stay there in your account for you to copy and paste for years to come. You can always delete them if you want. However, if you delete them while they are being hosted somewhere, they will no longer show up wherever you posted them on the internet. So, they will disappear from here on the forum pages.

To post pics using Imageshack.......

1. Click on Browse and navigate your hard drive to where your picture is.

2. Then, click on Host It.
Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

3. It will change over to a new screen to display many hosting options. You want to scroll down and select the third line from the bottom that says "Hotlink for Websites."
Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

4. Click on that line to highlight it, then right click the line to select copy (or cut). Paste it right into your message box above or under your typed message. If you paste more than one pic, paste them under one another in the message box, not on the same line. So, you'll want to hit your Enter/Return key two times, then paste the next picture. You can type in between the pastings if you want.

Resizing Pictures

Graphics that are too large will knock the forum page out of whack and make it difficult to read messages and replies. Please be sure to resize images that are wider than 600 pixels before posting them. If you don't have an image editor on your computer, there are many online image editing sites you can use to resize them.

If you're not sure how large your pictures are, paste them into your message box here and then you can see them after clicking preview but before clicking on submit. The preview will show your message and pictures in their entirety for your editing and resizing descretion.

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clipped on: 06.07.2009 at 08:35 pm    last updated on: 06.07.2009 at 08:35 pm

RE: purple pod pole beans (Follow-Up #20)

posted by: fusion_power on 06.03.2009 at 01:51 am in Beans, Peas & Other Legumes Forum

I have 6 rows of beans across the garden. Each row is about 110 feet long.

1 row of Tobacco Worm
1 row of Blue Marbutt
1 row of Lima beans (1/2 Old time pink & white, 1/2 Herndon)
1 row of Insuk's Wang Kong scarlet runner beans
1 row of Uncle Walt's Cranberry beans
1 row of about 12 different varieties with 10 to 20 feet per.

The row of different varieties will give me enough beans to trial several that I am interested in or that I have grown before and need fresh seed.

I am growing the beans in part for myself to eat and can and in part to save seed for Sandhill Preservation.

To answer the urgent question posted above, 20 feet of beans is enough to comfortably feed 2 people and have enough beans to can about 20 to 25 quarts. Rattlesnake is very productive here in the south. It is not my favorite bean for flavor. That is not a serious negative, Rattlesnake has decent flavor, it is just middle of the pack.

DarJones

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clipped on: 06.04.2009 at 09:04 pm    last updated on: 06.06.2009 at 06:20 pm

RE: posting pictures (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: bomber095 on 06.04.2009 at 06:21 am in Vegetable Gardening Forum

Another way is to just post the link to your album or photos. In keeping w. the above theme, do this (again, remove the *'s>

<*a href="http://www.whateveryourURLis.com"*>Some text goes here<*/a>

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clipped on: 06.04.2009 at 10:18 pm    last updated on: 06.04.2009 at 10:18 pm

RE: posting pictures (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: lazyhat on 06.04.2009 at 12:09 am in Vegetable Gardening Forum

I'm surprised there is not "html help" link near the comment posting area. But yeah some here are webmasters of sorts so html is not a problem. But if you dont know i guess it may be hard to remember a line "code" but this is the Html snytax for posting an image on Gardenweb.
(Remove the * signs)

<*img src="http://imageshack.us/someimage.jpg"/*>

There are many Image hosting sites. Like TinyPic.com, Photobucket.com, Imageshack.us

I hope that makes sense, as I said before you no experince with making html pages it may seem confusing.

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clipped on: 06.04.2009 at 10:16 pm    last updated on: 06.04.2009 at 10:16 pm

RE: How do you string up your bean poles? (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: zeedman on 06.20.2008 at 05:46 pm in Beans, Peas & Other Legumes Forum

For my trellises, I use a combination of T-bar steel fence posts and 3/8" rebar rod. The rod runs through 1-1/4" PVC "T's" that slip over the ends of the posts on top, and a bottom bar is secured to the posts using cable ties. I run twine between the two bars; the rough surface of the rebar rod prevents the lines from bunching up in strong winds.

A picture is worth a thousand words... I'll be posting a photo as soon as I put up my trellises.

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clipped on: 06.03.2009 at 10:59 pm    last updated on: 06.03.2009 at 10:59 pm

RE: How do you string up your bean poles? (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: tcstoehr on 06.18.2008 at 09:36 pm in Beans, Peas & Other Legumes Forum

Here's a picture of my current setup that I posted on another thread. The fencing is 7' tall. The twine reaches up 3-5 feet above that.

Here's the picture. (900K JPG file)

My_Beans

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clipped on: 06.03.2009 at 10:57 pm    last updated on: 06.03.2009 at 10:57 pm

RE: Thinking About Next Year -- Multiple Bean Questions (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: farmerdilla on 06.03.2009 at 01:20 pm in Beans, Peas & Other Legumes Forum

Yellow Romano type -Supernano Marconi Gold
Lots of purple and wax beans out there, but most are round to oval types. Purple Queen is my favorite, but you have Purple Teepee, Royal Burgundy, Royalty. Wax beans too nunerous to list.
Cowpeas and thier subset Yardlong/Asparagus beans (Vigna unguiculata) are not closely related to snap beans ( Phaseolous vulgaris). The Yardlong/Asparagus bean is grown for its edible pods, but most other cowpeas have edible pods when young. Grown mostly for green or dry shell peas however. Flavor is quite different and adapted to different cooking styles than snap beans. They don't taste quite like asparagus either. Great in stir fries and Chinese dishes. They handle hot southern summers well. Available in both bush and vining forms.

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clipped on: 06.03.2009 at 10:18 pm    last updated on: 06.03.2009 at 10:19 pm

RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean) (Follow-Up #61)

posted by: sparklenj on 03.21.2008 at 11:05 pm in Beans, Peas & Other Legumes Forum

For a bit of trivia, Wang Kong means in Korean "king bean."

"Insuk" is likely a male first name (or very old-style female name).

NOTES:

For a bit of trivia,
Wang Kong means in Korean "king bean."

"Insuk" is likely a male first name (or very old-style female name).
===================================

Posted by jwr6404 8B in Wa (My Page) on Sat, Mar 22, 08

sparklenj:
Insuk is my 69 year old Korean wife's name and Wang Kong is indeed korean for King Bean.

My wife recalled eating beans of this type as a little girl in Korea and that is how macmex,zeedman decided on the name.
==================================
Posted by jwr6404 8B in Wa (My Page) on Sat, Mar 22, 08
Carol:
Another part of the story concerning the name. I've never stated the Beans originated in Korea. To put it into perspective,timeline,my wife is 69 and I'm soon to be 71. We got the seeds from an elderly(now deceased) Korean friend in 1988/1989 and he in turn got them from an older Korean friend some 25 years earlier who may have brought them from China. I have no reason to doubt/dispute the story concerning it's source prior to receieving the Beans from our friend. He had planted them,off and on, in his yard for the Flowers and to maintain the seed.Knowing we garden and would provide him beans for consumption he gave us the seeds. Zeedman/macmex realizing the Beans had been perpetuated in Korean hands felt it should have a name associated with Korea. I mentioned that my wife recalled Beans of this type as a small girl and they were called Wang Kong.They decided that would be a good name. I suggested,and they concurred,that my wife's name be included ,hence Insuks Wang Kong, or as sparklenj states Insuks "King Bean".
===================================

clipped on: 05.30.2009 at 10:30 pm    last updated on: 05.30.2009 at 10:37 pm

RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean) (Follow-Up #18)

posted by: jwr6404 on 10.07.2007 at 03:24 pm in Beans, Peas & Other Legumes Forum

fliptx
We've been eating them as dried beans for 18 years. In fact its the only way we eat them. The Mr's soaks them overnight and then steams them. She says they remind her of Chesnuts. She mixes a concoction of sesame oil,soy sauce and hot pepper then gets out her chopsticks and start dipping. I prefer them cooked with rice in the Rice Cooker.

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clipped on: 05.30.2009 at 10:14 pm    last updated on: 05.30.2009 at 10:15 pm

Succession planting: ATTRA information

posted by: ppod on 05.28.2009 at 11:47 pm in Vegetable Gardening Forum

I found some of the information in this ATTRA PDF on succession planting fascinating. For example:
Quote:
This same process happens in
reverse for fall crops. Even a couple of days
difference in midsummer planting dates can
lead to a harvest date difference of two, or
even three, weeks. (Ogden, 1992.)
Unquote.

Here is a link that might be useful: Attra on succession planting

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clipped on: 05.30.2009 at 11:09 am    last updated on: 05.30.2009 at 11:10 am

RE: SVB bug (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: ppod on 05.29.2009 at 08:17 pm in Vegetable Gardening Forum

Wikipedia on:
Squash vine borer, which mentions wrapping squash stem in foil to foil the bugs.
Squash bug

ATTRA on squash vine borer and squash bug.

Fanfortony's picture of her/his terrific tulle row cover.

NOTES:

Squash vine borer and squash bug

Attra: management of

clipped on: 05.30.2009 at 11:06 am    last updated on: 05.30.2009 at 11:06 am

RE: what's up with my carrots? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: ppod on 05.29.2009 at 09:03 pm in Vegetable Gardening Forum

Before you thin them, have a tulle row cover (or another type of protection) ready to install to prevent the carrot fly from laying her eggs and ruining your carrots. Fanoftony's picture of the tulle cover is found almost at the bottom of the page in above link.

Carrot root fly problems and solutions are explained in the link below.

Good luck with your carrots; may they be sweet and delicious!

Here is a link that might be useful: Werneth Allotment Society

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carrot fly
clipped on: 05.30.2009 at 11:04 am    last updated on: 05.30.2009 at 11:05 am

RE: When to plant beans, okra and cukes in Z6 (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: very_blessed_mom on 04.28.2008 at 10:59 am in Oklahoma Gardening Forum

I think I found the book (I put the link below), but I emailed and they responded back

"We do not sell any used books. However, we do have new copies of this book available in third edition paperback. All the same information as the first edition with some updates and all black and white photos inside. Price is $28.63 (includes tax and shipping). You can order from
our website www.texasgardener.com or by calling toll free 1-800-727-9020"

I'm thinking it's not near the quality of book you have plus the photos aren't color. It might do until I could find the one you have.

Here is a link that might be useful: Texas Gardener's

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clipped on: 05.25.2009 at 08:49 pm    last updated on: 05.25.2009 at 08:50 pm

RE: Flagstone Steps Border (w/pics) (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: nycynthias on 05.21.2009 at 12:46 am in Landscape Design Forum

Beautiful!
Being in the northeast like you, I tend to be a sucker for masses of billowing color after our long, long winters. I could see a few small boxwoods for evergreen structure--easy to prune and keep within bounds--and if you DID want color, combine them with masses of super easy Wave petunias, and other perennials mixed in as an accent to the phlox and soften the lines of the steps.
You could do an all white palette, which would be cooling and soothing but still work well with your desire for largely green.
I personally love riots of color though:

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clipped on: 05.24.2009 at 11:13 pm    last updated on: 05.24.2009 at 11:14 pm

RE: Where to order plants from? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: carolyn137 on 02.28.2008 at 01:15 am in Growing Tomatoes Forum

How far are you from Raleigh? Craig LeHoullier raises a huge number of different varieties and sells them at the Farmer's Market there. And I know there are others in the area who do the same.

Just enter Craig's name at Google and look for his topcities home page and there he always lists what he's growing and you can e-mail him off his website as well. And if you aren't that close to Raleigh he knopws the growers in the area and can perhaps give you some info about those folks.

But I also reccommend Darrel at selectedplants.com if you need yet another recommendation for his plants. Lots of choices, superbhly packed and prices very reasonable.

Carolyn

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selectedplants.com
clipped on: 05.22.2009 at 05:58 pm    last updated on: 05.22.2009 at 05:59 pm

RE: cattle panel arch... (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: aka_peggy on 07.05.2008 at 05:25 pm in Beans, Peas & Other Legumes Forum

Here's a partial view of 4-16' cattle panels in my garden. I love em!..

Photobucket

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cattle panel arch picture
clipped on: 05.21.2009 at 01:25 pm    last updated on: 05.21.2009 at 01:25 pm

RE: My first carrots ever! (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: cabrita on 05.14.2009 at 09:06 pm in Vegetable Gardening Forum

ppod, we have tried a few. Danvers, red cored chantenays (or chanterays?), King Midas, little romeos and Nantes (or scarlet nantes). My favorites are the nantes. The King Midas are huge, but if you let it grow fully to my taste they are little woody, however they are OK if I harvest them immature. Little romeos are small round ones, you wait the same amount of time but get less carrot.....to me they do not taste that special, but I will use them as biennial flowers. I am trying Nelsons now, since I bought them as a warmer weather carrot, I am trying to extend the carrot growing season. Never got too excited about carrots until we started growing them.

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My favorites are the nantes. The King Midas are huge
clipped on: 05.21.2009 at 11:34 am    last updated on: 05.21.2009 at 11:35 am

RE: Is red sails lettuce harder to grow than other lettuces? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: gardendawgie on 05.14.2009 at 05:15 pm in Vegetable Gardening Forum

Red Sails is real easy to grow. You have a problem. maybe with the seeds.

All the lettuce is about the same. I have grown probably 50 different lettuce. A few lettuce might have slight problems mostly it is with bad seed.

Red Sails is a leaf lettuce. Leaf lettuce is the easiest to grow. Try some Jericho Romaine and Nevada Batavia types for quality lettuce. Jericho is the best Romaine. Batavia types are excellent. There are several real good ones.

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clipped on: 05.15.2009 at 01:36 am    last updated on: 05.15.2009 at 01:36 am

RE: Effective chipmunk/ground squirrel control (Follow-Up #61)

posted by: andthis on 05.28.2006 at 05:44 am in Integrated Pest Management Forum

Super vacuums are used widely in the midwest to collect groundhogs.

Here is a link that might be useful: Vacuum Cleaner

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clipped on: 05.12.2009 at 04:03 pm    last updated on: 05.12.2009 at 04:03 pm

RE: Disappointed in turnips (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: carolync1 on 05.10.2009 at 05:14 pm in Vegetable Gardening Forum

Purple top white globe turnips will taste strong and sometimes bitter in most of Zone 9 in May. Here in the Central Valley of California, they're planted commercially in September to mature in cool, but not freezing, fall weather.

I like the Purple Tops when well-grown. But I usually like much better the little sweet "summer turnips" in early spring or fall: Oasis, Hakeuri, White Lady. They also have sweet, hairless greens (with a tough midrib that should be removed). I find regular, hairy turnip greens palatable only after long simmering.

For later fall eating, try "Just Right" hybrid. Plant it at the same time as the little turnips. It's big, ugly, tender and sweet. It doesn't have a lot of usable bulb when young. Makes a big bunch of tall, sweet, hairless greens. Holds in the garden better in cold, wet weather than most turnips. It may be a cross between a true turnip and something else. I get my seed from Twilley, a firm which sells mostly to commercial growers. They and Stokes also sell White Lady. There are several sources for the other "summer turnips".

I also like the old-time sweet white turnip or rutabaga "Gilfeather", which has a harder, crisper texture than any of the turnips above. It keeps in storage. Plant with other fall turnips.

For earliest spring, try Tokyo Cross - very mild, but not as sweet as any of those named above. It can be harvested almost as soon as radishes.

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clipped on: 05.10.2009 at 11:26 pm    last updated on: 05.10.2009 at 11:26 pm

RE: Pole bean spacing (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: zeedman on 09.08.2008 at 05:28 pm in Beans, Peas & Other Legumes Forum

Dean, "Pole 191" is used as a snap. For about 15 years, it was my main crop snap bean, and I bought new seed every year. When Ferry Morse dropped it in the 80's, that put my feet on the path that led me to seed saving.

You know, Dean, I've described my trellis system several times, but never took good photos of it - they were always covered with vegetation. If it weren't for the darned rabbits destroying most of the seedlings, this trellis wouldn't be visible either... and I couldn't demonstrate the full size of a pole bean plant. Every dark cloud has a silver lining I guess - I just wish this dark cloud was lined with rabbit fur! ;-) In the top photo, the details described below are clearly visible.

The poles are 7.5 foot fence poles, driven about 1&1/2 feet into the ground with a pole driver. Each pole is topped with a 1&1/4" PVC "T" fitting. I run 3/8" rebar rod through the T's on top, and tie an equal length of rebar rod to the bottom of the poles, about 6-8" off the ground (I plastic cable ties). This is the basic frame for the trellis.

The pole spacing varies, depending upon how much weight the trellis will be carrying. For beans & bitter melon, I use about 5 feet between poles. For climbing cucumbers or squash, I can either use 3-4 feet between poles, or use 1/2" rebar for the top support in place of the 3/8".

String is run horizontally between the poles (I use plastic baler twine for this). Then I run vertical strings (of some natural fiber) between the top & bottom rods, wrapping it twice around each horizontal string on the way down. I generally use brown baler twine for the verticals, since some beans (such as yardlongs) dislike artificial materials. The spacing of the verticals depends upon the plant spacing, and on how rampant the vines will be... but no less than one per plant.

You could probably just run the vertical strings, but the horizontals add a lot of stability. The advantage of the rebar rods on top & bottom is that the vertical strings will not move during high winds.

For the rebar rod, I use 20, 10, and 5 foot lengths; I can combine these (bound with cable ties) to match any length of trellis.

There are variations of this; you can use construction remesh or fencing attached to the frame. While this is quicker to erect & remove than a string trellis, I seldom use a steel trellis. There is a considerable amount of work required initially to straighten out the fencing, plus the storage issue.

I had mentioned the use of trellises & corn as windbreaks. This is the view looking toward the northwest corner of my garden:
Photobucket
A trellis of cucumbers:
Photobucket
And a view of two rows of various beans, spaced 4 feet apart. The rows run N-S:
Photobucket

You can see why my grandchildren like to play hide-and-seek in the garden. ;-)

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clipped on: 05.09.2009 at 10:54 pm    last updated on: 05.09.2009 at 10:55 pm

Pole bean spacing

posted by: zeedman on 09.07.2008 at 06:25 pm in Beans, Peas & Other Legumes Forum

On several threads, I have advocated wider spacing for pole beans than is usually recommended. Given fertile soil & adequate moisture, most varieties will send out more & longer branches, and produce much more per plant than if spaced closely. The pods will also be longer & better filled, and the dry seeds larger. These plants tend to be healthier, and more able to resist disease.

Rabbits & poor germination were responsible for this observation; sometimes good things come from bad circumstances. This year, the rabbits struck again; so I thought I would post a couple of photos. Both of these are single plants of "Pole 191" (a.k.a. white-seeded Kentucky Wonder). Both of these are single plants.
Photobucket
Photobucket

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clipped on: 05.09.2009 at 10:54 pm    last updated on: 05.09.2009 at 10:54 pm

tulle pic take 2 (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: fanfortony on 04.30.2009 at 07:59 am in Vegetable Gardening Forum

Garden 2008

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clipped on: 04.30.2009 at 10:50 am    last updated on: 04.30.2009 at 10:50 am

RE: disappointed in row covers/will netting work for cabbage moth (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: fanfortony on 04.28.2009 at 07:35 am in Vegetable Gardening Forum

I have always used tulle netting (the stuff wedding veils are made of) to cover my cabbages. it works great! Its light weight, cheap, and has tiny holes. the rain gets in just fine with no problems, as does the sun. It comes in many colors, and I don't see that it matters what color you use. I've had blue, green, and pink. You can get it at fabric stores or craft stores like Joann's. Usually around now, (pre-wedding season) is a good time to buy it on sale, only about 50 cents a yard. it comes in 72 inch widths too, which is generally better than the 52 inch wide.

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clipped on: 04.30.2009 at 10:49 am    last updated on: 04.30.2009 at 10:50 am

Forget the seed warming mat!

posted by: momma_s on 04.28.2009 at 03:18 pm in Frugal Gardening Forum

Ok, I just wanted to share my frugal seed starting way...

I was looking for a warm place for my seeds, but couldn't find any. Our fridge is cool on top, and our water heater is in the garage... I was considering buying a seed mat, but then I remembered how I one time put a cake in the cold oven to store it overnight, but left the light on, and the next day the icing was ruined because of the heat generated by the oven bulb.

So, I put a bunch of seeds by the window for comparison, then a bunch in a clear plastic container with lid, and wrapped it in a towel to keep the light out at night, and ALL of my seeds in the oven sprouted in 1.5 days!! The seeds in the window haven't done anything yet.

Forget the warming mat! ;-)

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clipped on: 04.28.2009 at 06:06 pm    last updated on: 04.28.2009 at 06:09 pm

RE: Where to find cheap corn gluten meal? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: farmboy66 on 04.28.2009 at 03:33 pm in Frugal Gardening Forum

try hunter nutrition .com,765-563-1003

NOTES:

...for cheap corn gluten (fert)
clipped on: 04.28.2009 at 06:08 pm    last updated on: 04.28.2009 at 06:08 pm

RE: blackberry/raspberry question (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: hines on 08.02.2008 at 09:06 am in Fruit & Orchards Forum

If yu are moving in a year or so, I wouldn't bother trying brambles at this point in your life. You won't get any fruit before it is time to pull up your stakes.

That said. They are easy to grow and seem to attract few pests. The exception being Japanese beetles, who seem to love them as much as I do. The new shoots sprout vigorously from the rootstock and you can easily dig them up and transplant them.

I responded to your query because I do have a favorite variety of raspberry. Encore, is a thornless everbearing raspberry. It is vigorous, and the canes stand erect with little support. The berries are very large and incredably sweet.

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Rasberry Encore
clipped on: 04.27.2009 at 01:09 am    last updated on: 04.27.2009 at 01:10 am

RE: Your Tomato Growing Secrets (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: deep___roots on 07.02.2008 at 12:29 pm in Growing Tomatoes Forum

Plant a thick cover crop of vetch during the Winter in the raised beds and half-whiskey barrels. Cut it down and work it into the soil in April, let it decompose for a month, plant the tom starts right into the mix in May.
Nothing is more important to success than your soil. Take care of it. I make and use compost too. Throw in a little horsie manure also.

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clipped on: 07.03.2008 at 11:00 pm    last updated on: 07.03.2008 at 11:01 pm