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RE: Anyone REGRET getting a silgranite sink? (Follow-Up #18)

posted by: lynninnewmexico on 10.06.2008 at 11:43 am in Kitchens Forum

We've had our Blanco Silgranit double sink ~ in Anthracite~ now for 10 months and I can't say one bad thing about it. Over the years ~in different houses~ we've had SS, cast iron and you-name-it sinks. I was tired of the water spots; tired of the pot scratches; tired of the constant stains; tired of the noise when washing dishes; tired of my sinks looking less-than-nice, 90% of the time.
Nowdays, our Silgranit sink looks great all the time! I'll never have another kind of sink.
Lynn

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clipped on: 11.12.2008 at 02:23 pm    last updated on: 11.12.2008 at 02:23 pm

RE: What kind and color hardwood floor do you have??? (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: kats on 11.06.2008 at 07:10 pm in Building a Home Forum

I'm being lazy today so this is a copy of a post I made about 6 months ago when someone else asked this question.....

We have Siberian white oak in 8" planks. It can come in different finishes or custom which is what we did. Our floor is unstained. We have a LOT of south facing windows and french doors so it was recommended we do a UV oil protection when it was installed. We clean spots with water and vinegar and recently started using a tung oil mixture recommended by the flooring company once a month. The trick is to make the mop almost dry. If water doesn't dry within a couple of minutes the mop is to wet.

Our floor is by far the most complimented feature in our home. We've had red wine dropped on it twice now. No problem. Also DH cooked a rare tri-tip and while cutting it the plate slid and he dropped the hot roast- red juices and all ( plus the plate which shattered). No problem. We also had workers scoot our leather couch several feet across the room leaving several scratches. But because we didn't stain the floor- scratches don't show as much. It's like fingernail polish, if you scratch off red polish you're going to see it but if you use just gloss and it scratches you don't notice it. This floor has a lot of dark streaks and knots in it so I used Murphy-dark oil soap applying with a Qtip on just the scratch areas then took off the excess. You would have to know the scratches were there to begin with to ever see them now. And because we consider it a "rustic" floor we don't get all bent out of shape if someone's high heel or a chair does scratch.

I don't know if this type flooring is something you might like. The company is Provenze. I've linked their website below for you. The closest you can find to what we got is from their Old World collection. The link doesn't immediately go to that so click wood floors, then click Premier Collection then click "Old World" collection.
Bree

Photobucket

Here is a link that might be useful: Provenza Wood Flooring

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clipped on: 11.07.2008 at 02:08 pm    last updated on: 11.10.2008 at 03:40 pm

RE: Shower tile -6 inch or 12 (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: bill_vincent on 05.24.2008 at 09:34 pm in Bathrooms Forum

I've never used 6" tumbled marble for a shower, but I've used 4" tumbled marble, and I've used 6" porcelain that's made to RESEMBLE tumbled marble. Here are the pics:

6" porcelain:

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4" tumbled marble:

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clipped on: 11.10.2008 at 03:35 pm    last updated on: 11.10.2008 at 03:35 pm

RE: What was your best bathroom remodeling decision? (Follow-Up #48)

posted by: sekhmet45 on 06.13.2007 at 02:16 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Best decisions:
---frameless shower with just brackets no bottom channel. Doesn't leak at all and was very expensive. But, worth every penny.
---Vermont Verde and Cararra Marble floor, polished with spectacular design. It always gets a WOW when anyone sees it. Green marble needs careful installation in a wet area.
---floor to ceiling Cararra Marble 12 x 12 tiles. It gives the room an extra tall feeling.

Worst decisions:
----Polished brass faucets, etc. They look dated already.
----Going with the 6' whirlpool tub the GC recommended. A smaller one would have been fine. He was a big man. Guess I should have considered why he likes a huge tub.
----not building niches into the shower wall. I have one shelf and a brass built-in soap dish, but a niche would have been better.

Bathrooms are so much fun to design!

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clipped on: 11.07.2008 at 05:37 pm    last updated on: 11.07.2008 at 05:38 pm

RE: What was your best bathroom remodeling decision? (Follow-Up #44)

posted by: dmlove on 06.12.2007 at 01:34 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Bumping this up (because I never responded :)):

Best decisions:

1) Thermobalance valves on each shower head (two people shower concurrently most mornings and like different water temperature)

2) Kitchen-height cabinets (although I failed to take into account the height of the sink, so they're about an inch higher than would be ideal)

3) Toto toilets everywhere

4) Large drawers to store clean towels and wide shallow drawer to store daily use items. I keep them in two baskets which can be easily removed and replaced.

5) Adding a beautiful frameless shower door (had an open shower for 20 years before)

6) Shampoo shelf (we got the idea from a hotel shower)

Bad/less bad/unnecessary:

1) Seat in shower - used only as a place to prop up a leg.

2) Body sprays - used infrequently

3) Keeping the old full-wall mirror (still going to change it, but it has kept us from "finishing" for a almost a year now).

4) Should have done heated floors (even though this is California, tile floors are cold, period)

Worst decision:

Not putting the plug for the hairdryer inside the top drawer.

Mariainny, I don't know if this is what home_nw was referring to, but here's a picture of our shampoo shelf. We have no glass except for the angled door, so you can't see the shelf from elsewhere in the bathroom.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

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clipped on: 11.07.2008 at 05:36 pm    last updated on: 11.07.2008 at 05:36 pm

RE: What was your best bathroom remodeling decision? (Follow-Up #34)

posted by: patrice607 on 03.08.2007 at 02:46 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Best

I love my beveled mirror, Kohler soaking tub, marble vanity top, mosaic insets in the floor tile and timer on the vent fan. Guests are impressed (or confused ) by the Aquia duo flush toilet. New vanity has a full width drawer under the plumbing. The niche was also a good decision.

I wish I could have talked the electrician into wiring one of the drawers. It would have kept the chargers off of my vanity.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
http://i111.photobucket.com/albums/n121/patrice607/P1000720.jpg
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

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clipped on: 11.07.2008 at 05:31 pm    last updated on: 11.07.2008 at 05:31 pm

RE: What was your best bathroom remodeling decision? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: hoffman on 02.19.2007 at 10:47 am in Bathrooms Forum

Best decisions:

1)Installing a handheld showerhead on a slide bar in addition to the overhead rainshower.
2) Installing glass shelf betweeen sink and medicine cabinet
3) Splurging on marble mosaic floor tile

Regrets:

1) Not specifying caulk (instead of grout) in corners!
2) Only installing 2 (now wish I had 3) corner shelves
3) Not personally selecting beadboard for wainscot (contractor purchased low quality wood)

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clipped on: 11.07.2008 at 05:07 pm    last updated on: 11.07.2008 at 05:08 pm

RE: Modern House Update (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: billyc on 08.07.2008 at 11:15 am in Building a Home Forum

Thanks coffeehaus. The floors are indeed white oak. I've copied some of the text from a post I made in the Kitchens forum...

----------------

A quick note about our floors. We looked at quite a few wide plank flooring retailers, including the usual suspects like Carlisle. Originally, we wanted reclaimed white oak. When we realized how much it would cost, we settled on rustic grade old growth white oak, which most retailers priced around $12 a square foot. We found an amazing place, just over the border in Connecticut that was able to do it for $4.15 (6, 7 and 8 inch widths and 6 to 12 foot lengths, although 95% were the full 12 feet) including delivery. If you're looking for rustic (or character) grade flooring, which we wanted, this place is amazing. If anyone is interested, let me know and I'll email you the name of the company.

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clipped on: 11.04.2008 at 04:56 pm    last updated on: 11.04.2008 at 04:56 pm

RE: has anyone found any wooden garage doors reasonable in price? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: bdpeck-charlotte on 04.09.2008 at 07:55 am in Building a Home Forum

You might also try www.amarr.com. Our quote for 3 doors, composite material that takes stain or paint, 9' wide by 8' tall, style #45, for $2,300 each... including openers. We'll have to get our painters to stain them.

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clipped on: 10.30.2008 at 11:38 am    last updated on: 10.30.2008 at 11:38 am

RE: has anyone found any wooden garage doors reasonable in price? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: jaymielo on 04.08.2008 at 10:36 pm in Building a Home Forum

Hi Kate, Don't give up. I bet you can get there. We ordered 3 8'x8' garage doors for $2425 apiece. Add in another $310 for the opener and $49 for the keypad and you are at a grand total of $8254 (with installation). The doors are cedar and made by Raynor. Here is a link to their River Pointe garage doors. I don't have any installed pictures yet (is that the story of my life) ;) but I hope to soon! BTW, the siders are back and we have the rest of our siding. I'm hoping to be done by the end of the week.... j.

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clipped on: 10.30.2008 at 11:38 am    last updated on: 10.30.2008 at 11:38 am

RE: Question: how did you bring down build costs? (Follow-Up #19)

posted by: texasun on 10.20.2008 at 06:29 pm in Building a Home Forum

we designed and built our own house and contracted it out; price shop with at least 3 contractors and review each one to make sure you are pricing apples to apples; they will bid it the way they want, leaving out items or features, or pricing some things wrong (low), so make sure they do it the way YOU want. Go back to them and get them to bid it correctly. Get the contract done so that if they go over budget or time you don't pay for it. I counted every door knob, faucet, light fixture, appliance, sinks, toilets, etc., and bought them ourselves. You will get the quality and style you want and cheaper than letting the contractor get them. Store them until you need them; keep receipts for easy returns. Use local cabinetmakers, window makers, etc. Watch your warranties and know when they expire; be sure to get any issues resolved before time runs out after install. Look over the progress EVERY day; be knowledgeable and ask questions if something does not look right. Don't assume they will read plans or notes (my husband deals with contractors each day and you get what you pay for; get legitimate references and look at their subcontractors work.) We got several thousand dollars BACK when we closed on our house because we did some legwork and bought things ourselves.

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clipped on: 10.29.2008 at 05:41 pm    last updated on: 10.29.2008 at 05:41 pm

RE: Question: how did you bring down build costs? (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: twogirlsbigtrouble on 09.20.2008 at 11:24 am in Building a Home Forum

We modified our house plan to make the room sizes just right. Less in a secondary bedroom, more in a living space. Less in the office, more in the kitchen, etc. And yes, watch your outside corners and roof lines.

We are also providing sweat equity. We're painting all of the walls (not the trimwork) and are saving almost 5K that way. My husband is also laying the roof and will possibly put up the siding and soffits. Oh and I forgot the yard and landscaping, we are also doing that.

Another thing we are doing is paying for certain upgrades out of pocket so our home loan is less. Yes, we're still spending the money, but we wont be paying 30 yrs of interest on it. Things like HW floors, granite countertops, etc. And if we cant come up with the money they wait, but we still have a complete house.

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clipped on: 10.29.2008 at 05:37 pm    last updated on: 10.29.2008 at 05:37 pm

RE: Question: how did you bring down build costs? (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: whidbey on 09.20.2008 at 02:58 am in Building a Home Forum

"Sweat Equity." If YOU can do it yourself, DO IT. We're just finishing up framing and I've already saved (I kid you not) $30,000. I've got my Excel budget spreadsheet to prove it all. :)

I track every penny spent and how much over/under we are. So helpful in knowing where you are at all times. :)

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clipped on: 10.29.2008 at 05:37 pm    last updated on: 10.29.2008 at 05:37 pm

RE: Alternative to cedar shake shingles (Follow-Up #51)

posted by: persnicketydesign on 05.23.2007 at 09:15 pm in Building a Home Forum

Our lumberyard sells the Sierra Primed Shake Deep Groove in 20 board bundles at $168.30 per bundle, which breaks down to approx $8.40 per 8' board. We did price out the pre-finished in Maple too...$259.25 per bundle or approx $12.96 per board. Those prices are with a 15% discount that they very kindly offered since we're OBing. :o)

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clipped on: 10.29.2008 at 12:16 pm    last updated on: 10.29.2008 at 12:16 pm

RE: Alternative to cedar shake shingles (Follow-Up #33)

posted by: stanza30 on 04.03.2007 at 05:11 pm in Building a Home Forum

Hi Jaymielo - I certainly am lurking today. I am very sympathetic with your siding problems. I really had to put my foot down on my choice of fiber cement siding. My architect couldn't imagine having anything but a living breathing material. But he doesn't have to suffer the consequences of such a decision (see exibit A in my first post above.) I cannot tell you how many complements I have gotten on this house, and no one knows that it isn't real ceder. Yes, if you get close, real close, of course they might be able to tell. I guess I was fortunate to find a sider that had worked with Hardie and was willing to install the Nichiha. They did a very good job and did it fast. I'm including a picture that will show how they finished the corners. They simply primed the edges for the winter and will stain when it gets warmer. I'm fairly certain that Nichiha sells the stain, but I'll check on that for you. As I mentioned before, they had some problems with the stain process in the factory, so we are going to get the stain from them (at their cost) and have our painter correct the stain problem when the weather warms up.

I did find out that my contractor had to use two layers of Azek to get it to the thickness needed for the trim around the windows. So that will be an extra cost. I can also find out how thick they were.

Don't give up. Good installers should be willing to work with the Nichiha product. It is thicker than Hardie, but essentially the same kind of product to work with.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Joan

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clipped on: 10.29.2008 at 12:06 pm    last updated on: 10.29.2008 at 12:07 pm

RE: Alternative to cedar shake shingles (Follow-Up #35)

posted by: stanza30 on 04.03.2007 at 08:40 pm in Building a Home Forum

Hi persnicketydesign,

Yes you were right it is Owens Corning Cultured Stone. Apparently it is one of the better cultured stone products, or at least our stone guy thought so. Ours is the Cobblefield stone. They have a lot of different colors for that particular series. That stone is easy to dry stack and is therefore cheaper on labor costs. Ours is the Chardonay color. Thanks for the compliment, I appreciate it.

Joan

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clipped on: 10.29.2008 at 12:07 pm    last updated on: 10.29.2008 at 12:07 pm

RE: Alternative to cedar shake shingles (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: stanza30 on 12.12.2006 at 11:47 am in Building a Home Forum

I offer for your consideration in this case, Exhibit A

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

This woodpecker was one of the reasons we decided to go with a fiber cement shake siding. If you look very closely you will see all the previous holes that the previous owner patched up over the years. And I can't tell you how delightful it is to listen to that #$%& woodpecker pecking against the siding day after day.

So we decided on Nichiha's FC shakes, stained a redwood color.
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Nichiha guarantees the product for 30 years, and the stain for 12 years.
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Their website is www.nichiha.com

For our house we have spent approximately $17,000 for their siding.

Joan

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I love this stone...color and arrangement
clipped on: 10.29.2008 at 12:03 pm    last updated on: 10.29.2008 at 12:03 pm