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RE: Hardware size (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: badgergal on 05.25.2013 at 10:41 pm in Kitchens Forum

I have a slightly more contemporary look in my kitchen and I used several sizes of pulls. I used 10 in. pulls on all my doors and on my drawers I used pulls that were actually about half the drawer width. My 36 inch drawers have 19 inch pulls and the 24 inch wide drawers have 12 inch pulls. I have 10 inch pulls on my 18 inch drawers. I have some drawers that are only 13 inches wide and those have the 6 inch pulls.
You really can do what ever you like as far as pulls go. you don't have to follow any "rules"
I have shown this picture to many times but in case you want to see what various oversize pulls look like on some of my drawers here it is once again:
Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

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drawer pull widths
clipped on: 06.01.2013 at 02:16 am    last updated on: 06.01.2013 at 02:17 am

Island and Counter Balance install (no corbels) Pic Heavy

posted by: slush1422 on 06.21.2011 at 09:01 pm in Kitchens Forum

I wanted to share the progress of our island and pictures of how we modified our IKEA cabinets to install Counter Balance supports. DH does not like the look of corbels and we really couldn't do legs and since we are having a 15" overhang on two sides of the island for seating we wanted some extra support for our granite. Hoping this is helpful for someone.

First the guys built a box and screwed in into my beautiful new wood flooring (oh the horror)!

From Island and Overhang Supports

From Island and Overhang Supports

From Island and Overhang Supports

We realized that since we have frameless (or are they considered inset?) we had to do some modifications to get the support rods in. We will also have to do a mod or two for the tops of the doors but I wasn't too concerned because those 3 doors are under the overhang where the seating is so no one will really ever see them.

From Island and Overhang Supports

From Island and Overhang Supports

From Island and Overhang Supports

From Island and Overhang Supports

From Island and Overhang Supports

For the support on the corner that 2 overhangs will be they had to cut out part of the cabinet

From Island and Overhang Supports

From Island and Overhang Supports

From Island and Overhang Supports

From Island and Overhang Supports

He also made a perfect fit from the bottom of the plywood that goes over them.

From Island and Overhang Supports

This is how many tools it takes to install an island...haha!

From Island and Overhang Supports

Everything definitely seems very sturdy and supported. Our fabricator came today to template and was even impressed. Hopefully I'll be posting pics of my Moon Night honed granite counter-tops installed by Saturday or Monday!

From Island and Overhang Supports

From Island and Overhang Supports

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clipped on: 10.04.2012 at 01:40 am    last updated on: 10.04.2012 at 01:40 am

RE: under cabinet lighting (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: numbersjunkie on 08.14.2012 at 05:00 pm in Kitchens Forum

Check out environmental lights. I researched LED UCL's to death, and these were the best quality/price I could find. I am very happy with them - bright, but they dim nicely, and good quality light.

In addition ot the color of the light (temperature), you should check the Color Rendering Index or CRI. Many of the lights I found had very low CRI ratings or else the rating was not specificed. Environemental lights have a CRI of 80 which is very good for LED's.

There is also a lot of good info on the lighting forum if you haven't looked there.

Here is a link that might be useful: Environmental Lights

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clipped on: 08.15.2012 at 02:15 am    last updated on: 08.15.2012 at 02:15 am

RE: utensil drawer help needed (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: sarahhomeremodel on 07.13.2012 at 11:06 am in Kitchens Forum

I LOVE this thing. Got it at container store. Available in different widths, so you could use it in part of your drawer for knives.

Here is a link that might be useful: Deluxe Bamboo Knife Dock

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clipped on: 07.13.2012 at 04:03 pm    last updated on: 07.13.2012 at 04:03 pm

RE: Barocca soapstone looks like Ray Liotta after 2 hours. What e (Follow-Up #28)

posted by: lisacan on 07.12.2012 at 11:32 am in Kitchens Forum

I have antique Nordic black granite. It looks a lot like soapstone but it doesn't need special care. It is really lovely...industructable, no fingerprints, does not hide dirt or catch clothing.

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clipped on: 07.12.2012 at 11:29 pm    last updated on: 07.12.2012 at 11:30 pm

RE: Barocca soapstone looks like Ray Liotta after 2 hours. What e (Follow-Up #24)

posted by: Angie_DIY on 07.12.2012 at 10:47 am in Kitchens Forum

I still have a collection of soapstone samples, the edges of which are all sharp. (As rmtdoug points out, this is a little unrealistic.) I just banged their edges and tops with a wine bottle, and I also did a "Mohs test for edge banging." The latter test was banging the sharp edge of the samples against each other.

Three held up pretty well to the wine-bottle-banging, viz., Cobra, Belvedere, and Cobra II. In each case, the wine bottle was able to inflict a small ding on the sharp edge, and a very small ding on the top. Here, the edge ding was smaller than the radius of a profiled edge, and the small ding on top was the size of a pinhead.

The "Mohs scale for edge-banging" ranked the samples in order of hardness. To my mild surprise, the results were pretty much a one-way affair: one sample was damaged and the other was unscathed. The hardest was Cobra, followed by Belvedere, followed by Cobra II.

By the way, don't be put off by Barroca -- it isn't even in the same league as the others.

Here is a picture in full sunlight of the hardest three. There is not a hint of green in my Belvedere or Cobra II samples. The Cobra reads charcoal/back, but has a slight cast of very deep green. (The junk in the foreground is sawdust from my workbench, not soapstone detritus!)
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I got those from M. Teixeira, but they no longer have Cobra on their website. Perhaps worth taking a look for it. I'd be comfortable with Belvedere and Cobra II, too.

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clipped on: 07.12.2012 at 11:28 pm    last updated on: 07.12.2012 at 11:28 pm

RE: Barocca soapstone looks like Ray Liotta after 2 hours. What e (Follow-Up #18)

posted by: prospect711 on 07.12.2012 at 09:49 am in Kitchens Forum

Our Beleza soapstone is looking bulletproof so far. It is possible to put a dent in it by hitting it with a hammer (we did that to the sample). There are some small scratches but they are the same color as the stone and they don't show.

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Here is a link that might be useful: Finished Kitchen

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clipped on: 07.12.2012 at 11:25 pm    last updated on: 07.12.2012 at 11:25 pm

RE: Dish drawer (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: a2gemini on 07.07.2012 at 10:06 pm in Kitchens Forum

42 inches
Minimal pegs-mostly to remind me what goes where when using lots of dishes.
Still learning new kitchen so not sure what I would do differently. I know that I re-arranged the dishes within the pegs but haven't moved the pegs.

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clipped on: 07.08.2012 at 02:11 am    last updated on: 07.08.2012 at 02:11 am

RE: Support 1000lb Soapstone Overhang? (Follow-Up #14)

posted by: zartemis on 03.05.2012 at 11:00 pm in Kitchens Forum

We had overhang concerns in our install (but nowhere near as demanding scenario: 18 inch overhang on two sides, no corbels, but the center line was over cabinets). We considered tubular support, but couldn't find a local specialist to assist with design. We did find these folks in North Carolina who appear to have experience with tubular supports. Here is one of their projects:

We did contact them and at the time they were willing to consider remote design services to provide drawings we could give to a steel fabricator.

In the end, we decided on 1/2 inch steel plate from a fabricator who had lots of experience doing such installs (covering near the entire surface, not strips), bolted down through the cabinets with cables to the floor joists (we wanted to have extra protection in case of major accident: say someone heavy jumping on the overhang, making the center of balance no longer over the cabinets, possibly ripping the steel off the cabinets. With the cable, the countertop may fracture (steel plate can flex more than tube steel), cabinets may get damaged, but no one should be injured by 100s of lbs of tipping/falling stone and steel unless all 3 cables snap or major structural fail of the reinforced cabinet box). Because of the weight and cost of the steel, we also downgraded from 3cm soapstone to 2cm granite to save a little (in both weight and dollars).

Here's our install. And it's only a 4 foot by 6 foot peninsula and overhang is 18 inches on two sides:

Under counter view:

Top view:

Lack of legs or corbels was important to us because there are wheelchair users and friends with disabilities limiting the bending of their legs. Height is 34". We find 18 inch sufficient. There is an occasional light kick of the cabinet underneath -- I wouldn't want less overhang -- but otherwise it's adequately spacious. Those cables run in dedicated chaseways in the cabinets themselves and the entire cabinet is also bolted to extra framing in the peninsula wall. This may be overkill for our situation, but we wanted overkill for safety.

This was our solution for a less demanding scenario. Keep in mind you don't have vertical support anywhere near the center of balance, but you could if you gave up overhang depth.

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clipped on: 06.30.2012 at 05:03 pm    last updated on: 06.30.2012 at 05:03 pm

RE: have you seen this. (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: Laura12 on 06.25.2012 at 06:00 pm in Kitchens Forum

Fantastic!

Here is the photo for others:

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clipped on: 06.25.2012 at 10:18 pm    last updated on: 06.25.2012 at 10:18 pm

RE: Crown moldings-show me your simple options (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: badgergal on 06.24.2012 at 08:35 am in Kitchens Forum

I used a simple square step crown in my kitchen maybe you could do something similar but have the top piece of crown rounded to match your window and door framing. Here's a close up of my crown
Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

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crown molding
clipped on: 06.24.2012 at 06:56 pm    last updated on: 06.24.2012 at 06:56 pm

Eye-Vac info and photo

posted by: kiffgirl on 02.21.2011 at 08:17 am in Kitchens Forum

I thought I would post separately about the Eye-Vac we used in the kitchen. It is a portable, stand alone vacuum you sweep to - kind of like and electric dustpan.

We had an extra outlet installed and then had the cabinet people cut out the bottom of the sink cabinet and toe kick. It works like a charm. It can be set to manual, where you turn it on once you sweep to it or left on auto, which is how we have it (with a sensor to activate suction). It is bagless, the front panel pops out for easy emptying. It has a filter, too.

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clipped on: 06.19.2012 at 10:40 pm    last updated on: 06.19.2012 at 10:41 pm

RE: Cloud Swift...your outlet covers? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: cloud_swift on 04.24.2008 at 08:40 pm in Kitchens Forum

rmkitchen has the right link. Columbia Gorge Stoneworks, stonewallplates.com, made our outlet and switch covers. They were a pleasure to work with. They aren't cheap but it was worth it to us to complete the look especially given how many switches and outlets we have.

We followed the directions on their website regarding how much stone to send - they need extra in case they have a problem with an area on the stone. We used two sink cut-outs and the cut outs from the 3 wide switches which were just the size needed for a one wide outlet cover.

We used some plastic transparent film cut to the size of each wall plate so we could slide it around on the scraps and see the stone underneath. We found the spots on the scraps that provided a good match to the backsplash around the wall cover and taped down the transparent film to mark the spot.
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Then we packaged the stone and shipped it to Columbia Gorge Stoneworks. My careful DH used about 20 pounds of cardboard to pack the stone because he didn't want it to get damaged in transit! :^o

In a few weeks, this came back:
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Here is the back of a wall cover so you can see how much they shape the stone:
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We had the blanks marked with letters for each outlet position and they put the letter on the back of each wall plate so we didn't have to figure out which went where. They had one case where they couldn't use the spot on the stone that we had marked but they chose a good alternate spot with a great match. The silvery rectangles on the back are magnets so that we don't have to have screws. We checked and all our outlets and switches attracted the magnets. They have magnets that you can glue in place on the outlet/switch if yours aren't magnetic.

The colored cover on the Lutron outlets extends over the part of the outlet that the magnet would stick to so it is in the way:
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No problem, the excess plastic breaks off easily enough - here you can see the plastic with one end taken care of and the other still there:
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Close-up of a finished cover in place:
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clipped on: 06.13.2012 at 02:26 am    last updated on: 06.13.2012 at 02:26 am

Templating 411

posted by: ICFgreen on 01.04.2012 at 02:05 pm in Kitchens Forum

Hi everyone,
We have a meeting tomorrow bright and early to do the templating for all our countertops. Mostly quartz with a little marble baking center and granite in the bathrooms.

This is the one and only time we're building. Any advice for things we should do/know/expect/ask when during this part of the process?

Thanks!

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clipped on: 06.12.2012 at 01:00 am    last updated on: 06.12.2012 at 01:00 am

RE: french door & screen options (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: jscout on 06.07.2012 at 03:20 pm in Kitchens Forum

You can also take a look at Mirage Retractable Screens. They are competitors to the Phantom. I played with the Mirage at a builder's show a couple of years ago and I thought it was a great product. I have French Patio doors but no screen...yet. I've been looking at the retractables. They are pricey at about $800 a set, so I've held off getting them.

Here is a link that might be useful: Mirage Retractable Screen

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clipped on: 06.07.2012 at 08:01 pm    last updated on: 06.07.2012 at 08:01 pm

RE: Whole house surge protection (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: library_girl on 06.05.2012 at 10:58 am in Kitchens Forum

I think it's a small charge for the protection it provides, not just for the kitchen, but also for the TVs and computers. We had to upgrade our electric, so we had a 200 amp surge protection unit from Continental Power installed. Here's all the info my electrician sent on our options and their pricing. I'm not sure how much he charged us to install it, because it was included in our upgrade package:

Sycom surge company is a good company.
The following prices are for the items but installation and extra materials are on top of that.
It normally doesn't take long to install it (maybe like 15 to 30 minutes)
Sycom surge 200amp panel protection unit ~ $80
Sycom surge High speed coax ~ $95
Sycom surge Analog system coax ~ $95
Sycom surge Phone (1 Line) protection ~ $29
Sycom surge 6way, phone, coax protection ~ $37

There is another 200amp surge protection unit that I sell that is from Continental Power. (I have this one personally)
It does more than just surge protection, it also increases the power factor to every motor that is in your house like frig, dishwasher, a.c. unit, furnace and ect., this reduces the electric bill because you don't lose the electricity to your motors like it does normally. It also reduces the harmonic noises.
Take a look at this item on http://continentalpowerworx.com/ it's called powerwoRxe3 and is at the bottom of home page.
It's a great unit.
The cost of this powerwoRxe3 unit is $675.

Here is a link that might be useful: powerwoRxe3 - at the bottom of home page.

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clipped on: 06.06.2012 at 01:12 pm    last updated on: 06.06.2012 at 01:12 pm

RE: Passive Makeup Air (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: davidahn on 06.06.2012 at 05:08 am in Appliances Forum

I'm really excited about the CCB Innovations MUA solution!

Refresher/update for those who've read my previous posts: I've ordered a CC 60" range and a 72W x 27D Modernaire hood with 1400 CFM external Abbaka blower. Broan's dampers, but I needed to cobble a lot of pieces together. Shelter has conditioned air and HVAC tie-in, but is complex and not cheap (mid-$1K's). So I'd decided to just use the "crack" method (a window, that is). I live in San Diego, so that wouldn't be too bad... but my wife wasn't having it.

So I asked Trevor at Eurostoves if he knew of a good MUA, and he referred me to Modernaire, who sells the CCB Innovations (http://www.modernaire-hoods.com/MODERNAIRE_2/Makeup_Air.html). The damper (6, 8, or 10") is powered but it's a passive system; negative pressure from the range blower brings in outside air. There are two possible configurations: 1) outside air to diffuser; and 2) outside air to HVAC return air intake.

I was intrigued by the HVAC tie-in option. The HVAC filters the fresh air, and when needed, heats or cools it before pumping it into the house, with no redundant, expensive conditioning equipment. But I was concerned that the separation between the hood's blower and the damper/outside air would result in poor air replacement. So I asked Trevor, and because it was relatively new, he referred my questions to the owner of CCB, Nathan Trant, who called me right away. (Kudos to both Trevor and Nathan for responsiveness!)

So Nathan explained it, and it makes a lot more sense. This is how I understand it (some blanks filled in by me): the range hood blower creates negative pressure, which sucks in the HVAC vent output, which transfers the negative pressure to the return air side. Outside air gets pulled in preferentially over house return air because of negative pressure in the return air. It makes sense to me, anyway.

The beauty of this system is its simplicity. It offers conditioned makeup air at under $500 by using passive equalization from existing blowers rather than adding another blower, and using existing HVAC to filter and condition the air rather than adding heating elements and other complexities.

Kas and others, I'm interested to hear your analysis of this system. Do you think it will be efficient enough to effectively prevent any negative pressure/backdrafting, or do you see potential problems? Thanks in advance.

David

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clipped on: 06.06.2012 at 12:46 pm    last updated on: 06.06.2012 at 12:46 pm

RE: Belvedere soapstone question (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: fivefootzero on 05.16.2012 at 08:48 am in Kitchens Forum

The wax combos will last longer. We do not oil our Belvedere...we like it the gray color. We did have the same experience though, oil, evaporate, repeat. We found we like the lighter color better so we stopped.

And you are correct about the hardness. We originally had Santa Rita Venata installed, which was a beautiful stone with greenish sea glass-like inclusions. Unfortunately it was extremely soft (a fork pushed across left marks)...and the particular slabs we had were defective...so we replaced with the Belvedere and haven't looked back. It still has that silky feel, it's just not as black as it would be if oiled.

Here it is naked and natural:

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clipped on: 05.16.2012 at 06:11 pm    last updated on: 05.16.2012 at 06:11 pm

RE: super white quartzite irl--omg!!!!!!!!! (Follow-Up #75)

posted by: cloud_swift on 04.17.2011 at 05:10 pm in Kitchens Forum

BreezyGirl, Bedrosians is a chain with yards in a number of western states (and, oddly, Florida). It looks like there is one in Kent, Washington. I don't know how far away they would do it for, but when we wanted Azul do Mar in larger slabs than their Rancho Cordova yard had, they located some in the San Jose yard and moved them to our's so that we could take a look. Pretty nice of them since we had already said we would be okay with the size they had locally. The slabs they moved were just as nice and let us have one seam in our L rather than two.

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clipped on: 05.07.2012 at 02:11 am    last updated on: 05.07.2012 at 02:11 am

RE: Pictures of wood kitchens please! (Follow-Up #48)

posted by: julieh1926 on 11.10.2010 at 08:48 am in Kitchens Forum

We're not quite done, and I haven't posted any pictures yet (hopefully will have a final report soon!), but here's a sneak peak of our natural cherry cabinets with soapstone counters! This was mostly a DIY job.

Sorry they're a bit blurry.

view of the kitchen from family room:
view from family room area into kitchen

wine rack wall:

wine rack, pantry & other storage

appliance garage -- closed

view of kitchen

island with cooktop

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clipped on: 05.06.2012 at 05:00 am    last updated on: 05.06.2012 at 05:00 am

Progress pics - floor and fireplace

posted by: cloud_swift on 10.02.2011 at 06:34 pm in Kitchens Forum

We are getting there. The floor and fireplace are in. The paint is in. The baseboards should go in next week. The family room cabinets which will be free standing so they aren't really part of the construction will take another couple of weeks. I'm really pleased with how the fireplace granite came out. Using black for the hearth works well, I think.

Close up of fireplace:
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I like how they put a little hardwood frame around the fireplace. The granite fabricator did a good job of getting tight seams. I was a bit worried that it would look too pieced together with the surround being made of three pieces but he cut for nice transitions, IMO. The swirly nature of the grain in our granite helps.

From the kitchen door:
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Kitchen and breakfast room with the new floor and paint (the toe kicks aren't back in yet):
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They made little frames around the floor vents. These are flush to the floor instead of sticking up like the old ones did:
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The floor guy promised to make the floor level to the entry way tile so that no little metal transition was needed and he delivered:
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clipped on: 05.06.2012 at 04:37 am    last updated on: 05.06.2012 at 04:37 am

RE: Please show me your cherry wood cabinets (shaker preferred) (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: leela4 on 03.02.2012 at 11:22 am in Kitchens Forum

Here are our natural cherry cabs with natural maple floors. Again, lighter than your inspiration pics, although they have darkened somewhat; they've been in since July 2010.
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clipped on: 05.06.2012 at 04:34 am    last updated on: 05.06.2012 at 04:34 am

Choosing a wood floor to go with natural cherry cabinets

posted by: cloud_swift on 05.17.2011 at 09:41 pm in Kitchens Forum

I haven't been on here much since we finished our kitchen remodel about 5 years ago. At the time, we kept our existing wood floor. We weren't changing the footprint which allowed us to keep the floor. We planned eventually to remodel the fireplace end of the family room taking out the hearth that extends most of the way across the far wall so it made sense to wait until that for redoing the floor.

We are now starting the second phase of the remodel and are having trouble choosing a floor. We know that we want wood as tile and stone are too hard on the feet. Our cabinets are natural cherry and our counters are Azul do Mar quartzite. We have left over Azul do Mar and probably will use that for a floor level hearth stone in front of the new fireplace.

We are leaning toward choosing a floor that is lighter than the cabinets, though we also looked at darker floors in the show room today. Here are photos of the two samples that we brought home along with a bit of our cabinets and granite. The cabinet and wood colors look right but the granite color is a bit washed out in these photos - in real life it is bluer.

Maple:
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Red Oak:
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Here is the big picture at the end of the first phase of the remodel (the white fridge which we didn't replace at the time eventually died and was replaced with a stainless steel Samsung; the wood paneling you can see around the window which covers the walls outside the kitchen cabinet area will be taken down - the walls will probably be painted an off white):
The big picture

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clipped on: 05.06.2012 at 04:31 am    last updated on: 05.06.2012 at 04:31 am