Clippings by kayskats

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Half sours simplified

posted by: kayskats on 07.24.2008 at 05:03 pm in Harvest Forum

I have taken the liberty of editing Ken's recipe (after all I did earn a respectable living editing for many years) and putting it in more a recipe format. -- Hope you're not offended Ken, but this was the only way I could make sense of the many, many posts.
I am putting a copy of this recipe in my clippings and anyone who wants it can find it there.
One other caveat (Please don't blow a stack, ken), but this is very similar to the recipe that USDA dropped about two decades ago. Recent NCHFP tests showed that Listeria can multiply in a pickle partially fermented at room temperature in a salt brine. NCHFP is supposed to be doing more testing, but at the present they do not recommend this process. Listeria is very common. It affect many people and they don't even know it. BUT the young, elderly and those with a compromised immune system should be aware before using this technique.
Okay here's

Ken's Half-Sour Pickles
Source: ksrogers, Harvest Forum

5 1/2 ounces by weight Kosher salt
per gallon of room-temp water
--
Cloves of garlic coarsely chopped
Fresh dill heads
Fresh dill sprigs
Peppercorns
--
Pickling cucumbers - the freshest you can get

Use only very fresh water from the cold water tap. Measure Kosher salt by weight and thoroughly dissolve in water.
Put as many of the seasonings as suits your taste in the bottom of sterilized jars -- quarts, half gallon, whatever.
Pick, rinse, clean and cut 1/8" off both ends of cukes and pack tightly in the jars to about 1 inch from top. All cukes should be wedged firmly to stay under brine.
Pour the room-temp salt water brine over cukes and spices to 1/2" from top. Top with a new flat and a Ball Plastic Jar cover.
Flip the filled and capped jars over a few times to loosen and release any trapped air bubbles.
Return to upright position and then give the jars a "quick twist" a couple of times a day.
Leave on the counter for two days to start it working. (You probably will not see bubbles.) After 48 hours, open a jar, check the liquid level and adjust if necessary. If you wish, taste one of the top cukes, it will probably taste slightly of dill and salt. Remember it is not yet half sour.
If cukes are not mushy, bland or bitter, you have the option of adding a bit of salt or more water.
Reseal and leave on counter one to three more days. Taste sample again and if you are happy with the taste, add a tablespoon of white vinegar to each half gallon jar to slow/stop fermentation. (Adjust measure for the size jar used) Recap and flip over several times to distribute vinegar.
Place in refrigerator for a few days. Then you can start eating and keep eating up to a year (if they last that long).
IMPORTANT: If at any point in this process the brine becomes very cloudy or forms a scum, something is wrong. Stop, toss and start over.

KEN, I hope I got everything right, and you can take it easy for a while and take care of yourself.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.24.2008 at 05:05 pm    last updated on: 07.24.2008 at 05:06 pm

Apple Chutney Question

posted by: booberry85 on 10.06.2007 at 12:32 pm in Harvest Forum

I think this recipe is Annie's. Is it ok to substitute either dried cherries or dried cranberries for some of the raisins?

APPLE CHUTNEY
8 C chopped apples (I use Northern Spy's)
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 XL sweet red pepper, chopped (or 2 med)
1 lb golden raisins
1 lb black raisins
2 jalepenos, chopped
2 Tbsp mustard seeds
4 C apple cider vinegar
2 med onions, chopped
4 C brown sugar
1/4 C fresh ginger, chopped (no need to peel)
2 tsp salt
2 tsp grd allspice
2 tsp grd cinnamon
2 tsp grd cloves
Combine all in a large kettle and bring slowly to a boil, stirring often to keep from sticking. Boil till thick. Pour into hot jars, adjust lids and process in BWB 10 min.
Yield: 12 to 14 half pints (maybe?)

NOTES:

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clipped on: 11.18.2007 at 11:56 am    last updated on: 11.18.2007 at 11:56 am

RE: apple butter in the oven? (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: annie1992 on 09.12.2006 at 07:27 pm in Harvest Forum

Nope, no cottage cheese in my apple butter, but I always do mine in the oven. Keep the heat low when it starts to thicken so it doesn't "caramelize", I start at 350, when it begins to thicken I turn it down to about 250 and let it cook until it's "thick enough". That's a relative term, and depends on how thick you like it.

Here is the recipe my own Grandmother used, and the one that I used to win a Blue Ribbon at the County Fair the year I was 12.

GRANDMA'S -APPLE BUTTER

6 lbs.
1-2 quarts sweet cider (Grandma used 2, I use 1 because I can cook a shorter time. Grandma thought longer was better)
2 cups sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground cloves

Cook the apples in the cider and press through a food mill or sieve. Mix in sugar and spices to taste. Pour pulp into a non-reactive pan (I use an old enameled roaster) and bake at 250, stirring every hour or so, until "thick enough". If I'm in a hurry, I start at 350, then turn it down after a couple of hours. I usually double or triple the amount, so mine takes a long time to cook down. This amount will still take several hours.

When it's "thick enough", pour into hot jars and BWB 10 minutes for half pints or pints, 15 minutes for quarts.

Annie

NOTES:

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clipped on: 11.16.2007 at 09:16 am    last updated on: 11.16.2007 at 09:17 am

RECIPE: Buttermilk Refrigerator Roll recipe

posted by: bumblebeez on 11.08.2005 at 10:09 am in Recipe Exchange Forum

These are often requested by my family for holidays and recently from another member here so I am posting it for her.
I like to make them in the mornings for a breakfast roll too.
I usually double the recipe using only 1/3 cup sugar in the doubled recipe.
If you keep the dough for a week, punch it down every day or so.
They are a great roll.

Buttermilk Refrigerator Rolls

1 Package dry yeast
1/2 cup warm water
1/2 cup melted butter
4 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon soda
2 cups buttermilk

Dissolve yeast in warm water in a large mixing bowl. Let sit 5 minutes. Stir in butter

Combine dry ingredients; add to yeast mixture along with buttermilk.
Stir well. Turn dough out on a floured surface, knead gently a few times and shape into a ball. Place in greased bowl, cover, and refrigerate until needed. Keeps for one week.

Break off a soft ball sized lump of dough and roll into a circle about 1/4" thick. Cut into pie shaped wedges and roll up from the wider edge into crescent shapes. You do not have to let them rise again.
Bake on greased baking sheet at 400 for 8-10 minutes.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 11.15.2007 at 11:28 pm    last updated on: 11.15.2007 at 11:29 pm

RE: homade mustards? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: readinglady on 09.14.2007 at 12:52 pm in Harvest Forum

Once-upon-a-time we had some threads about mustards, but some dropped off and I see the ones that remain have dead links so forget that.

I used to make all kinds of mustards but I haven't done it lately. I move from enthusiasm to enthusiasm, but now I'm thinking this winter would be a good time to get back to it. They do make wonderful Christmas gifts.

So, here're some possibilities:

Coarse Grain Mustard with Beer
Makes about 1 to 1-1/2 pints
This is an excellent mustard, easy to make and full of good flavor. I find it rivals all but the very best commercial coarse grain mustards, and I particularly enjoy the spicy variation.
1 cup dark beer, chilled
1/2 cup yellow mustard seed
1-1/2 cups apple cider vinegar
1 small yellow onion, chopped (use a sweet onion, if available)
5-6 cloves garlic, minced
1 shallot, chopped
2 ounces mustard flour
1/8 cup very cold water
1-1/2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon allspice, ground

Pour the dark beer over the mustard seed and let it sit at least four hours or overnight. Place the vinegar, onion, garlic, and shallot in a heavy saucepan and simmer slowly until mixture is reduced by 2/3. Strain the liquid and chill it. Make a paste of the mustard flour and water and let it sit for 20 minutes. Stir in the vinegar reduction, salt, sugar, and allspice and add this mixture to the wet mustard seeds. Place the mustard in the container of a food processor and pulse until the mustard seeds are partially ground and the mixture is well blended. Transfer the mustard to the saucepan and simmer over very slow heat until it thickens, 10-15 minutes. Cool the mixture, place in a glass jar, and age on a cool, dark shelf for two or three weeks before using.
Variation: Spicy Coarse Grain Mustard
Using the above recipe, add 1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom; 1/4 teaspoon each of ground cinnamon and ground clove; 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin; 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger; 2 tablespoons very finely minced candied ginger.
________________________________________
Copyright 1996, by Michele Anna Jordan, from The Good Cook's Book of Mustard. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted with permission.

I really liked this one. I'm mad at myself that I didn't note the source. Somewhere around here I have 3 or 4 books just on mustards.

Bordeaux Mustard

Categories : Appetizers & Nibbles Condiments
Gift Giving

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
2/3 cup yellow mustard seeds
1/2 cup brown mustard seeds
1 cup red-wine vinegar
1/2 cup dry red wine (cabernet, pinot or beaujolais)
4 cloves garlic -- minced
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2 tablespoons white-wine worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon -- crumbled
1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram -- crumbled
1 teaspoon ground white pepper
1 teaspoon turmeric

In a nonreactive pot or jar, combine all the seeds, vinegar, wine and garlic; cover and soak for 48 hours, adding additional vinegar and wine (in the correct proportions) if necessary to maintain enough liquid to cover the seeds.

Scrape the soaked seeds into a food processor. Add the sugar, Worcestershire sauce, salt, tarragon, marjoram, pepper and turmeric and process until the mustard turns from liquid and seeds to a creamy mixture flecked with seeds. This takes 3-4 minutes.

Add additional vinegar and wine (in correct proportions) as necessary to create a nice creamy mustard. (Keep in mind that it will thicken slightly upon standing.) This mustard benefits from several weeks of aging. Keep refrigerated.

Yield: "3 1/4 cups"

This is an old favorite, more of a spread than a mustard. There are lots of variations of this recipe around, but we like this one best. Note because it has eggs and mayonnaise, it must be kept refrigerated.

People love this. It's terrific on rye bread rounds with elk sausage or rare roast beef. Ham sandwiches really shine with this. Good with any meat really.

This makes a big batch. I often halve it.

Sweet Hot Mustard

Categories : Appetizers & Nibbles Condiments
Dressings, Marinades, Sauces Gift Giving

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
4 ounces dry mustard
1 cup cider vinegar
2 eggs
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups mayonnaise

Mix vinegar and mustard. Let stand overnight. Beat eggs, salt and sugar; then add to mustard and vinegar. Cook until thick. Cool; then beat in mayonnaise.

I have never canned the following recipe so can't speak to that. It's not a safety issue as mustard (unless there're eggs or garlic or other iffy amendments) is not congenial to bacteria. However, there are varying reports about the quality of canned mustards. The new Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving does have some recipes.

Fresh Peach Mustard
1/2 cup dry mustard
2 tablespoons water
1 cup cider vinegar
1/2 cup minced onion
1/4 cup flour
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
2 cups pureed Washington peaches
1/2 cup sugar

Combine mustard and water; mix until smooth. Cover and let stand 10 minutes. Combine remaining ingredients in saucepan. Bring to boil and boil 3 minutes. Remove from heat and whisk 1/4 cup hot mixture into mustard paste until smooth. Repeat twice; then whisk in all remaining hot mixture. Puree in blender or food processor until smooth. Remove from heat and skim. Ladle into clean, hot 8-ounce canning jars to within 1/8-inch of tops. Seal according to jar manufacturer's directions. Place jars on rack in canner. Process 15 minutes in boiling water bath with boiling water two inches above jar tops. Remove jars from canner. Place on thick cloth or wire racks. Cool away from drafts. After 12 hours test lids for proper seal; remove rings from sealed jars. Makes about 3 (8 oz.) jars.

Tip: Refrigerate Fresh Peach Mustard if not processed.

If I get a chance later I'll see if I can search out some others. Since I have the books, I've never entered the recipes into my database. There's a cranberry mustard that's lightly pink, very nice for the holidays, great with turkey.

I'm sure other posters will have their own contributions. If you (or others) have a preference for a particular style, give a shout. I didn't include any recipes, but there are also blends that start with a prepared mustard base of one sort or another.

Probably the hardest mustard to duplicate well is Dijon. There are lots of recipes online, but how anyone can call it "Dijon" and not even include white wine is beyond me. (Not to mention we're in the wrong hemisphere.)

Carol

NOTES:

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clipped on: 11.15.2007 at 11:15 pm    last updated on: 11.15.2007 at 11:15 pm

RE: Lemon Jelly wanted? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: daisyduckworth on 08.16.2007 at 06:14 pm in Harvest Forum

Lemon Jelly
4 cups lemon juice (about 20 lemons)
180ml liquid pectin
6 cups sugar
1/4 teaspoon butter (prevents foaming)

Boil lemon juice one minute. Add sugar and pectin and the butter. Return to a full rolling boil. Boil 3 minutes. Ladle into clean hot jars and process in a water bath for 10 minutes.

I've never made this, and frankly I fail to see the necessity of the pectin, since lemon juice has plenty of its own (a squeeze of two of lemon juice in any jam will make it jell!). Try a small batch without the pectin and see how it goes, add pectin if needed. I don't think you'll need it. You could toss the peel (minus pith) into the mixture and strain it out before bottling for a more intense flavour.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 11.15.2007 at 11:10 pm    last updated on: 11.15.2007 at 11:11 pm

RE: Does Mustard Need to Age? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: readinglady on 11.15.2007 at 04:49 pm in Harvest Forum

Sure. I think I've posted this before, but it's been a while, so it may have dropped off. This recipe comes from Jan Roberts-Dominguez' book "The Mustard Book."

This mustard is very good with sausage and ham or for a nice sauce stir several spoonsful into a cup of heavy cream.

My note says, "Safe for shipping as long as it doesn't exceed 4 days," but I'm personally more comfortable with overnight and attaching a tag: "Refrigerate."

Bordeaux Mustard

Recipe By : Jan Roberts-Dominguez
Yield : 3 1/4 cups
Categories : Appetizers & Nibbles Condiments
Gift Giving

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
2/3 cup yellow mustard seeds
1/2 cup brown mustard seeds
1 cup red-wine vinegar
1/2 cup dry red wine (cabernet, pinot or beaujolais)
4 cloves garlic -- minced
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2 tablespoons white-wine worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon -- crumbled
1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram -- crumbled
1 teaspoon ground white pepper
1 teaspoon turmeric

In a nonreactive pot or jar, combine all the seeds, vinegar, wine and garlic; cover and soak for 48 hours, adding additional vinegar and wine (in the correct proportions) if necessary to maintain enough liquid to cover the seeds.

Scrape the soaked seeds into a food processor. Add the sugar, Worcestershire sauce, salt, tarragon, marjoram, pepper and turmeric and process until the mustard turns from liquid and seeds to a creamy mixture flecked with seeds. This takes 3-4 minutes.

Add additional vinegar and wine (in correct proportions) as necessary to create a nice creamy mustard. (Keep in mind that it will thicken slightly upon standing.) This mustard benefits from several weeks of aging. Keep refrigerated.

Yield:
"3 1/4 cups"

NOTES:

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clipped on: 11.15.2007 at 05:09 pm    last updated on: 11.15.2007 at 05:09 pm

RE: LOOKING for: French Bread casseroles (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: woodie2 on 12.10.2005 at 10:30 am in Recipe Exchange Forum

Magic, you may have seen this one already because its been tossed around on the forum lately, but its very good.

CRME BRULEE FRENCH TOAST
(Courtesy of Arthur Schwartz, WOR Radio)

1 Stick Butter
1 Cup Brown Sugar
2 Tablespoons Corn Syrup

8-10 inch round country loaf, or
1 pound French bread or
1 Challah

5 eggs
1 1/2 cups half and half
1 teaspoon Vanilla
1 teaspoon Grand Marnier
1/4 teaspoon salt

1. Melt butter, sugar and corn syrup in saucepan over moderate heat. Pour into 9 X 13 pan.

2. Slice bread into 6 slices and place on top of the sauce in the 9 X 13 pan, press together to fit.

3. Whisk together eggs, half and half, Vanilla, Grand Marnier and salt. Pour over bread.

4. Cover and chill 8 to 24 hours.

5. Bake at 350 degrees for approximately 40 minutes, until puffy and brown.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 11.15.2007 at 04:53 pm    last updated on: 11.15.2007 at 04:54 pm

RECIPE: maria's stuffin muffins from abc/gma

posted by: lizzynola on 11.14.2007 at 11:37 pm in Recipe Exchange Forum

MARIA'S STUFFIN MUFFINS

I got this recipe from Good Morning America where they are having a contest for the best stuffing/dressing, and made this for a luncheon. Crusty on the outside and moist on the inside!

It was sooooooooooo good, and everyone wanted the recipe!

RECIPE
1 bag Pepperidge Farm cornbread cubes
1 pound bulk pork sausage
1 stick of butter
2 chopped onions
2 cups chopped celery
2 Granny Smith apples, peeled and chopped
1 bag of Craisins
1 cup chopped pecans or walnuts
2-3 cups low sodium chicken stock
2 eggs
2 tsp. baking powder
Salt & pepper to taste

Place cornbread cubes in a large mixing bowl
Saute sausage and onions in a skillet until brown, breaking sausage into small pieces. Drain in a colander and transfer to a bowl.
Melt the butter is the same skillet and saute celery until tender. Add to the bowl.
Add apple and remaining ingredients, except the broth.
Mix all together and then add the broth until thoroughly moistened but not really wet.
Add the eggs and the baking powder and mix well.
Place stuffing mixture in a large, greased glass casserole or in 12 greased muffin tins.
Bake, covered for about 25 minutes, 10 minutes uncovered for casserole and 25 minutes for muffins.
Serve warm.

I tell you these were really good. Maybe Maria will win the contest!

NOTES:

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clipped on: 11.15.2007 at 01:26 pm    last updated on: 11.15.2007 at 01:27 pm

RE: Annie's Salsa (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: greenglass on 03.26.2007 at 01:57 pm in Harvest Forum

Here it is Nanahanna ... recommend you try it - suspect you'll love it!

Posted by readinglady z8 OR (My Page) on Wed, Aug 9, 06 at 20:39

Annie's at Canning Camp right now, but here's her recipe with her comments. Note her comment there are two amounts of vinegar, depending upon whether you water bath or pressure can.
"Sure I do, here's mine. Please note that it is pressure canned, because I cut the acid ingredients down by half. The original directions were to use 2/3 cup of vinegar and waterbath, but I wanted less of the acidic flavor and so cut the vinegar in half and process according to the Blue Book instructions for non-acidic vegetables. If you want to waterbath it, add that extra vinegar. If you want it mild, use the smaller amount of jalapenos.

ANNIES SALSA
8 cups tomatoes, peeled, chopped and drained
2 1/2 cups chopped onion
1 1/2 cups chopped green pepper
3 5 chopped jalapenos
6 cloves minced garlic
2 tsp cumin
2 tsp pepper
1/8 cup canning salt
cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/3 cup sugar
1 cup vinegar (for BWB or 1/3 cup vinegar for PC)
16 oz. tomato sauce
16 oz tomato paste
Mix all ingredients, bring to a boil, boil 10 minutes. Pour into hot jars, process at 10 lbs of pressure for 30 minutes for pints. Or BWB 15 minutes.
Makes 6 pints

Good luck and happy canning. I get a lot of compliments on this recipe, and one of the local attorneys actually paid me $10 a pint for the last jar a couple of years ago (He NEEDED it for a Super Bowl party). Fine by me, I wish I had made more!! Annie"

Posted by Carol

NOTES:

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clipped on: 04.04.2007 at 12:31 pm    last updated on: 04.04.2007 at 12:31 pm

RE: Apple Butter (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: annie1992 on 08.25.2005 at 07:31 pm in Harvest Forum

Here you go. This is definitely tried and true, Grandma made it for years before I started making it.

GRANDMA'S OLD FASHIONED APPLE BUTTER

6 lbs apples, quartered
2 quarts sweet cider
2 cups sugar
1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground cloves

Cook apples in cider until tender and press through sieve or food mill. Measure 3 quarts apple pulp. Cook pulp until thick enough to round up in a spoon. As it thickens stir frequently. Add sugar an spices and cook slowing until thick, stirring frequently, about 1 hour. Por into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Process 10 minutes in BWB.

Makes about 5 pints

Now, for technique. I don't cook apple butter on the stove, stirring and sticking and dodging those little apple butter volcanos that explode onto your forearms when the butter gets thick. I dump the whole mess into a large enameled roaster and put it in the oven at about 350, stirring every hour or so until it's thick enough. The house smells wonderful, I can do other things, and the apple butter gets as thick as you like it, depending on how long you cook it.

Annie

NOTES:

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clipped on: 04.03.2007 at 09:18 pm    last updated on: 04.03.2007 at 09:21 pm