Clippings by leafaholic

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When You Come To A Fork ----------

posted by: dcarch on 10.15.2009 at 09:25 pm in Garden Junk Forum

For you guys who are into making plate flowers.
Fork bends easy if your heat it up to red hot.

dcarch


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clipped on: 10.12.2010 at 10:05 am    last updated on: 10.12.2010 at 10:06 am

When You Come To A Fork ---#3

posted by: dcarch on 10.26.2009 at 11:58 am in Garden Junk Forum

Still more.

dcarch


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clipped on: 10.12.2010 at 10:01 am    last updated on: 10.12.2010 at 10:02 am

Frying Pan For Flying Friends --Pix Heavy!!!

posted by: dcarch on 07.18.2010 at 03:42 pm in Garden Junk Forum

The pan that almost got junked was a typical 12" aluminum Teflon frying pan. It occurred to me that it is totally ideal for a birdbath. The right size and weather-proof. The design of the curly art nouveau looking vines was based on the consideration that birds will need them to perch on if they prefer not to be in the water. You will see three holes also along the edge. The pan can also be hung from a tree branch.

The graphics were carved using a rotary burr/file with a Dremel tool. The leftover black Teflon coating is a perfect background to show up the carved graphics.

You can find thousands of graphics of all styles on the internet. Just print it out on a piece of paper. Using spray-on adhesive, you can attach the graphics on the pan. Then using the rotary tool and follow the design on the paper, trace and carve away. No great skill is needed to put a fancy design on the pan.

How to cut aluminum:

1. It is not that difficult to cut thick aluminum with an electric reciprocating jig saw with a wood cutting blade.
2. It is not that difficult to cut it with a hacksaw by hand.
3. Actually it is possible to cut it with a pair of metal cutting shears. Aluminum is that soft. That was how I did it.
4. Bending aluminum takes not much effort.

The solar pump:

I was pleasantly surprised at how well and powerful that tiny solar pump works. The pump has a high-tech motor. It is similar to the fan motors in a computer. It uses Hall-effect devices so it is a brushless DC design. It is normally rated for 50,000 hours and uses very little electricity.

Using carbide bits, I drilled a hole thru a pebble for the fountain. I have not decided on what spray pattern I want yet. The pump is so small so it is very easily hidden by the pebbles.

The solar panel comes with a long cord and can be positioned any place where you get the best sun. I bought the solar fountain on eBay. Not very expensive.

The solar panel sends plenty of power to run the fountain non-stop. Because the water is being re-circulated, there is no waste of water.

More----

You can find a plug-in DC power supply/charger to run this indoors.
This would be wonderful in the winter for growing Narcissus indoors.

Let me know if you need more information.

For those of you who make and sell things, this one should do very well for you.

dcarch

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clipped on: 08.15.2010 at 09:12 am    last updated on: 08.15.2010 at 09:12 am

Cool projects for silverware

posted by: toomuchglass on 08.06.2010 at 11:38 am in Garden Junk Forum

No -- not cool ----- AWESOME ! I found these pics on the internet -- they got my wheels turning ! ( Especially the fish )

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clipped on: 08.10.2010 at 10:28 am    last updated on: 08.10.2010 at 10:29 am

RE: glass bird feeder (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: imjustsam on 01.31.2010 at 03:44 pm in Garden Junk Forum

This is the version I made a couple years ago. It was pretty easy. I used a divided relish tray for the bottom and drilled a hole in the middle of it. the second layer was a glass lampshade(open at both ends, no drilling) and then I had a glass globe at the top which had the top hole already in it. I strung them together with a rod from the hardware store(less than $1)and then you can get caps or nuts to fit on each end. This way you can easily unscrew or loosen an end to add the birdseed. Easy Schmeasy

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clipped on: 02.01.2010 at 09:48 pm    last updated on: 02.01.2010 at 09:49 pm

Helpful instructions for stained glass artists

posted by: silvamae on 10.21.2009 at 11:45 am in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

I stumbled upon these instructions for making stained glass windows. For those of you who work with lead and solder and came instead of mosaic, these instructions are comprehensive and might be of help.

Here is a link that might be useful: instructions for stained glass windows

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clipped on: 10.21.2009 at 10:27 pm    last updated on: 10.21.2009 at 10:27 pm

Grouting tips - found here on GardenWeb

posted by: silvamae on 10.21.2009 at 12:11 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

I found these instructions to be very helpful, especially for newbies who haven't found their own methods yet. I have yet to try the baggie method (piping) but I intend to use it on my latest project.

Here is a link that might be useful: Grouting instructions - tips from GardenWeb

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clipped on: 10.21.2009 at 10:26 pm    last updated on: 10.21.2009 at 10:26 pm