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RE: Cyclonic central vacuums? Hide-a-hose? Brand? (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: faithers03 on 01.20.2009 at 09:35 pm in Cleaning Tips Forum

Cyclonic central vacuums are the best. I grew up in the industry and have had all three of the major brands, Vacuflo, Imperium, and Vacu-maid. You can't go wrong with any of these three brands. If you want to do it yourself there are great deals to be found online. The HAH is great so is the Vacuflo vroom for small spaces like bathrooms or kitchens. centralvacuumstores has a coupon code at the end of the youtube vroom video 10% off.

NOTES:

central vac
clipped on: 06.16.2013 at 09:37 pm    last updated on: 06.16.2013 at 09:37 pm

RE: Cyclonic central vacuums? Hide-a-hose? Brand? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: chinook73 on 11.04.2008 at 04:47 pm in Cleaning Tips Forum

Sorry for the delay! I just checked this site out again today.

Anyway, we have a vacuflo maxair canister (model #88100). We're in Canada where Vacuflo is the only dealer of the HAH. It's their biggest, most powerful canister and the only one that requires the special wiring. I also really like their powerheads which run on the suction rather than a motor. Much quieter than our old one and work really well. I also got the "rug rat" for stairs, it was the first I'd heard of it - good lord whoever invented that deserves a nobel prize!

We have 2700 sq. feet and a hose on each story. The basement's currently undeveloped so we just put a regular outlet down there.

Good luck!

NOTES:

central vac
clipped on: 06.16.2013 at 09:35 pm    last updated on: 06.16.2013 at 09:35 pm

RE: Please show me how to hide the hair dryer,etc... (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: linda-z on 11.12.2007 at 09:09 pm in Bathrooms Forum

I took pictures for you!

Here are the pictures of the "back sides."

This is the underside of my drawer (and the back side of my outlet in the drawer)

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

And this is where the wires go:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

I hope this helps. It's not an extension cord, at least not in the classic sense.

And it passed inspection! I really do like it.


NOTES:

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clipped on: 02.04.2011 at 02:20 pm    last updated on: 02.04.2011 at 02:20 pm

RE: Please show me how to hide the hair dryer,etc... (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: monicakm on 11.11.2007 at 07:13 pm in Bathrooms Forum

My bathroom is still a work in progress (DH is tiling the walls as I type). I brought the hairdryer from his bathroom and plugged it in to show you the plug behind a drawer in the vanity. I also had him put an outlet in one of the bathroom closets.


NOTES:

Hair dryer storage
clipped on: 02.04.2011 at 02:18 pm    last updated on: 02.04.2011 at 02:19 pm

RE: WHole house fan (Follow-Up #28)

posted by: fasola-shapenote on 02.15.2009 at 06:40 am in Remodeling Forum

I have a recommendation for whole-house fans, and that is to go with the ones made by Triangle Engineering of Arkansas (made in the USA!).

These things move more air than any other brand. As an example: the 36" belt-drive model sold at Lowes & Home Depot moves 6,900 CFM on its highest speed. The 36" one that Triangle makes moves 10,600 CFM.

I just put one of these in last week and am so taken with it that I'm evangelizing for Triangle now.

These things are much higher quality than the other brands too -- these are made with very heavy-gauge solid welded steel (as opposed to the thin, flimsy metal - often aluminum - that other brands use). They use a very solid motor made by Emerson, the best of the top three motor-making companies (the other two being Fasco and A.O. Smith). They come pre-framed on a wood frame for installation, AND they have sponge-rubber noise-dampening material between the fan and the frame, so they are much quieter than the other brands. Also, Triangle holds a patent on an automatic belt-tensioning system these things use, so you don't have to worry about getting the tension right when you install the fan (or in the years thereafter as the belt loosens up).

Also, they come in more sizes than the other companies -- from 24" all the way up to 48" blade diameter (which moves a ridiculously whopping amount of air; no one else makes one that big).

They're sold online at Southern Tool amongst other places that ship nationwide, so they're available wherever you live.

Also, Triangle re-brands some of these as a private label for Dayton, which is the "store brand" of Grainger - so if you have a Grainger store near you (check your phone book or their website), you can buy one there. I will say this, though - Grainger/Dayton makes their own shutters, and those shutters are much better than the one Triangle makes. Triangle makes great fans, but crappy shutters. Luckily, they're sold separately -- so buy a Triangle fan and Dayton shutters; money can't buy better products.

They also re-brand some for a company out in San Francisco called "Fanman" (a/k/a "Delta Breeze").

A word to the wise -- these fans move a lot of air, so make sure to install at least the recommended minimum amount of attic exhaust space (gable vents, soffit vents, roof vents, some combination thereof, whatever works for you) - if you don't have enough, the fan will operate at reduced capacity, and there will be a backpressure which will cause the shutters to rattle when the fan is in operation (any time you hear whole-house fan shutters rattling, you know there isn't enough exhaust space). Oh, and one other thing -- only buy a belt-drive whole-house fan, don't EVER buy a direct-drive model...the direct-drive models are at least five times louder, they sound like standing on an airport runway next to an old prop plane getting ready to take off.

Several of the dedicated whole-house fan installing companies have chosen to use Triangle fans; that should tell you something. These companies want satisfied customers, so they use Triangle and only Triangle.

Refer to http://www.trianglefans.com/wholehouse.html for more info

Here is a link that might be useful: Triangle whole-house fans

NOTES:

make sure to install at least the recommended minimum amount of attic exhaust space (gable vents, soffit vents, roof vents, some combination thereof, whatever works for you) - if you don't have enough, the fan will operate at reduced capacity, and there will be a backpressure which will cause the shutters to rattle when the fan is in operation (any time you hear whole-house fan shutters rattling, you know there isn't enough exhaust space). Oh, and one other thing -- only buy a belt-drive whole-house fan, don't EVER buy a direct-drive model...the direct-drive models are at least five times louder, they sound like standing on an airport runway next to an old prop plane getting ready to take off.
clipped on: 02.08.2010 at 08:42 pm    last updated on: 02.08.2010 at 08:42 pm

RE: Making house cooler (Follow-Up #41)

posted by: robin_DC on 07.27.2005 at 07:22 pm in Old House Forum

There's an attic fan in my house. While it instantly cools the area immediately by it (good as there are no ac vents there) and does a good job cooling downstairs as well, it also manages to pull up odors in certain rooms of the house. The bathroom ends up smelling acidic, almost urine-y, the home office smells very musty 'old house' and lately the living room has an unpleasant odor too! I have no idea where these smells reside (especially the bathroom, as it did have a damp towel/pet smell with the prior owners but I've removed the carpet and had tile installed, removed wallpaper and primed and painted the walls and ceiling), but the attic fan is guaranteed to bring them out. So that deters me from using it; hadn't thought about allergens but I'm sure it's even better at sucking those up.

NOTES:

whole house fans - brings out smells
clipped on: 02.08.2010 at 06:42 pm    last updated on: 02.08.2010 at 06:42 pm

RE: Hot Water Recirculating System Anyone? (Follow-Up #23)

posted by: oruboris on 01.13.2009 at 02:47 pm in Building a Home Forum

The issue I have with pumpless systems is that water in the pipes is kept at temp -always-, not as needed as with a pumped system. They return a LOT more gallons to the heater for re-heating than a pump running for a few minutes at a time.

With pumpless, every pipe in your home is essentially part of the hot water tank. The best pipe insulation is still far behind what your tank has, and the combined surface area of all those pipes is huge.

NOTES:

pumpless may cost more to keep heated ?
clipped on: 02.08.2010 at 06:10 pm    last updated on: 02.08.2010 at 06:10 pm

RE: Hot Water Recirculating System Anyone? (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: david_cary on 01.12.2009 at 05:52 am in Building a Home Forum

dlm2000 - the electricity to run the pump is a minor concern. Here is a link showing a $400/year cost for a pumpless system as you have. A pumped system that runs on a timer, demand or motion sensor will save money over the 24/7 system you have. Mind you, this guy is on propane so a NG system would be cheaper. The water saved around here would save about $50 a year but he had a long run from hot water heater to master bath so it could easily be 1/2 that.

Your husband must not be an engineer that is concerned with energy wastage. My father is one and he thinks such a system is like driving a full size SUV with 1 person and no cargo - oh wait - people do that all day long....

Here is a link that might be useful: Cost breakdown with recirc system

NOTES:

ck the link out
clipped on: 02.08.2010 at 06:02 pm    last updated on: 02.08.2010 at 06:02 pm

RE: Hot Water Recirculating System Anyone? (Follow-Up #14)

posted by: oruboris on 01.11.2009 at 10:11 pm in Building a Home Forum

ncamy: a recirculation pump draws water from the furtherest point in your hot water system and and puts it back in the water heater. This draws freshly heated water to the pump point, essentially as if you'd run the tap, but the water isn't wasted and less energy is required to re-heat the once hot water than ground water.

In your case, it would save you the cost of a second water heater. Tankless elicits just about as much controversy as politics and religion. How long it takes to pay off the much higher initial cost will depend on energy costs, and I think anyone counting on a long term downward trend of those costs will be dissappointed. Also, if you have extremly cold ground water temps in your area, the tankless may have a hard time keeping up with the demands of a multi-head shower with body sprays.

The idea of a motion activated or push button recirc pump is pretty cool: mine is on a timer. If I lead a really structured lifestyle and showered at the same time every day it would be great. But there's really not a lot of point in the pump heating up the shower at 7am if I'm not going to be ready till 9-- the water in the pipes will be cold again by then.

Since my walls are now enclosed, I may look into a wireless transmitter to control the pump-- Billy Mays to the rescue...

NOTES:

Also, if you have extremly cold ground water temps in your area, the tankless may have a hard time keeping up with the demands of a multi-head shower with body sprays.
clipped on: 02.08.2010 at 05:59 pm    last updated on: 02.08.2010 at 05:59 pm

RE: Side opening oven? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: plllog on 11.02.2007 at 01:16 am in Appliances Forum

Thank-you!

Interesting that there aren't more. I grew up with one and it was so much easier to use.

After researching the brands we have:

Frigidaire -- simple, electric, less than $1000, comes in white or black.

BlueStar and American Range, I found french door gas ovens, commercial for home lines with high end features. Lots of cool colors plus stainless. Price above $3000.

The smallest BlueStar (24"), new on the market (I couldn't find anyone who shows it in stock yet) has a single side swing door. It's gas, with a "ceramic infrared broiler".

Gaggenau -- high end, modern styling, electric. Price over $3000. 27" discontinued but still available. 30" current standard. Also comes combi convection/steam.

I so appreciate the help! If anyone knows of any I've missed or gotten wrong, please do tell!

NOTES:

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clipped on: 11.10.2007 at 05:31 pm    last updated on: 11.10.2007 at 05:31 pm

RE: Whats your dream laundry room? (Follow-Up #22)

posted by: ugly_duckling_2 on 06.19.2006 at 04:41 pm in Laundry Room Forum

Oh raybeck! I love the idea of piped in stereo! Do you find 40" of drip dry bar to be too much or just right? I bought a wall mounted extending/collapsing drying rack to fit above my utility sink.

Despite having started the project how many moons ago, I finally fired my contractor for not completing the work...so its STILL only half done. I LOVE my swanstone utility sink and am anxiously waiting for my handyman to install the faucet this week on my MTI jentle jet sink. My handwash is piling up in excitment. I've ended up paying way more $ than I wanted to on Moen Camerist faucets due to contractor stupidity.

Also, due to miserable contractor, my cabinets are a total fiasco. Still waiting for uppers.

I'm now planning on adding shelving near the top of the opposing wall to the cabinets to place my lifelong goofy collection of snow globes. DH is trying to figure out if we should construct the shelves out of crown molding or regular shelving (it only needs to be 2-3" deep.

NOTES:

Jentle jet whirlpool laundry sink
clipped on: 06.07.2007 at 01:11 pm    last updated on: 06.07.2007 at 01:11 pm

RE: Exposed heating element on DW - old school? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: whirlpool_trainee on 01.11.2007 at 02:02 pm in Appliances Forum

LG also offers a hidden heating element - besides all the Euro brands.

Miele offers a special "Multi-function basket" to hold baby bottles and so forth. I'm pretty sure all the upper baskets with "Removable spiked insert on right side" (Optima Series and above) can accept this extra basket.

HTH, Alex

NOTES:

small stuff basket
clipped on: 05.23.2007 at 12:03 pm    last updated on: 05.23.2007 at 12:03 pm

RE: Do Miele dry plastics well? (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: jerrod6 on 01.17.2007 at 10:36 am in Appliances Forum

I can increase the drying time on my Miele model G2830 which does help a bit. I generally don't do this because like others have said no heat condensation drying(which is especially energy saving and I think is found on the Bosch, Miele, Asko, some GE and perhaps most new DW made today) depends on the heat within the dishes and inside the tub and I guess in the 10+ years I have had Miele dishwashers I don't care too much about it anymore.

The fan assist does make it "better" because it causes a more dramatic temperature difference within the machine while not blowing any outside air over the dishes themselves.

I have found that some plastics dry completely...some do not. Heavy plastics(tupperware) work best. The light cheap stuff like my glad or ziploc storage containers are just OK. For me I just shake them off in the sink when I take them out. Or if I think about it and I am around when the dishwasher is finished I take them out shake them off and put them back in for a while. It also helps to use one of the cycles that uses a higher water temperature setting which means that the cycles suggested for energy savings don't cut it when it comes to drying plastic.

The DW that worked the best was the old kitchenAid models which were made by the Hobart company up until the mid 1990s. They had forced Hot Air drying. That worked well but even then there were some wet spots on plastics - you can imagine how much energy that took...but back in those days no one cared...and the Energy Star police were not walking around to make sure you sold efficent appliances. Also that hot air drying method they used DID suck up air from the bottom of the unit(in other words up off of the floor) and blow it all over the dishes. I noticed this when one of mine was pulled out of it's cabinet. There was the fan sitting there open to everything just sucking it up. I hated that because you could not get back in there to clean the area on a regular basis.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 05.16.2007 at 08:00 pm    last updated on: 05.16.2007 at 08:00 pm

RE: Do Miele dry plastics well? (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: jerrod6 on 01.17.2007 at 07:27 pm in Appliances Forum

Sshrivastava

I noticed that the G2830 LaPerla has a plastics program that according to the advertizing brochure is supposed to dry plastics(Of course nothing is going to remove pools of water). The owners manual doesn't state this however. I have never used it. Have you tried it? Like you I don't have any problems with heavy plastic it is just the light food storage containers that is sometimes damp.

borngrace...If this may be an issue you would want to stay away from ANY dishwasher that does not have a heated drying element in the bottom....If you are going to be looking be sure to ask the sales man to show you the element and explain how it would dry the dishes. Problem is that some dishwashers do have an element that they use to heat the water, but they don't use it to provide heat for the dry....Ugh. So maybe you will need to read the owners manual before you buy.

NOTES:

bottom heating element may only be used to heat the water and not to hot dry for plastics.
clipped on: 05.16.2007 at 07:57 pm    last updated on: 05.16.2007 at 07:58 pm

RE: Do Miele dry plastics well? (Follow-Up #14)

posted by: sparky823 on 01.18.2007 at 03:47 am in Appliances Forum

You might want to go to the GE site and check out their machines. They have one with a cycle just for plastics and it focuses on drying.From what I have read they are supposed to do a great job.They also have something called angle/dry where you adjust tines to tilt the cups with bottoms that tend to hold water.
I have a Kenmore Elite and all the plastics dry well in it and I even use the energy saving dry most time. I think the key is to keep jet-dry in the dispenser all time.Also mine sit overnight so the next day they are all dry.
With 4 kids you might opt to use the sani-rinse on yours and the extra heat would help dry them.

NOTES:

Drying plastics and tilting tines for cups.
clipped on: 05.16.2007 at 07:56 pm    last updated on: 05.16.2007 at 07:56 pm

RE: Crazy idea? Wall oven in-wall above counter?? (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: lee676 on 05.15.2007 at 08:08 pm in Appliances Forum

> I have seen some upper ovens with a door that slides up parrelel to the wall-surface. Many years ago, though. Believe was Gaggenau. That would be easier and safer.

Nope, it was a Frigidaire. This picture is of a range (with pull-out burners below the oven that retract like a drawer when not in use), but they made standalone ovens with the same type of door. There are still many of these out there, often in good condition. One local store had one in their showroom the last time I was there.

When wall ovens were first introduced (by Thermador) in the 1950s, they were often installed actual walls - after all, nobody made oven cabinets back then since there were no ovens to put in them (interestingly, the term "wall oven" has stuck, even though the norm is now to install them in a cabinet, not a wall). I've seen pictures of kitchens with the oven recessed into a wall - this Thermador brochure shows one so installed - and it may be possible to install a modern oven in the same manner. The surrounding materials may need to be able to withstand high temperatures though, and check the oven's installation guide first. Indeed, the ovens I've seen installed in a wall recess often were in a brick wall, not drywall.

If a drop-down door gets in the way, Frigidaire and Gaggenau both still make ovens with side-hinged doors.

NOTES:

Oven with side hinged door or wall mounted ovens with door that opens upward.
clipped on: 05.16.2007 at 07:01 pm    last updated on: 05.16.2007 at 07:01 pm

RE: Central Vac's anyone? (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: gardenchick1 on 11.20.2006 at 08:51 am in Appliances Forum

I've had central vacs for 15 yrs. now and wouldn't ever go back to a regular vacuum. It's much easier on the knees because you are not using your legs to push and pull that heavy vacuum around.

We had the NuTone in our old house and recently had a HP Vacuflo installed in our new construction. I like the Vacuflo much better and it is incredibly much quieter. Sometimes I can hardly tell if the powerhead is running -- it's that quiet.

We have two vacpans -- one in the laundry room and one in the kitchen. Love them both. So much easier to sweep crumbs into the vacpan than haul out the hose. We have mostly hardwood floors (probably about 3/4 of the house is hardwood) and love the floor brush.

Our old NuTone had standard outlets and we had to have electrical outlets nearby to run the powerhead. Our Vacuflo system has all direct connect outlets so we just have to plug in the hose and go. The Vacuflo hose is also much lighter than our old NuTone one (even though it's longer). No problem dragging it around at all -- it's super light.

Total price for our new system installed (5 outlets) was $1800.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 03.23.2007 at 07:24 pm    last updated on: 03.23.2007 at 07:24 pm

RE: Central Vac's anyone? (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: chris8796 on 11.16.2006 at 12:18 pm in Appliances Forum

Yes there are 2 types of outlets "standard" and "direct connect". Direct connect has 120V AC built in to operate powerheads and attachments.

Direct connect hoses work only in direct connect outlets, Standard hoses work in either. I would get Direct connect outlets if you have new construction.

I personally would replace your vacuum if it is that noisy. I went with the top of the line "acoustic unit" (MAU 65) from Allegro. It is very quiet and will suck the proverbial golf ball through a garden hose. The noise of air sucking through the opening is louder than the motor noise, even if your in the next room. It was about $500 delivered. I bought all of my stuff from them and DIY it myself, no complaints after 2yrs. Definitely the best bang for the buck I could find.

Here is a link that might be useful: Allegro vacuums

NOTES:

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clipped on: 03.23.2007 at 07:11 pm    last updated on: 03.23.2007 at 07:11 pm

RE: Central Vac's anyone? (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: seekingadvice on 11.12.2006 at 11:23 pm in Appliances Forum

ekoreilly, I'll answer your questions as best I can.

First, MD makes the actual vacuum but the rest is sourced from elsewhere. I believe this is true of many of the manufacturers, though they often rebadge the parts with their own name. MD, for instance, sells the "Stealth" powerhead/accessory kit as their own, but it's made by Lindhaus. You can buy a Lindhaus powerhead/accessory kit that is identical but it costs even more, I think. Most CV makers use the same outlets so assuming yours is standard, you can use any accessory/powerhead kit you want that utilizes a standard inlet with almost any brand of vacuum unit. The thing that won't necessarily work is if you use one type of hose with another type of powerhead, but as long as you buy the hose and powerhead together you should be fine.

I am sorry, but I don't know how to change to a different type of outlet. Mine is low voltage and turns on the unit, but also works the powerhead so I don't really know what that's called. Mine was all retrofitted into our home during the remodel and the guys said it was pretty easy to do (except for crawling around under the house).

There are two types of kickpan that I am aware of, and they are used with any system. One is the Vacpan and the other is the Vacusweep. They are basically the same thing but I needed the Vacusweep because I didn't have room in the toekick area for the Vacpan piping. I'll try to explain this: Picture the kickpan as a box with a plastic face that you see on the toekick. Behind the toekick, in that short space behind the frame piece, the piping is run from the kickpan to the vacuum unit. With the Vacpan, the piping goes out the top of the box, then back, then down. I didn't have room for the pipe to go straight up and then down. The Vacusweep pipe exits through the back of the box and then goes down. You can do a search and find pictures that illustrate this. The Vacpan has a foot-activated switch whereas the Vacusweep has a long flange thing that you push up on to activate. You can also wire either one to a switch so that you turn it on that way, but then the door of the pan is always open. I wouldn't care for that although it doesn't really show that much. Since I've never used a Vacpan I don't know whether or not the toe switch is easier to use than the flange, but I will say that the flange took me some time to get used to because you have to feel around with your foot for it. I guess the switch would probably be the same but I'm not sure. If your toekick is stained/natural wood, be sure to get brown! My contractor got white and I had to reorder it in brown.

The hose can be plugged into the outlet without being on because you have to turn on the switch on the hose handle first.

HTH!

NOTES:

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clipped on: 03.23.2007 at 07:09 pm    last updated on: 03.23.2007 at 07:09 pm

RE: Central Vac's anyone? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: seekingadvice on 11.11.2006 at 08:48 pm in Appliances Forum

I love mine. It's located in the garage and is very quiet from the house but loud in the garage. I have scared more than one person out there by turning on my vacuum :) The same company (MD) makes one that is called Silent Master, I believe, and it's supposed to be very quiet.

You can mix and match the components of the different systems. I have MD canister, for instance, and a Vacusweep (like a Vacpan but requires less toekick space for the piping) plus an attachment/power head package by some German company whose name escapes me now. Be sure to get a powerhead with separate motor as opposed to a turbo model! The Stealth is supposed to be the best (same as Lindhaus), but it's very pricey. I just have regular hose (not crushproof) because I don't have a problem with squashing it and the regular hose is a lot lighter weight.

Be sure to get a powerhead that has a switch on the handle to turn off the beater bar thing. That allows you to go from rug to bare floor without changing attachments! I love that. I just use my regular powerhead for both rugs and hardwood. Also make sure you get the kind of outlets/hose that plug in directly and don't require the pigtail cord separately plugged in.

Something else I'd highly recommend is to locate your main outlet inside the closet where you plan to store the hose. This allows you to keep it plugged in and then it's all ready to go when you want to vacuum with it.

Here is a link that might be useful: Central vac site (feature MD but have good info)

NOTES:

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clipped on: 03.23.2007 at 07:03 pm    last updated on: 03.23.2007 at 07:03 pm

RE: LG Washers & Dryers Part 19 (Follow-Up #38)

posted by: AKAsTJ_Northern_CA on 11.23.2005 at 07:30 am in Laundry Room Forum

WarEagle_CA,

FL washers are happiest when installed on concrete. However, if it's going to be installed on a wood sub-floor, it's recommended that you install a 3/4" to 1" piece of plywood under at least the washer, but preferably under both the washer and dryer, and then secure that plywood to the floor joists. A number of Forum members have followed this procedure and had no problems...

TJ

NOTES:

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clipped on: 02.20.2007 at 03:08 pm    last updated on: 02.20.2007 at 03:08 pm

RE: Anti-Vibration Pads and Drain Pan (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: deke on 01.27.2007 at 09:19 pm in Laundry Room Forum

I am planning a new first floor room and I am going for multiple redundant systems on potential leaks. Our laundry will be right off the kitchen and the drain pans I have seen are kind of, well, ugly. You could have a tile drain pan built (almost like the bottom of a shower), but that can get expensive!

Whether you get a pan or not, leaks from a washer or its hoses are a potential nightmare. Have you seen the Intelliflow? I bought one and it will be installed for our new laundry room. It is a electronic valve that automatically turns on/off your water supply to the washer as it is needed. It works by sensing current draw from the washer and then turning on the water. So, there is no pressure on your washing machine hoses when the washer is not in use. In addition, it has a water sensor that goes on the floor and if it detects water it shuts down the water supply to the washer. However, the Intelliflow is made to work with 110 volt appliances! What to do? They also make an add on that will allow you to work with a 220v machine. It is a little bit of a work around in that is turns on the water flow for 120 minutes, but the leak sensor will still work. Here is a link: http://www.watts.com/pro/divisions/watersafety_flowcontrol/learnabout/learnabout_intelliflow.asp

Still, if the machine itself is leaking the Intelliflow isn't going to do anything about all the watter currently in the machine. For that a pan or drain are the only thing that can save you.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 02.20.2007 at 02:22 pm    last updated on: 02.20.2007 at 02:22 pm

RE: Returning Bosch Nexxt (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: mrsee on 12.25.2006 at 10:40 pm in Laundry Room Forum

I purchased my Siemens Washer and Dryer last summer no problems. A month Later I built my on pedestals using some 4x4 fence post cut to 12 inches and framed between the fence post with 2x4's then topped it off with some 1/2 inch plywood for stability. Believe you me I set my Washer and Dryer on them and levled them, I have not had any problems what so ever. I trimmed the front and sides of the stand out with the nice white shelving board. And it looks very nice Infact My washer has not moved from the spot where it is set back then. So to you who are having vibration issues you may want to try this. I was going to purchase some pedestals from Best buy but I deciced against that due to reading the problems that some were having with those pedestals. I wish I could post pics so you can see what I am talking about, plus they look very professional.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 02.20.2007 at 02:15 pm    last updated on: 02.20.2007 at 02:16 pm

RE: Returning Bosch Nexxt (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: benbow on 12.24.2006 at 04:06 am in Laundry Room Forum

ak-titan,

We have tile over 1 inch thick plywood & joist floor construction in our laundry room, (no 1.5 inch Gypcrete layer), and the vibration from our Bosch washer has not resulted in any damage to the tiles.

What some folks with vibration prone wood floors have done is to add an extra layer of plywood under the washer to dampen the vibrations being transmitted from the washer. They usually suggest a single layer of three quarter inch plywood. I think at least an inch thickness of plywood, or 1.5 inches like one uses on decking may be even better.

I would try cutting a sheet of 0.375" or 0.5" plywood into three 32" x 32" squares and glue them togther with construction adhesive. Make sure they glue up very flat by clamping or weighting the pieces. As additional "insurance" one could glue on waterproof rubber matting material to each surface. This panel will distribute the washer weight over several joists and eliminate mid joist floor bounce and noise.

Alternatively, one could reinforce the floor from below but that is a miserable job best left to professionals.

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clipped on: 02.20.2007 at 02:13 pm    last updated on: 02.20.2007 at 02:13 pm

RE: Cow mats under washer? (Follow-Up #17)

posted by: hamptonmeadow on 05.06.2006 at 11:18 pm in Laundry Room Forum

To move your stall mats from one area to another, as they are awkward and very heavy, use vise grips and drag them. The smell should dissipate early on. We use horse stall mats in our horse stalls. One can find smooth sided mats, but most have either grooves or bumps on one side or another. Hate bumps in a horse stall. Your manure fork gets caught on those damn bumps.

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RE: Cow mats under washer? (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: feetr2c on 03.15.2006 at 08:43 pm in Laundry Room Forum

seven, yes the entire mat weighed 80. the 30 x 32 size is what I just decided worked the best to fit my LG. YES the LG feet are on the mat. I also lag bolted the four corners of the mat to the floor with fender washers under the bolt heads.

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RE: Cow mats under washer? (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: washer_man on 03.14.2006 at 08:45 pm in Laundry Room Forum

It certainly helps if your builder knows that you are going to put a front loader in your installation, because then he can make the construction stiff enough, and strong enough, to avoid problems for you.

There are a few things that your builder can do to help.

Firstly, it helps a lot if your washer is next to, or on top of, load bearing walls. this is where there is a wall in the room below that's either directly underneath the washer, or right next to it. The best situation is where there are two walls underneath your washer that cross each other. If you have something like this you shouldn't have any problems at all.

The spacing between the wooden supports in the floor is also important. Your builder can halve this spacing where your washer is going to go.

Also, a tile floor under the washer also helps as well. This also has the added benefit of not absorbing water, just in case you ever get a leak of some sort.

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RE: Vibration commentary (Follow-Up #24)

posted by: the_seven on 03.26.2006 at 11:07 pm in Laundry Room Forum

Case 1) Using my FL on slags/carpets
Assuming the FL and its laundry and water weight 300 lbs.
This force is spread over the four 12"X12" slags.
Then the force on the floor is (300/(4X12X12)) = 0.52 lb per sq in.

Case 2) Using feetr2c LG on mat
Assume area of each footing = 2 sq in.
The 300 lbs force is acting on the floor over 8 sq in via the mat. Only this 8 sq in of the mat bears the load. The rest of the mat does not bear any load.
Then the force on the floor is 300/8 = 37.5 lbs per sq in.

So the mat alone does not spread the force over a large area like the slags.
If an 3/4" plywood is placed between the FL and the mat, the force would spread over a large area and would have a better result.

NOTES:

They mean "slabs" not "slags". They are talking about concrete slab blocks size 12x12x2.
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RE: He4t Shake Rattle and MOVE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: hbw248 on 06.12.2005 at 09:45 pm in Laundry Room Forum

It's not a matter of all four feet just "touching" the floor but rather all the weight of the washer "evenly" distributed >between all four legs<. This is not something you just eye or guess at. It takes time to tweek the leveling legs and get it right. It's best to have a load that vibrates spinning at the time you adjust the legs. Throw the bubble level away and forget about it once the washer is sitting relatively level and pleasing to the eye. Below is the method I recommend to get the smoothest operation from your machine:

Tweek the leveling legs with a load spinning until you get the smoothest operation. Bubble leveling is not nearly as critical as having the full weight of the machine "evenly" distributed between all four legs. Again, don't use a bubble level during the final leveling procedure. Start by tightening up the back two legs and their lock nuts first and then finish the tweeking process on the front two legs last. You don't want to be moving the machine out to tweek the rear legs so get them adjusted and lock nuts tight "first". Then position the washer in its final resting place before finishing up the adjustments on the front two legs.

Get down on the floor and examine each foot as the load is spinning. I like to lay down on the floor with my eyes level with the legs. Most likely you'll see one leg moving more than the others. Use a bright light to check this. The leveling leg that moves the most is not supporting enough weight. Thread that leg towards the floor or out from the washer a tad bit and make very small adjustments until you get the least movement and smoothest operation.

You may have to do this again in several months as the machine settles into the flooring material. Also try to thread the leveling legs in as close as possible to the chassis to start with.. only allowing enough space to fit an open end wrench to tighten up the lock nuts. The farther out the leveling legs are threaded, the more chance of vibration. Make sure the lock nuts are tight up against the chassis when finished. Remember, if the leveling legs are threaded out to far and the lock nuts left loose, more vibration will occur.

I'm willing to bet that if owners would follow this simple procedure there would be alot less vibration complaints. A little patience goes a long way so take your time and do it right!

Bruce

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RE: Duet Sport Whirlpool 2nd floor *Continued* (Follow-Up #81)

posted by: montr on 05.20.2006 at 10:38 am in Laundry Room Forum

I have a Duet Sport. The pump is noisier after it has removed most of the water from the drum. The noise come from the pump pushing the water up toward the drain pipe then getting unloaded (cavitation). At that time the water that is in the drain hose (past the pump) is coming backward in the pump. It is pushed back again and again and again ....

I found that most of the noise come from the base of the washer. Here is what I did. I took a 3/4" foam pipe insulation. I split it in two length wise (half circle). I fitted this half pipe foam insulation under the washer in front and on the side. The insulation is closing the gap between the floor ad the waher. This significantly reduced the noise from the pump. One section of pipe insulation is enough for one washer. Cost around $2 at Home improvement store.

Putting insulation in the bottom panel reduced the noise but I think it is not as good as closing the gap between the floor and the washer.

Note: I did both and now I can live with the pump noise.

NOTES:

Add foam pipe insulation around the edges when done.
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RE: Vibration commentary (Follow-Up #25)

posted by: dross on 03.26.2006 at 11:35 pm in Laundry Room Forum

The rest of the mat does not bear any load

It is not obvious that the sole benefit of either mat or slags is to spread the weight over a larger area. After all, one way manufacturers reduce vibration in most FLs is to add cement blocks (or cast iron in the case of Miele) inside the washer; this of courses increases the weight per square inch of the machines. - DR

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RE: Vibration commentary (Follow-Up #23)

posted by: feetr2c on 03.26.2006 at 12:49 pm in Laundry Room Forum

Personally, if I were using a 3/4 plywood, I would place it on the floor, then place the mat, and then the washer. I like the washer in direct contact with the mat, since both the mat and the washers feet are rubber. Rubber to rubber = sticky. This ensures that the washer won't walk around. I would lag bolt the mat to the plywood and into the floor. As far as getting the machine onto it, I just tilted the machine to get two legs on it, then kinda 'walked' it into position.

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RE: Vibration commentary (Follow-Up #20)

posted by: jaums on 03.26.2006 at 09:18 am in Laundry Room Forum

Or, if you can't lift the machine and drop it in the center of the mat, cut 4 squares from the pad and put one under each foot. Tilt the machine forward to put the pads under the back feet. Then tilt it back to put the pads under the front feet. Or sideways . . . Of course, this wouldn't work if you have the type of vibs that feet42c has.

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RE: Vibration commentary (Follow-Up #18)

posted by: feetr2c on 03.25.2006 at 11:26 pm in Laundry Room Forum

Bookert....YES strong rubber smell at first, but it does go away, at least mine did within just a few days. I cut my mat to 30 x 32 to fit my LG which leaves about 1.5 inches of mat sticking out on all sides. I found that vibration caused the washer AND the mat to slide out, as a single unit, from the corner where I have it. I solved that by lag bolting the mat to the floor. One bolt in each corner. I placed large fender washers under the bolt heads to prevent them from pulling through. The friction between the rubber feet on the washer and the mat is great enough that the washer stays put on the mat.

SEVEN----Yes. Not to make you feel stupid, but what good would a mat be if the washer feet weren't on it?

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RE: Vibration commentary (Follow-Up #17)

posted by: the_seven on 03.14.2006 at 01:37 pm in Laundry Room Forum

feetr2c,

Do the footings of your LG stand directly on the TSC mat?

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RE: Stall matts (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: bookert on 02.22.2006 at 10:22 am in Laundry Room Forum

feetr2c,

I should have asked it this way:
"How do you lift these monster machines in order to get them on the matt?"
We can slide the machine on the plywood, but getting the machine UP on the matt will be back breaking. Do you use a dolly? We have a small dolly, not an appliance dolly.
Oh, REALLY important question!! The matt reeks so bad!! Will this smell dissapate? My husband almost had an allergy attack just looking at it in the back of the truck.
I was mislead on price from Big Horse and when I arrived the next morning the quoted $34.99 went up to $54.99. Lady said the guy didn't know what he was talking about, but I made some other calls and all other stores were much less than the $54.99. That bumms me out when that happens. =(
One store even has a 1" thick matt. Think that would be better yet? ( Live in a newer Manufactured Home with thick plywood underflooring)
Thanks for your help!

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clipped on: 01.01.2007 at 07:13 pm    last updated on: 01.01.2007 at 07:13 pm

RE: Vibration commentary (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: feetr2c on 02.20.2006 at 11:16 pm in Laundry Room Forum

Bookert the FIRST step is placing your plywood down and then leveling the machine on it. Then when you place the mat down, you'll automatically be leveled. The only thing you will need to do is "fine tune" your leveling during a spin. I did this with no clothes in the machine. If you hear objectionable chatter, lift up one corner of the machine at a time to isolate which leg needs attention. Place a couple layers of heavy cardboard under that leg. After you have used it a while and know that all is well, you can remove the cardboard, and then unscrew that leg by the approximate thickness of the cardboard. This is much easier than the trial and error method of screwing/unscrewing the legs. Also be advised that when spinning WITH a load of clothes, there may be times that you get a nice quiet spin, while other times not. This is due to a load being slightly off balance. All in all, I think you'll notice a HUGE improvement.

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clipped on: 01.01.2007 at 07:12 pm    last updated on: 01.01.2007 at 07:12 pm

RE: Vibration commentary (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: feetr2c on 02.11.2006 at 12:07 am in Laundry Room Forum

Bookert, Ya try an agricultural store or buy from TSC online.

Here is a link that might be useful: TSC Rubber Mat

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RE: Vibration commentary (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: bookert on 02.10.2006 at 11:57 pm in Laundry Room Forum

feetr2c,

Where do I find a TSC? Can I purchase one at a big feed store? I have two 3/4 " pieces of plywood under my w/d that helps alot, but in mid spin speed I am experiencing jack hammer type noise for a short time that I would love to curb!
Thanks.

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clipped on: 01.01.2007 at 07:11 pm    last updated on: 01.01.2007 at 07:11 pm

RE: Vibration commentary (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: feetr2c on 01.29.2006 at 11:18 pm in Laundry Room Forum

I solved our LG FL vibration on a first floor by purchasing a 4' x 6' stall mat from Tractor Supply Co. It's 3/4" thick, and I used a sharp utility knife to cut it to 30" x 32". I placed it under the washer, grooved side down, and woohoo! That thing absorbed 80% of the vibration! It only cost around $40, but it weighs 80 pounds, yes, eighty!

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clipped on: 01.01.2007 at 07:06 pm    last updated on: 01.01.2007 at 07:07 pm