Clippings by jessyf

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RE: Curious about stir fry preparation. (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: ruthanna on 01.22.2012 at 09:42 am in Cooking Forum

Here are some recipes for stir-frying sauces that I make in advance of starting the frying. I add them at the end of cooking and just stir them long enough to coat the ingredients.

STIR FRY SAUCES

Each recipe makes 2 servings but can be doubled.

BASIC STIR FRY SAUCE

1 1/2 tsp. sesame oil
1/2 tsp. minced garlic
1/2 tsp. minced ginger
1/2 cup chicken broth
1 Tbs. soy sauce
1 Tbs. brown sugar
1/8 tsp. Tabasco
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1 1/2 tsp. lemon or lime juice
1 1/2 tsp.cornstarch
1 Tbs. rice wine or sherry

Heat the sesame oil in a small saucepan. Add the ginger and garlic and stir-fry 15-30 second over medium heat to bring out the flavor. Add the chicken broth, soy sauce, brown sugar, Tabasco, salt, pepper, and lemon juice. Bring just to a boil, stirring. Dissolve the cornstarch in the wine and whisk into the sauce. Heat until sauce thickens and reaches a full boil. Simmer for 30 seconds. Remove from the heat and set aside.

GARLIC SESAME STIR FRY SAUCE

1/2 tsp. pepper
2 Tbs. soy sauce
3 Tbs. chicken broth
1 Tbs. sugar
2 1/4 tsp. lemon juice
1/3 cup sesame oil
2 1/4 tsp. minced garlic
1 tsp. cornstarch mixed with 1 1/2 tsp. water

Combine the pepper, soy sauce, chicken broth, sugar and lemon juice. In a small saucepan heat the sesame oil. Add the garlic and saute 1 minute until soft but not browned. Add the soy sauce mixture and bring just to a boil. Whisk in the cornstarch mixture and let boil 20 seconds. Remove from the heat.

SZECHUAN STIR FRY SAUCE

1 1/2 tsp. sesame oil
1/2 tsp. minced fresh ginger
1/2 tsp. minced garlic
1/2 cup chicken broth
2 whole anise stars
1 1/2 tsp. red wine vinegar
1 Tbs. soy sauce
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. hoisin sauce
1/8 tsp. Tabasco sauce
1/8 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/8 tsp. 5 spice powder
2 tsp. cornstarch dissolved in 1 Tbs. water

Heat the oil in a small saucepan. Add the ginger and garlic and saute 1 minute until softened but not browned. In a bowl combine the remaining except for the cornstarch mixture. Add them to the saucepan and bring to a simmer, covered, for 10 minutes. Remove star anise. Whisk in the cornstarch mixture and let boil 1-2 minutes. Taste and add more Tabasco if desired.

Adapted from The Frog/Commissary Cook Book by Steve Poses, Anne Clark and Becky Rolle

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.22.2012 at 09:48 am    last updated on: 01.22.2012 at 09:48 am

RE: Quinoa. (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: jessyf on 10.20.2011 at 05:35 pm in Cooking Forum

A friend brought this over Monday night. I couldn't stop eating it. She said she only used one jalapeno, FWIW. It wasn't spicy at all.

Spicy Quinoa, Cucumber and Tomato Salad
By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN

This refreshing summer salad can sit in the refrigerator for a few hours without deteriorating, so it makes a great choice for bringing to work or to a summer picnic.

1 cup quinoa
3 cups water
Salt to taste
2 cups diced cucumber
1 small red onion, finely minced (optional)
2 cups finely diced tomatoes
1 to 2 jalape�o or serrano peppers (to taste), seeded if desired and finely chopped
1/2 cup chopped cilantro, plus several sprigs for garnish
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar or sherry vinegar
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 avocado, sliced, for garnish

1. Place the quinoa in a bowl, and cover with cold water. Let sit for five minutes. Drain through a strainer, and rinse until the water runs clear. Bring the 3 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add salt (1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon) and the quinoa. Bring back to a boil, and reduce the heat to low. Cover and simmer 15 minutes or until the quinoa is tender and translucent; each grain should have a little thread. Drain off the water in the pan through a strainer, and return the quinoa to the pan. Cover the pan with a clean dishtowel, replace the lid and allow to sit for 10 minutes. If making for the freezer, uncover and allow to cool, then place in plastic bags. Flatten the bags and seal.

2. Meanwhile, place the finely diced cucumber in a colander, and sprinkle with salt. Toss and allow to sit for 15 minutes. Rinse the cucumber with cold water, and drain on paper towels. If using the onion, place in a bowl and cover with cold water. Let sit for five minutes, then drain, rinse with cold water and drain on paper towels.

3. Combine the tomatoes, chiles, cilantro, vinegar, lime juice and olive oil in a bowl. Add the cucumber and onion, season to taste with salt, and add the quinoa and cilantro. Toss together, and taste and adjust seasonings. Serve garnished with sliced avocado and cilantro sprigs.

Yield: Serves six.

Here is a link that might be useful: NYT Spicy Quinoa

NOTES:

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clipped on: 10.20.2011 at 05:35 pm    last updated on: 10.20.2011 at 05:35 pm

RE: What's Your Favorite Superbowl Recipe? (Follow-Up #19)

posted by: gellchom on 01.30.2011 at 05:56 pm in Cooking Forum

I like the idea of recipes related to both team's locations.

Even better would be just the Packers-related. GO PACK!!!

But anyway, this is my favorite dip for Super Bowl, World Series, etc. It is related to neither Wisconsin nor Pennsylvania, but it's great! And I love the leftovers (if there are any!) in scrambled eggs.

Corn & Pecan Dip

2 8-oz. packages cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup lime juice
1 T ground cumin
1 T ground red chiles (I've used 2 t cayenne and it was plenty hot)
1/2 t salt
dash black pepper
1/4 c vegetable oil
1 16-oz. can whole-kernel corn, drained
1 c chopped pecans
1 small onion, diced (I like more)

In a large bowl, combine all ingredients except corn, pecans, and onion. Beat until smooth with electric mixer on medium speed.

Stir in corn, pecans, and onion.

Serve with tortilla chips (Trader Joe has great ones).

NOTES:

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clipped on: 10.20.2011 at 12:19 am    last updated on: 10.20.2011 at 12:19 am

RE: medjool dates (Follow-Up #17)

posted by: chase on 07.03.2011 at 12:45 pm in Cooking Forum

Alexa, they really are sublime!! I did a web search and found a thread from this forum where I had posted the original recipe.
-------------------------------------------------------

They are amazing when doing the sausage filling from scratch but a really good Chorizo, raw not smoked, works fine and saves time....but if you have the time, and the inclination, make the meat mixture it is so good.

Bacon Wrapped, Sausage Stuffed Dates from the Snake River Grill in Lake Charles LA.

2 TBSP olive oil
1 pound ground lamb or beef
4 oz ground pork
1 TSAP salt
3/4 tsp Black pepper
1 cup finely chopped red onion
1/2 cup finely chopped fennel
1 TBSP garlic puree
1 1/2 TBSP Smoked paprika
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1/4 cup sherry vinegar
1/2 cup orange juice
2 tomatoes, blackened and pureed
1 1/2 TBSP chipotle puree
3/4 cup chopped parsley
24 pitted Medjool dates
24 slices good quality bacon

Heat the oil in a skillet. Add the ground meat , salt and pepper. Saute until crumbly.

Add the onion, saute 5 minutes. Add the fennel and garlic. Reduce heat to low and add paprika, cumin and cayenne. Cook 5 minutes.

Add the vinegar, stirring to deglaze. Add the orange juice and cooked until reduced by 3/4. Stir in tomato puree and chipotle puree. Simmer 15 minutes.

Remove from the heat , cool to room temp, stir in parsley and refrigerate.

Spoon the cooled meat mixture into each split and pitted date. Wrap each tightly with a slice of bacon.

Place seam side down and bake at 385 for 20 minutes until crisp....I find I need to turn them once.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.03.2011 at 02:29 pm    last updated on: 07.03.2011 at 02:30 pm

RE: Uses for shellfish stock (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: jessyf on 11.22.2010 at 10:34 am in Cooking Forum

Have I got a recipe for you. DS#1 inhales this. Please note my modifications at the end. We first had this at a small restaurant in Cambria, California, and I had to recreate it. First time I used up some leftover lox - not for the salt-averse!

ROBIN'S SALMON BISQUE - Robin's Restaurant

1/2 cup butter
2 cups sliced leeks
1/2 LB sliced mushrooms
1 Tblsp crushed garlic
46 ozs clam juice or fish stock
4 cups canned crushed tomatoes
1/2 c chopped fresh parsley
2 tsp dried dill weed
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
4 cups salmon filet cut into 1/2 into half inch cubes
4 cups cream
1/4 cup flour
Fresh dill sprigs for garnish

Method: Melt butter in large pot. Add leeks, mushrooms, & garlic. Saute for approximately 5 minutes. Add clam juice, tomatoes, parsley, dill & salt & pepper. Heat broth to almost boiling & add salmon. Cook salmon for about 3-5 minutes. Stir in cream & whisk in flour. Reheat. To serve, garnish with fresh dill sprigs. Makes 12 servings.

Jessica's mods: I cut this way down, to about a third of the portions. I also used a container of TJ's (organic) creamy tomato soup in place of the tomatoes and cream, because I HAD to do some pantry clean-out, and I liked how it came out. YMMV.

Here is a link that might be useful: Robin's Restaurant, Cambria

NOTES:

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clipped on: 04.17.2011 at 06:13 am    last updated on: 04.17.2011 at 06:14 am

RE: Easy Appetizer--Large Quantity? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: teresa_nc7 on 12.14.2010 at 01:04 pm in Cooking Forum

Here is a link to a good resource. I would suggest Crabbies, Chili Cheese Bites, Party Rye Toppers, and Hummus with Triscuit crackers or Wheat Thins. You can double the Chili Cheese Bites or other similar recipes and bake in a 13x9 pan, cut into 1" bites. The Crabbies and Party Rye Toppers can be made ahead and frozen. The Seven Layer Taco Dip could be doubled and put in a large dish with tortilla chips for dipping.

It's wonderful that your "kids" are now bringing their friends to your party!
Teresa

Here is a link that might be useful: Appetizer List

NOTES:

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clipped on: 12.18.2010 at 08:18 am    last updated on: 12.18.2010 at 08:18 am

RE: Wasting time on a computer. (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: ravencajun on 09.06.2010 at 01:39 pm in Computer Help Forum

I no longer spend nearly as much time sitting at my computer but I do have my netbook that I can used in my recliner and my Pandigital novel that I can use pretty much anywhere it is so light weight. I am on several support forums that I check in a few times a day usually. I don't do a lot of email so that is not much of a time waster but I do have a netvibes page that I have all of my RSS feeds on so I can go to one place and view everything which is a time saver.
Some of the game sites I have used are
Gamez Laboratory
Friv
FantasticContraption
that one is very challenging, there are forums dedicated to how to do the tasks, I used to play it quite a bit.

Games for the Brain
Jigsaw Puzzle Paradise
Crossword
http://www.eastoftheweb.com/games/ word games
and this one to try to improve my numbers and math
Addemup
Unfortunately have not played it in a long time.

and from popcap I play bookworm, bejeweled, and a few others on occasion. I do not download them I just play them there online.

enjoy!life is too short not to have a little fun

Here is a link that might be useful: online games popcap


NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.17.2010 at 05:22 am    last updated on: 09.17.2010 at 05:22 am

RE: Pizza Sauce from 6 in 1 Tomatoes? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: ann_t on 11.13.2009 at 10:17 am in Cooking Forum

Becky I prefer a non cooked pizza sauce. The 6-1 are perfect for pizza sauce.

You can play with the different herbs to suit your own taste.

Home Cookin Chapter: Recipes From Thibeault's Table

My Pizza Sauce
==============
1 28 oz can quality Italian Tomatoes
2 cloves of garlic
fennel seed
oregano
Basil
2 to 3 Tablespoons olive oil
salt and pepper
hot red pepper flakes (Optional)

Puree tomatoes with the minced garlic. Grind the fennel seeds. Add the seeds and the oregano,basil, olive oil, salt pepper and red pepper flakes if using, and mix together.

NOTE: I use a stick blender and blend all of these ingredients right in the can.


NOTES:

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clipped on: 08.14.2010 at 06:49 pm    last updated on: 08.14.2010 at 06:49 pm

RE: Your favorite Burger recipes, please! (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: wizardnm on 04.01.2010 at 10:16 pm in Cooking Forum

Linda, I've been looking.... that burger cook-off was fun.
I'll C+P what I found on a Google search:


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Burger Cook-Off...Ideas, Recipes, Alternatives and Techniques clip this post email this post what is this?
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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Sat, Sep 8, 07 at 12:05

Here are 2 recipes from the Build-A-Better Burger contest and I think I will make bowls of the sauces for a condiment bar.
Portabello Burger

Sun-Dried Tomato Mayonnaise
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1/4 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes packed in olive oil, drained

Spice Mixture
2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Grilled Portabellos
1/4 cup Zinfandel
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon grated fresh lemon zest
4 portobello mushrooms, stems removed

Patties
1 1/2 pounds ground chuck
3 tablespoons Zinfandel
2 shallots, finely chopped
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne
Vegetable oil, for brushing on the grill rack
4 round focaccia rolls or onion rolls, split
16 arugula leaves
1/2 cup (about 4 ounces) fresh goat cheese

Prepare a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill with a cover, or preheat a gas grill to medium-high.

To make the mayonnaise, combine the mayonnaise and the sun-dried tomatoes in a small bowl and mix well. Cover and refrigerate until serving.

To make the spice mixture, combine all of the ingredients in a small bowl and mix well. Set aside.

To make the grilled portobellos, combine the Zinfandel, olive oil, lemon zest, and 1 tablespoon of the spice mixture in a shallow container and whisk to blend well. Add the mushrooms and turn to coat with the marinade. Set aside.

To make the patties, combine the beef, Zinfandel, shallots, cumin, cayenne, and remaining spice mixture in a large bowl. Handling the meat as little as possible to avoid compacting it, mix well. Divide the mixture into 4 equal portions and form the portions into patties to fit the rolls.

Drain the mushrooms, reserving the marinade.

When the grill is ready, brush the grill rack with vegetable oil. Place the patties and the mushrooms on the rack, cover, and cook, turning once, until the patties are done to preference, 5 to 7 minutes on each side for medium, and the mushrooms are tender, 5 to 10 minutes.

Brush the mushrooms frequently with the reserved marinade.

During the last few minutes of cooking, place the rolls, cut side down, on the outer edges of the rack to toast lightly.

To assemble the burgers, spread the mayonnaise over the cut sides of the rolls. On each roll bottom, place 4 arugula leaves, a patty, 2 tablespoons of the goat cheese, and a mushroom. Add the roll tops and serve.

Makes 4 burgers

Napa Valley Basil-Smoked Burgers

Pesto Mayonnaise
2/3 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons prepared basil pesto

Patties
2 pounds ground sirloin
1/4 cup Zinfandel
1/4 cup lightly packed minced fresh basil
1/4 cup minced red onion
1/4 cup fresh Italian bread crumbs
8 sun-dried tomatoes packed in olive oil, finely chopped
2 teaspoons garlic salt

Vegetable oil, for brushing on the grill rack
8 large fresh basil sprigs, moistened with water, for grilling
6 large seeded sandwich rolls, split
6 slices Monterey Jack cheese
6 red leaf lettuce leaves
6 (1/4-inch-thick) large tomato slices
6 paper-thin red onion slices, separated into rings
6 fresh basil sprigs, for serving

Prepare a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill with a cover, or preheat a gas grill to medium-high.
To make the mayonnaise, combine the ingredients in a small bowl and mix well. Cover and refrigerate until needed.

To make the patties, combine the sirloin, Zinfandel, basil, onion, bread crumbs, sun-dried tomatoes, and garlic salt in a large bowl. Handling the meat as little as possible to avoid compacting it, mix well. Divide the mixture into 6 equal portions and form the portions into patties to fit the rolls.

When the grill is ready, brush the grill rack with vegetable oil.

Toss the moistened basil sprigs directly onto the fire.

Place the patties on the rack, cover, and cook, turning once, until done to preference, 5 to 7 minutes on each side for medium.

During the last few minutes of cooking, place the rolls, cut side down, on the outer edges of the rack to toast lightly.

During the last minute of cooking, top each patty with a cheese slice.

To assemble the burgers, spread the mayonnaise over the cut sides of the rolls. On each roll bottom, place a lettuce leaf, a patty, a tomato slice, an onion slice, and a basil sprig. Add the roll tops and serve.

Makes 6 burgers

Here is a link that might be useful: Build a Better Burger

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RE: Burger Cook-Off...Ideas, Recipes, Alternatives and Techniques clip this post email this post what is this?
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Posted by jessyf (My Page) on Sat, Sep 8, 07 at 14:35

Two of my favorite turkey burger recipes. This first one I ignore the sausage directions and just grill 'em. I made the second one for my MIL, she's a curry freak, and she asked me to keep it in my 'repetoire' (sp?)
Thai Turkey Sausage - Sunset magazine

Notes: It's easiest to mince lemon grass in a food processor or mini-chopper. For best texture, mince the remaining ingredients with a knife.

Makes: 16 patties; 8 servings

1 pound ground turkey
1/4 pound green beans, ends and strings removed, minced
8 green onions, ends trimmed, minced
1 stalk (5 to 8 in.) fresh lemon grass, tough outer layers, stem end, and coarse leaves removed, minced
3 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro
2 to 3 teaspoons fresh serrano chilies (2 or 3), stemmed, seeded, and finely minced
2 tablespoons Asian fish sauce (nuoc mam or nam pla)
1 large egg
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon sugar
About 2 tablespoons olive oil

1. Mix turkey well with beans, onions, lemon grass, cilantro, chilies (lesser amount for mildest flavor), fish sauce, egg, cornstarch, and sugar. Divide into 16 equal portions and shape into 16 patties, each 1/2 inch thick.

2. Pour oil into a 10- to 12-inch nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. When hot, add a few patties, without crowding. Cook until brown on each side and no longer pink in center (cut to test), about 7 minutes total. Remove as cooked and drain on paper towels; add more patties to pan.

Per patty: 73 cal., 53% (39 cal.) from fat; 5.9 g protein; 4.3 g fat (0.9 g sat.); 2.4 g carbo (0.3 g fiber); 107 mg sodium; 34 mg chol.

Curry Turkey Burgers Recipe courtesy Rachael Ray
1 1/3 pounds ground turkey breast, the average weight of 1 package
2 scallions, thinly sliced
A handful cilantro, chopped very fine, about 2 tablespoons, optional
1 inch piece fresh ginger, grated or minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 red bell pepper, finely chopped
Coarse salt
2 tablespoons mild curry paste or a handful of curry powder (Preferred brand: Patak's Mild Curry Paste)
Drizzle extra-virgin olive oil
5 crusty rolls, split
Toppings:
Bib or leaf lettuce
Sliced vine-ripe tomatoes
Mango chutney (preferred brands: Major Grey's or Patak's Mango Chutney)
Serving Suggestions: Thai Slaw Salad, recipe follows and root vegetable chips (preferred brands: Terra Chips)

Combine first 8 ingredients and form into 5 patties.
Brush or drizzle patties with extra-virgin olive oil. Grill patties 6 minutes on each side on indoor electric grill or pan fry for same amount of time in a large nonstick skillet over medium high heat.
Pile patties on split crusty rolls with lettuce, tomato, and chutney spread liberally on roll tops as a condiment. Serve curry turkey burgers with Thai Slaw and root vegetable chips.


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Posted by woodie2 (My Page) on Sat, Sep 8, 07 at 16:25

Here are a few recipes FYI
Roasted Pepper and Garlic Turkey Burgers

I am a huge turkey burger fan, and this recipe is a family favorite. The
red pepper and garlic help overcome the two major complaints people have
with turkey burgers (dry and tasteless) by adding oodles of flavor and
keeping the meat moist. Serve these burgers with Aioli or your favorite
herb mayonnaise, Romaine lettuce leaves, and kaiser rolls or grilled
sourdough bread.

2 pounds ground turkey
1 cup chopped roasted red peppers
6 minced garlic cloves
3 tablespoons minced onion
1/2 cup dry bread crumbs
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the grill. Combine all of the ingredients in a medium bowl. Gently
pat the mixture into eight 4-inch patties. Grill over medium high heat for
10-12 minutes, or until cooked through, turning once partway through.

Makes 8 servings.

Preparation Time: 5 minutes
Cooking Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes

Barb's Lentil Burgers
by Alexander Yotis

1/2 cup brown lentils
1 bay leaf
2 medium onions chopped
2 cloves garlic crushed
2 tablespoons oil
1 tablespoon chooped parsley (dried)
1/2 teaspoon basil (dried)
1/2 teaspoon marjoram (dried)
1/4 teaspoon thyme (dried)
salt and black pepper to taste
1/2 cup fresh bread crumbs
2 medium eggs
2 tablespoons tomato paste
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
1/2 cup plain flour

Cook lentils with bay leaf till soft, remove bay leaf and drain. Saute garlic
and onions till clear, add herbs. Mix rest of ingredients, it should be soft
but workable, make into patties and fry in a little oil and brown on each side.
You can freeze some patties (1/4-3/8 inch, in gladwrap) and then cook directly from the freezer..

RECIPE: Cuban Fritas (Cuban Hamburgers)
Posted by Marlen (My Page) on Fri, Aug 15, 03 at 0:33

This is the Cuban version of the good ole American hamburger. It is made into patties and served on plain hamburger buns. A deli close to my house makes them into rectangles and serves them on Cuban bread and they are superb!
Traditional Cuban fritas are served with a bit of ketchup, a sprinkle of chopped onions and a pile of shoe string potatoes right out of the can on top of the meat, inside the bun!
The traditional version also has no lettuce or cheese, but DH sneaks it in and calls it the Cuban-American version! LOLOL
If the patties are not too firm after I form them, I return them to the refrigerator to firm up before cooking.
This is my version.

1/2 lb. lean ground beef
1/2 lb/ ground pork
2 T ketchup
1/ 2 c fresh bread crumbs
1 egg beaten
1 clove garlic, minced
1 /2 c finely minced yellow onion
1/4 tsp cumin
Salt and pepper to taste

Mix all ingredients well and form into patties. Fry in olive oil or grill.
I use my George Foreman grill.


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Posted by bunnyman (My Page) on Sat, Sep 8, 07 at 20:04

Soak the bread side of the bun in butter or burger grease or both and toast/grill it.
Hot onions turn sweet when fried.

Raw sweet onions mixed in with the french frys.

Tiny slices of habenera pepper stuck in the burger... what they make beer for.

Kosher salt... lots of it. Tellicherry black pepper... fresh ground. Pinch of cardamom has made eyes light up when I add it. Cayenne if you don't have habenera stuck in them.

Bacon bacon bacon... did I mention bacon?

Long comfortable couch so after 2 burgers, 3 beers, and a load of fries you have a place to crash. Purring cats optional if they stay off your tummy.

: )
michael


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Posted by terri_pacnw (My Page) on Sat, Sep 8, 07 at 21:02

One of the stuffed burgers I love to make is:
Inside Out Smoked Bacon Cheese Burger.

Lean ground beef
crisp fried bacon pieces
kosher salt
fresh cracked black pepper
smoked cheddar cut into small cubes

Form ground beef into buns size thin patties.(I actually go a bit larger to allow for shrinkage.) Put a few pinches of bacon and cheese on half the patties, cover them with the other halves...pinch closed well. season both sides with s&p.
Grill up to your desired doneness.
I like mine with dill pickle slices, lettuce and mayo.
Hubby likes his with a slice of american on top, lettuce and thousand island dressing or mircle whip and ketchup.

And the turkey burger is:

Parmesan Chive Turkey Burger

ground turkey (I like white, but you can NOT over cook!)
handful of parmesan for each pound of meat
half a handful of fresh snipped chives for each pound
s&p
Mix together quickly, grill, pan sear or bake, until "just done".


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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Sun, Sep 9, 07 at 13:48

Thanks Woodie for posting the lentil burger recipe.
Since we are doing the entire weekend with burgers I'm considering a veggie burger for Saturday Lunch and would like to read some veggie burger recipes before deciding on which one I make. We already eat Tofu burgers but I'd like to try something new.

I searched on the internet and most of the veggie burger recipes sound pretty strange. Any one have a T&T veggie burger recipe?

Michelle


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Posted by kathleen_li (My Page) on Sun, Sep 9, 07 at 14:48

Both of these are from Southern Living and there are a lot more in the Tailgating section

Chicken-Apple-Bacon Burgers Try Cooking Light!

Ingredients
2 bacon slices
1/4 cup chopped red onion
1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast, coarsely chopped
2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Cooking spray
1 granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, and cut crosswise into 8 (1/4-inch-thick) slices
4 (2-ounce) Kaiser rolls

Preparation
Prepare grill.
Cook bacon in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until crisp. Remove bacon from pan, and crumble. Add onion to drippings in pan, and saute 2 minutes or until lightly browned. Cool slightly.

Place chicken in a food processor; process until coarsely ground. Combine chicken, bacon, onion, sage, salt, and pepper. Divide chicken mixture into 4 equal portions, shaping each into a 1/2-inch-thick patty.

Place patties on a grill rack coated with cooking spray; grill 5 minutes on each side or until done. Place apple slices on grill rack coated with cooking spray; grill 1 minute on each side. Place rolls, cut sides down, on grill rack; grill 1 minute or until toasted. Place patties on bottom halves of rolls; top each serving with 2 apple slices and top half of roll.

Yield
Makes 4 servings

Mini Cajun Burgers With Easy Rmoulade Southern Living
Prep: 20 min., Grill: 10 min. Prepare patties the night before the game. Stack between sheets of wax paper, place in a disposable plastic container, cover with lid, and refrigerate overnight. Transport patties safely by packing in a cooler with ice. They'll be ready for the grill once you arrive at your destination.

Ingredients
1 1/4 pounds ground beef
1/2 pound spicy Cajun sausage, finely chopped
2 teaspoons Cajun seasoning
1 (14-oz.) package dinner rolls, split
Green leaf lettuce
Easy Rmoulade

Preparation
1. Combine ground beef and sausage in a large bowl. Shape mixture into 12 (2 1/2-inch) patties, and place on a large baking sheet. Sprinkle patties evenly with Cajun seasoning. Cover and chill up to 1 day, if desired.
2. Grill, covered with grill lid, over medium-high heat (350 to 400) 5 minutes on each side or until no longer pink in center. Serve on split rolls with green leaf lettuce and Easy Rmoulade.

Easy Rmoulade: Stir together 3/4 cup light mayonnaise, 2 Tbsp. Creole mustard, and 2 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley. Cover and chill 30 minutes or up to 3 days. Makes 1 cup. Prep: 5 min., Chill: 30 min.

Yield
Makes 12 appetizer servings


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Posted by terri_pacnw (My Page) on Sun, Sep 9, 07 at 14:56

Oooh Kathleen..those mini burgers sound yumm..
Two of my three boys love the Aidele Chicken apple sausages..But I wonder it the burger would translate to them as the "same"?


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Posted by earthlydelights (My Page) on Sun, Sep 9, 07 at 19:53

miche,
what if we are just winging it and have no real recipe to follow? i won't know what kind of burger i will be in the mood for until the time comes to enjoy it. does that disqualify a participant?

maryanne


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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Sun, Sep 9, 07 at 20:19

Maryanne, you can do whatever you want. You don't have to follow a recipe or even post your recipe.
But after you post your pictures please share with us what you did even it's "abt 1/2 c. and abt a slight TBL of" or "I'm not quite sure but just enough to make it gooey".

Our virtual dinners are just for fun and sharing.

Michelle


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Posted by earthlydelights (My Page) on Sun, Sep 9, 07 at 21:40

okily dokily...thanks for the clarification.


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Posted by kathleen_li (My Page) on Tue, Sep 11, 07 at 13:03

From Martha Stewart...

Burgers will shrink during grilling, so make the diameter of the patties about 1/2 inch larger than the buns for the perfect fit.

-Season patties on the outside only; this prevents overworking the meat while mixing in the seasonings.

-If serving a crowd, stack patties on a plate, separating layers with wax paper.

-Season just before grilling to avoid drawing moisture out of patties.

-Grill patties straight from the fridge; don't bring them to room temperature. To prevent cross-contamination, never return grilled burgers to the plate you put them on before cooking.

-Scrape grates clean before oiling and grilling to give burgers nice grill marks and keep them from sticking.

-Don't press on patties as they cook. This only squeezes out the juices and encourages flare-ups.

-Use a thin, wide spatula for turning. If the burger doesn't come off the grill immediately, it's too soon to turn it. Continue cooking, and once the meat forms a crust, you can lift it right off the grill.

First Published: July/August 2007


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Posted by gwtamara (My Page) on Thu, Sep 13, 07 at 16:24

Hi everyone,
I mentioned this cook-off to our producers and they loved that you are planning to do this. Once you have it up and running, they'd like to feature it as a slideshow in the food section of iVillage. So, sort of fun and nice to know that people take notice. And, don't worry -- you don't have to do a thing. Just post along as usual and once we've created the feature, we'll be sure to let you know.

Also, thought you might be interested in some exisiting content:

101 Burger Builders
5 Gourmet Burgers

Best,

Tamara
GW Community Manager


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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Thu, Sep 13, 07 at 19:12

Ah oh...now we know we are being watched. Should I wear makeup? ;)
Michelle


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Posted by kathleen_li (My Page) on Thu, Sep 13, 07 at 19:21

Oh, how exciting!!I'd better get my buns in shape..hamburger buns, ie!


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Posted by gina_w (My Page) on Fri, Sep 14, 07 at 18:59

I'm going to do mine Sunday at a friend's house. Just simple grilled burgers as my audience is not that food-sophisticated and one is downright picky.


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Posted by earthlydelights (My Page) on Fri, Sep 14, 07 at 19:32

all these virtual dinners and finally LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION!
i'm debating making my own rolls/buns. anyone have a decent recipe for a nice, soft, delicious hamburger bun? i'd like to experiment before the big day.

thanks
maryanne


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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Fri, Sep 14, 07 at 21:12

I think I am going to try AnnT's Potato Rosemary Rolls.

Potato Rosemary Rolls

Makes 18 small rolls or 12 hamburger sized buns

1 potato, cooked and mashed
1 lb (3 1/2 cups) bread or all-purpose unbleached flour
3/4 - 1 cup water
2 teaspoons instant yeast
2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon dried rosemary or 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground sage leaves

Cook the potato until soft, either by boiling or baking in the oven or microwave. For this batch I chopped up and boiled the potato. I then reserved a cup of the potato water to add to the loaf, figuring it had additional nutrients and starches that would help my loaf.

Mash the potato. Removing the skin prior to mashing is optional: if you are using tough skinned potatoes like russets I would suggest removing them, but with soft skinned potatoes such as yukon gold or red potatoes I typically leave them on. The chopped up skin add nice color and texture to your rolls.

Combine the flour, mashed potato, yeast, salt, pepper and herbs in a large bowl. Add 3/4 cups water and knead or mix for 5 to 10 minutes, adding more water or flour until a consistency you are comfortable working with is reached. I added close to a full cup of water and ended up with an extremely sticky dough that was difficult to work with. I was only able to shape the rolls by repeatedly dipping my fingers in flour. The end result was wonderful though.

(I encourage amateur bakers to push the limit of what they think they can handle, moisture-wise. More often than not you'll be pleasantly surprised with the results, though you can go too far and end up baking a pancake, which I've done more than once.)

Place the dough in a greased bowl, cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a moist towel and let the dough rise until it has doubled in size, typically 60 to 90 minutes.

Remove the dough from the bowl, gently degas it, and shape it. For rolls or buns you can weigh them if you like or just eyeball them. I cut racquetball sized chunks of dough (larger than golf balls, smaller than tennis balls) then rolled them into balls in my well-floured hands. I placed them on a baking sheet covered with parchment, placed the entire sheet in a plastic trash bag, and set it aside to rise for approximately an hour again.

While the dough rose, I preheated the oven to 375 degrees.

If you have a spritzer, spray the top of the rolls with water right before placing them in the oven. Place them in the center rack and bake them for 10 minutes. Rotate the pan 180 degrees and bake them for another 10 to 20 minutes, depending on size. My large hamburger bun sized rolls took close to half an hour to bake. You'll know they are done when the bottom of the rolls is solid and slightly crispy. If you have a probe thermometer, check the temperature inside one of the rolls. When the internal temperature is approaching 200 degrees F, they are ready to pull out of the oven.

Allow the rolls to cool before serving. They keep very well too, so you could bake them a day or two ahead of time and still serve them for Thanksgiving.

Michelle


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Posted by lakeguy35 (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 0:36

Not sure if I'll have company or not yet...my group is last minute for the most part. I don't have any recipes to share at this time. The ones posted so far sound good, I may try some of them depending on how many may be here for the evening.
One thing I would like to try is to grind my own meat. I've never taken that on yet. Can I do that with a FP? I don't have a meat grinder. If so, what cut or combo of cuts should I use? I'm thinking it would be fun to compare homemade ground meat to the ground meat from the store or butcher.

I was thinking about making buns so it's good to see Ann's recipe posted above. Any other recipes for good buns from the group?? I've never made them before and always buy them at the store or bakery. They must be toasted on the grill though! I'm thinking I remember one from several year ago that included wine in the recipe.... or maybe it was a marbled rye combo??? I'm thinking Lars or Kframe posted it??? I like a heartier, crustier bread rather than the softer type of bun for my burger.

As far as sides go......I'm thinking fries, onion rings, or Lay's Potatoe Chips with a homemade dip. The pan fried onion dip is one of our favorites.

Even though Julia made a great burger in a cast iron skillet on one of her shows....I'll be using one of my grills!! LOL!

David


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Posted by chase (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 9:06

Yikes!!! Our 15 minutes of fame!!! Was going to do my standby burger using my homemade chile sauce, now I'm thinking I may try and get a bit more creative. LOL
I was thinking of doing rolls as well. I recall someone posting pics of gorgeous hamburger rolls but I can't reall who. If we don't get the recipe here I'll start a thread requesting it.


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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 9:19

David, I ground my pork for the Sausagethon in my FP with no problems. I cubed up the pork shoulder and put, I think, 3 cups at a time into the FP and pulsed 2-3 times and it was ground perfectly. Be careful with how many times you pulse as it can and will make the meat into mush which is not what you want.
David could you post the recipe for the pan fried onion dip? Thanks.

Onion rings sound great....YUM!

Michelle


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Posted by dishesdone (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 10:03

Debbie had posted these and they look great. I might go with these. Except for the mustard!
Mexican Burgers
from debbie814
===============
1 lb ground beef
1 egg
1/2 cup finely chopped cilantro
1 jalapeno
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 tsp salt
1 tsp Tequila
1/4 tsp fresh ground black pepper

sour dough bread

Top with:
sliced tomato
avocado
salsa
mustard

1. Finely chop onion, jalapeno and cilantro.

2. Combine beef, egg, cilantro, jalapeno, onion, salt, tequila and
pepper in large bowl.

3. Divide into 4 patties.

4. Cut up the tomatoes and avocado and set aside for topping.

5. Grill burgers on each side for 4 minutes for medium doneness.

6. Toast bread lightly, if desired.

7. Top burger with avocado and tomato slices. Serve with salsa and mustard.


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Posted by wizardnm (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 11:00

This is getting more fun by the minute. I made Kaiser buns no long ago. If anyone needs the recipe, let me know.
Nancy


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Posted by lakeguy35 (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 13:26

Thanks for the tips on grinding meat in the FP Michelle.
Nancy, I'd like your recipe please. If not for this dinner for a future venture in baking.

Here is the dip recipe. There is one floating around from Alton Brown too. I'm thinking they are basically the same thing.

David

Barefoot Contessa Pan-Fried Onion Dip Ina Garten
2 large yellow onions
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
4 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
1/2 cup sour cream
1/2 cup mayonnaise, not light
Cut the onions in half and then slice them into 1/8-inch thick half-rounds.
(You will have about 3 cups of onions.) Heat the butter and oil in a large saute pan over medium heat.
Add the onions, cayenne, salt, and pepper and saute for 10 minutes.
Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, for 20 more minutes until the onions are browned and caramelized.
Allow the onions to cool.
Place the cream cheese, sour cream and mayonnaise in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and beat until smooth.
Add the onions and mix well.
Taste for seasonings.
Serve at room temperature.

Note: I chop the onions. I didn't like the long strings of onion the first time I made this.


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Posted by wizardnm (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 14:53

David, here's the recipe I used along with another recipe for Onion Buns.
Kaiser Rolls (King Arthur Flour recipe)

3 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
1 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1 large egg
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
3/4 cup water

Manual Method:In a large bowl, or the bowl of your electric mixer, combine all of the ingredients, stirring till the dough forms a cohesive mass and begins to clear the sides of the bowl. Knead the dough for 5 minutes, then allow it to rest for 10 minutes (which gives the dough a chance to absorb the liquid, and the gluten in the flour a chance to relax.) Knead the dough for an additional 5 minutes, or until it's smooth and supple. The dough should be quite stiff, but not at all "gnarly;" adjust its consistency with additional flour or water, as necessary. Transfer the dough to a lightly greased bowl or dough-rising bucket, cover the bowl or bucket, and allow the dough to rise till it's noticeably puffy, about 1 hour.

Bread Machine Method:Place all of the ingredients into the pan of your machine, program the machine for manual or dough, and press start. About 10 minutes before the end of the final kneading cycle, examine the dough's consistency; it should be quite stiff, but not at all "gnarly;" adjust it consistency with additional flour or water, as necessary. Allow the machine to complete its cycle.

Shaping:Transfer the dough to a lightly greased work surface, and divide it into six equal pieces. Shape the pieces into round balls, and place them on a lightly greased or parchment lined baking sheet. Working with one ball of dough at a time, center your kaiser stamp over the dough. Press down frimly, cutting to the bottom but not all the way through the dough. This is important; if you don't cut deeply enough, the shape disappears as the roll bakes; if you cut too deeply (all the way through), the roll will form "petals" as it rises and look like a daisy, not a kaiser roll. Practice makes perfect! Repeat with the remaining rolls.

Place the rolls cut-side down (yes-cut-side down--this helps them retain their shape) onto a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. Cover the rolls, and allow them to rise for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until they've almost doubled in volume. Turn the rolls cut-side up. Dip tops in milk and coat with poppy or sesame seeds, if desired.

Bake the rolls in a preheated 425F oven vor 15 to 17 minutes, or until they're golden brown. Remove them from the oven, and cool on a wire rack.Yield: six large kaiser rolls.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

ONION HAMBURGER ROLLS

2 eggs, divided
2 medium onions finely chopped, divided
1/4 cup butter
3/4 cup warm water 105 to 115 degrees
1 tablespoon dry yeast
1 teaspoon granulated sugar
3 cups (or more) bread flour
2 tablespoons instant dry milk powder
1 1/2 teaspoons salt, divided
A pinch of mace (Optional but enhances flavor)

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Melt butter, add onion and cook over medium heat until soft but not browned.

Add yeast and sugar to hot water and let sit until foamy, about 10 minutes.

In a food processor, combine 3 cups of flour, 1 egg, milk powder, 1 teaspoon salt and all but 1/4 cup of the sauteed onion.

With the processor running, pour yeast mixture through feed tube and mix until dough is uniformly moist and cleans side of work bowl, about 40 seconds. If dough is too sticky add more flour 1 teaspoon at a time until mixed in.

Transfer dough to greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap, let double in size...about 1 hour.

Grease a baking sheet and set aside.

Punch down dough and turn onto lightly floured surface and divide into ten pieces if making hamburg rolls. Shape into a ball and flatten to a circle about 3/4 inch thick.

Arrange 1 1/2 to 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheet. Mix remaining egg with 1/2 teaspoon salt. Brush rolls with this glaze. Gently press 1 teaspoon of reserved onion onto tops of each roll. Cover loosely with oiled plastic wrap. Let stand until almost doubled in size about 45 minutes.

Bake rolls on center rack about 20 minutes or until golden. Transfer to wire rack and cover with a kitchen towel until cool. If you want a hard crust then do not cover with a towel.

Nancy


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Posted by terri_pacnw (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 15:29

Well I was going to make the Honey Wheat Rolls..but I might just make one of Nancys recipes...

Here is a link that might be useful: Honey Wheat Rolls...

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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 16:49

Thought I would let you know that there is a mustard thread over on Harvest that just might have the perfect condiment for your burgers.
Michelle

Here is a link that might be useful: Homemade Mustard

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Posted by ohiomom (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 20:05

Homemade buns and mustard ? I am skeered of you all :)
I have never made my own buns ... lol ... this will be fun.


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Posted by wizardnm (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 20:20

LOL Ohiomom!!!! No one says you have to make homemade buns... :P
I only do on special occasions.... but hey, why not step out of the box once in a while?
Nancy


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Posted by terri_pacnw (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 20:33

I'll have to look closer at that thread on Mustard making..I was going to just follow the Penzey directions one of these days and make it from their ground mustard. LOL


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Posted by debbie814 (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 20:50

LOL Ohiomom :-) I have a great recipe for homemade ketchup that I should post.
Carol, we're doing the Mexican Burgers as well. And we'll use mustard. Give it a try with the mustard. It really is good, unless you don't care for mustard.


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Posted by dishesdone (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 21:17

Debbie, I love mustard, just never had it on a burger! I'll give it a try :)


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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 21:25

I have a great recipe for homemade ketchup that I should post.
I'd like to see the ketchup recipe, please. Although being a Chicagoan, ketchup is the same as sunshine to a vampire.

OhioMom, I was thinking about making some Focaccia, slicing it lengthwise and putting the burger on this. I've had it before at restaurants and it is deliciuos. And there is not much easier then Focaccia.

Michelle


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Posted by terri_pacnw (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 21:45

I'm thinking I might make mini burgers for the boys..You serve it on grilled sliced bagette. They'd get a kick out of it...And we'll probably do it on Sunday that weekend, because there's no football obligations..


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Posted by ohiomom (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 21:48

Thanks Michelle :) I thought about making some whole wheat buns. I do love Focaccia though, and have an easy recipe for it, I will have to give this some thought.


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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Sat, Sep 15, 07 at 21:49

Oops forgot to post the Focaccia recipes:
Focaccia Bread (My recipe)

1 1/3 c. warm tap water
2 1/2 tsp (1 envelope) active dry yeast
6 TBL. Olive Oil
3 1/4 c. Flour
2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. Kosher Salt

10 1/2 by 15 1/2 Jelly Roll Pan

1. Measure water into bowl and whisk in yeast and 3 TBL Oil.

2. Measure Flour and 2 tsp. salt into bowl. Mix.

3. Stir yeast/water into Flour. Cover bowl and let rise.

4. Spread 1 1/2 TBL. Oil on baking pan. Turn dough out onto pan and press into edges. Cover the dough with a piece of oiled plastic wrap and allow it ot rise again until doubled up to an hour.

5. Preheat oven to 450 Degrees

6. Poke cavities into dough at 2" intervals.

7. Drizzle remaining 1 1/2 TBL Oil and sprinkle with Kosher Salt.

8. Bake until brown on edges.

Note: Keep you eye on this bread as it bakes quickly. When it starts pulling away from the edges of the pan it is done.

NOTE: I dribble more EVOO on top of bread.

Focaccia (Wolfgang Puck)

1 cup warm water
1 teaspoon granulated sugar
1/2 oz. (1 packet) dry yeast
2 3/4 cups bread flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon dried thyme (or rosemary)
1 teaspoon dried basil
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground pepper
1 tablespoons olive oil + 1 tablespoon

Combine 1/4 cup of the warm water with sugar and yeast. Allow mixture to stand for 10 minutes, if it doubles continue.

In a large bowl, stir together flour, salt, garlic powder, oregano, thyme, basil and pepper.

Mix in 1 tablespoon olive oil, remaining cup warm water and yeast mixture.

When dough comes together, turn out onto lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic.

Lightly oil a bowl and place dough in it turning to coat with oil. Cover with a damp cloth, let rise in warm place for 20 minutes.

Preheat oven to 450.

Coat a 10X15-inch jelly roll pan with olive oil.

Place dough on pan and using your fingers pat to fill pan.

Drizzle top lightly with olive oil.

Sprinkle with coarse ground pepper as desired.

Allow to rise again 15 to 20 minutes.

Bake 15 minutes until golden.

Michelle


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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Sun, Sep 16, 07 at 12:02

Here is a chutney recipe that I found that sounds good as a condiment.
Tomato Mustard Seed Chutney

2 large ripe tomatoes peeled & seeded
1 Tablespoon mustard seed
1 Tablespoon diced fresh ginger
1/4 Cup diced red onion
1/2 Cup sugar
1/2 Cup rice wine vinegar

To make the chutney you will need a heavy
saucepan. Place the saucepan over moderate
heat and add the sugar. Melt the sugar until it
caramelizes. Stir the rice wine vinegar into the
sugar; once incorporated add the ginger,
mustard seed, red onion, and diced tomatoes.
Cook on a low heat until the liquid is absorbed.
Cool and set aside.

And a Mustard Focaccia:

Mustard Infused Focaccia

1 lb all purpose flour
1 lb bread flour
1/2 ounce salt
1 oz yeast
2 c water, 110 degrees
1/3 c sugar
2 oz Dry Mustard
2 oz olive oil

Combine the All Purpose Flour, Bread Flour and
salt with a dough hook. Combine the Yeast,
Water, Sugar, and Colemans Dry Mustard, proof
(allow to stand) for 5 minutes. Add Olive Oil to
the Yeast / Water mixture. Pour liquid mixture
into dry. Process dough until elastic,
approximately 10 minutes. Turn dough out into
oiled bowl and cover with a clean towel. Allow
dough to rise 2 hours. Punch down every 45
minutes (two times). Pour dough out onto oiled
sheetpan and bake in 350-degree oven for
approximately 15 to 20 minutes. Remove and
cool, then cut into pieces.

Michelle


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Posted by terri_pacnw (My Page) on Sun, Sep 16, 07 at 15:14

Wow..Yummm Michelle..I think I might have to try the focaccia this week..just cuz...


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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Wed, Sep 19, 07 at 18:00

Just bumping this up so anyone else with ideas can post.
We still have 10 days to prepare so there is plenty of time. And don't think that you need to make a gourmet recipe, juicy burgers with mustard is fine.

Michelle


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Posted by sally2 (My Page) on Thu, Sep 20, 07 at 19:28

Whew, I had forgotten about it and seeing this thread up again I thought it was this weekend. I still have time to figure out a good veggie burger. I may try the lentil one that was posted above, but I'm wondering if I could do a variation of the Mexican burger using black beans somehow. I'm going to experiment with it.
I love onion rings but I've never made them. I have a deep fat fryer that we picked up at a garage sale I could dust off. Does anyone have a good onion ring recipe? Of course, would onion rings go with Mexi-burgers? Oh, why not!

I sure am getting hungry reading this thread.

Sally


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Posted by debbie814 (My Page) on Thu, Sep 20, 07 at 20:03

Michelle, I'll type up the ketchup recipe and post by the weekend. I'm a slow typist :-) The ketchup is delicious and worth the extra effort.


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Posted by stacy3 (My Page) on Fri, Sep 21, 07 at 8:27

Here's one from bon appetit, that I haven't tried yet.
PORCINI-GORGONZOLA BURGERS WITH VEAL DEMI-GLACE (not my pic)

A true demi-glace the luscious sauce made by reducing homemade stock and red wine to a rich concentration needs to simmer for several hours, making it the perfect activity for a lazy winter Sunday.
Demi-glace
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
3 1/2 pounds meaty veal bones (such as shank knuckle bones or neck bones)
1 medium onion, chopped
1 medium carrot, chopped
1 celery stalk with leaves, chopped
12 cups cold water, divided
2 teaspoons tomato paste
3 fresh parsley sprigs
2 fresh thyme sprigs
1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
2 cups dry red wine
Burgers
2 cups water
1 1/2 ounces dried porcini mushrooms,* broken into 1/2-inch pieces
3 pounds ground sirloin
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
3/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) chilled unsalted butter
6 4-inch square or round sourdough rolls, halved horizontally
Fresh arugula
Olive oil
6 1/4-inch-thick slices Gorgonzola cheese
For demi-glace:
Heat oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add veal bones and saut until deep brown on all sides, about 12 minutes. Transfer bones to bowl. Add onion, carrot, and celery to pot. Saut until browned, about 6 minutes. Add 2 cups cold water, tomato paste, herbs, and peppercorns; bring to boil, scraping up browned bits. Add bones with any accumulated juices, then remaining 10 cups water to pot. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer uncovered until stock is reduced to 2 1/2 cups, about 4 hours. Strain into 4-cup glass measuring cup, pressing on solids to extract as much liquid as possible. Refrigerate stock uncovered 1 hour.
Spoon off fat from surface of stock. Place stock in heavy medium saucepan; add wine and simmer until reduced to 1 cup demi-glace, about 25 minutes. (Can be made 3 days ahead. Cover and chill.)
For burgers:
Bring 2 cups water and mushrooms to boil in small saucepan. Remove from heat, cover, and let stand until mushrooms soften, about 20 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer mushrooms to medium skillet. Slowly pour soaking liquid into skillet, leaving any sediment behind. Boil over medium-high heat until liquid is reduced to glaze, stirring occasionally, about 6 minutes. Cool mushrooms. Transfer to work surface; chop mushrooms coarsely.
Transfer mushrooms and any juices to large bowl. Add meat, salt, and pepper; mix gently. Shape mixture into six 1-inch-thick patties. Place on foil-lined baking sheet. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill.)
Preheat broiler. Rewarm demi-glace over medium-low heat; add butter and whisk until melted. Remove from heat. Place rolls, cut side up, on baking sheet. Broil until lightly toasted, about 2 minutes. Remove rolls; maintain broiler setting. Arrange roll bottoms on plates. Top with arugula. Heat 2 large broilerproof skillets over medium-high heat; brush with oil. Add 3 burgers to each skillet. Cook to desired doneness, about 5 minutes per side for medium-rare. Top each burger with slice of cheese. Broil burgers until cheese begins to melt, about 1 minute. Place burgers on roll bottoms; spoon some demi-glace over. Cover with roll tops. Serve, passing remaining demi-glace separately.
*Dried porcini mushrooms are available at Italian markets, specialty foods stores, and many supermarkets.
Makes 6 servings.

Bon Apptit
January 2004

Great ideas at this site, too, - I will possibly make 2 kinds - one for kids one for grownups.

Here is a link that might be useful: lots of burger info and recipes

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Re: Burger Cook-Off...Ideas, Recipes, Alternatives and Techniques clip this post email this post what is this?
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Posted by stacy3 (My Page) on Fri, Sep 21, 07 at 8:48

Oh, here's Ina's "Real hamburgers".
Real Hamburgers - Barefoot contessa
2 pounds ground chuck
1 pound ground sirloin
3 tablespoons steak sauce (recommended: Crosse & Blackwell)
6 extra-large egg yolks
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
4 tablespoons cold unsalted butter
12 hamburger buns

Carefully mix the meats, steak sauce, egg yolks, salt, and pepper with the tines of a fork, but do not mash it. Lightly form each hamburger and lightly press into a patty shape. Make an indentation and put a thin slice of butter inside each hamburger, making sure the butter is entirely encased in the meat.
Heat a grill, broiler, or saute pan and cook the hamburgers for 3 to 5 minutes on each side until almost done. Remove to a plate and cover with aluminum foil. Allow the hamburgers to rest for 5 minutes and serve immediately on buns.


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Posted by chase (My Page) on Fri, Sep 21, 07 at 13:17

Well I have my burger figured out but.....we have decided to go away next weekend so....I'll cook my burger Wednesday or Thursday.
Michelle. if I email you the picture can you post it on the actual Cook Off thread for me?


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Posted by lakeguy35 (My Page) on Sat, Sep 22, 07 at 0:34

I think I may have some people up next weekend so I'm excited about that. I was going to do just traditional burgers but I'll be looking over all of the recipes posted and making a final decision next week. There are some great options to pick from for sure.
Sally, I don't have a recipe so to speak...more so a method. I like to slice the onions and soak them in Buttermilk for a few hours. Then I put them in seasoned flour and fry. I usually just use salt and pepper but I've been known to add some cayenne for a little heat and or some garlic powder. I've cut them thick, medium , or very thin. That is a personal preference/taste option.

A lot of people don't like deep frying anything because of the leftover smell. I'll do it outside if the weather permits. If not, I've found that burning a few candles or oil lamps takes care of the lingering fry/oil smell....it works with fish too.....and that smell/odor can really linger...LOL

David


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Posted by debbie814 (My Page) on Sat, Sep 22, 07 at 6:30

Even though this is a bit time consuming, it is wonderful on burgers and fries. We loved the ketchup so much when we had it at the restaurant, that we bought their cookbook.
Famous Tomato Ketchup "Recipes from HOME" - David Page and Barbara Shinn

"Our homemade ketchup is the only one served at our restaurant. After all, the motto at Home Restaurant is Fine Wine, Fine Ketchup.

2 large onions, sliced about 2/3 inch thick
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup red wine vinegar
1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon (packed) dark brown sugar
10 garlic cloves, peeled
cup capers with their brine
cup Tabasco sauce
1 tablespoon Home Spice Mix (listed below)
teaspoon mild paprika
teaspoon ground cinnamon
teaspoon ground allspice
teaspoon ground ginger
teaspoon dried oregano
teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
teaspoon ground cardamom
3 (28 ounce) cans whole tomatoes
2 (12 ounce) cans tomato paste
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Preheat the broiler.

Toss the onion slices with the olive oil and broil them until charred, about 8 minutes on each side.

Put the onions and all the remaining ingredients in a deep heavy nonreactive pot. Simmer uncovered over low heat for about 3 hours, stirring every 15 minutes to break up the tomatoes and to keep the ketchup from sticking to the bottom of the pot. The mixture will thicken. Puree the ketchup in batches in a food processor or blender. If the pureed ketchup seems too thin, return it to the pot and simmer until it is as thick as you like it. This ketchup keeps well refrigerated for up to 4 weeks. Makes 3 quarts.

Home Spice Mix: (this spice mix is used at the restaurant, in quite a few of the recipes) .
1/3 cup cumin seeds
1/3 coriander seeds
1/3 cup yellow mustard seeds

Heat a skillet over medium heat until hot. Add the cumin seeds and toss occasionally until lightly toasted, about 1 minute. Transfer to a plate to cool, and repeat with the coriander seeds and then the mustard seeds.

When the spices are cool, coarsely grind them together in a spice grinder or in a mortar with a pestle. Makes cup.


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Posted by msafirstein (My Page) on Sun, Sep 23, 07 at 18:11

Michelle. if I email you the picture can you post it on the actual Cook Off thread for me?
Sorry been at the MI Run with some "funny look'n" people in a "general sorta way".

Sure, I can post your pics for you. Send them directly to beans at rocketmail.com

Michelle


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Posted by sally2 (My Page) on Sun, Sep 23, 07 at 18:23

Thanks, David! I never would have thought of soaking the onion rings in buttermilk, but that sounds real good.
I came home from work yesterday to the house smelling strongly of fried food. My son has just started culinary school, and they just had a unit on frying food. He decided to practice, and made deep fried chicken, mushrooms and french fries. I rarely fry things due to the issue of what to do with the left over oil, not to mention the calories. But, now and then it's fun, and definately fun to eat! I definately want to try those onion rings the way you do it.

Sally


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Posted by mtnester (My Page) on Sun, Sep 23, 07 at 19:22

Glad this post came to the top again: I need some advice. The ground beef I use is 15% fat. I usually make a plain-Jane burger with no additions except for onion flakes and Montreal seasoning. However, sometimes the burgers get very dry. What's the trick (other than going to a higher grade of fat) to make them more juicy? Or am I just overcooking them?
Sue


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Posted by terri_pacnw (My Page) on Sun, Sep 23, 07 at 21:16

Sue, with 15% fat..you must be over cooking them..
That's the percent I use..sometimes I mix it with some 7% too...

Here is a link that might be useful: Maybe this will help?

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Posted by mtnester (My Page) on Sun, Sep 23, 07 at 22:23

Terri, I think you're right. I tend to get distracted while food is cooking, and then suddenly it's overdone (pathetic, huh?). Tonight, however, I watched the pan carefully, and the burgers were still pink inside and pretty juicy. They were also quite tasty. Thanks for the link, too, but I don't mix meat and milk.
I have another thought on this: my store has just begun using a vacuum pack for ground meat; instead of a 1-day expiration, it's supposed to be good for a couple weeks. The freshness of the meat is probably a factor, too.

Sue


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clipped on: 08.06.2010 at 12:25 pm    last updated on: 08.06.2010 at 12:26 pm

RE: Beef Flanken ribs and what to serve with them (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: chase on 09.08.2007 at 08:35 am in Cooking Forum

I think a noodle dish would be interesting.

Jessy posted this one which is a cold dish.

Spicy Cold Soba Noodles

1/3 cup soy sauce
1 tbls molasses

1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup tahini
1/4 cup sesame oil
1/4 cup chili oil
3 tbls balsamic or red wine vinegar
1/2 bunch thinly sliced scallions, white and green

1/2 lb soba noodes

Place soy sauce in a pan over high heat and reduce by half. Turn heat to low, stir in molasses, and warm briefly. Transfer to a serving bowl. Add brown sugar through scallions and whisk to combine.

Bring a large pot of water to boil. Add noodles; bring back to a boil, and cook, stirring occasionally, until they just begin to soften, about three minutes.

Have ready a large bowl of iced water. Drain noodles, plunge in iced water, and drain again (I just rinse with cold water in the colander). Transfer noodles to the serving bowl that has the sauce, toss well and chill.

From City Cuisine by Feniger and Milliken.

This one is served either warm or hot.

Sesame Noodles (Chien Noir) by Susan Branch
serves 6

1/4 cup tahini
1/4 cup warm water
1/4 cup soy sauce (or Tamari)
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons cider vinegar
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2 tablespoons chili oil
2 teaspoons sesame oil
1/2 cup green onions
16-ounces thin udon noodles

Look for any unfamiliar ingredients at your health food store. Whisk together tahini and water; whisk in soy sauce, vegetable oil, sugar, vinegar, garlic, chili oil and sesame oil. Finely chop green onions. Cook the noodles according to package; lightly coat them with sauce, tossing gently. Sprinkle green onions and serve. Best hot or at room temperature. Try Chinese egg noodles if you cant find udon!

For veggies how about Kimchee?


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RE: Annie - a new BEET recipe to check out! (Follow-Up #17)

posted by: readinglady on 07.21.2010 at 10:33 pm in Cooking Forum

Annie, you've got it. It's in Ziedrich's Joy of Pickling.

Pickled Beets with Red Wine

Categories : Canning & Preserving Pickles and Relishes

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
6 pounds beets with rootlets and 2 inches of tops
1 teaspoon whole cloves
2 4-inch cinnamon sticks, broken
1 inch fresh ginger -- sliced thin
3 cups sugar
2 cups red wine
3 cups red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon pickling salt

Scrub the beets. Put them in a large pot and cover them with boiling water. Return water to a boil and boil the beets 15 to 35 minutes, depending on their size, just until tender.

Drain the beets and cover with cold water. When they are cool, trim them and slip off their skins. If they are large, halve or quarter themor if you prefer, slice into 1/4-inch-thick rounds. (Beets can be prepared to this point and then refrigerated until ready to complete.)

Tie the cloves, cinnamon, and ginger in a spice bag or a scrap of cheesecloth. Put the spice bag, sugar, wine, vinegar and salt into a nonreactive pot. Bring the contents to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar and salt. Simmer the syrup, uncovered, for 10 minutes.

While the syrup simmers, pack the beets into pint mason jars. If beets are sliced, pack loosely. Pour hot syrup over the beets. Leave 1/2-inch headspace.

Process pints for 30 minutes in BWB. Store at least three weeks before eating.

Description: from "The Joy of Pickling" p. 108
Yield: 7 pints

Be sure to let this pickle age. It benefits tremendously.

Carol


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RE: Do You Use Packaged Goods? If so, what? What not? (Follow-Up #64)

posted by: dcarch on 06.09.2010 at 09:26 pm in Cooking Forum

Posted by lindac

"----------- What we are NOT about is..."This is how I make it, do it this way, and if you dont' want to I will be insulted ----"

I agree completely.

" we aren't about ---- comments about the best chefs making something one way or another. "

I dont understand why thats not cooking related?

"------- But I find I am a bit intolerant of those - ---- who never enter into the "community" of the forum by offering birthday greetings not sympathy nor cheers when appropriate. -- "

I am sorry that you feel that way. I certainly hope you are in the minority. Not all posters schedules permit the various non-cooking related activities enjoyed by some members, yet they contribute significantly more than the others.

"---It seems we are a family.....with all that word implies. -----"

For some yes. For others no. Anonymity in internet forum posting is perfectly acceptable.

dcarch

(Appologies to plllog for my off-topic comments)


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RE: Pre-made baking mixes (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: ci_lantro on 02.26.2010 at 12:42 pm in Cooking Forum

Pink, the 'Waffles of Insane Greatness' recipe that Joanm posted on the January New Recipe Review thread is a fantastic recipe.

Waffles of Insane Greatness
Recipe courtesy Aretha Frankensteins

3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup whole milk or buttermilk
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 egg
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
Butter and syrup, for serving

In a medium bowl, combine the flour, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, and salt; mix well. Add the milk, vegetable oil, egg, sugar and vanilla and mix well. Let the batter sit for 30 minutes.

Preheat a waffle iron. Do not use non-stick spray on the waffle iron; the oil in the batter will allow the waffle to release easily. Follow the directions on your waffle iron to cook the waffles. Serve immediately with butter and syrup.

This recipe was provided by professional chefs and has been scaled down from a bulk recipe provided by a restaurant. The Food Network Kitchens chefs have not tested this recipe, in the proportions indicated, and therefore, we cannot make any representation as to the results.

These are hands down THE best waffles I have ever eaten. Crisp & delicious. It's readily adaptable to what you're wanting to do. The only problem, for the impatient or time crunched, is that the batter has to sit for 30 minutes before baking.

Try this recipe & you won't want any other waffles. Guaranteed!!

Oh--I've made this recipe 3x already & have used buttermilk each time.


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RE: favorite homemade salad dressing? (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: jessyf on 05.28.2008 at 11:27 am in Cooking Forum

Here is my contribution...one of the only salads that I like to make and eat. Correction - the ONLY salad I like to make and eat (without the bacon). I'm too lazy when it comes to salads!

Spinach Salad with Chutney Dressing

Bon Appetite Magazine, by Sarah Tenaglia

cup balsamic vinegar or 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
3 Tbs mango chutney
1 Tbs sugar
1 large garlic clove, chopped
1 tsp dry mustard
1/3 cup olive oil

pound bacon slices
1 10 oz package fresh spinach leaves
2 cans (11 oz each) mandarin oranges, drained
10 ounces of thin sliced mushrooms
1 cups bean sprouts
1 8 oz can sliced water chestnuts

For dressing: combine vinegar, mango chutney, sugar, chopped garlic and dry mustard in processor or blender and blend well. With machine running, gradually add oil in a thin steady stream and blend until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Can be prepared one day ahead cover and refrigerate, bring to room temperature before using.

For salad: cook bacon in heavy large skillet until crisp. Transfer to paper towels and drain. Crumble bacon. Place spinach, oranges, mushrooms, bean sprouts and water chestnuts in a large bowl. Toss with enough dressing to coat. Sprinkle with bacon and serve.

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clipped on: 01.29.2010 at 02:30 pm    last updated on: 01.29.2010 at 02:30 pm

RE: schmaltz (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: jessyf on 01.09.2010 at 07:51 am in Cooking Forum

dirlgirl, schmaltz is from fowl - chickens/geese. Lard is from pigs. The term is used mostly by Eastern European Jews but it simply means 'rendered fowl fat'.

Thanks gardengrl!

Here is a recipe for 'pate' by Joan Nathan...posting and clipping, does anyone have variations?

In France, It's Not All Chopped Liver
By JOAN NATHAN
FOR a long time I thought that all chopped-liver recipes were essentially the same. Then someone shared this tasty French recipe, the perfect start to a dinner at Hanukkah or on any other special occasion.

French Jews took lowly chopped liver and turned it into pt by passing it through a food mill, adding a little brandy and corn or potato starch and then pouring it into a terrine that they baked in a bain-marie (water bath) and cooled.

Voil: completely kosher chopped-liver pt.

A learned rabbi once told me that, aside from gefilte fish, chopped liver was the only distinctly Jewish dish. But in a way it's strange that it's Jewish at all.

Kosher dietary laws prohibit the consumption of the blood of any animal. The liver, though, has a higher concentration of blood than other organs. (In antiquity the human liver was considered the seat of the soul because it held so much blood, symbolizing life itself.)

Soaking and salting a piece of meat, the usual kosher process for removing the blood, is not enough with liver. Broiling is, but it dries out the meat. Non-Jews can use butter or cream to create a succulent pt. But observant Jews, who can't mix dairy products and meat, can use only the heavier chicken or goose fat.

Lightened with onions and chopped hard-boiled eggs, traditional chopped liver -- as it is eaten as an appetizer for the Sabbath and holidays -- was born.

But the French can always make a good thing better.

French Chopped-Liver Pt
Time: 45 minutes, plus refrigeration

1 pound chicken livers
3 tablespoons chicken fat or vegetable oil, plus more for greasing pan
1 large onion, diced
4 large eggs, hard-boiled
3 to 4 tablespoons Cognac or other brandy
1 tablespoon corn or potato starch
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
5 or 6 bay leaves, preferably fresh
Rye bread.

1. For a strictly kosher preparation heat broiler and grease a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan or terrine. Broil livers on a rack 4 inches from the heat for about 2 minutes on each side. Take out livers, and drain. Turn oven to 350 degrees.
2. Heat chicken fat or vegetable oil in saut pan over medium heat for 1 minute, and saut onion in it 20 to 25 minutes, or until very soft and lightly golden. For nonkosher preparation add uncooked liver, and cook until just pink inside, a few minutes.
3. Place onions and liver in food processor with eggs, brandy and starch, and process until smooth. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
4. Arrange bay leaves shiny side down in loaf pan, and spoon liver mixture on top, pressing gently with spoon to get rid of any air bubbles. Set pan in a larger pan two-thirds filled with warm water, and bake 20 minutes. Cool, and unmold. Serve with rye bread.

Yield: About 20 servings.

Here is a link that might be useful: wikipedia

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clipped on: 01.09.2010 at 07:52 am    last updated on: 01.09.2010 at 07:52 am

The winning Sweet Potato Pie

posted by: michaelmaxp on 12.16.2009 at 08:58 am in Cooking Forum

Jessy,

As requested, here's is the winning entry in the 1st Annual Boeing Technical Geek Male Pie baking contest.

It is truly a delicious pie. He applied the topping as flowerettes from a piping bag.

Ricks Sweet Potato Pie

Crust
6 oz Ginger Snaps
2 oz Pecans
1/4 cup brown sugar (divided)
4T melted butter

Preheat oven to 400.
Combine ginger snaps, pecans and 2 Tbls brown sugar in a food processor. Pulse until most of the cookies are broken. Pour in the melted butter then pulse until uniform.
Press into a 9" pie pan and sprinkle with remaining sugar.
Bake for 10 minutes.

Filling
15 oz sweet potato puree
2 eggs
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 cup half-and-half
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp rum extract
1/2 tsp vanilla

While crust is cooking, combine all ingredients in a food processor and blend until smooth.
Pour into the hot pie crust.
Reduce heat to 325 and bake for 45-60 minutes (until an inserted knife comes out clean).
Place the pie on a wire rack to cool completely.

Topping
1/4 cup water
1 pkg unflavored gelatin
1 cup sweet potato puree
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp rum extract
1/2 tsp vanilla
1 cup cream

Sprinkle gelatin over the water in a small saucepan. Let rest 5 minutes.
Heat the gelatin and water slowly over low heat to dissolve the gelatin.
Add sweet potato, sugar, salt, and extracts and stir until smooth. Remove from heat and let cool.
Whip the cream until firm and fold into the cooled sweet potato mixture. Put onto a completely cooled pie, then refrigerate.

michaelp

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clipped on: 12.16.2009 at 09:01 am    last updated on: 12.16.2009 at 09:01 am

RE: What's wrong with this Picture ( Turkey ) (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: hawk307 on 11.27.2009 at 05:54 pm in Cooking Forum

Hi everyone : I'd like to oblige all of you.
Carol:
you are right, that's all that matters.
And of course friends and relatives to share the Food.
I just like to make waves sometimes.

Tried all the other ways but I'm back to Traditional .
Hope you all had a Happy Thanksgiving.
Lou

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clipped on: 11.27.2009 at 05:58 pm    last updated on: 11.27.2009 at 05:58 pm

RE: need ideas for elegant vegetarian/fish main dish (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: lindac on 01.11.2009 at 10:36 am in Cooking Forum

What I might suggest for a manu dish depends on your appetizers, soup etc.
But the thing that comes immediatly to mind is a whole poached or baked fish.
Baked salmon served with this orange ginger sauce is both elegant, easy and vegetarian. Unfortunatly I didn't record the person who sent it to me....if it's yours please speak up so I can amend my file. I have made this several times, always to rave reviews.

1/2 cup sour cream
1/4 cup mayonnaise
2 teaspoons Dijon-style mustard
1 1/2 tablespoons grated peeled fresh gingerroot
1 teaspoon freshly grated orange zest
2 tablespoons fresh orange juice
1 1/2 tablespoons drained green peppercorns (*I omitted)
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon white-wine vinegar
Make the sauce while the salmon is poaching:
In a bowl whisk together the sour cream, the mayonnaise, the mustard, the gingerroot, the zest, the juice, the green peppercorns, the sugar, the vinegar, and salt to taste and let the mixture stand at room temperature for 20 minutes to let the flavors develop. From ??

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clipped on: 09.23.2009 at 12:58 pm    last updated on: 09.23.2009 at 12:58 pm

RE: Grainlady: no more Perfect-A-Crust - please measure? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: grainlady on 09.21.2009 at 02:45 pm in Cooking Forum

PERFECT-A-CRUST measurements...

8-inch ring: 10-7/8-inches (inside) - 12-7/8-inches (outside)

9-inch ring: 11-7/8-inches (inside) - 13-7/8-inches (outside)

10-in. ring: 12-7/8-inches (inside) - 14-7/8-inches (outside)

Have you contacted King Arthur Flour to see if they have a source for them? Even though they no longer carry them, perhaps they know a source. That's where I'd start.....

-Grainlady

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clipped on: 09.23.2009 at 10:03 am    last updated on: 09.23.2009 at 10:03 am

RE: LindaC, will you share your recipe for blue cheese dressing (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: lindac on 06.29.2009 at 05:00 pm in Cooking Forum

Funny....I had a salad for lunch with my blue cheese dressing.
The story goes is that there was a restaurant in Tiffin, Iowa where lots of people went after an Iowa game, and their blue cheese salad dressing was legandary. Their salads were enormous....they stood a leaf of iceberg lettuce up at the back of a salad bowl and filled that bowl full of chopped greens and dumped on easily half a cup of blue cheese dressing, made with Maytag Blue of course!!.
Every time Iw ent there I tasted the dressing and wrote down something I noticed about the dressing...Mayo based....sweet and sour, thin enough to coat every leaf, parsley...and a "bite"....horseradish. Finally my DH and friends said! That's IT!....here's the recipe...I recommend doubling it....or quadrupling!

Donns Delight
4 oz Maytag blue crumbled
1 cup of mayo ( I use Kraft)
3 oz ( about 1/3 cup) milk or cream
2 tsps sugar
2 tsps dried parsley
1 Tablespoons lemon juice
1 Tablespoons cider vinegar
1 Tablespoon fresh grated onion
2 Tsp Lee and Perrins worchestershire
1 tsp horseradish
tspoon garlic powder.
Mix gently so as to leave some lumps, and serve over a green salad or on sliced tomatoes or cukes and onions or as a dip for raw veggies.
Serves about 6 to 8

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clipped on: 07.17.2009 at 12:56 pm    last updated on: 07.17.2009 at 12:56 pm

RE: Question on new old bread machine? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: grainlady on 02.08.2009 at 06:34 am in Cooking Forum

I have a Zojirushi and it does everything according to a pre-set timer - which was magically determined after lots of testing, I'm sure. On the Zo you can override these pre-set selections and create your own.

When you select a particular course, it's because of the bread type and/or yeast type used (active dry yeast or one of the fast-rising yeast products - SAF-Instant, Bread Machine Yeast, Rapid-Rise, or Quick-Rise). Bake time is also according to a timer.

I bake in the oven according to the internal temperature of the loaf, not a timer. Bread is done at certain temperatures, and different temperatures for different types of breads.

Bread machines are nortorious for over- and under-baking bread. Next time you bake in yours, take the loaf temperature with an instant read thermometer when it's done; and if it's over 200F for a basic loaf of bread, it's over-baked. Internal temperatures of 205-210F are best for free-form Artisan breads baked in really hot ovens, not sandwich bread. I like some breads best when they are baked to 195F.

You can also be deceived to the doneness of the bread because of the crust color. Bread is done to internal temperature, not crust color. Most machines will also let your choose your crust color (light, medium, dark).

On a Zojirushi-V20:

BASIC - This setting is for baking a basic bread using ACTIVE DRY YEAST and this course takes 3:30.

BASIC WHEAT - This setting is for whole grain bread using active dry yeast and this course takes 3:40.

QUICK - This setting is used for quickly baking a basic bread and you MUST use a FAST-RISING YEAST. This course takes 1:58. It only requires a short rising time because a fast-rising yeast product is used. (I also have a QUICK WHEAT setting.)

Personally, I only let the bread machine do the grunt work of the mixing and kneading. I never leave the rise to a machine set on a timer. Dough rises according to the ambient air temperature, the humidity, and the strength of the yeast - NOT a timer. I can develop more flavor by a long, slow, cool rise outside the bread machine.

I always remove the dough when the kneading is over and watch the rise in a dough-rising bucket myself. Because I use 100% freshly-milled wholegrain flour, it doesn't have the extensibility to go to "double", or over. If I used "double" as my standard, that is actually over-proofing the dough. Todays unbleached and bleached flours are no longer bromated and they don't have the extensibility they did when flour was bromated and "double" was the rising standard. If you allow dough to over-proof during bulk fermentation, you won't have the "umph" it needs for the oven-spring.

I also like to use more methods of bread-making than direct (straight) dough (which is what the bread machine is designed to do). I also use the bread machine for a sponge method and sourdough method, and the pre-set times don't work for those methods, but the bread machine is EXCELLENT for kneading. Better than a stand mixer (which tends to aerate dough) or by hand. This is why the King Arthur Test Kitchens use the Zojirushi for making bread dough - instead of stand mixers or by hand.

Sourdough takes much longer to rise than the pre-set times on a bread machine. I leave a sponge set for anywhere between 2-1/2 hours to 12-hours. These long methods develop a lot of flavor you can't get when using a Quick Cycle and get a loaf of bread, start-to-finish, in 1 or 2 hours (some machines in 45-minutes).

I also follow other bread-making science that isn't part of a bread machine-style recipe. Such as when you add fat will determine the crumb of a loaf and can affect the rise of the loaf. Add fat early and it will have a shortening effect on the gluten and you'll get a close, almost cake-like crumb. Add fat late in the kneading and you'll get an open crumb and a higher rise. When salt is added early, it takes longer for the gluten to develop. Add the salt later and the gluten will develop quicker and better, but these facts fly-in-the-face of the convenience of dump-and run. I add both fat and salt according to what type of bread I'm making, not according to the loading instructions of the operating manual.

-Grainlady

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clipped on: 02.08.2009 at 09:55 am    last updated on: 02.08.2009 at 09:56 am

RE: Baking soda vs powder - well done info for the curious (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: velodoug on 01.10.2009 at 04:11 pm in Cooking Forum

Most double-acting baking powders contain both cream of tartar and an aluminum salt (along with the sodium bicarbonate). The former works at room temperature. The latter only at oven temperature. Rumford baking powder substitutes monocalcium phosphate for both the cream of tartar and the aluminum salt. It works just like regular double-acting baking powder at room temperature but it rises less in the oven. It's sort of halfway between single-acting and double-acting in that respect. I use it because I think that the regular double-acting has a nasty taste.

--Doug

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clipped on: 01.10.2009 at 08:14 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2009 at 08:14 pm

Baking soda vs powder - well done info for the curious

posted by: sands99 on 01.09.2009 at 10:54 pm in Cooking Forum

This is the best explanation I've come across - as an engineer I've done a bucket truck of science and I had a good understanding but this made it it crystal clear :)

Fun with Food Chemistry:

Both baking soda and baking powder are leavening agents, which means they are added to baked goods before cooking to produce carbon dioxide and cause them to 'rise'. Baking powder contains baking soda, but the two substances are used under different conditions.
Baking Soda

Baking soda is pure sodium bicarbonate. When baking soda is combined with moisture and an acidic ingredient (e.g., yogurt, chocolate, buttermilk, honey), the resulting chemical reaction produces bubbles of carbon dioxide that expand under oven temperatures, causing baked goods to rise. The reaction begins immediately upon mixing the ingredients, so you need to bake recipes which call for baking soda immediately, or else they will fall flat!

Baking Powder

Baking powder contains sodium bicarbonate, but it includes the acidifying agent already (cream of tartar), and also a drying agent (usually starch). Baking powder is available as single-acting baking powder and as double-acting baking powder. Single-acting powders are activated by moisture, so you must bake recipes which include this product immediately after mixing. Double-acting powders react in two phases and can stand for a while before baking. With double-acting powder, some gas is released at room temperature when the powder is added to dough, but the majority of the gas is released after the temperature of the dough increases in the oven.

How Are Recipes Determined?

Some recipes call for baking soda, while others call for baking powder. Which ingredient is used depends on the other ingredients in the recipe. The ultimate goal is to produce a tasty product with a pleasing texture. Baking soda is basic and will yield a bitter taste unless countered by the acidity of another ingredient, such as buttermilk. You'll find baking soda in cookie recipes. Baking powder contains both an acid and a base and has an overall neutral effect in terms of taste. Recipes that call for baking powder often call for other neutral-tasting ingredients, such as milk. Baking powder is a common ingredient in cakes and biscuits.

Substituting in Recipes

You can substitute baking powder in place of baking soda (you'll need more baking powder and it may affect the taste), but you can't use baking soda when a recipe calls for baking powder. Baking soda by itself lacks the acidity to make a cake rise. However, you can make your own baking powder if you have baking soda and cream of tartar. Simply mix two parts cream of tartar with one part baking soda.

Good to know! I know many of our experts here may know this already but for the less experienced I thought it might be helpful. Bake on GW'ers!

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clipped on: 01.10.2009 at 06:07 am    last updated on: 01.10.2009 at 06:07 am

Vegetarian stuffing/dressing (for jessyf)

posted by: kathleenca on 11.17.2008 at 05:00 pm in Cooking Forum

Hi Jessy,

Here is a dressing I've made several times for friends who are vegetarians. Good flavor!

APPLE-PECAN DRESSING

butter or margarine
2/3 c diced onion
2/3 c diced celery
3 c diced day-old bread
3 c diced apple
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1/8 tsp sage
1/8 tsp marjoram
1/8 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp parsley flakes
1/2 c chopped pecans
1/2 c water OR vegetarian broth
golden raisins (optional)

Add vegetables to bread cubes.
Melt 2 Tbsp butter in skillet. Stir in apples & cook until golden.
Add apples to bread mixture. Mix in herbs & pecans.
Add water or broth & mix thoroughly.

Bake in greased casserole at 350 degrees 30 - 40 min.

Kathleen

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clipped on: 11.17.2008 at 05:23 pm    last updated on: 11.17.2008 at 05:23 pm

RE: Moronic question for Grainlady (I think) (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: grainlady on 08.30.2008 at 07:23 am in Cooking Forum

Here goes. These are the tips and ideas that DIDN'T come with the set of pastry rings (LOL).

1. Put down a sheet of plastic wrap. I purchased a box of EXTRA WIDE Reynolds Plastic Wrap (50% wider than regular plastic wrap) just for this purpose. If you don't have, or can't find, the Extra Wide Plastic Wrap, just use two lengths of regular plastic wrap and overlap the pieces to form one large sheet - larger than the size of the ring you are using.

2. Place the "puck" of pastry on the center of the plastic wrap and cover with another sheet (or 2 overlaping sheets) of plastic wrap.

3. Place the plastic ring over the top of all the sheets of plastic. The pastry is now sandwiched between the plastic wrap. This keeps your plastic ring clean.

4. Use a LONG, non-tapering, rolling pin (see link below) for easy use and best results, but a regular pin will work. Roll out the dough until the ring is filled. Once you roll the pastry so it is touching the ring on two opposite sides, it should stabalize the ring enough to let your finish without any problems. If the plastic wrap bunches or gets caught in the dough, just lift up the plastic wrap off the top of the dough, smooth it out, top with the ring again and continue rolling. Run the palm of your hand over the entire crust when you are done rolling it to make sure it's level all around.

Benefits of this method... It's amazing really, but it seems you can't over-work the pastry. You don't add any bench flour, so that doesn't contribute gluten, and you won't get a tough finished product. That dreaded clean-up is a snap.

More hints:

a. Still in the plastic wrap, transfer the rolled out pastry to a cookie sheet (a really thin sheet without any lip or edges works best) and chill for 20 minutes to firm it up after rolling it out.

b. After chilling, leave the pastry on the cookie sheet and CAREFULLY peel off the top sheet/s of plastic wrap. Center the pie plate on the pastry.

c. Flip the cookie sheet and pie plate. Remove the cookie sheet.

d. Press the pastry into the pie pan while the plastic wrap is still on the pastry. This is very beneficial because it will prevent you from stretching the pastry, which leads to it shrinking during baking. When satisfied with it's positioning, remove the plastic wrap. If the plastic wrap is sticking to the pastry, stick the pan/pastry back in the refrigerator, it's gotten to warm.

e. If you have a really warm kitchen or very warm hands, an old tip is to dip your hands in ice water and dry them to cool them off, while forming the dough in the pan to keep your hands cool. You can also chill the pie pan before using it.

f. When you are satisfied with the fit, remove the plastic wrap and flute the edge. Lay the plastic wrap back on the pastry and refrigerate it until ready to fill. If it's a double crust pie, roll out both crusts, leave one flat in the refrigerator. Fit the bottom one into the pie pan, leaving the plastic wrap intact and leave it in the refrigerator until ready to fill. Remove the plastic wrap and fill. Top with the second well-chilled crust (you have removed one side of the plastic wrap - flip it on the pie and then remove the second sheet of plastic wrap.

Okay, this sounds rather complex, but it's not really, and you get a perfect crust every time. A friend who uses these always takes the blue ribbons at the fair every time she enters a pie. They are especially great when you have to make a LOT of pies - for the simple fact you don't have to mess with bench flour everywhere.

You may get frustrated when you first use this method - your plastic wrap may bunch, or your ring will move slightly, but hang in there, it all works out and you WILL have a perfectly round crust. I used to hate to roll out pastry because of all the mess, but I LOVE using this method.

-Grainlady

Here is a link that might be useful: Vic Firth Bakery Rolling Pin

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clipped on: 09.05.2008 at 08:05 am    last updated on: 09.05.2008 at 08:05 am

RE: Grainlady - About Your Solar Ovens (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: grainlady on 06.23.2008 at 09:39 pm in Cooking Forum

They can easily be made and you'll find lots of how-tos if you search it. Everything from a simple pizza box to any number of other models and sizes. You'll also find lots of recipes on-line. I bought my solar ovens. I'm a gadget person (LOL)! Be sure to check prices, they vary greatly for the same types and models.

For anyone in the U.S. who watched the Ed Begley, Jr. show on HGTV "Living With Ed", he used one of the models I use - a Global Sun Oven. This one is tall enough inside to bake a loaf of bread. It has a self-leveling swinging shelf so you can pretty-well get cakes level.

The other is a hybrid - the Tulsi-Hybrid Solar Cooking Oven. This one has an electric back-up as a safety feature. If the temperature falls to an unsafe cooking temperature, it will use electricity (if it's plugged in and set to come on) to bring the temperature back up to a safe level. You can also use this model without the sun using electric power. So it's versatile. It's similar in size to a small hardcase suitcase. You'll find many people on the missionary field use these solar ovens because you can pack everything you need in them for easy transport.

I'd recommend the book, "Cooking with the Sun" by Beth Halacy and Dan Halacy, which includes building instructions as well as recipes.

-Nearly anything you can cook/bake in a conventional oven you can make in a Solar Oven. They can reach temperatures between 350-400F. Exceptions - avoid recipes like pies with a bottom crust - they tend to get soggy and pasta can be tricky.

-The oven needs to be preheated (approx. 30 minutes) before adding food.

-They work best between 9:00 a.m. and 4 p.m.

-Your traditional oven is bottom heated. The solar oven is heated from the top and the sides.

-Slow-Cooker recipes work well in a solar oven.

-You need to use dark, thin, cookware. Dark enamelware works great! Forget thick crockery or cast iron. You can also use glass canning jars. Just paint the outside of the jars black with heat-resistant paint designed to be used to repaint gas grills. You can heat water in the quart jars as well as cook in them.

-Foods that are easy to cook 1-2 hours:
eggs, rice, fruit, (above ground) vegetables, fish, chicken

-Medium cooking times 3-4 hours:
potatoes and other root vegetables, some beans, lentils, most meat, bread

-Hardest to cook, 5-8 hours:
large roast, soup and stew, most dried beans

-You need to move the oven to follow the sun, shifting the oven every 30-minutes to 1-hour. An oven thermometer is used to check the temperature. You can adjust the temperature several ways, including placing the oven off axis.

-I have a pair of Kevlar oven gloves ("OVE" Glove) that I use instead of hot pads for working in the solar ovens. With the gloves you have all your fingers and thumbs to use. Hot pads or mits can be cumbersome.

-Wear a visor and/or sunglasses when working with the solar oven to protect your eyes from glare.

-Release the built-up steam occasionally while cooking.

-You can cook eggs in their shell WITHOUT water in about 30 minutes.

-Solar ovens can be used to pasteurize water (on a sunny day - 4 litres water in approx. 4 hours.

-I have my ovens on a metal shop cart on wheels and move them from the garage to the patio and cook on the top of the cart. I use a heat resistant tray (or jellyroll sheet) for transporting hot foods from the oven to the house.

-You need to plan carefully. You need to cook while the sun is high and hot. If it's hazy, even if it's sunny and no clouds, you may not be able to reach high temperatures. When they burn the wheat fields around here I can't use the solar oven because of the haze in the atmosphere. Thankfully, that's only for a week or so.

There's probably lots more I'm not covering...

-Grainlady

Here is a link that might be useful: Solar Oven Society

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clipped on: 07.24.2008 at 09:11 am    last updated on: 07.24.2008 at 09:11 am

RE: My six braid challah (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: cloud_swift on 04.14.2008 at 11:19 am in Cooking Forum

Thank you all - I guess it helps technique to do a thing most every week. The thing I'm still working on is keeping the braid even along the loaf. I tend to start out loose with the long strands and get tighter as the strands get short.

trixietx, the braiding is pretty fast. The work is in making the six 12-inch long strands for each loaf. That seemed to take forever at first but after a few weeks it goes more quickly. It's a physical skill that takes the muscles a bit of practice to learn.

The recipe I use comes from Secrets of a Jewish Baker. His directions tend to be pretty wordy so I'll paraphrase. We usually make the dough in the bread machine (dough cycle) and take it out after the first rise but to do the double batch (4 loaves) I did it in the KA stand mixer. This recipe has a lot of yeast and some sugar so it rises very quickly.

Challah from
Secrets of a Jewish Baker George Greenstein
paraphrase by cloud_swift

1 cup warm water
2 packages active dry yeast (about 1 1/2 tbsp)
1 egg plus 2 yolks, lightly beaten
1/4 cup vegetable oil (I usually use a mild olive oil)
1/4 c plus 1 1/2 tsp sugar (that's what his recipe says, I usually just do a slightly rounded 1/4 c)
4 to 4 1/2 cup bread flour
2 tsp salt
1 egg beaten with 1 tsp water for egg wash
corn meal for dusting pan (I usually bake on parchment without dusting - I like corn meal or semolina on the bottom of some breads but its too rustic for challah IMO)
poppy or sesame seeds for topping if desired.

In mixing bowl, sprinkle yeast into water and stir to dissolve. (I'm pretty haphazard about the stirring)
Add the egg and yolks, oil, sugar, salt and 4 cups of flour.
Stir to combine. (He doesn't say to do so, but I usually let the dough rest for 10-15 minutes before starting to knead - that gives the flour some time to absorb the water so I don't add to much flour to get a firm dough.)
Knead adding more flour 1/4 cup at time to make a firm dough, this shouldn't be a sticky dough.
Knead until the dough is smooth and elastic (10 to 15 minutes). Dough should push back when you push at it. (I do the window pane test.)

Put in an oiled bowl, turn to coat and cover. Let triple. (I usually aim to let it go to somewhere between double and triple. This is the time it is easiest to make a mistake as the dough rises quite quickly so if you aren't careful it will over-rise and the loaves won't taste as good.)

Transfer to floured work surface, punch down (I've become a fan of doing a more gentle pat down and forming into a rectangle for division). Divide in half and allow to rest for 15 minutes (sometimes I'm in too much of a hurry to do this rest and it doesn't seem to matter for this dough).

For the six braid challah, divide the half into 6 equal pieces. Roll into ropes. I find this goes best if I have little or no flour on the work surface so that the surface helps keep the rope stretched, the pieces have picked up enough flour when they were divided on the floured surface.

Braid the loaves - see steps for six braid below. They may look scary but it goes fast once you get use to it. We find that the challah tastes better when baked in the six braid than in a three braid.

Put the loaves on a corn-meal dusted pan (as mentioned above, I prefer to put them on parchment on a pan). I give them their first brush with egg wash at this point. Allow to rise in a warm draft-free area until doubled in size.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Brush with egg wash. If desired, sprinkle with poppy seeds or sesame seeds or go to town and use both. Bake about 35 minutes until top has a rich brown color and the lines between the braids have begun to color. When you press lightly on the top of the challah it should be firm when done. (He gives various tests - I suggest using an instant read thermometer to see if it is around 200 degrees - after a bit you will be able to look at the challah to see if it is done.)

Allow to cool on a wire rack.
Steps for six braid:
Here's how it goes:
Start with 6 strands pinched together at the top.

Lift left most over to the right and up.
Lift the original right-most (i.e. not the one you just moved) to the left and up

Now you have a strange beast that has two arms crossed at the top and 4 legs. From here you will continually be moving an arm down to be the center leg and replacing that arm with the opposite outside leg so after each two steps you will have 2 arms and 4 legs with the "head" of the creature growing longer and longer. So:

1) Take the right arm and move it down to the center (between the 4 legs).
2) Take the left-most leg and move it up to be the new right arm.
3) Take the left arm and move it down to the center.
4) Take the right-most leg and make it the new left arm.

Repeat steps 1 through 4 until it is all braided.

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clipped on: 04.14.2008 at 11:45 am    last updated on: 04.14.2008 at 11:45 am

RE: Difference between a kuchen and a clafouti? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: spacific on 11.04.2007 at 06:02 pm in Cooking Forum

Here's a recipe from Saveur that I use often for Clafoutis. With the 6 eggs, it doesn't have a very crumb-y texture, but closer to a sweet quiche (not quite as it does have flour... maybe a cross between a quiche and a kuchen???). I usually make it for Sunday brunch instead of dessert as it's not overly sweet. You can also experiment with different fruits (plums are nice). Also, if you don't want to put in the Kirsch, I've tried it with a touch of almond extract instead.

Clafoutis
Serves 8

1 T. butter
1 T. vanilla extract
6 eggs
6 T. sugar
1 1/4 cups milk
2 T. kirsch
A pinch of salt
3/4 cup flour
3 cups black cherries, pitted or unpitted
Confectioners' sugar (optional)

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Generously butter a 9" cast-iron skillet or baking dish. Combine vanilla extract, eggs, sugar, milk, kirsch, and salt in a blender. Blend for a few seconds to mix ingredients, then add flour and blend until smooth, about 1 minute.
Pour batter into buttered skillet, then distribute cherries evenly over top. Bake until a skewer inserted into batter comes out clean and a golden brown crust has formed on top and bottom of clafoutis, about 30 minutes. Dust with confectioners' sugar if you like.

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clipped on: 11.14.2007 at 08:24 am    last updated on: 11.14.2007 at 08:24 am

RE: Very limited diet and more (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: lindac on 08.07.2007 at 12:34 am in Cooking Forum

Interesting....green squash, if it has the skin on will bother me.
And turkey but no chicken....also interesting...
You could roast a turkey outside....either in a borrowed roaster or on the grill...
If you lived close to me, I'd roast you a turkey!!

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clipped on: 08.07.2007 at 07:58 am    last updated on: 08.07.2007 at 07:59 am

Can we add a Questionnaire to the FAQ for newbies?

posted by: jessyf on 07.02.2007 at 09:30 pm in Laundry Room Forum

First, does anyone know who is in charge of the FAQ, and if that person is long gone, who wants to take over, if my idea flies?

I propose the following, rough draft (and lets edit/add to it), to be a FAQ topic for folks who stumble into this forum looking for advice from us laundryholics.

Any one of us can cut/paste the final questionnaire into the new thread asking 'Whats the best washing machine' and the OP can answer as many questions as he/she can to help us narrow down choices.

Whaddaya all say - has this been done before?

Washing Machine Questionnaire

Do you want a front loader (FL) or top loader (TL)?

If you want a front loader, do you want an internal heater? If you dont know, please read the Laundry Room FAQ (insert link here).

Where in the house will the washer be set up second floor, basement, closet? What is the floor made of?

What are your space configurations/confinements? Are you looking for undercounter units?

How big a machine do you want? How many loads a week do you do or want to do?

Do you have special laundry considerations like shedding pets, or young children in diapers? Do you have any problems now that you are hoping to solve with a new machine?

How important to you is the loudness of the machine?

Do you want controls on the top rear or front of the machine?

Where are your hook-ups washer on left/right, stackable?

Are you looking for just a washer, and if not, do you need/want a matching dryer?

What factors are most important to you: cost, reliability, performance, speed, water/electricity savings, controls (specify things like: water temp, type and amount of cycles, cycle times, spin speed, ability to open the machine and add chemicals or clothes)?

How much do you want to spend?

Do you have a preferred vendor Sears, Best Buy, Independent retailer, Lowes/Home Depot (some may have deals going)?

Have you called a few of the extended warranty companies to ensure they are within servicing distance?

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clipped on: 07.20.2007 at 07:28 am    last updated on: 07.20.2007 at 07:28 am

RE: Wanted!!! Christmas Cookie Recipes!!!! (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: booberry85 on 10.14.2006 at 09:46 pm in Cooking Forum

Sherry,

Here are some hints and some trouble shooting techniques for cookies. It looks like the links Ann gave you have lots of good recipes!

So How Do You Want Em?

How do you combine it all to come up with your favorite winning texture? The tips below will help you achieve the cookie you desire.

Flat
If you want your cookies on the flat side, you can do some or all of the following things: Use all butter, use all-purpose flour or bread flour, increase the sugar content slightly, add a bit of liquid to your dough, and or bring the dough to room temperature before baking.

Puffy
If you like your cookies light and puffy, try some of the following tricks. Use shortening or margarine and cut back on the fat, add an egg, cut back on the sugar, use cake flour or pastry flour, use baking powder instead of baking soda, refrigerate your dough before baking.

Chewy
If chewiness is your desire remove the cookies a few minutes before they are done, while their centers are still soft and not quite cooked through. The edges should be slightly golden but the middle will still look slightly raw. Use brown sugar or honey as a sweetener. Try using egg yolks instead of whole eggs. This will add some extra moistness to the cookies thus helping to be a bit more on the chewy side.

Crispy
For crisp and crunchy cookies, bake your cookies a few minutes longer than suggested and immediately remove them to a wire rack to cool. Cookies made with all butter and high amounts of white sugar will also crisp quite nicely. Another trick is to use bread flour.

Common Cookie Problems

Exerts taken from www.joyofbaking.com.

Cookies brown too quickly the oven is too hot or baking pans are a dark color. Try baking at a lower temperature, longer or use heavy gauge aluminum baking sheets.

Bottom of cookies brown too quickly same as above, or the oven rack is too low, or too much sugar is in the cookies.

Top of cookies brown too quickly and bottoms are not cooked the rack is too high in the oven

Cookies spread too much the dough is too soft - refrigerate for 15 minutes; warm baking sheets were used; too much butter, oil, or margarine was used try using a 50/50 mix of shortening and butter.

Cookies do not bake evenly your cookie sheet may be warped or the temperature throughout the oven is not even.

List of Abbreviations, Equivalents, and Substitutions

Abbreviations

lb - pound

oz ounce(s)

tbsp tablespoon

teas teaspoon

Equivalents

3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon
16 tablespoons = 1 cup
4 tablespoons = cup
2 cups = 1 pint
5 1/3 tablespoons = 1/3 cup
4 cups = 1 quart
8 tablespoons = cup
4 quarts = 1 gallon

Substitutions

Baking powder (1 teaspoon) = teaspoon cream of tartar + teaspoon baking soda

Buttermilk (1 cup) = 1 tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar + enough milk to equal 1 cup (let stand 5 minutes before using)

Cornstarch (1 tablespoon) = 2 tablespoons flour

Honey (1 cup) = 1 cups sugar + cup liquid

Light cream = 1 tablespoon melted butter + enough whole milk to measure 1 cup

Unsweetened chocolate (1 square (1 ounce)) = 3 tablespoons cocoa + 1 tablespoon shortening or oil

Whole milk (1 cup) = cup evaporated milk + cup water

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clipped on: 10.15.2006 at 10:41 am    last updated on: 10.15.2006 at 10:41 am

RECIPE: Chunky Orange Marmalade Cookies

posted by: jenn on 10.11.2006 at 10:51 pm in Dessert Exchange Forum

I made these cookies tonight and doubled the recipe. Instead of using two egg yolks, I used one whole large egg. And I used sweet butter instead of shortening. I asked about those substitutions in the Cooking forum and promised I'd share the recipe when I finished. So, here it is.....

Chunky Orange Marmalade Cookies

1/4 cup shortening (I used unsalted butter)
1 egg yolk
1/2 cup orange marmalade
1/2 tsp. vanilla
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. BP
1/2 tsp. BS
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chips
1/2 cup chopped pecans (magazine says "teaspoon" instead of "cup"... has to be an error!)

Combine the flour, salt, BP, BS, cinnamon and nutmeg, set aside.

Cream the shortening, egg yolk, and marmalade until light and fluffy. Beat in vanilla.

Add flour mixture to creamed mixture and mix well. Stir in chocolate chips and pecans.

Drop by tablespoonfuls 2 inches apart on greased baking sheets (I used non-stick pans and didn't grease). Bake at 350 for 12-15 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove to wire racks.

Yield: 2 dozen (my double batch yielded 3 dozen).

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clipped on: 10.15.2006 at 02:09 am    last updated on: 10.15.2006 at 02:10 am

RE: Lime Cilantro sauce recipe, Katie? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: KatieC on 09.15.2005 at 12:25 pm in Harvest Forum

This stuff is great(we had it on steaks last night and it's wonderful on halibut). Not too hot even with the chipotles, and such an interesting blend of flavors. Thanks to Jessy for posting it.

(oops...I guess I've been calling it by the wrong name, too...owellll...it's good no matter what you call it.)


* Exported from MasterCook *

Lime-Chipotle Sauce

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Preserving Sauces

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1/2 cup honey
2 tablespoons minced canned chipotle chilies in adobo sauce
3 tablespoons brown mustard -- or dijon
1/2 cup lime juice
1 1/2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
Season with salt and pepper

Blend in food processor. Serve sauce as a marinade grilled meats, poultry, and fish if your guests don't get to it first with tortilla chips. Makes 1 1/2 cups.

Source:
"posted by Jessy to the Cooking Forum"

NOTES : This can be canned in a boiling waterbath for 15 min. at 0-1000 ft., 20 min. at 1001-6000 ft. and 25 min. above 6000 ft.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.26.2006 at 06:52 am    last updated on: 09.26.2006 at 06:53 am