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RE: What is the 'One True Kitchen? I Want Photo Examples Please (Follow-Up #50)

posted by: marcolo on 11.19.2011 at 05:48 pm in Kitchens Forum

And the One True Kitchen spoke to her, making her heart sing:

I. I am the One True Kitchen, who brought thee out of the land of cheap builder's grade oak and shiny brass. Thou shalt not install any strange kitchens before Me; nor paint thy walls a non-neutral color; nor make for thyself any likeness of the Sopranos' kitchen, or early '90s Tuscan. Nor shalt thou apply any graven appliques upon thy Shaker cabinets. Thou shalt not prefer other kitchen styles, for I, the One True Kitchen, am a jealous Kitchen, visiting iniquity on them that hate Me.

II. Thou shalt not take any countertop unless it came with veins.

III. Remember the annual Crown Point holiday sale; eleven months shalt thou pay full retail; but on the twelfth month thou shalt negotiate, when it shall be surprisingly affordable.

IV. Honor thy subway tile and thy farmhouse sink, that thou shall not tire of thy kitchen for many days.

V. Thou shalt not spill, especially wine or lemon juice unless thou buyest soapstone.

VI. Thou shalt not commit to any slab unless thou hast tested it first with ketchup.

VII. Thou shalt steal everything from Christopher Peacock's website that isn't tied down and copy it exactly.

VIII. Thou shalt not bear to go without a false door unless it is up against a neighboring cabinet.

IX. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's colorful countertop; or her colorful backsplash; or her colorful paint; or her stained cabinets; or her dreadful four-inch strip of granite before the tile starts, what was she thinking.

X. Thou shalt not covet anything that is thy neighbor's, for it is not timeless and classic and she has no taste.

NOTES:

My favorite ever!
clipped on: 11.19.2011 at 10:31 pm    last updated on: 11.20.2011 at 12:13 am

RE: Help! Preferred direction of veining along a long countertop (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: jrueter on 04.09.2010 at 08:58 pm in Kitchens Forum

I have a dark granite (marron cohiba) with white veins running across the short dimension - on the island and on the countertops. On the countertops it goes from the wall to the edge in a couple of places

I love the way it looks, especially because we did a mitered edge that really allows the vein to be integrated into the edge well

island
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end of counter run
end of sink run

near space for range
next to gap for range

Have you talked to your fabricator about the layout?

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clipped on: 11.17.2011 at 11:20 pm    last updated on: 11.17.2011 at 11:25 pm

RE: super white quartzite irl--omg!!!!!!!!! (Follow-Up #43)

posted by: mbarbie on 03.23.2011 at 02:23 pm in Kitchens Forum

Hi All,
We went with what our supplier in CT called Vermont White Quartzite and it's really not that grey at all and goes well with the BM White Dove on the cabinets. We mixed it with a black granite with white streaks called Via Lactea ( Dushi Marble & Granite) 203-978-0038 Stamford,CT
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clipped on: 10.16.2011 at 01:42 pm    last updated on: 10.16.2011 at 01:42 pm

RE: Modern country with a bit of rustic kitchen (Follow-Up #45)

posted by: pps7 on 11.12.2010 at 02:58 pm in Kitchens Forum

Hello again! I finally bought counter stools-The Turner from C&B.

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Carters5, the windows are Windsor Pinnacle glad. We are happy with them so far, but both my son and DH have allergies so we rearely open them.

leela4, the shelves are from Elmwood;I've linked the website below. They are very, very rustic. I was worried how they were going to look, I didn't expect them to be so beat up with splinters, holes etc. But once they were up, they looked great. We wanted to create the illusion that they were 'floated'. We used L brakcets, cutting out the drywall and screwing them straight into the studs. We then mud over them and painted.

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Here is a link that might be useful: Elmwood

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clipped on: 09.25.2011 at 10:39 am    last updated on: 09.25.2011 at 10:39 am

Ceramic Beadboard Backpslash - Done

posted by: SusieQusie60 on 08.20.2011 at 09:07 am in Kitchens Forum

This past week we had our ceramic beadboard backsplash installed. I'm very happy with it! Here are some pix if anyone is interested:
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You can probably tell that I ultimately decided to go with the "mellow" theme in my kitchen with the backsplash. I picked something I thought would really blend, leaving my floor and my backsplash (both dark) to really "pop" in my kitchen.

Not a whole lot between me and completion at this point - glass inserts, under cabinet lighting, a few pieces of trim. Can't believe I might really have a "Finished Kitchen" soon.

SQ

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clipped on: 09.08.2011 at 09:33 pm    last updated on: 09.08.2011 at 09:33 pm

RE: Show me your Arts and Crafts / Bungalow / Craftsman backsplas (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: sharon_s on 11.27.2007 at 04:51 pm in Kitchens Forum

Pinar,

Here you go. I can't seem to get pictures that do the tiles justice, but it is what it is. I know what you mean about the colors being hard to pick! The tiles are handmade, and there is variation--even in the same color. So you really need to see actual samples--and even then there will be variation from tile to tile. Anyone who likes a uniform look should stay far away from these.

They worked well for us, though. Our house is 100 years old, and the original fireplace tiles are very much like the Trikeenan tiles--color variation and imperfections in glazing. So, it all works well together.

My tiles are a combination of 4 colors: fog (the greener color), sharkskin, and two creams. I'm blanking on the names of the cream.

Hope this helps some.

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clipped on: 09.07.2011 at 02:18 pm    last updated on: 09.07.2011 at 02:18 pm

Another Garden Web Inspired Finished Kitchen ( Lots of Pics)

posted by: LRy511 on 09.05.2011 at 04:42 pm in Kitchens Forum

My new kitchen makes me smile. I have to thank everyone at the Garden Web Kitchen Forum for giving me wonderful, practical ideas to help create my new kitchen. I also have to thank my DH for allowing me to do what I wanted to do in this kitchen, mainly white cabinets.

I have lived in this house for 13 years and always knew one day we would (God willing) renovate the kitchen. At first I wanted to change everything as far as layout, however, as time went on I discovered the layout really worked well and all I need to do was tweak a few areas. I needed to create a larger prep zone; I needed the garbage bin to by my prep zone and not half way across the kitchen. I also needed move the microwave away from the range at the request of my four children. I switched the refrigerator and wall oven to shrink the work triangle. My DH and I debated whether to put in a narrow island/ table or keep our kitchen table. We decided the space would be too small for an island and I liked the family sitting around the table and talking to one another and not seated bar style.

Many thanks to the Garden Web for giving me the impetus to ask if we could raise an obtrusive beam (left over from a 1985 renovation) into the ceiling. This beam caused the 6" vent pipe to run through several cabinets severely limiting my storage space. All gone now! This alone helped to create more storage space .We also expanded the opening into the family room and eliminated a door into the dining room and upgraded the windows to tilt-ins.


Appliances:
Range: Electrolux Induction Cooktop Range with second oven.
Wall oven: Electrolux single wall oven
Refrigerator: Kitchen Aid Architect II French Door Refrigerator (KFCS22EVMS4) Love the water feature inside!
Dishwasher: Kitchen Aid KUDE40FXPA panel ready. And Yes! you can integrate a Kitchen Aid if you know up front you need to allow for an extra �" in length. My CG put an extra �" sheet of sheet rock on the wall and cut out the space for the dishwasher. We had plenty of room to accommodate the Kitchen Aid and make it look integrated.
Microwave: GE Monogram ZEM200SF
Hood: Broan Elite Rangemaster Power Pack RMP17004
Cabinets: Dura Supreme: Crestwood series
Arcadia Classic, Maple perimeter in classic white
Arcadia Classic, Cherry Hutch peninsula
Granite: New Venetian Gold
Hardware: Amerock 96mm Westerly Pulls in Satin Nickel
Amerock Revitalize Knobs in Satin Nickel
Sink: Franke Orca sink, Love,Love,Love!!!
Faucet: Kohler K-690 Vinnata in polished chrome
Lotion Dispenser: Kohler Fairfax collection
Backsplash: Sonoma Tile; market collection, Ashbury Series in Mojave ( 4x4, subway, bead liner and moulding) also, Tumbled Honey onyx .
Under cabinet Lighting: Utilitech LED under cabinet lights
Flooring: Verde1999, Moonstone 20 x 20 porcelain tiles.
Charging Drawer
Wall Color: BM 1639 Windy Sky

Before:
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After:
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After:
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message center:
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charging drawer:
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Before:
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After:
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eating area:
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After:
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Future Roman Shade Fabric for windows:
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Orca Sink:
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love the lowered outlets:
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Drawers for pots:
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New Floor:
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Sam loves it too!
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granite
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integrated dishwasher:
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Thank You looking at our pictures!

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clipped on: 09.05.2011 at 05:52 pm    last updated on: 09.05.2011 at 05:52 pm

Finished Peppercorn/Delicatus White for FKB

posted by: kitchenaddict on 06.21.2010 at 06:32 pm in Kitchens Forum

Here are my official digital pictures for the FKB, along with the list of details as requested by starpooh....

Cabinets- Kraftmaid Peppercorn Stain on cherry
Cabinet Door Style-Layton
Granite--Delicatus White
Flooring-Pergo Select Laminate in Red Prairie Pine
Range-GE Profile
Microwave-LG
Dishwasher- LG
Refridgerator-Fridgedaire Professional
Backsplash- Crema Marfil Tumbled Marble
Sink- Blanco Silgranit in Anthracite
Faucet- Delta Talbot
Pendants- Bellacor Seeded Bell Jar with Brushed Nickel
Pulls- Kraftmaid

Peppercorn Kraftmaid Cabinets

Here is a link that might be useful: Peppercorn Cabinet Kitchen

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.05.2011 at 02:48 pm    last updated on: 09.05.2011 at 02:49 pm

Marble gets edge--more kitchen progress pictures

posted by: sandn on 04.28.2011 at 03:47 pm in Kitchens Forum

Back in January, we asked this forum to help us choose an edge for our our marble counter top. And of course you very helpfully did. There's a link to my original post at the bottom of this post.
Just as you helped us with our decision to choose soapstone over stainless for our perimeter counters, the kitchen forum emboldened us to try an unusual edge on the marble for our island. And when I say try, I mean try for the next 40 or so years, since it's not every day one replaces a marble counter.
We did choose the eased square edge over a setback inverted ogee. And, we love it. Here are some pictures:

Here's the island counter being installed over a plywood substrate. You can see the built-up edge quite clearly. Unlike the soapstone, which took two men a full day to install, the marble (with no seams and no sinks) went in in under an hour).


Please don't panic; we aren't going to have a crazy two-toned island. I'm in the process of painting all of our beautiful custom cabinetry by hand. The gray is primer. The black, actually called off-black, is a Farrow and Ball paint in estate eggshell. I volunteered for the job (much to the delight of my cabinetmaker and mirth of N, and I may be in indentured servitude to my kitchen for the rest of my life).

Another edge shot. Again, what's gray will be black, off-black.

Here's the marble. What you can't really see in these pictures is the subtle but unmistakable coffee coloured veining that runs throughout the white body of the marble. It picks up and is emphasized by the other ivory tones in the room.

And another shot of the marble. In this photo you can see the recess under the bar top, which makes the lower part of the island extra deep and gives us a place to store dishes and hide two recessed outlets.
I wrote a blog post in a little more detail you could read here: "Soapstone wins and Marble gets its edge"
If you click on the original post link below, you can see the slab we had our island counter cut from. In our excitement at getting our soapstone counters installed, we only remembered at the 11th hour to specify to the marble fabricators how we wanted the slab cut. Luckily we weren't too late.
Thanks, all, for your help.
More to come.

Here is a link that might be useful: Marble edge dilemma: advice would be very nice

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clipped on: 09.02.2011 at 11:10 am    last updated on: 09.02.2011 at 11:11 am

Sound system for kitchen

posted by: danielle84 on 03.15.2010 at 10:02 am in Kitchens Forum

As I am writing this message, 3 guys are in my kitchen putting the final touches to it. (doors, molding, hardware) I am so excited...it's unbelievable that in 5 hours all will be done except for the counters and paint touch-up. What I wanted to share with all of you is the sound system I had install in the kitchen. Two speakers in the ceiling. The sound is just amazing. James Taylor is now playing next Cat Stevens. The boys really likes it. They are signing along. The system is called "Sonos Multy room Music System. Worth the $$$ if your in the midst of renos.

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clipped on: 08.29.2011 at 10:33 am    last updated on: 08.29.2011 at 10:34 am

RE: please tell me the name of a cream tumbled stone for backspla (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: kitchenaddict on 12.06.2010 at 03:29 pm in Kitchens Forum

Hi dreamywhite...

Here is mine...Creama Marfil Tumbled Marble..It's very smooth.

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KA:)

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clipped on: 08.27.2011 at 03:05 pm    last updated on: 08.27.2011 at 03:06 pm

RE: Anyone tired of their white subway tile backsplash yet? (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: segbrown on 07.27.2010 at 05:11 pm in Kitchens Forum

Still love mine, but it's only been about 9 months, and they are bigger than normal (6x8). I also have dark grout. Maybe all that helps...

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clipped on: 08.27.2011 at 02:59 pm    last updated on: 08.27.2011 at 02:59 pm

RE: Anyone tired of their white subway tile backsplash yet? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: chana_goanna on 07.27.2010 at 03:06 pm in Kitchens Forum

Sabjimata:

1. When will you be posting your comleted pics? I can't WAIT to see your kitchen. (Or did I miss it somehow?)

2. Please post a link to your blog; our tastes seem very similar and I'm sure your blog would be a goldmine of ideas for me.

Gina: I personally find subway tile much more interesting with a darker grout, like so:

The trick here is to space the tiles very close together and use a medium-to-dark gray grout, not black, which would be too stark a contrast.

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clipped on: 08.27.2011 at 02:57 pm    last updated on: 08.27.2011 at 02:57 pm

RE: Blue/gray stained cabinets instead of paint? Am I crazy? (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: boxerpups on 07.01.2010 at 09:43 am in Kitchens Forum

Hi lceh,

I can not recommend specific stain colors. Cabot is
what I use and love but I have not used indoor colors.
I love the feel and look of the outdoor deck paint-like
stain outdoors. It goes on like paint and has a smooth
flat finish that looks soft. If a deck can be soft.

I love the ideas you are thinking about. Swedish gray blues
with a wood top. I think it is Brillant. This is very
popular in Germany right now. Everyone is loving the muted
blue grays for their homes with lots of painted white
pieces it is minimal elegance.

Firsthousemp, is so sweet to suggest I might have some
image. I do not have specicifally what Lceh is looking
for but here is what I do have. Maybe it can help.

~boxer

Martha Mockford UK
gray

Lion Ville Blue Bell

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Pale blue House to Home UK kitchens
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Reid Brothers Kitchen
gray

Taylor Creek
(This would look even better with a wood island)
gray

French Gray painted island

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Washington Post Magazine kitchen
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News Cast Gray paint
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Attic Magic
blue

Art Factory
blue


Gray Area Dance Blog
dark lower

Martha Mockford UK
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Designed to be beautiful
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Home bug
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clipped on: 08.23.2011 at 12:08 pm    last updated on: 08.23.2011 at 12:08 pm

RE: Link or post of Katieob's kitchen pictures? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: katieob on 10.04.2010 at 02:30 pm in Kitchens Forum

Hi.

Sorry for the delayed response. I haven't been on GW as much lately. Thanks for your kind words. I think mine is a "coming soon" kitchen on the FKB. Here are some photos that won't show in the thread anymore. Don't know why. Any questions, I'd be happy to help. Good luck!
Katie

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 10:13 pm    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 10:14 pm

Finished Kitchen Pictures (except backsplash)

posted by: alliern on 11.24.2008 at 12:22 am in Kitchens Forum

Hello! I am happy to finally be able to say that our house is done and we moved from NYC to Colorado 3 weeks ago! Here are some pictures of our new kitchen...I am so enjoying it! I am still undecided about what to do for a backsplash...have to make a decision soon but I wanted to live in the house for a little while before deciding :)

Details:
DW, Fridge, microwave/convection oven (Kitchen Aid)
6 burner dual-fuel 36" range (Thermador)
Thermador Traditional Silent 42" Hood w/remote blower
Perimeter countertop Black Minas Soapstone from Dorado Soapstone
Island Countertop Honed Statuario Marble
Perimeter Cabinets custom built with BM Simply White paint
Island Custom Built Alder
Floor Owens PlankFloor 6" Walnut with Satin Water Based Polyurethane
Delta Allura Faucet and soap dispenser
Danze Pot Filler
Cabinet hardware from Restoration Hardware

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 08:08 pm    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 08:08 pm

Finished Kitchen~White, Marble, Soapstone

posted by: katieob on 12.04.2009 at 02:57 pm in Kitchens Forum

Hi all.

A huge thank you to everybody on this forum who helped graciously with advice, photos, experience & info. What an incredible resource this is. Shout outs to Erikanh & marthavila for hood help, willowdecor for tile, all the stoners, and many more.

We moved in last week-bottom trim on fridge & dw are still missing, excuse the messy bottoms.

I'll be happy to provide details if anyone wants them.

Thanks for looking!

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Marble Close Up

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Soapstone Close Up

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 08:02 pm    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 08:03 pm

Thank you for my kitchen! (Long, lots of pics)

posted by: jsweenc on 07.05.2010 at 02:36 pm in Kitchens Forum

Start: Jan. 19, 2010
Finish: July 5, 2010

It is not an exaggeration to say that this kitchen is a result of GWs collective wisdom. I did not ask that many questions but I gleaned untold amounts of information from searches and reading and participating in others threads and revisiting the FKB every time I had a new detail to conquer.

There are so many of you who have a good eye for the big picture as well as details when looking at layouts; and even more impressive and appreciated is that you take the time to walk each person through with honest, detailed feedback and encouragement. Thank you for looking so consistently at all the posts requesting help. rhome and buehl come to mind immediately -- I know there are others who do that as well and I am sorry for not remembering everyone to acknowledge.

Many others have kitchens posted to the FKB that gave me great inspiration, answers to questions and solutions to problems. You were a huge help and didn't know it, and I wish I could list every single one of you! (Many of these were not white shaker inset kitchens.)

Special thanks to jrueter for counter help and encouragement, among other things -- aside from the layout itself, that was one of my biggest challenges.


It feels good to be finished, and now I hope I can start to give back a fraction of what I received. Thank you to everyone!

Appliances
DW - Bosch
Like - Gets dishes clean
Dont like - Plastics are wet in am unless I leave the door ajar; door catch is already broken, door won't stay halfway open (should be covered under warranty)
Hood - VAH PRH18, 36", 350 cfm (wish I had gotten more, salesman talked us out of it)
Fridge - Whirlpool Gold french door
Range - Electrolux Induction slide-in; still learning it but love it so far
MW - Sharp

Cabinets
Tar River Custom Cabinets, Creedmoor, NC, white inset with Blum glides
Like - Looks, the 30" and 36" drawer bases
Dont like - Not as much useable space with inset; drawer glides dont all work smoothly

Counters -
Leathered Impala Black, 3 cm, 3" radius corners, 1" radius corners, no radius
Love - Easy to keep clean, dont show fingerprints, just the color I was looking for in a matte finish (didnt want shiny)
Dont like - sink reveal is not uniform, slightly negative in most places (I asked for flush, was told that slope of sink prevented exact flush but in one area its actually positive, one its flush, so sink is not set in perfectly; not being picky and preferring to have it finished, I am leaving it alone)
Supplier - Daltile
Fabricator - The Countertop Factory, Raleigh NC

Wood counter - Walnut edge grain, classical edge minus one bead from http://www.blocktop.net/; finished for non-food use

Sinks - Blanco Silgranit in Anthracite ordered from HomePerfect.com
Clean up - BlancoDiamond Super Single (drop in) 33"
Prep - BlancoPrecis Large (undermount) 24"
Like - Looks, size, location, maintenance
Faucets - Delta Leland 978 (Main) 9978 (Prep) (ordered from DesignerPlumbingOutlet.com
Like - Looks, function, ease of use

Hardware - Amerock
Like - Looks, feel
Dont like - One set of cup pulls, on my one deep drawer, were not placed well but it was too late by the time I saw it

Lights
Pendants - Edison by Hudson Valley, with glass # D12 (~$600 total for 3 pendants)
Like - Looks, adjustable length
Tracks - WAC

Paint - Timberlake Painting, Mickey Smith
Kitchen walls - BM Quiet Moments (LR walls @ 50% formula of QM)
Laundry walls - Valspar Safari Beige
Garage hall walls - Valspar Oatbran (on same strip as Safari Beige)
Trim, ceiling, etc - White gloss (dont know color, just agreed with painter to do white)

Floors - red oak, refinished with oil-based poly satin finish

Windows - Monarch double casement

Backsplash - Adex Neri White 3x6 beveled subway tiles, 1/2 round liners

Trash pullout, tall pan divider

Sweeby Test
warm or cool, tranquil and soothing or energetic and vibrant? calm, happy, dramatic?
Cool, tranquil, soothing, calm

cozy or spacious? light and bright or dark and rich?
Open, spacious, light, bright

subtle tone-on-tone, boldly colorful, textured?, woody or painted?
Simple, unobtrusive, painted (maybe not exactly subtle but not bold, overstated colors)

modern, traditional, vintage, rustic, artsy, retro, Old World, Arts & Crafts, Tuscan?
Backdrop rather than focal point, no particular theme, time period or style to stand out (vintage would be closest but not overtly so)

elegant, casual? sleekly simple, elaborately detailed, or somewhere in between?
Casual, simple (not sleek), understated touches of elegance, but not be intimidating

pristine or weathered, professional or homey?
Simple, summer cottage; Clean (pristine?), homey

whimsical, sophisticated, accessible, romantic? masculine or feminine?
Accessible, maybe a touch of whimsy and zing (in decorative elements); Neither overly masculine nor feminine (functional, clean straight lines for ease of construction, with a few rounded edges to soften)

How much zing? and where?
Quiet, unobtrusive but a breath of fresh air so when people walk in, invites but does not distract from fellowship

I've been saying "I really like my kitchen". DH was surprised that I wasn't saying "I love my kitchen". That's because it wasn't truly finished and clean until today when we got everything hung and most everything put away (still a few very minor things to do). So as of today, I can say "I LOVE my kitchen". I also LOVE my utility room just as much!

We are not completely finished with the house; we plan to add to the front to expand the LR and add a MBR. With the kitchen construction, we were all crammed into a small room together during the day, but with the addition, we have a refuge with our new kitchen.

View 1
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Still need a piece of molding on either end to cover up the holes made to install Plugmold, which I couldn't stand and had replaced with Sillites

View 2
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View 3
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View 4
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Mudroom Photobucket

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Baskets - World Market
Bag - Belvah, custom embroidered by mineembroidery.com
Shelf - salvaged from 200 yo house DH bought for office
Hooks - Pier 1 Imports

Pantry Photobucket
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Countertop and pullout shelves recycled from previous kitchen
Upper shelves built by carpenter

Laundry from kitchen
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Laundry toward kitchen
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Communication center and laundry shelving
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4" shelves built by carpenter
Upper box shelves - Pottery Barn Outlet
Calendars, etc - Storables.com
Fabric boxes - World Market, Target

Here is a link that might be useful: Photobucket link

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 01:58 pm    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 01:59 pm

Stone Information and Advice (& Checklists)

posted by: buehl on 04.14.2008 at 02:56 am in Kitchens Forum

First off, I want to give a big thank-you to StoneGirl, Kevin, Joshua, Mimi, and others (past and current) on this forum who have given us many words of wisdom concerning stone countertops.

I've tried to compile everything I saved over the past 8 months that I've been on this Forum. Most of it was taken from a write-up by StoneGirl (Natural stone primer/granite 101); other threads and sources were used as well.

So...if the experts could review the information I've compiled below and send me comments (here or via email), I will talk to StarPooh about getting this on the FAQ.


Stone Information, Advice, and Checklists:

In an industry that has no set standards, there are many unscrupulous people trying to palm themselves off as fabricators. There are also a number of people with odd agendas trying to spread ill rumors about natural stone and propagate some very confusing and contradictory information. This is my small attempt at shedding a little light on the subject.

Slab Selection:

On the selection of the actual stone slabs - When you go to the slab yard to choose slabs for your kitchen, there are a few things you need to take note of:

  • Surface finish: The finish - be it polished, honed, flamed antiqued, or brushed, should be even. There should be no spots that have obvious machine marks, scratches, or other man made marks. You can judge by the crystal and vein pattern of the stone if the marks you see are man-made or naturally occurring. It is true that not all minerals will finish evenly and if you look at an angle on a polished slab with a larger crystal pattern, you can clearly see this. Tropic Brown would be a good example here. The black spots will not polish near as shiny as the brown ones and this will be very obvious on an unresined slab when looking at an acute angle against the light. The black specks will show as duller marks. The slab will feel smooth and appear shiny if seen from above, though. This effect will not be as pronounced on a resined slab.

    Bottom line when judging the quality of a surface finish: Look for unnatural appearing marks. If there are any on the face of the slab, it is not desirable. They might well be on the extreme edges, but this is normal and a result of the slab manufacturing process.


  • Mesh backing: Some slabs have a mesh backing. This was done at the plant where the slabs were finished. This backing adds support to brittle materials or materials with excessive veining or fissures. A number of exotic stones will have this. This does not necessarily make the material one of inferior quality, though. Quite often, these slabs will require special care in fabrication and transport, so be prepared for the fabricator to charge accordingly. If you are unsure about the slabs, ask your fabricator what his opinion of the material is.

  • Cracks and fissures: Yes - some slabs might have them. One could have quite the discussion on whether that line on the slab could be one or the other, so I'll try to explain it a little.

    • Fissures are naturally occurring features in stone. They will appear as little lines in the surface of the slabs (very visible in a material like Verde Peacock) and could even be of a different color than the majority of the stone (think of those crazed white lines sometimes appearing in Antique Brown). Sometimes they could be fused like in Antique Brown and other times they could be open, as is the case in the Verde Peacock example. They could often also go right through the body of the slab like in Crema Marfil, for instance. If you look at the light reflection across a fissure, you will never see a break - i.e., there will be no change in the plane on either side of a fissure.

    • A crack on the other hand is a problem... If you look at the slab at an oblique angle in the light, you will note the reflection of the shine on the surface of the stone. A crack will appear as a definite line through the reflection and the reflection will have a different appearance on either side of the line - there will be a break in the plane. Reject slabs like this. One could still work around fissures. Cracks are a whole other can of worms.

    • Resined slabs: The resin gets applied prior to the slabs being polished. Most of the resin then gets ground off in the polishing process. You should not be able to see just by looking at the surface of a slab whether it was resined or not. If you look at the rough sides of the slab, though, you will see some drippy shiny marks, almost like varnish drips. This should be the only indication that the slab is resined. There should never be a film or layer on the face of the stone. With extremely porous stones, the resining will alleviate, but not totally eliminate absorption issues and sealer could still be required. Lady's dream is an example. This material is always resined, but still absorbs liquids and requires sealer.

    • Test the material you have selected for absorption issues regardless - it is always best to know what your stone is capable of and to be prepared for any issues that might arise. Some stones indeed do not require sealer - be they resined or not. Baltic Brown would be an example here. It will not absorb one iota of anything, but it is still resined to eliminate a flaking issue.

Tests (especially for Absolute Black) (using a sample of YOUR slab):

  • To verify you have true AB and not dyed: Clean with denatured alcohol and rub marble polishing powder on the face. (Get denatured alcohol at Home Depot in the paint department)

  • Lemon Juice or better yet some Muratic Acid: will quickly show if the stone has alot of calcium content and will end up getting etched. This is usually chinese stone, not indian.

  • Acetone: The Dying usually is done on the same chinese stone. like the others said, acetone on a rag will reveal any dye that has been applied

  • Chips: Using something very hard & metalhit the granite sharply & hard on edges to see if it chips, breaks, or cracks


Measuring:

  • Before the templaters get there...
    • Make sure you have a pretty good idea of your faucet layout--where you want the holes drilled for all the fixtures and do a test mock up to make sure you have accounted for sufficient clearances between each fixture.

    • Be sure you test your faucet for clearances not just between each fixture, but also between the faucet and the wall behind the faucet (if there is one). You need to be sure the handle will function properly.

    • Make sure that the cabinets are totally level (not out by more than 1/8") before the counter installers come in.

    • Check how close they should come to a stove and make sure the stove sits up higher than the counter.

    • Make sure they have the sink/faucet templates to work from.

    • Make sure have your garbage disposal air switch on hand or know the diameter

  • If you are not putting in a backsplash, tell them

  • Double check the template. Make sure that the measurements are reasonable. Measure the opening for the range.

  • Seam Placement: Yet another kettle of fish (or can of worms, depending on how you look at it, I guess!) Seam placement is ultimately at the discretion of the fabricator. I know it is not a really popular point of view, but that is just the way it is. There really is more to deciding where the seam would go than just the size of the slab or where the seam would look best in the kitchen.

    Most stone installations will have seams. They are unavoidable in medium or large sized kitchens. One hallmark of a good fabricator is that they will keep the seams to a minimum. It seems that a good book could be written about seams, their quality, and their placementand still you will have some information that will be omitted! For something as seemingly simple as joining two pieces of stone, seams have evolved into their own universe of complexity far beyond what anybody should have fair cause to expect!


  • Factors determining seam placement:

    • The slab: size, color, veining, structure (fissures, strength of the material an other characteristics of the stone)

    • Transport to the job site: Will the fabricated pieces fit on whatever vehicle and A-frames he has available

    • Access to the job site: Is the house on stilts? (common in coastal areas) How will the installers get the pieces to where they need to go? Will the tops fit in the service elevator if the apartment is on the 10th floor? Do the installers need to turn tight corners to get to the kitchen? There could be 101 factors that will influence seam placement here alone.

    • Placement and size of undermount (or other) cut-outs. Some fabricators like to put seams in undermount sinks, some do not. We, for instance will do it if absolutely necessary, and have done so with great success, but will not do so as general practice. We do like to put seams in the middle of drop-in appliances and cut-outs and this is a great choice for appearances and ease of installation.

    • Location of the cabinets: Do the pieces need to go in between tall cabinets with finished sides? Do the pieces need to slide in under appliance garages or other cabinetry? How far do the upper cabinets hang over? Is there enough clearance between the vent hood and other cabinets? Again the possibilities are endless and would depend on each individual kitchen lay-out and - ultimately -

    • Install-ability of the fabricated pieces: Will that odd angle hold up to being moved and turned around to get on the peninsula if there is no seam in it? Will the extra large sink cut-out stay intact if we hold the piece flat and at a 45 degree angle to slide it in between those two tall towers? Again, 1,001 combinations of cabinetry and material choices will come into play on this question.

    You can ask your fabricator to put a seam at a certain location and most likely he will oblige, but if he disagrees with you, it is not (always) out of spite or laziness. Check on your fabricator's seams by going to actual kitchens he has installed. Do not trust what you see in a showroom as sole testament to your fabricator's ability to do seams.

    With modern glues and seaming methods, a seam could successfully be put anywhere in an installation without compromising the strength or integrity of the stone. If a seam is done well, there is - in theory - no "wrong" location for it. A reputable fabricator will also try to keep the number of seams in any installation to a minimum. It is not acceptable, for instance to have a seam in each corner, or at each point where the counter changes direction, like on an angled peninsula.

    Long or unusually large pieces are often done if they can fit in the constraints of a slab. Slabs as a rule of thumb will average at about 110"x65". There are bigger slabs and quite often smaller ones too. Check with the fabricator or the slab yard. They will be more than happy to tell you the different sizes of slabs they have available. Note, though, that the larger the slabs, the smaller the selection of possible colors. Slab sizes would depend in part on the capabilities of the quarry, integrity of the material or the capabilities of the machinery at the finishing plant. We have had slabs as wide as 75" and as long as 130" before, but those are monsters and not always readily available.

  • Generally, it is not a good idea to seam over a DW because there's no support for the granite, and anything heavy placed at or near the seam would stress the stone, possibly breaking it.

  • Rodding is another issue where a tremendous amount of mis-information and scary stories exist: The main purpose for rodding stone would be to add integrity to the material around cut-outs. This is primarily for transport and installation and serves no real purpose once the stone is secured and fully supported on the cabinets. It would also depend on the material. A fabricator would be more likely to rod Ubatuba than he would Black Galaxy, for instance. The flaky and delicate materials prone to fissures would be prime candidates for rodding. Rodding is basically when a fabricator cuts slots in the back of the stone and embeds steel or fiberglass rods with epoxy in the slots in the stone. You will not see this from the top or front of the installation. This is an "insurance policy" created by the fabricator to make sure that the stone tops make it to your cabinets all in one piece

  • Edges: The more rounded an edge is, the more stable it would be. Sharp, flat edges are prone to chipping under the right (or rather wrong) circumstances. Demi or full bullnose edges would almost entirely eliminate this issue. A properly milled and polished edge will be stable and durable regardless of the profile, though. My guess at why ogee and stacked edges are not more prevalent would be purely because of cost considerations. Edge pricing is determined by the amount of work needed to create it. The more intricate edge profiles also require an exponentially larger skill set and more time to perfect. The ogee edge is a very elegant edge and can be used to great effect, but could easily look overdone if it is used everywhere. We often advise our clients to combine edges for greater impact - i.e., eased edge on all work surfaces, and ogee on the island to emphasize the cabinetry or unusual shape.
    Edge profiles are largely dependent on what you like and can afford. There is no real pro or con for regular or laminated edges. They all have their place in the design world. Check with your fabricator what their capabilities and pricing are. Look at actual kitchens and ask for references.


Installation:

  • Seams:
    One hallmark of a good fabricator is that they will keep the seams to a minimum [StoneGirl]

    • A generic good quality seam should have the following characteristics:
      • It should be flat. According to the Marble Institute of America (MIA) a minimal amount of lippage is acceptable (1/32"), but conscientious fabricators all strive for a perfectly flat and smooth joint.

      • It should be narrow - as in smaller than 1/16". (I think the MIA stipulates no larger than 1/8", but that is pushing it - and only if the fabricator bevels the edges of the seam, almost similar to the edge of a stone tile. This is, thank goodness, not a standard practice any more!)

      • The color on either side of the seam should match as closely as possible. On regularly patterned stones like Ubatuba for example - there should be no variation. On stones with variation in colors or veins, the match should be made as close as was humanly possible.

      • Vein direction should flow. The MIA suggests a single direction of vein flow, but it is acceptable IF DISCUSSED WITH THE CLIENT to change vein direction on a seam if no other option is available. This would happen in book matched slabs - you will have a "butterfly" seam in this case. In other cases, the fabricator could put a miter seam in a corner and change vein direction 90 degrees. This is usually done with extremely linear veining like Bamboo Green, for example, but this is something that should be discussed with the fabricator and agreed upon by the client.

      • The seam on the finished edge of the stone should NOT dip in and create a divot in the edge. When you run your fingers over the edge, you should not be able to feel the location of the seam at all.

      • The thickness of the slabs on either side of the seam should be equal (or feathered out so that there is no discernible difference)

      • The glue in the seam should be of a color that matches the stone as closely as possible. Glue joints that are too light or too dark will show up something terrible. The idea behind tinting the glue is to try to make the seam "disappear" or something relatively close to it

  • Checklist:
    • Check the seams for evenness and smoothness.

      • Make sure that the seams are neat and clean.

      • Make sure that the seams are not obvious.

      • Make sure the seams are butted tight

      • Make sure that there are no scratches, pits, or cracks

    • If sealing is necessary (not all granites need to be sealed):

      • Make sure that the granite has been sealed

      • If more than one application of sealer was applied, ask how long they waited between applications

      • Ask which sealer has been used on the granite.

    • Make sure the sink reveal is consistent all the away around

    • Check the gap of the granite at the wall junctions.

    • Check for inconsistent overhangs from the counter edges

    • Check for chips. These can be filled.

    • Make sure the top drawers open & close

    • Make sure that you can open & close your dishwasher

    • Make sure the stove sits up higher than the counter

    • Make sure that you have the appropriate clearances for your appliances

    • Check the edge all around, a good edge should have the following characteristics:
      • Shine: The edge polish should match the top polish in depth and clarity. The edge should not be milky, dull, or waxy.

      • The edge should not have "waves". Eyeball along the edge. A good edge should have a mirror like reflection and be fairly flat. Waves that you can see or feel are not a good thing.

      • The aris (very top of the edge) should be crisp and straight, even on a bullnose edge. Once again you can see this by eyeballing along the very top end of the edge profile. A wavy, dippy aris is poor craftsmanship.

      • A good edge will have a consistent profile. It will not be larger in some spots or smaller in others.

      • A good edge should also have NO tooling lines. These will be fine lighter/white lines running along the edge. This is a mark of a poor edge polish, of a CNC machine that is not set correctly, and a lack of hand finishing. This is common when a company has only mechanical fabrication (i.e., CNC machines or line polishers) and no skilled hand fabricators to finish the work properly.

    • Run your hands around the entire laminated edge of yor counters to make sure they are smooth

    • Check surrounding walls & cabinets for damage

Miscellaneous Information:

  • More than all the above and below, though, is to be present for both the templating as well as having the templates placed on your slabs at the fabricator's
    If you canot be there, then have a lengthy conversation about seam placement, ways to match the movement, and ways to color-match the counters that will be joined at the seam

  • Find a fabricator who is a member of the SFA

  • When they polish your stone for you don't let them wax it. It will look terrible in 2 months when the wax wears off.

  • Don't use the Magic Eraser on granite--especially AB

  • Any slab with more fill (resin) than stone is certainly a no-no!!

  • When you do check for scratches, have overhead lighting shining down so scratches are easier to see

  • Don't let them do cutouts in place (granite dust becomes a major issue)

  • Granite dust can be a problem...some have heard of SS appliances & hoods damaged by the dust, others have heard of drawer glides being ruined by the dust

  • If you have wood floors--especially if you're in the process of staining or finishing them--make sure that they don't spill or drip granite sealer on the wood floors. Apparently the sealer interferes with the stain or finish process.

  • Suggested Prep for Installation:
    • Remove any drawers and pullouts beneath any sections that will be cut or drilled onsite, e.g., sink cutouts and/or faucet, soap dispenser, air gap, instant hot etc. holes, cooktop cutouts.

    • Then just cover the glides themselves with a few layers of blue painter's tape (or some combo of plastic wrap and tape)

    • If you make sure to cover the top of the glides and attach some of the tape to the cab wall as well (to form sort of a seal)and cover the rest of the glides completely with tape, you should be fine.

    • Usually the fabricators will have someone holding a vacuum hose right at the spot where they are drilling or cutting, so very little granite dust should be landing on the glides. What little dust escapes the vacuum will be blocked by the layer(s) of tape.

    • When done w/installation, remove the tape and use a DustBuster (or similar) on all the cabinets and glides

  • Countertop Support:

    • If your granite is 2 cm thick, then there can be no more then 6" of of unsupported span with a 5/8" subtop

    • If your granite is 3 cm thick, then there can be no more then 10" of unsupported span - no subtop required

    • If you need support, the to determine your corbel dimensions:

    • Thickness of Stone - Dimension of Unsupported Span = Corbel Dimensino

    • i.e., an 18" total overhang in 2 cm would require a 12" corbe; the same overhang in 3 cm would require an 8" corbel

NOTES:

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 01:53 pm    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 01:53 pm

RE: Inspiring GW Kitchens (Follow-Up #35)

posted by: brickton on 01.06.2011 at 01:32 pm in Kitchens Forum

There are so many kitchens here that I love but the one that stands out the most as being 'THAT! That is what I want!' would have to be from caoh.



But honorable mention would have to go to Jsweenc:


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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 12:57 pm    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 12:57 pm

RE: Inspiring GW Kitchens (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: positano on 10.26.2010 at 05:30 am in Kitchens Forum

Joan2121- thanks for the shout out!

Some of my favorites are orchidluvr, mamadadapaige,erikanh,katieob,caliwendi,hoffman,segbrown,blakey,jrdip,mrslimestone,alliern and of course Jbrodie.

This site has been such a great inspiration! Great thread!

Here are some pictures!
Erikanh

Cali wendi

JBrodie

Mrs. Limestone

Segbrown

Katieob

Blakey

Hoffman

alliern

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 12:47 pm    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 12:47 pm

RE: pps7 - would love to see more of your kitchen! (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: pps7 on 06.22.2011 at 07:09 pm in Kitchens Forum

aokat15, The X-back chairs are the Aaron chiar from potterybarn.

Jen, this is probably too late, but here are a few pics. Kitchen pain color is BM gray wisp and dining/family room is BM natural cream.

Photobucket

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http://s26.photobucket.com/albums/c123/srs-mom/House stuff/Completed/?action=view&current=DSC_2419.jpg#!oZZ7QQcurrentZZhttp%3A//s26.photobucket.com/albums/c123/srs-mom/House%2520stuff/Completed/%3Faction%3Dview%26current%3De0368c67.jpg

Photobucket

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 12:34 pm    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 12:34 pm

RE: Beekeeper's Wife -- Question about your kitchen (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: beekeeperswife on 03.23.2011 at 09:02 am in Kitchens Forum

Sure! Here you go:
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Not an "after" picture, but a "during", this would be from the sink/stove corner:
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This is from the corner to the left of the range, near the laundry room door, facing the family room:
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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 11:44 am    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 11:44 am

RE: White Kitchens.....what makes it right? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: segbrown on 10.19.2008 at 11:04 am in Kitchens Forum

Photobucket

I saved this page in an issue of "Kitchens and Baths" specifically to address this question. Here are parts of the text:

-Material variation breaks up large banks of cabinets
-Large rectangles of contrasting color, including ss appliances, white cabinets, black countertops
-Switching from solid to glass-front cabinets
-Shallow cupboard over the hood more valuable as a visual bridge than storage
-Open shelves break up solid white

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 11:41 am    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 11:42 am

Finished! White, Statuary, and Aqua Grantique

posted by: niffy on 05.22.2010 at 02:09 am in Kitchens Forum

Egad, I think it is done - well except for the dinette chairs that are on a container somewhere in the Pacific, and the base moulding for the fridge/freezer. Done enough, anyway....
I owe GW a great debt for many things, but a special thanks to all the marble lovers out there whose kitchens convinced me to go for it. I almost became a Virginia Mist convert, too, until I happened upon this brushed Aqua Grantique which fulfilled all my soapstone/marble/but low maintenance fantasies.... Margieb2- if you are still around, thank you for your arch! We had the half walls/columns on our plans, and once I saw yours, I knew EXACTLY how ours needed to be trimmed. We owe you big time.

So details....
Cabinets: custom, antique white. Island is maple stained dark walnut with a dark glaze or something.
Hardware: Polished nickel pulls and knobs, through cab company
Island countertop: statuary marble, honed
Perimeter countertop: aqua grantique (a granitic gneiss, apparently) - brushed finish
Backsplash: statuary 12x12 cut down to subways, statuary herringbone, and cut statuary slab
Floors: Brazilian walnut
Walls: SW Silvermist
Chandeliers: Schonbek New Orleans mini
Appliances: 30" Gaggenau fridge/freezer columns, GE Monogram Advantium 240 oven, GE Monogram Convection single oven, Wolf 36" induction cooktop, Miele La Perla dishwasher, and GE Monogram microwave (in end of island)
Sinks: Rohl 30" and Kohler Irontones for prep
Faucets: Rohl Country in polished nickel (avoid the burgundy felt "protective" bags. They stain when wet - stain things like new white marble. Don't ask how I know. Bags. Are. Evil.)

Hood/cooktop wall:
Photobucket

Sink wall (well, part of it anyway):
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Fridge/freezer wall:
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Perspective on location of pantry/butler's pantry:
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Breakfast room and Family room:
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Breakfast room hutch:
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Aqua Grantique Close-up:
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Countertop and Backsplash:
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Cooktop backsplash:
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Built-in Pantry (across from butler's pantry cabinets/counter)
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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 10:11 am    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 10:11 am

95% Finished Kitchen.

posted by: alabamamommy on 07.11.2011 at 04:55 pm in Kitchens Forum

Hiya folks! We're almost there. Moving in just weeks.

I've been waiting for it to be finished to take the final pictures, but I've come to the conclusion that if I wait for all of the "blue tape" issues to be addressed, for the cleaning crew to clean up the construction gravy and/or to borrow someone's wide-angled lens, well, then it will be filled with our stuff. And with baby #3 on the way, well, God knows how long before the boxes will be broken down and we're truly settled.

So, aside from a missing microwave, plastic still on the fridge doors (which are in the middle of their THIRD reinstallation) and general mish mash in the sandwich area - here's as close as we're going to get to photos of a finished kitchen this year : )

Details as follows:
Cabinets - Custom cabinet maker, inset shaker, SW Pearly White, Walnut Stained Trim
Floors - Teak hardwood stained Jacobean (very hard, does not absorb to typical Jacobean dark!)
Range - 48" Thermador Combo
Venthood - Ventaire with 1600 CFM roof-mounted blower
Sink - Franke
Faucet - Brizo
Pot Filler - DRATS I can't remember :)
Hardware Pulls - Amerock Highland Ridge, Polished Nickel
Hardward Knobs - Atlas
Countertops Island - Alabama White Marble 6cm slab
Countertops Perimeter - Caesarstone Pebble 2cm with mitered edge to 6cm
Island Chopping Block - Boos Block Walnut End Grain 4inch
Island Pendant Lights - Restoration Hardware Royal Seamaster (Discontinued)
Refridgerator - Thermador 30" Freedom Column
Freezer - Thermador 30" Freedom Column
Double/Single Oven - GE Profile
Backsplash - 4" Shiplap Wood Paneling whitewashed

I'm sure I'm forgetting lots... heck, I barely know my name. So if anyone has any questions, please let me know. You've all been wonderful, and I sincerely enjoy just knowing that a community of such substantial depth and helpfulness exists. I wish I could invite you all over for coffee!!

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 10:10 am    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 10:10 am

The Next Step...Planning For Storage

posted by: buehl on 01.03.2011 at 05:23 am in Kitchens Forum

Planning For Storage

Once you've finalized your basic design, it's time to analyze your storage needs in each zone. The results of that analysis will drive the size & configuration of your cabinets and drawers.

  1. First, make a list of everything you plan to store in your new kitchen, regardless of where it's stored now...kitchen, basement, dining room, etc.

  2. Next, take the list and group the items according to function. Will they be used during prep? cooking? baking? cleanup? Some items, like pot holders, may belong in two different zones (in this case, cooking & baking). You can either find storage between the two zones or have duplicates and store one in each zone.

  3. Now, determine where each of your zones will be (prep, cleanup, cooking, baking, storage, etc.)

  4. The next step depends on the stage you are in the design/order process...

  5. If you've already ordered your cabinets, then you will have to work with what you have. So...

    • Identify the storage potential in each zone and list them on a piece of paper with a section for each cabinet (base & upper) and one line per drawer or shelf in that cabinet. This includes your pantry for your "storage" zone.

    • Take the two lists and, while imagining yourself working in each zone, put the dishes, tools, etc. that you will be using in cabinets in that zone. Fill in the lines in the cabinet list with these items.

  6. If you are still in the design phase, you will have the opportunity to plan your storage to meet your needs in each zone.
    • Take your list and imagine yourself working in each zone.

    • Go through the motions to determine the best locations for each item that will be used and stored in that zone (don't forget that you will probably have both upper and lower cabinets).

    • Now that you know where to put the items, determine what the best way is to store those items (drawer, shelf, etc.) and what size (e.g., pots & pans work best in 30" or 36" drawers)

    • Lastly, transfer what you've done to your design & tweak as necessary.

You should now have a well-thought out and highly functional kitchen!

Sample storage map: http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x108/Buehl/2008-2009 Remodel/Kitchen/20 Designs/Storage Plans/StorageMapping-CooktopWall.jpg

This process and the resultant "map" will not only help you to "see" how things will fit, but the map will also help when you move back into the kitchen...you won't have to think about it, you'll be able to just put things away. It will also be a handy map for everyone to use when attempting to find things the first few weeks w/o having to open every drawer or door!

Oh, and don't forget the Junk Drawer! Most people end up with one, so you may as well plan for it so you at least have control over where it's located!

Common Zones, Appliances In That Zone, and Suggestions For What To Store There:

  • Storage--pantry & refrigerator--Tupperware, food, wraps & plastic bags

  • Preparation--sink & trash/recyclables--utensils, measuring cups/spoons, mixing bowls, colander, jello molds, cutting boards, knives, cook books, paper towels

  • Cooking--cooktop/range & MW (and near a water source)--utensils, pot holders, trivets, pots & pans, serving dishes (platters, bowls, etc.), paper towels

  • Baking--ovens/range--utensils, pot holders, trivets, pots & pans, casserole dishes, roasting rack, cooling racks, cookie sheets, foils, rolling pin, cookie cutters, pizza stone, muffin tins, paper towels [often combined with Cooking Zone]

  • Cleanup--sink & DW & trash--detergents, linens, dishes & glasses, flatware

  • Eating/Serving--island/peninsula/table/nook/DR--table linens, placemats, napkins, dishes & glasses, flatware

  • Utility--broom, dustpan, swifter, mop, cleaning supplies, cloths, flashlights, batteries, extension cords

  • Message/Communication/Command Center--keys, phones/answering machine, charging station, directories/phone books, calendar, desk supplies, dry erase board or chalkboard, pens/pencils, sticky notepaper

Less Common Zones:

  • Tea/Coffee Bar--tea/coffeemaker (and near a water source)--mugs, teas/coffees, sugar, teapot

  • Snack/Beverage Center--near MW & refrigerator or small refrigerator--snacks, snack dishes, glasses [often combined with Tea/Coffee Bar]

  • Pet Zone--feeding area--food, snacks, leashes, medicines (if no children in the home), etc.

Overlapping of Zones

Due to space constraints, some zones often overlap. If this is the case in your kitchen, be sure there is enough work space in the overlap for both activities. Zones that commonly overlap...

  • Prep & Cooking Zones--These zones should be adjacent to each other, so this is a common overlap and is generally not a problem. Just be sure you have enough room for prepping as well as landing space for the range/cooktop. (It is strongly advised you have enough room for emergency landing space on both sides of a range/cooktop.)

  • Prep & Cleanup Zones--If there is only one sink in the kitchen, these zones will be adjacent to each other because of the need for a water source for both zones. However, true overlapping is not generally a good idea. Instead, try to keep the cleanup area separate from the prep area by putting the sink between them. E.g., DW on one side, Prep Zone on the other side. (You should strive to keep the DW out of the Prep Zone as well as out of the path between the sink and Prep & Cooking Zones and between the refrigerator and Prep & Cooking Zones.) Also try for at least 36" (42" or more is better) of room on the Prep Zone side of the sink for ample workspace as well as accommodating the inevitable dirty dishes that will accumulate next to the sink.


Commonly Used Items: pots & pans, utensils, small appliances, linens, pot holders, trivets, dish detergents, "Tupperware", knives, pitchers, water bottles, vases, picnic supplies, cook books, etc.

Foods: Spices, Breads, Flours/Sugars, Teas/Coffees, Potatoes, Onions, Canned Goods, Dry Goods (rice, pasta, etc.), Cereals, Snacks

Small Appliances: Toaster, Stand and/or Hand Mixer, Blender, Breadmaker, Toaster Oven, Food Processor, Crockpot, Waffle Iron, Electric Skillet, Coffeemaker, Coffee Grinder, Ricer, Steamer


SPECIAL NOTE: If your ceiling or one or more of your walls is coming down, consider wiring for speakers, TV, Computer, etc.


Some helpful threads:

forestfire..please help me with my lists [Missing In Action as of 5/16/10...if anyone has saved it, please let me know by emailing me via "My Page"]

List of stuff in kitchens?

What should go within easy reach of the cooktop?

What goes where?

Reloading the new kitchen, any tips where things should go?

Only one lower cabinet...would you do it?

NOTES:

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 10:06 am    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 10:07 am

What are zones and how do you design with them in mind?

posted by: buehl on 05.04.2011 at 08:23 am in Kitchens Forum

Kitchen work zones, what are they?

"Zones" are areas in your kitchen where the work occurs. Work in the kitchen is broken down into three primary work zones. Everyone has these three zones, everyone!

Prep Zone...This is the zone where food prep takes place. Food prep can be anything from making a sandwich to preparing a multi-course meal. It includes cleaning/rinsing food, cutting, mixing, processing, etc. For many people, especially those with small kitchens, their Prep Zone is also their Baking Center for rolling out dough, etc. 70% of the work and time spent in the kitchen is spent prepping. It's the most often used and longest used zone in your kitchen!

Cooking Zone...This is the zone where you take the food you've already prepped and apply heat...cooktop, oven, MW. Only 10% of the work and time spent in the kitchen is spent actually cooking. This is the least used Zone, relatively speaking. Think about it, you usually don't spend the entire time standing in front of your oven or cooktop watching it cook. Sure, there are some things that do have to be stirred constantly, but most things are not. And even then, you usually still spend more time prepping before you begin cooking.

Cleanup Zone...This is the zone where the dirty dishes are handled! Dishes, pots, pans, etc. 20% of the work and time spent in the kitchen is spent cleaning up.


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OK, so now we know what the primary zones are. So now, how do we design a kitchen keeping them in mind?

Prep Zone...works best when it contains a water source and is next to or across an aisle no more than 48" wide or so from the Cooking Zone. Trash & recycle bins should also be in the Prep Zone.

Cooking Zone...works best when next to/across from the Prep Zone (see Prep Zone). It's also nice to have a water source nearby as well as trash & recycling nearby.

Cleanup Zone...works best when separated from the Prep & Cooking Zones. This can be on the opposite side of a one-sink kitchen from the Prep Zone or it could be in a completely separate location (the latter usually only works well if you have two sinks). Obviously, it also needs a water source and the DW.


What else do we need to keep in mind regarding planning a kitchen and zones?

Dish Storage...works best when it's near the DW and near the serving/eating locations (island, DR, Nook, etc.)

Food Storage...works best when it's near the "action". It's nice to be able to store staples, etc. at their point-of-use, so food storage can be spread throughout the kitchen. E.g., flour, sugar, etc. in a "Baking Center", spices in the Prep or Cooking Zone, Cereal close to where breakfast is eaten, etc. If you have a dedicated pantry, it's nice to have the pantry near the point where the groceries enter the house as well.

Refrigerator...works best on the periphery of the kitchen so it's easily accessed by people working in the kitchen as well as "outsiders" looking for a snack without the "outsiders" getting underfoot of those working in the kitchen. It should also be near the Prep & Cooking Zones inside the kitchen and, if possible, near the main meal location(s) for ease of access during mealtime.

Microwave (MW)...this also works best on the periphery of the kitchen so it's easily accessed by people working in the kitchen as well as "outsiders" looking for a snack without the "outsiders" getting underfoot of those working in the kitchen.


Zone-crossing - avoid!...When planning zones, etc., try to minimize zone-crossing. For example, if you can avoid it, don't put the refrigerator such that you have to cross through the Cleanup Zone to go b/w the refrigerator and the Prep or Cooking Zone.


Protection...of all the zones, the Cooking Zone should be the most protected from through-traffic as well as general-kitchen traffic. The Cooking Zone contains the range/cooktop where you will be dealing with fire (if gas), hot foods, etc. You also do not want to have to cross a busy aisle when taking a pot of boiling water from the range/cooktop to the sink for emptying...or anything else hot, for that matter!


Zones and Kitchen Workflow

When designing your kitchen, ideally, the zones should follow the normal/usual workflow in a kitchen:

Refrigerator --> (Prep) Sink --> Workspace --> Cooktop/Range --> Table OR (Cleanup) Sink --> (Cleanup) Sink --> Cabinets (dishes, pots/pans, etc.)

Which translates to:
Refrigerator --> Prep Zone --> Cooking Zone --> Serving Zone --> Cleanup Zone

You don't necessarily have to have this exact flow, but something close. For example, you might have the Cooking Zone located between the Refrigerator and Prep Zone. This isn't necessarily bad b/c these two zones are tied so closely together. On the other hand (OTOH), it's not a good idea to put the Cleanup Zone between the Refrigerator and Prep or Cooking Zones on the same run or on the same aisle if it's a narrow aisle. In this case, the DW and someone cleaning up and/or unloading the DW will be in the way of anyone prepping or cooking because the refrigerator is an integral part of both prepping and cooking. And, of course, the reverse is true....someone prepping and/or cooking will get in the way of someone cleaning up!


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Common Zones, Appliances In That Zone, and Suggestions For What To Store There:

  • Storage--pantry & refrigerator--Tupperware, food, wraps & plastic bags

  • Prep(aration)--sink & trash/recyclables--utensils, measuring cups/spoons, mixing bowls, colander, jello molds, cutting boards, knives, cook books, paper towels

  • Cooking--cooktop/range & MW (and near a water source)--utensils, pot holders, trivets, pots & pans, serving dishes (platters, bowls, etc.), paper towels

  • Baking--ovens/range--utensils, pot holders, trivets, pots & pans, casserole dishes, roasting rack, cooling racks, cookie sheets, foils, rolling pin, cookie cutters, pizza stone, muffin tins, paper towels [often combined with Cooking Zone]

  • Cleanup--sink & DW & not too far from trash--detergents, linens, dishes & glasses, flatware

  • Eating/Serving--island/peninsula/table/nook/DR--table linens, placemats, napkins, dishes & glasses, flatware

  • Utility--broom, dustpan, swifter, mop, cleaning supplies, cloths, flashlights, batteries, extension cords

  • Message/Communication/Command Center--keys, phones/answering machine, charging station, directories/phone books, calendar, desk supplies, dry erase board or chalkboard, pens/pencils, sticky notepaper

Less Common Zones:

  • Tea/Coffee Bar--tea/coffeemaker (and near a water source)--mugs, teas/coffees, sugar, teapot

  • Snack/Beverage Center--near MW & refrigerator or small refrigerator--snacks, snack dishes, glasses [often combined with Tea/Coffee Bar]

  • Pet Zone--feeding area--food, snacks, leashes, medicines (if no small children in the home), etc.

Overlapping of Zones

Due to space constraints, some zones often overlap. If this is the case in your kitchen, be sure there is enough work space in the overlap for both activities. Zones that commonly overlap...

  • Prep & Cooking Zones--These zones should be adjacent to each other, so this is a common overlap and is generally not a problem. Just be sure you have enough room for prepping as well as landing space for the range/cooktop. (It is strongly advised you have enough room for emergency landing space on both sides of a range/cooktop.)

  • Prep & Cleanup Zones--If there is only one sink in the kitchen, these zones will be adjacent to each other because of the need for a water source for both zones. However, true overlapping is not generally a good idea. Instead, try to keep the cleanup area separate from the prep area by putting the sink between them. E.g., DW on one side, Prep Zone on the other side. (You should strive to keep the DW out of the Prep Zone as well as out of the path between the sink and Prep & Cooking Zones and between the refrigerator and Prep & Cooking Zones.) Also try for at least 36" (42" or more is better) of room on the Prep Zone side of the sink for ample workspace as well as accommodating the inevitable dirty dishes that will accumulate next to the sink.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 10:06 am    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 10:06 am

99% Finished Kitchen--creamy white w/soapstone

posted by: jbrodie on 03.01.2009 at 06:59 pm in Kitchens Forum

Finally! Our kitchen is finished! I never thought the day would come, and boy am I enjoying it. I owe so much to this forum. I can't tell you how much you all helped me. Thank you!!! I hope I can help others in return.

Hope I'm not putting too many pictures!

Photobucket

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Island
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soap stone

Quick description (feel free to contact me if you have questions)
-Soapstone: Julia
-Cabinets: Custom, inset/flush shaker style with single bead (waiting to see if we get some issues resolved before I recommend the cabinet maker)
-Bookcase and desk tops: walnut
-Sharp microwave oven drawer (love it!)
-GE fridge
-Shaw 30 inch apron sink
-Wolf range top
-Thermador double ovens
-Vent-a-hood hood
-Dal tile
-potfiller: Newport Brass
-hot/cold faucet Newport Brass
-Main faucet: Mico
-Door to garage: one panel painted with chalkboard paint...fun! The kids love this and it's fun to put messages to guests, each other, holiday wishes, etc.
-Pull out baskets (love these...I keep bread in one and potatoes, onions, etc. in the other)
-Wine shelf--love it!
-Bar stools from Sturbridge Yankee Workshop (love these and they were so reasonable!)
-What would I do differently? More than 12 inch overhang on seating area of island (maybe 14-16 inch). And I might skip the bead board in the backs of the bookshelfs and glass cabs.

Happy kitchen designing to all! Thank you again!

NOTES:

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clipped on: 08.22.2011 at 08:31 am    last updated on: 08.22.2011 at 08:40 am