Clippings by marble_com

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RE: Want Cambria Torquay but the slab is too small! (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: marble_com on 12.19.2012 at 08:50 am in Kitchens Forum

Since the Cambria Torquay is not a very busy stone and has little overall movement, if you use a quality fabricator, the seam should be barely visible to the naked eye (unless you focus on it being there). Therefore if the slab is not enough for one continuous countertop piece but you really are attracted to this particular quartz, then I'd go with it and opt for the seam. Sometimes, the seam is created in the middle of the sink cut-out so it would be even less visible. However, I recommend to ask the fabricator to show you a sample / example of how their seams look. They *should* have seam examples available in the office. This way you can judge their workmanship on this very important issue. Hope this helps!

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clipped on: 12.19.2012 at 08:51 am    last updated on: 12.19.2012 at 08:51 am

RE: Countertops and contractor questions (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: marble_com on 12.19.2012 at 08:43 am in Kitchens Forum

Depending on what area of the country you're in, some of the entry-level common granite colors can be a very affordable price which could work on a small budget. Also, often homeowners are able to use remnants from the fabricator which can further drive the cost down, or there is the option of using pre-fabricated countertops. Hope this helps!

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clipped on: 12.19.2012 at 08:44 am    last updated on: 12.19.2012 at 08:44 am

RE: The lowdown on Super White (Follow-Up #69)

posted by: marble_com on 12.14.2012 at 10:27 am in Kitchens Forum

Hi Karen,

I'm simply trying to provide some helpful insight into how the granite fabrication industry generally behaves. I know it's not right, but it's just the way it is. Just to give you an example, 99% of the time a salesmen does not know Absolute Black is not really granite, and they say it's granite. It is a common and accepted practice by many people in the stone industry to use the name "Absolute Black Granite". Geologists would disagree that Absolute Black Granite and most other black granite are not granite at all! From what I understand, it is made of silica, black sand fused under extreme heat to become a form of glass.

If you ready my previous post carefully, I did not say that Brazilian vs. Italian marble have different "minerals" or anything like that, I simply said that they have a little different specs (technical information) such as absorption by weight, density, compressive strength, abrasion resistance hardness. This technical information are tested and checked by the quarry and come as a material data sheet when a fabricator direct imports the slabs.

Lastly, maybe I didn't understand you correctly, but I thought you had said in your original post that there is a difference between dolomitic calcite marble vs. calcite marble, which probably creates some level of difference between care and maintenance of the stone, and perhaps the technical specifications. I was simply making the correlation that this sounds like what my import manager said about brazilian vs. italian marble.

It is great to talk to a geologist and I hope to learn new things from you to be a better person in the stone industry! :) I know I already have!

This post was edited by marble_com on Fri, Dec 14, 12 at 10:29

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clipped on: 12.14.2012 at 10:29 am    last updated on: 12.14.2012 at 10:30 am

RE: The lowdown on Super White (Follow-Up #64)

posted by: marble_com on 12.13.2012 at 10:08 am in Kitchens Forum

Just something to add for OP -- you are absolutely correct that the natural stone industry (fabricators & wholesalers) often times do not correctly classify the stones geologically as they should be. While I don't have the knowledge of geologist, I suspect that Super White is what my import manager calls Brazilian Marble. Brazilian Marble has different specs than Italian Marble. It is suitable for kitchen countertops (as opposed to the more calcite-based Italian Marble) but there's more maintenance involved since color is very light and material not as dense as normal granite. For example, we classify our stone called Classic White as this "stronger" marble. We say it's not a granite, not a quartzite, and not a regular marble. Kind of in-between granite and marble, is what we say (well at least I know I do). These very light marble-looking granite-like stones are HOT on the market right now for kitchen countertop application. EVERYONE wants a "white granite" and desperately look for it, although in reality (with correct classification) it does not really exist. However, there is confusion in the industry because of all this, as some fabricators do classify colors such as the Classic White I've shown as a "granite" because it has pretty similar characteristics. Because of this, sometimes customers get countertops installed with this material without knowing the real maintenance involved (thinking it's like a regular granite) and then are unhappy when it stains or chips or something. I hope this provided some helpful insight.

Here is a link that might be useful: Classic White

This post was edited by marble_com on Thu, Dec 13, 12 at 10:09

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clipped on: 12.13.2012 at 10:09 am    last updated on: 12.13.2012 at 10:09 am

RE: Identify this quartzite or granite? Macauba? (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: marble_com on 12.13.2012 at 09:58 am in Kitchens Forum

Beautiful. We don't carry this name so I am not definitely sure so I won't say what I *think* it is, because it's not definite. I recommend to acquire a sample of the stone and live with it at home & test out it's durability yourself. As well as initiate a stain test -- seal the sample, then try to stain it with red wine. It's important to be sure if this stone is appropriate for a kitchen countertop application. Best of luck!

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clipped on: 12.13.2012 at 09:58 am    last updated on: 12.13.2012 at 09:58 am

RE: Is soapstone shiny like granite? (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: marble_com on 12.13.2012 at 09:54 am in Kitchens Forum

Soapstone is a matte finish. I would compare it closest to a granite that has a honed, non-polished surface. You should acquire a sample of a soapstone so you can actually touch it -- it's a blast! Lol. Unlike the name implies, soapstone is not actually *soft* to the point of being brittle or anything like that, it's actually quite a durable countertop material. Hope this helps! :-)

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clipped on: 12.13.2012 at 09:54 am    last updated on: 12.13.2012 at 09:55 am

RE: Cambria quartz estimate (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: marble_com on 12.13.2012 at 09:52 am in Kitchens Forum

Hello OP,

What I can chime in from experience, is that *basically* all of the engineered quartz is the same in terms of composition (usually around 93 percent quartz and the rest resins & pigments & fillers). It's just various manufacturers that create unique (sometimes patented) colors. What I'm trying to say is unless you are set on a specific color that only one quartz manufacturer carries, I don't see a reason picking one brand over another if there is a large price difference, especially if you can find a comparable color with the less expensive brand. Hope this makes sense!

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clipped on: 12.13.2012 at 09:52 am    last updated on: 12.13.2012 at 09:52 am

RE: Giallo Veneziano (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: marble_com on 06.23.2011 at 10:15 am in Kitchens Forum

As others have already said, yes it has to be sealed. I recommend Dupont Bulletproof Sealer. It's water-based and a strong impregnator of stone to keep it stain resistant. Once you seal the stone, you should be fine for 2-3 years. The best way to check if a stone needs to be sealed at the moment is to do a water spill test. All you have to do is simply spill some water on the stone and wait some time, half an hour to an hour. If the area where you spilled the water on darkens, this means that it's time for the stone to be reseal as the water has soak into the stone instead of staying on the surface with the help of the sealer. Hope this helps.

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clipped on: 06.23.2011 at 10:15 am    last updated on: 06.23.2011 at 10:16 am

RE: So Upset....They sold my slabs out from under me (Follow-Up #44)

posted by: marble_com on 06.17.2011 at 11:02 am in Kitchens Forum

Just wanted to say that I am so sorry for what you went through, and very happy you found a gorgeous stone that is just as pretty. I think the Alaska White is a great choice for your cabinet colors.

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clipped on: 06.17.2011 at 11:02 am    last updated on: 06.17.2011 at 11:02 am

RE: Backsplash with Bianco antico granite (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: marble_com on 06.17.2011 at 10:09 am in Kitchens Forum

Attached is a video of a Bianco Antico kitchen with a 4x4 glass tile backsplash. Hope this helps and gives inspiration.

Here is a link that might be useful: Bianco Antico Kitchen

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clipped on: 06.17.2011 at 10:10 am    last updated on: 06.17.2011 at 10:10 am

RE: URGENT- Granite Ideas Needed (Follow-Up #20)

posted by: marble_com on 06.15.2011 at 10:51 am in Kitchens Forum

I think White Spring could be a very appropriate choice, in addition to the Delicatus. White Spring looks like this:

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clipped on: 06.15.2011 at 10:52 am    last updated on: 06.15.2011 at 10:53 am

RE: Help Typhoon Bordeaux or Costa Esmeralda??? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: marble_com on 06.15.2011 at 10:32 am in Kitchens Forum

I'm leaning towards the Costa Esmeralda. It's a soft and calm look that will compliment your soft white cabinetry nicely. For wall color with this, I'd use Benjamin Moore "Guilford Green".

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clipped on: 06.15.2011 at 10:32 am    last updated on: 06.15.2011 at 10:32 am

RE: Pictures for review and comments (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: marble_com on 06.10.2011 at 01:14 pm in Kitchens Forum

Now that I looked over the two images again, both images may be the same slab of Madura Gold under different lightning. Waiting for clarification from the OP.

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clipped on: 06.10.2011 at 01:14 pm    last updated on: 06.10.2011 at 01:14 pm

RE: Virginia/jet mist and cherry cabinets (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: marble_com on 06.10.2011 at 11:28 am in Kitchens Forum

I've seen this combination before in-person, it looks really sleek and elegant. Just make sure you will have plenty of natural light so the area does not look dark.

I've attached an image of Virginia Mist for visualization:

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clipped on: 06.10.2011 at 11:28 am    last updated on: 06.10.2011 at 11:28 am

RE: Pictures for review and comments (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: marble_com on 06.10.2011 at 11:25 am in Kitchens Forum

Both are very pretty colors, but a slab with more golden hues such as the second photo may be more appropriate. It's warmer and further away from the cabinet color to offset it nicely, yet still has some burgundy clusters to tie-in the color at the same time. Hope that makes sense.

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clipped on: 06.10.2011 at 11:25 am    last updated on: 06.10.2011 at 11:25 am

RE: Uh-oh.... GC doesn't use contracts? (Follow-Up #28)

posted by: marble_com on 06.08.2011 at 11:50 am in Kitchens Forum

I would never start any construction project without a clearly written and signed off by both parties contract. This is a necessity and the absolute minimum to protect yourself. If the contractor for some strange reason is offended at your request for a standard written contract, then off to the next one.

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clipped on: 06.08.2011 at 11:50 am    last updated on: 06.08.2011 at 11:50 am

RE: Care of Emerald Pearl Granite (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: marble_com on 06.08.2011 at 11:34 am in Kitchens Forum

First off, congratulations on your new granite countertop. It's very easy to care for a granite such as Emerald Pearl. For cleaning, gentle soap and water will do. Don't use harsh abrasives and cleaners. That means no Windex and the such. You can also use a natural stone cleaner, they are pH balanced and specifically formulated for granites. They are not expensive and available at home improvement stores such as Home Depot as well as online outlets. With regard to sealing, since it was sealed upon installation, I would not worry about it for a good 2-3 years. Sealing is also an easy do-it-yourself job when the time comes, and solvent-based or water-based impregnating sealers can be bought at home improvement stores and online. There are many varieties to choose from. I recommend Dupont StoneTech Bulletproof Sealer and Superior ZERO line Ultimate Stone Protector. Hope this helps!

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clipped on: 06.08.2011 at 11:37 am    last updated on: 06.08.2011 at 11:38 am