Clippings by northshore3

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RE: When to start grafting? (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: windfall_rob on 03.27.2013 at 08:31 am in Fruit & Orchards Forum

I have had good success grafting pommes anytime the risk of hard freeze is past. But generally better luck the less time they sit around on the tree before it breaks dormancy.

The type of grafting you plan to use is a big factor. I like whip and tongue when my scions are the right size and it is easier to do these grafts cleanly before the trees break dormancy and the bark begins to "slip" ...I think clefts do a bit better at this stage too.

Other graft require that the bark slips easily and the tree be in active growth.

In my (limited)experience, stone fruit definitely do better with the tree out of dormancy and a nice stretch of 60-70 ish weather.

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clipped on: 03.27.2013 at 09:55 am    last updated on: 03.27.2013 at 09:56 am

RE: When to graft apples (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: harvestman on 03.16.2011 at 06:30 pm in Fruit & Orchards Forum

I have lousy results grafting plums and have heard it's best to wait for warm weather, but others on this forum should be able to offer better guidance on this than me. Post the question and I think the concensus will be to wait until a stretch of warm weather (in the '70's) is in the forecast after trees start to grow.

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clipped on: 03.27.2013 at 09:44 am    last updated on: 03.27.2013 at 09:45 am

RE: When to graft apples (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: harvestman on 03.15.2011 at 05:21 pm in Fruit & Orchards Forum

The reason I found out early works well is that I've had clients to prune that were far away and also wanted me to do some grafts. I ended up doing both at the same time, some times when the trees were a week from even showing signs of growth. These early grafts have done better every time than grafts done a couple weeks later.

The closer the grafts leaf out to the rest of the tree the more growth they get during the tree's surge. Growth after the surge is much slower. This has been my experience comparatively and I wonder about others on this forum.

Frost isn't likely to be a problem because once the tree begins to leaf out it rarely gets cold enough to damage leaf buds or small leaves. Flower buds are more delicate.

I used to think that the grafts healed from cells generated by the tree and the idea was for the graft to leaf out after enough of this healing took place to support growth with adequate water. Therefore you'd want the tree well ahead of the graft. Now I think that the cells are generated from the graft itself- at least some of them and that everything happens as the graft starts to grow.

But this is just speculation- anyone got any research on it?

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clipped on: 03.27.2013 at 09:40 am    last updated on: 03.27.2013 at 09:42 am

RE: When to graft apples (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: harvestman on 03.15.2011 at 06:00 am in Fruit & Orchards Forum

I actually get my best results in southeastern NY when I graft just at first signs of coming out of dormancy- silver tip. That way grafts are well established before the leaf hoppers set in. This is for apples and pears.

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clipped on: 03.27.2013 at 09:39 am    last updated on: 03.27.2013 at 09:39 am