Clippings by natalie4b

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RE: How about a tour of Natural Selection Daylilies? #1 (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: growgirl on 07.31.2013 at 07:20 pm in Daylily Forum

One of many garden areas and yard art/signs.

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clipped on: 07.31.2013 at 09:04 pm    last updated on: 07.31.2013 at 09:05 pm

RE: disease (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: xokientx on 07.06.2013 at 01:39 pm in Daylily Forum

If it is leaf streak, you may treat by spraying with Cleary's 3336 50WP or Systhane 40WP. Treat every 2 weeks while symptoms persist.
Ed

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clipped on: 07.06.2013 at 05:53 pm    last updated on: 07.06.2013 at 05:53 pm

RE: Favorite cottage garden blog? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: fluffyflowers on 04.29.2013 at 09:09 am in Cottage Garden Forum

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clipped on: 05.01.2013 at 07:54 am    last updated on: 05.01.2013 at 07:54 am

RE: Wrong time of year, but who else is dreaming of the Spring Sw (Follow-Up #22)

posted by: girlgroupgirl on 02.14.2013 at 11:49 am in Georgia Gardener Forum

How is Saturday, May 4th for people?
We'll gather between 10-11 pm, officially trading between 11-1 with a pot luck lunch.
I plan to run this trade as the others i have held:
You can set up personal trades 1-1, please box or bag those separately for the individual you are giving them to.
We have an open trade for about an hour, where people can bring almost anything (I ask that you do not bring chemicals or plants that are considered undesirably invasive - unless they are 1-1 trades, then you can of course do as you wish!!!). You bring 10 plants, you can take 10 plants unless there are left-overs and then you can take more!
we can trade:
plants of all kinds
seeds
fun things like pretty pottery, tools, watering cans, bird houses etc.
books and magazines garden related
helpful items like bags of home compost, or worm "stuff", small containers of neem oil etc.

pretty much anything garden related.
Please bring food to share and a utensil for serving. A chair to sit in outdoors, your plants and your 1-1 trades all individually bagged or boxed, flats or boxes to take your goodies home in!

I will place one specification on the date and trade at my home: my back has gone out. It's only been a week but it's really really bad and nobody can tell me what's going on. If I'm this bad I just can't possibly be a good host to you. If I'm fine then I will do my best to welcome you all and serve you as best I can :)

I supply the place, the toilets (ha ha), drinks, dishes/cutlery/cups and clean up :)

We are pretty much a gluten free household so I can't offer you things like serving utensils but I we have an oven to heat, a kettle....and will have recyclable/compostable goods for eating from and healthy beverages to drink. If you enjoy traditional sodas like coke & pepsi please bring them, we will have fruit soda (and perhaps some snappy -non-child-friendly) punch.
Children and pets: please let your pets remain at home, and please let your small children remain at home also. I'm just not equipped on property (holes in the back yard, etc) nor in the house to have kids younger than 11 or so. It's really not all that fun a day for most kids anyway.
It's all perfectly fine for adults :)

Closer to the trade date, in April I will contact people posting here who are registered GW members who have said they would like to come to the trade, I'll give you my address and phone number at that time, but you must be a GW registered member and I would actually prefer that you have taken the effort to add some information to your personal page. After all, I'm giving you my home address.

Thanks, all!
girlgroupgirl

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clipped on: 02.24.2013 at 06:17 pm    last updated on: 02.24.2013 at 06:17 pm

RE: The Myth of Soil Amendments (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: jolj on 12.22.2011 at 02:59 pm in Soil Forum

The link missed a few points.
1)Most landscaper cut up entire beds, not $5.00 holes.
The amendments are spread over the bed & tilled in, then each hole get some amendments.
2)Low-fertility is one small reason for amendments, yearly fertilizer will take care of that problem.
3) Water is the main reason for soil amendment, in the school of thought I was taught in.For sandy soil the amendments held water longer after a rain.
For clay soil the amendment loosen the soil for better drainage.A good mulch aways tops off any planting.
I got this from over 18 years of working in a nursery & over 30 year working in gardens & orchards.

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clipped on: 06.05.2012 at 08:35 am    last updated on: 06.05.2012 at 08:35 am

RE: Does anyone have window boxes? (Follow-Up #37)

posted by: brpinson on 05.05.2012 at 12:33 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

This year replanted two hayracks with succulents. Did this a few years ago and they were the easiest things to care for because they didn't require much water or soil. They lasted about 3 years and this year, I just emptied the racks and replaced the liner and soil and replanted the plants..added a few new ones and threw out a few that looked ratty.
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clipped on: 05.20.2012 at 08:56 pm    last updated on: 05.20.2012 at 08:56 pm

RE: Garden pics- ready as I'll ever be (Follow-Up #51)

posted by: hosenemesis on 05.08.2012 at 11:09 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

oops- I maxed out my Photobucket account. I hate it when that happens. Here are the photos- I think these are the same ones!

The little white daisies are annual paludosum daisies.

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clipped on: 05.10.2012 at 09:39 pm    last updated on: 05.10.2012 at 09:39 pm

More Bloom Photos to Share

posted by: mikesc on 05.04.2012 at 02:11 pm in Iris Forum

Here are some of the recent blooms here:

Fashion Diva (just opened), a new flower here:

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Fashion Diva, more fully formed--the photo doesn't show how pretty it is:

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Jurassic Park (new for me)--really liked its color and size:

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Perpetual Joy--camera doesn't begin to show how nice this one looks live:

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Party's Over:

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Secret Rites clump:

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And, finally, the loudest frog ever! Does anyone know the species name? They sound like dogs barking!

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clipped on: 05.04.2012 at 09:44 pm    last updated on: 05.04.2012 at 09:45 pm

Garden pics- ready as I'll ever be

posted by: hosenemesis on 05.03.2012 at 01:24 am in Cottage Garden Forum

Hi cottage gardeners,
My garden will be on the San Fernando Valley Iris Tour on Saturday, so I have really cleaned it up. Unfortunately, the irises and the roses are about done, but there are some other flowers blooming well now. I took a bunch of pictures today, and here are a few. It was overcast today so a good day to take photos!
Renee

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Bishop's Castle rose
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Plum Pretty Whiskers Iris
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Side yard:
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Showbiz roses
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clipped on: 05.03.2012 at 09:28 pm    last updated on: 05.03.2012 at 09:30 pm

Early May Blooms

posted by: hosenemesis on 05.03.2012 at 01:05 am in Iris Forum

Hi iris buds,
Here are a few more blooms from this week.

New Leaf
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Looky Loo

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NOID that was bought as Classic Look:
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Scottish Reel again:
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Grand Circle:
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Missouri Mist:
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Ringo:
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Plum Pretty Whiskers again:
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Bayberry Candle:
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And Rio Rojo, inspired by Rita's gorgeous photo last year.
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Renee

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clipped on: 05.03.2012 at 09:16 pm    last updated on: 05.03.2012 at 09:16 pm

Iris photos April 24

posted by: hosenemesis on 04.24.2012 at 09:39 pm in Iris Forum

Hi all, a few more shots:

Plum Pretty Whiskers:
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First bloom on Looky Loo this year:
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New Leaf:
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Fashion Passion:
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Wonderful, gorgeous 'Scottish Reel' and the first flower is perfect:
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Mom's Cantina:
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Jean's Thornbird (it was supposed to be Owyhee Desert- Schreiner's made a mistake):

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Jean's NOID Yellow:

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Jean's NOIDs:
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Plum Pretty Whiskers again:
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Renee

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clipped on: 04.25.2012 at 09:25 pm    last updated on: 04.25.2012 at 09:25 pm

I had Blooms for a Month - Rain Kissed

posted by: organic_kitten on 05.04.2011 at 08:09 pm in Iris Forum

Here are a few I took with rain drops on them:
Purple Serenade
purple Searanade

Seakist:
Seakist

Palace Symphoney - Staked since it was lying on the ground:
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Vienna Waltz:
Vienna Waltz

And Blackalicious - I love this one:
Blackaliicious

kay

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clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 09:48 am    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 09:48 am

I have a few new ones

posted by: organic_kitten on 05.02.2011 at 10:39 pm in Iris Forum

Although my first iris bloom came a month ago, I am still having new ones bloom,

Is there anyone who doesn't know I love purple?
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Now YOu Will Know:
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Evening Tidings:
Evening Tidings

A Clump of Decadence:
Decadence

This is Palace Symphony:
Palace Symphony

And Overload:
OverLoad

And with Blackalicious, I will quit since fear I have overloaded you:Blackilicious

But I must shoe wyou I have some delicate colors:
oNly a few I admit, but here is Miss Moon beam:
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kay

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clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 09:39 am    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 09:39 am

Latest Group Photo of Iris

posted by: organic_kitten on 05.04.2009 at 06:39 pm in Iris Forum

This is the most recent group photo of this year's iris.

Later Group Shot
kay

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clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 09:36 am    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 09:36 am

A Few More Blooms

posted by: organic_kitten on 04.21.2012 at 08:06 pm in Iris Forum

Ransom Note:
Ransom Note

Grape Jelly:
Grape Jelly

Pink Invasion:
pink invasion

Chinook Arch:
Chinook Arch
And Skating Party:
Skating Party

kay

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clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 09:26 am    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 09:26 am

An 8 year, or more, wait for Grand Old Opry

posted by: iris_gal on 04.19.2012 at 09:16 pm in Iris Forum

The tree loaded with that miserable English ivy went a couple of years ago - now enuf sun for this iris to finally bloom! It reminds me a great deal of Swingtown. Beard is more lav-purple than it photographed.

GRAND OLD OPRY - Meek'87
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clipped on: 04.20.2012 at 08:10 am    last updated on: 04.20.2012 at 08:10 am

Spring flower pics

posted by: hosenemesis on 04.16.2012 at 12:24 am in California Gardening Forum

Hi all,
I took some pictures today. I know most of you have seen this garden before- but I followed hoovb's advice and added some lavendar and I really like it. Thanks to all of you who have given me advice here.
Renee

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clipped on: 04.16.2012 at 06:52 pm    last updated on: 04.16.2012 at 06:52 pm

Recurring Dream photos

posted by: hosenemesis on 03.14.2012 at 12:02 am in Iris Forum

Recurring Dream is my first iris to bloom this year. It was sent to me by Irisgal, I believe.
Happy gardening, iris lovers.
Renee

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clipped on: 04.14.2012 at 07:34 pm    last updated on: 04.14.2012 at 07:34 pm

Huntington Garden Photos from Last Weekend

posted by: aimeekitty on 04.04.2012 at 07:41 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

I thought you guys would appreciate this as a lot of the delphinium area is very cottagey feeling (so pretty!)

More on my blog: http://aimeesroses.wordpress.com/2012/04/04/huntington-gardens-blooms-late-march/

Here is a link that might be useful: Huntington Gardens Blooms on Aimee's Blog

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clipped on: 04.08.2012 at 06:47 pm    last updated on: 04.08.2012 at 06:47 pm

Iris pics

posted by: hosenemesis on 04.06.2012 at 11:18 pm in Iris Forum

Hi iris buddies,
Here's what has bloomed so far in my garden.

First was Recurring Dream (purply-blue) and Lady Friend.
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Northwest Progress.
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City Lights.
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First time bloom on Telepathy.
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First time for Larry Gaulter.
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Aaahhhhhh- first time for Peach Royale!
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clipped on: 04.07.2012 at 06:19 pm    last updated on: 04.07.2012 at 06:19 pm

RE: Adding more food to the garden? (Follow-Up #17)

posted by: lavender_lass on 03.06.2012 at 09:59 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

Daisychain- I have a similar problem...but with roses! I found a nice plan for a veggie garden online, but I keep thinking how great it would be with old garden roses and herbs! LOL

From Lavender's Garden

CMK- I know we're not supposed to mix perennials and annuals, so don't you think it would be nice, to mix in some roses with the asparagus? Maybe on each corner and around the little bench, in the plan? Maybe some shorter roses, on the front corners...just to balance things out? :)

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Nice veggy garden plan
clipped on: 03.09.2012 at 07:12 am    last updated on: 03.09.2012 at 07:12 am

A perfect moment

posted by: Merilia on 06.13.2011 at 06:50 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

Yesterday I enjoyed a blissful morning outside. It was sunny and warm, and the late morning sun made everything glow. I've got countless gardening chores left to do, but instead I just wandered around watching the bees buzzing all over the lupines, nepeta and salvia, silently pleading the roses to finally open those buds they've been teasing me with for weeks, inspecting the seedlings in the veggie plot, and watching the cat follow me around. Times like these are why I bother to garden!

Kitty smells a flower

And then he sees a bee!

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clipped on: 06.13.2011 at 08:48 pm    last updated on: 06.13.2011 at 08:48 pm

A friends cottage garden

posted by: aftermidnight on 04.19.2010 at 10:47 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

On sunday I went over to a friends to see his tulips in bloom. I asked his permission to show some of his garden with you so here are a few pics. I was feeling quite smug and patting myself on the back on how nice my tulips were doing until I saw this display.

Annette

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clipped on: 05.15.2011 at 08:14 am    last updated on: 05.15.2011 at 08:14 am

Some Hollyhock photos (7)

posted by: schoolhouse on 06.17.2010 at 08:12 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

Rose/pink, light pink/white and an almost pure white:

Blooming so far at the picket fence:

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clipped on: 05.15.2011 at 08:08 am    last updated on: 05.15.2011 at 08:08 am

RE: I just love Zinnias (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: organic_kitten on 03.10.2011 at 08:19 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

My neighbor had that huge bed of zinnias last year, and she generously shared her seeds.

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Very late in the year, I have a pure white zinnia volunteer. My neighbor had talked so much about wanting some white ones that I pulled it up and repotted and kept it in the greenhouse until I had a few blooms to harvest for her.

I am planting a lot more zinnias this year.
kay

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clipped on: 05.15.2011 at 08:02 am    last updated on: 05.15.2011 at 08:03 am

Iris and their companions * lots of photos *

posted by: gottagarden on 03.16.2011 at 01:19 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

Spring is coming, and to get you excited about iris season coming up, here are some photos of iris and companion bloomers from my garden.

iris "Gypsy Romance" - my favorite. this is not photoshop, colors are really that brilliant

From Iris 2010

From Iris 2010


From Iris 2010

Got the blues . . .

From Iris 2010

From Iris 2010

Samurai Warrior and blooms of 'ravenswin​g' cow parsley

From Iris 2008

iris samurai warrior in front of red barberry

From Iris 2010

baptisia australis(​wild blue indigo) makes a great foil for this particular iris - late and tall

From Iris 2010

From Iris 2010

iris Dover Beach - photo is inadequate to how gorgeous these were, and long blooming too.

From Iris 2010

From Iris 2010

From Iris 2008

From Iris 2008

prettiest flower of all (and look at the size of those blooms!)

From Iris 2008

BTW - I'm cross posting to iris forum.

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clipped on: 05.15.2011 at 08:01 am    last updated on: 05.15.2011 at 08:01 am

Mom's cottage garden peaks (pics)

posted by: hosenemesis on 05.15.2011 at 12:56 am in Cottage Garden Forum

Hi all,
I went to my mom's house today to look at her garden. It looks lovely, so I took some photos to share with you. The pink rose is Guy de Maupassant, the white is Perdita, the small pink is Our Lady of Guadaloupe, the big flowered dark pink is Yves Piaget. The iris is Sweet Musette, and the other flowers are foxgloves, alstroemerias, and columbines.

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This is her tomato bed. It has been invaded by Mme Julia Correvon and Jackmanni clematis, red asiatic lilies and screaming pink ivy geraniums.
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Oh yeah- we met the nicest English lady down the street on Mother's Day, and got a tour of her HUGE cottage garden. I'm trying to finagle a good day to go over and snap some shots for you all.
Renee

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clipped on: 05.15.2011 at 07:19 am    last updated on: 05.15.2011 at 07:19 am

RE: black little ants indoor - how to get rid of them? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: marquest on 01.10.2004 at 02:25 am in Tips & Techniques Forum

20 Mule Team Borax. Sell in the grocery stores with the detergent. Mix half powdered sugar with the borax and sprinkle some on them. They take it back to the nest and they should be gone in a week. When you first start to see them sprinkle them. If you know the trail sprinkle the trail. I spinkle around the windows and doors.

I have gotten rid of all ants with this stuff Big black ants, red ants.

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Ants indoors
clipped on: 05.01.2011 at 07:43 am    last updated on: 05.01.2011 at 07:43 am

RE: Best books on southern gardening (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: girlgroupgirl on 03.20.2010 at 08:32 pm in Georgia Gardener Forum

Gardening 'Round Atlanta (for Atlantans), Southern Gardeners book of lists, anything by Allen Armitage - he writes general books but always says how things do in Athens for him. All books by Elizabeth Lawrence, Southern Herb Gardening by Madeline Hill.

And many, many more!

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clipped on: 04.10.2011 at 05:27 pm    last updated on: 04.10.2011 at 05:27 pm

I love irises.

posted by: hosenemesis on 04.20.2010 at 10:50 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

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World Premier with Foxgloves
WORLD PREMIER AND FOXGLOVES
Total Recall, the best ever iris! with Marmalade Skies rose
TOTAL RECALL

MAID OF ORANGE
Maid of Orange border iris
TOTAL RECALL
New Arbor
FREQUENT FLYER
Frequent Flyer with Paludosum Daisies
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Lady Friend and Total Recall
ALICE GOODMAN AND LADY FRIEND
Alice Goodman and Lady Friend
NEW LEAF
New Leaf with Mariposa Autumn in the background

It finally rained in Southern California.
Renee

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clipped on: 04.28.2010 at 10:16 pm    last updated on: 04.28.2010 at 10:17 pm

RE: I can't believe I actually paid money for............ (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: seamommy on 06.22.2009 at 01:23 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

Virginia Creeper should be renamed Hostile Takeover. I bought a little slip of it several years ago after I saw it growing on the wall of an old brick mansion. It was so beautiful I decided to let it grow over my little brick well-house. Didn't take long to overtake the well house and start on the cars. Then I found it growing wild on one of my pecan trees and DH and I spent a sweaty afternoon pulling it down. It took me several hours to get it off the well house and yesterday I noticed that it has rebounded from the pruning off of the pecan tree and is now twice as high. And I'm finding it in all my flower beds. It has runners just under the soil surface that go for 50 feet. I guess if it doesn't find anything to climb it will just cover the ground. I pulled up ropes and ropes of it yesterday out of the grass. Come to think of it, it would make good ropes, cause it's tough as nails, but the surface of the vine is smooth and fairly easy to handle and very flexible.

Oh, and I have lemon bomb too, but so far after 8 years it is still confined to one 5x15' bed and hasn't made the leap for freedom.

Blue mist flower-it can come up through a concrete sidewalk. It spreads by seeds, roots, rhyzomes and magic. It has a mind of it's own and plan for world domination. The fact that the hummers and flutterbys love it so much is a diversion to throw you off the track-it's a wolf in sheep's clothing, a garden terrorist, Osama Bin Misty. In my own defense, I didn't pay money for it, I got it in a trade from a formerly trusted friend who shall remain nameless.

I have (dis)obedient plant too, but find that it can be contained in an area if you have a trench around it. The roots only like to go so far underground and they don't like to jump over anything. And the roots also are easy to see when you dig it up, so it's not nearly such a formidable enemy as Hostile Takeover, Lemon Bomb or Osama Bin Misty. Cheryl

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clipped on: 06.23.2009 at 12:59 pm    last updated on: 06.23.2009 at 12:59 pm

RE: Rust (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: gail_ish on 05.19.2009 at 09:50 am in Cottage Garden Forum

Has anyone ever tried this recipe? I was thinking of trying it myself this year:

Healthy Hollyhock Spray
1 1/2 tsp. baking soda
1 tbsp. canola oil
1/2 tsp. Ivory dish liquid soap
1/2 C. white vinegar
1 gallon water.

Gail

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clipped on: 05.19.2009 at 09:28 pm    last updated on: 05.19.2009 at 09:28 pm

RE: Pics Anyone? of Caryopteris aka Bluebeard (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: bekcgarden on 05.01.2009 at 08:29 am in Cottage Garden Forum

Here is a google images link:

http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=sunshine+blue+caryopteris&gbv=2&aq=f&oq=

We have 2 different kinds (I can't remember which) and we love them.

Here is a link that might be useful: Google Images

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clipped on: 05.02.2009 at 07:49 am    last updated on: 05.02.2009 at 07:49 am

RE: Using cardboard in the garden! (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: ellenr on 03.16.2008 at 10:19 am in Organic Gardening Forum

I also found that worms love newspaper!
[I think they preferred NYTimes, very erudite worms in NJ]

When I put down newspaper to get rid of some weeds, I found I had more worms under it, than anywhere else.

ellen

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clipped on: 04.24.2009 at 06:42 am    last updated on: 04.24.2009 at 06:42 am

Safe Green Pesticides

posted by: sweetannie4u on 03.26.2009 at 07:51 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

I found this article in Harris' Gardening Almanac, pg. 54-55. I thought I would post it here for those of you interested in organic methods of controlling insects in your cottage & veggie gardens rather than poisoning them. Here are a few of the ideas found in the article:

Try these alternatives to commercial chemical products
by N. E. MacDougald

Borax - Cockroaches & ants hate it. Sprinkle 1/4 tsp around affected plants or areas. Caution: too much Borax is toxic, so stick with the tiny amount given and keep out of reach of children and pets).

Liquid garlic - Sprayed on plants & in orchards, it keeps birds away.

Garlic Barrier - Peel and mince a head of garlic; add to a quart of water; let it sit a few hours. Strain and spray. (I use this method. Can be used year round, if needed. Does not affect taste of fruit. You can also add crushed mint- repels aphids and ants.)

HOMEMADE PESTICIDES

Diluted vinegar - also called acetic acid-is a fine organic weed killer. Dilute it to 5%, 10%, or 20% strength with water----yes, the stuff you use to clean floors---and pour it into a spray bottle or if you need to cover a large area, a backpack sprayer. Vinegar acts as a defoliant, not a poison.Spray it onto the plants you want to kill, but wait for hot, sunny weather for best results. Spraying on cool, overcast days will have no effect. (note: If you use 5% apple-cider vinegar that you use for cooking, you need not dilute it.)

Dishwater - is an effective and virtually free insecticide. Put your (used) dishwater in a watering can and use it on mums and hostas. For a stronger insecticide, add three tablespoons of dishwashing detergent to a gallon of water and use it weekly.

Saltwater spray - is as simple as it sounds and works on cabbage worms and spider mites. Dissolve a couple of Tablespoons of salt in a gallon of water, mix and spray.

Spearmint-hot pepper-horseradish spray - is effective on a variety of insects. Mix the spearmint leaves horseradish, onion tops andpeppers together with sufficient water to cover everything. Strain the solution. After mixing all of these, add a half-gallon of water and 2 Tablespoons of liquid dishwashing detergent. Dilute this solution 50/50 with water. Use to spray most plants safely. You can store this solution for a few days in a cool place.

Ingredients:
1/2 cp. of hot peppers
1/2 cp. fresh spearmint
1/2 cp. horseradish, roots and leaves
1/2 cp green onion tops
2 Tbsp.liquid dishwashing detergent
Water (as needed to dilute).

This last one is my favorite organic solution that I have used since the 70s. I predominantly use it for spraying roses, strawberries and all fruit-bearing vines, bushes, brambles and trees, but it can be good for anything bothered by Japanese beetles, mites, thrips, aphids, ants, and etc. Grasshoppers don't like it either. It softens the exoskeletons of hard-shelled insects, which causes them to die.

(Note: For Tent caterpillars, I simply use a torch and burn them out of my trees. It is very effective!)

Beneficial Insects..................................Controls
Aphid midges................................Aphids
Beneficial wasps............................Green Peach & Apple Aphids
Dragonflies.................................Mosquitoes, Gnats
Ground Beetles..............................Cabbge-root maggots, cutworms, snails, slug eggs, armyworms,, tent caterpillars

Lacewings...................................Aphids, scale, sm. caterpillars, thrips
"Ladybugs"..................................Aphids, mealybugs, spider mites
Mealybug destroyer..........................Mealybugs
Minute pirate bug...........................Thrips, mites
Parasitic wasps.............................Whitefly, aphids, some pest caterpillars
Predatory mites.............................Fungus gnats, thrips, spider mites

Rose beetles................................Root maggot
Scale predator beetles......................Soft scales
Spined soldier bug..........................Colorado potato & Mexican bean beetle
Syrphid flies...............................Aphids
Tachnid flies...............................Tent caterpillars & armyworms
------------------------------------------------------
end

These things will not kill 100% of the insects - they are not poisons, but it will keep them in-check for a more natural solution to pest infestations in the garden.

~Annie

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clipped on: 03.27.2009 at 05:56 am    last updated on: 03.27.2009 at 05:56 am

RE: Hollyhock, Hollyhock, Oh Holly, Holly, Holly... (Follow-Up #31)

posted by: memo on 03.11.2009 at 10:44 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

OneEagleOne, THANK YOU, for bringing this post to the top again. I missed this last summer when I was on hiatus.

TM, I can not believe how beautifully this corner garden of yours has filled out over the past few years since you planted it. Your Hollyhocks are to die for!

I really wish I had written down the name of the person who posted this recipe here on the forum a few years ago, so I could give credit where credit is due. Please forgive me, whoever you are. Perhaps this will help some of you who have problems with rust. I never needed it, yeah! but I don't have any hollyhocks at moment either, so I can't really say how well it works from personal experience.

MeMo

Healthy Hollyhock Spray

1 1/2 tsp. Baking Soda
1 Tbl. Canola Oil
1/2 tsp. Ivory dish soap
1/2 Cup White Vinegar
1 gal. Water

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clipped on: 03.12.2009 at 07:57 pm    last updated on: 03.12.2009 at 07:57 pm

Preparing Plants for Shipping

posted by: remy on 04.07.2008 at 04:59 pm in Plant Exchange Forum

Hi All,
I was asked (and have been asked before) about how to prepare plants for shipping. I put together a photobucket album with descriptions of how I do it. I may have been too thorough, but better than not enough info right? lol.
I do hope people find it helpful!
Remy

Here is a link that might be useful: Preparing Plants For Shipping

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clipped on: 02.21.2009 at 07:27 am    last updated on: 02.21.2009 at 07:27 am

RE: Got a clever idea?? (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: ingrid_vc on 02.13.2009 at 10:00 pm in Roses Forum

Okay, I've finally thought of one! Alas, I didn't invent this one either. For getting rid of those pesky weeds in the cracks of your driveway or patio, put white vinegar in a spray bottle and spray the little darlings. They will be stone dead by the next day. No poisons, very little money, and great satisfaction.

Ingrid

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clipped on: 02.14.2009 at 08:57 am    last updated on: 02.14.2009 at 08:57 am

RE: organizing your seeds (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: susanc on 02.02.2009 at 12:50 pm in Seed Exchange Forum

Hi Nichol,

Some thoughts for you:

"Do you split up all of your seeds when you first get them, or do you wait until someone wants some or how do you do that part???"

With seeds I purchase or receive in trades, I do pretty much what Doris does and usually don't put them on my trade list until after I'm done sowing. However, when I harvest something that I want to sow, and I have plenty of it, I will divy it up right away and add some to my sow stash and some to my trade list/trade box.

"Oh, and where is there info about how to plant different seeds. like perennials, annuals and some of the herbs. Someone told me how to plant stevia, but I am unsure about rosmary, and many of the perennials in the book I am reading say it can take 2-8 weeks."

I use the following databases a lot to figure out when I want to start my seeds. I.e., if the database says a seed needs a cold period, I will know I need to winter sow it in January/February cuz that's the only time we get 'cold' temps. Most seeds are pretty forgiving though, and you will be fine just throwing them out the door without looking up info on them. However, if you enjoy research, as I do, there's lots of good info at these sites:

A great resource for determining whether a particular seed requires cold or warm temps to germinate is the Seed Germination Database at the Backyard Gardener site.

http://www.backyardgardener.com/tm1.html

The Seed Site is a wonderful resource. It has pics of teeny-tiny seedlings to help you identify what's coming up in containers that have lost their labels and also has a good germination database.

http://www.theseedsite.co.uk/

Tom Clothier's site has germination databases for perennials, annuals/biennuals, penstemons(?!?) and trees/shrubs

http://tomclothier.hort.net/

Lastly, if you can't find germination info at any of the above. B & T World seeds lists 35,000 seeds and has germination info on most of them.

You can look up plants at:

http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/

Re hybrids coming true. Not much to add to Sue's excellent post, except that I have become hooked on growing rose's from seeds. Like hybrid daylilies, hybrid roses have such complex ancestories that the babies are often quite different from mom; Sometimes they are butt ugly, but sometimes they are really, really lovely and the payoff is quite satisfying. (It's cheaper than gambling in Vegas...)

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clipped on: 02.03.2009 at 06:54 am    last updated on: 02.03.2009 at 06:55 am

RE: Hollyhock plants (Follow-Up #35)

posted by: memo on 03.14.2008 at 02:24 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

Here is a spray for Hollyhocks that someone, here at the cottage, posted a year or two ago. I'd give credit to that person if I had written down who it was...Sorry! It is supposed to stop RUST from happening. I haven't had to use it, yet, so I hope that it helps those of you that need it.

Healthy Hollyhock Spray

1 1/2 tsp. Baking Soda
1 T. Canola Oil
1/2 tsp. Ivory Dish Soap
1/2 C. White Vinegar
1 gal. water

MeMo

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clipped on: 01.30.2009 at 02:47 pm    last updated on: 01.30.2009 at 02:47 pm

pictures of a cottage summer garden

posted by: mikenl on 07.13.2008 at 09:37 am in Cottage Garden Forum

Dear gardening friends,
As promised in an earlier post I uploaded 137 new pictures of our cottage garden to my website today. If you would like to see the abundance of our little paradise, please follow the link, mentioned below. I hope you will enjoy.
Kind regards,
Mike from Holland
PS: To navigate in your own language, please click your flag below...

Here is a link that might be useful: Here you can visit the photo-archive

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clipped on: 07.13.2008 at 04:06 pm    last updated on: 07.13.2008 at 04:06 pm

Hooker Formula (Follow-Up #32)

posted by: foxesearth on 05.28.2008 at 01:58 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

Mary, George Hooker's formula is a daylily forum favorite. Mr. Hooker's original formula calls for measurements in coffee cans and orange juice cans. All the ingredients plus some water were mixed together to make the stock. Then the stock was further diluted and slowly poured around the roots of the plant.

I omit the pesticide he recommended in 1978 and the liqued iron (my blue stuff had iron) and just mix one five gallon bucketful of dilute, ready-to-apply mix:

5 tablespoons of that fertilizer stuff that turns the water blue, your choice.
1/3 cup fish emulsion fertilizer
1/3 cup Epsom salts
5 gallons of water.

If you're a purist, you could use compost tea instead of the blue fertilizer and water and just add fish emulsion and Epsom salts.

To minimize sloshing out all my solution, I put everything except water in two five gallon buckets on my little wagon, pull them to the area I'm going to fertilize, add water to the first bucket, dip and pour on everything in easy reach until it's gone and then move on to fill the second bucket at the next area. Oh, you add solution by size of plant. The daylily people put 2-4 cups, by size of clump.

Warning: Fish emulsion is awfully smelly. One year there was a recipe on the daylily forum for something even worse that added alfalfa and let it ferment for a day or so. It was not for those who can't abide bad smells, lemme tell you!

Libby, we should start a thread about pretty plants that just aren't cute any more.
My Sago Palm has 34 new fronds this spring.
It was cute when it finally had 12 one year and 16 the next....
Now I have to start a tropical bed around it so it doesn't look 'funny' or it might need to go.
Nell

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clipped on: 05.31.2008 at 10:09 am    last updated on: 05.31.2008 at 10:09 am

RE: Propagation HELP!!! from broken branch (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: collinw on 03.20.2008 at 12:22 am in Rose Propagation Forum

1. Cut off one of the lateral stems. Green wood roots more readily than woody growth. About 5-6 inches long is ideal.
2.Strip off all of the leaves but 2 or three at the top of the cutting.
3.With a sharp knife, cut the bottom at an angle. I use an x-acto knife.
4.Then make a series of very shallow cuts parallel with the stem at the bottom of the cutting; you just want to cut through the outer skin. Think of them as scratches.
5.Wet the end and dip in rooting hormone.Shake off excess.
6. Put rooting medium of your choice in 4" plastic pots and water. (I use ordinary garden soil, but some people get fancy) Poke holes in center with a pencil.
7. Put cutting in soil being careful not to rub off the hormone, press soil firmly around the cutting.
8. Place pot in large plastic zip-up bag.
9. Blow up with air.
10. Place bag in a sunny window.
11. DO NOT MESS WITH IT FOR AT LEAST 4 WEEKS, except to blow up bags with air. Do not water, do not wiggle the cutting, do not fuss with it daily.

12. If you just have to know if it is forming roots you can very, very gently pull on the end of the cutting. If you feel resistance it is rooting.

13. When you see roots coming out of the bottom of the pot, replant it in a larger pot.

Note: If you notice mold growing around the stem you can open the bag and spray it with hydrogen peroxide diluted with water. Say 3 tablespoons in a quart of water.

Hope that this helps. I have very good results with this method. The most important thing is to resist the urge to mess with it too much.

Cheers,
Collin

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clipped on: 03.29.2008 at 09:17 am    last updated on: 03.29.2008 at 09:18 am

RE: Time for a new Book List????? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: slubberdegulion on 06.17.2006 at 06:27 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

Okay, I'll bite, but since Patti has the "How To" thread going, I'll stay (mostly) away from those.

Here's a sort of gardener's vacation:
In New York, Diane Ackerman talks about gardening/life in Cultivating Delight. (I loved A Natural History of the Senses also, which has some mentions of her passions, like rose gardening.) I can't remember there being any how-to's, but the imagery is wonderful. I remember her mentioning her sassafras trees, which I still can't get established here...grr...

Also from New York was Sara Stein, author of Noah's Garden (and Planting Noah's Garden, My Weeds, etc). She is pro-natives and will be happy to tell you why. I can't say that I agree with all of her writing, but her books have been a big influence on me.

And yet again in New York, Lee Reich grows Uncommon Fruits for Every Garden. My copy is very well-thumbed. If only I had room for a few more fruit trees..

Then, in Vermont, Dorothy Sucher buys a blue farmhouse in The Invisible Garden. The characters she meets are entertaining. While in Vermont, you might visit Jamaica Kincaid, who wrote My Garden (Book). She talks about her hatred of winter, trips she has taken and her life in general and, of course, gardening.

In Missouri (or Maine, depending), you can find Sue Hubbell discussing bees, various other invertebrates, plants, and living in the country. Not exactly a gardening book, but I've enjoyed all of her books. Try A Country Year: Living the Questions.

In California, Amy Stewart moves to a sea-side cottage in From the Ground Up. She offers up advice, laughs, and many qoutes from other authors that are great leads to other works. I also enjoyed her book on worms, called The Earth Moved.

Also in California, Peter D'Amato will tell you how you too can cultivate The Savage Garden. Okay, so this is pretty much a How-To, but if you've ever felt jealous that my bog is prettier than yours, this will be a good read for you. Actually, he makes raising carnivorous plants sound very easy (it is) and walks you through all the steps. What I liked most is his "you can do it!" way of writing.

Then, in England, Beverly Nichols has written many hilarious books about his gardening. Good campy fun. Down the Garden Path begins with him buying a new place after reading an obituary while at sea.

Stop by the Chiltern Hills where Claire Leighton writes about her garden in Four Hedges. You've probably seen her engravings used in other books. She'll tell you about her chalky soil among other things.

In Europe, Daniel Blajan writes about Foxgloves and Hedgehog Days: Secrets in a Country garden. I want hedgehogs!! He wants you to see the magic inherent in gardens. Great light reading.

And my copy of Jurgen Dahl's The Curious Gardener is still extensively bookmarked. Read about odd food-stuffs (odd to me), stinky plants, frost flowers, etc. Wonderful essays.

One of my favorite "classics" is The Gardener's Year by Karel Capek, I laugh every time I read it. Whenever I'm planting "sticks", fighting a hose, or balancing on an elbow and toe to reach a weed, I think of his book.

And last, how about some Chickens in Your Backyard? Rick and Gail Luttmann will tell you how in this very basic and low-scare how-to book. It was one of the 1st chicken books I read and it lead me on to others. I still dream of having chickens... I suppose that's sort of a para-gardening book.

Okay, can you tell it's too hot to garden today?
Kent
(glad the blanket flower seeds did well Georgeanne!)

NOTES:

Favorite books
clipped on: 11.17.2007 at 07:09 am    last updated on: 11.17.2007 at 07:09 am

pathway finally done

posted by: DAVISSUE_zone9 on 03.23.2005 at 12:56 am in Garden Accoutrements Forum

Last year I posted pictures of the leaves I'd made in anticipation of making a pathway. I promised then I'd post a picture of the finished path. Finally last month I got those leaves in the ground. Here's how it turned out. The leaves were made using the formula provided in the faq section- white portland cement, white sand, buff liquid coloring. I used several species of leaves to make the steppingstones.

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clipped on: 08.11.2007 at 08:26 pm    last updated on: 08.11.2007 at 08:26 pm

RE: Hypertufa Rocks???? (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: wendy2shoes on 07.28.2007 at 09:43 pm in Hypertufa Forum

I use 1 part each sand, perlite or vermiculite, peat, and cement, then water mixed in to 'cottage cheese' consistency. Mine start out brown, I guess because of the peat, but then they whiten up in a month or so. As the peat rots, I get nice holes and green moss on them, to add to the natural look.
When they first come out of the bags though, they look like "dinosaur poop" to quote my DH.

NOTES:

Formula for hypertufa rocks
clipped on: 08.10.2007 at 03:31 pm    last updated on: 08.10.2007 at 03:31 pm

RE: Hypertufa Rocks???? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: wendy2shoes on 07.09.2007 at 11:31 am in Hypertufa Forum

I make rocks from hypertufa by just plopping a half shovel full into plastic shopping bags, twist them closed and lay them on the ground on top of the twist to keep them closed. Two days later I unwrap them, and out they go to my bed edge.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

NOTES:

Artificial rocks
clipped on: 08.10.2007 at 03:22 pm    last updated on: 08.10.2007 at 03:22 pm

Pronouncing Botanical Latin:

posted by: deshima on 08.08.2006 at 10:14 am in Master Gardeners Forum

This link will pronounce the names of most botanicals so you can always sound like a pro, you can also save the *.wav file and create your own dictionary. You could also down load the files to an ipod and take it with you. It would also be very usful if you ever gave a tour of your local botanical garden. I think this is one of the best freebie I have seen on the web, enjoy.

Here is a link that might be useful: Pronouncing Botanical Latin:

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clipped on: 02.17.2007 at 06:20 pm    last updated on: 02.17.2007 at 06:20 pm

RE: Fade - wear proof markers? (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: deeee on 07.06.2005 at 05:47 pm in Garden Accoutrements Forum

the absolute best marker, last a very long time, barely fades is an Allflex Tag pen. you buy at a feed or livestock supply store, last time i bought one it was about $6 or so, and i beleive they only come in black. It is designed to mark numbers on the ear tags that go into an animals ear. I had ear tags i could still clearly read after more than 10 years...don't get it on anything accidently, it DOES NOT COME OFF!!! I always had to hide them from my family or they would get used for the wrong things! trust me, these are the longest lasting pens you will find.

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clipped on: 11.09.2006 at 08:53 pm    last updated on: 11.09.2006 at 08:54 pm