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Wind spinner basics ( for those who asked )

posted by: toomuchglass on 08.17.2010 at 03:48 pm in Garden Junk Forum

I went to the hardware store & they had solid rods and hollow tubes - so I played with them untill I found one that fits right over the rod with no wobbling .

First I wrapped the marble with wire and attached it to the tube so it wouldn't move. The little bit of curve on the
marble that sits down inside the tube will be the pivot point for the whole top that slides down over the rod .

Photobucket

Now the tube with the attached marble can slide down over the rod and spin. If it doesn't spin - you can glue an upside down thumbtack to the top of the rod - that way the pivot is on the marble & against the point of the tack. The less surface area touching - the better for no friction.

Photobucket

I used copper wire & those copper leaves to make the 3 sides of the spinner . The leaves are large enough to catch the wind. I soldered mine - but I bet JB Weld Putty would do just as good. You can always add stuff to cover up the putty.

Photobucket

The solar light has the same idea - a marble glued into the bottom of the light so it can pivot on the rod.

The ideas are endless... I'm out of copper leaves - maybe beer can flowers can be on the next one !

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clipped on: 08.17.2010 at 04:06 pm    last updated on: 08.17.2010 at 04:07 pm

How to post multiple thumbnail links from PhotoBucket.txt

posted by: Nigella on 01.01.2006 at 04:03 pm in Garden Junk Forum

Hi Ya'll! Happy New year. I see we have a lot of new members so I thought I would let you in on some secrets I've learned. There is an easy way to post multiple pictures into a single thread using thumbnail links provided by PhotoBucket, where you can get a free account, which is a useful tool for those who love this forum. You can show pictures of before and after projects side by side, post different views side by side, etc. It also takes very little bandwidth to open the GW post since the information is in thumbnails rather than in large pictures.

The first step, of course, is to go to PhotoBucket.com, set up a membership and upload your pictures. Then click the little boxes next to the pictures you want to use and go down to the bottom of the page, click the down arrow beside the little window that reads "Choose Action" and choose "Generate HTML & IMG code". Then push the "Go" button.

This will bring up a new page with several windows with text, I use the first one. Click on the window, then right click and choose "Copy".

Come back to GJ and write your text, right click and choose "Paste". Preview.

That's all there is to it. Here's the table of pictures I generated when I did the original:


I took out the <center> command and the spaces between the pictures, btw. I hope this is a help to somebody!

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clipped on: 08.09.2008 at 02:14 am    last updated on: 08.09.2008 at 02:15 am

For Newbies - Easy Instructions to Post Pics

posted by: craftylady-2006 on 07.07.2007 at 09:35 am in Garden Junk Forum

Several of our newbies aren't quite sure how to post pics into their msgs and these are easy Instructions.

I use "photobucket.com" - it's free. Maybe the instructions for Photobucket will be similar or the same for Snapfish and/or other photo programs.

Open "photobucket.com" and set up an account. On the top of the page just to the right you will see a box for "uploading pics" - hit the "browse" button and it should open up your Documents Program. Set the file to where your pics are and find the picture you want, click on it and then hit the "open" button, this will put that particular pictures code into the white rectangular box in photobucket. Just to the bottom of that you will see "add more images." If you click on that, it will open up more white retangular boxes and the browse button next to each white box. Add more pics as described above. When you are done adding pics, click the "Upload" button and photobucket will put the pictures into your account. When you are typing a msg in the forums, leaving the forum page "open" or minimize it, and then open your photobucket site. Underneath each picture you will see four boxes, Share URL, URL Link, HTML Tag and IMG Code. To put the picture right into your msg in the forum, click on the HTML Tag, it will say "Copied" - then go back to the forum page and put your cursor where you want the picture to appear. Then go to the top menu bar, click on "Edit" and hit "Paste" - the HTML code will appear in your msg. If you want to add another pic or more to your post, "enter" down a few spaces and then do the same. When you "preview" your msg, you will see the pics in your msg. Next is to hit the Submit Msg button and it will be posted on the forum page.

See below where you type your msg, see the "Optional Link URL:" and then "Name of the Link" - it may be that what you are doing is ok and putting the URL code in the top box, but you are forgetting to "Name" the Link and it is being rejected.

Remember - you can always do a "Search" at the top of the forum page for something you might be looking for.

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clipped on: 06.07.2008 at 11:51 pm    last updated on: 06.08.2008 at 12:19 am

RE: For Newbies - Easy Instructions to Post Pics (Follow-Up #17)

posted by: craftylady-2006 on 05.14.2008 at 05:57 pm in Garden Junk Forum

Wow - those flower pics are awesome. I just want to reach out and grab a bunch for my flower vases. And I don't care what anyone else says - I love the "BIG" pics!!! HeeHeeHee

Carol - to post the "link" so it will pop up - go into your photobucket acct and click on the "Direct Link" code for the pic you want, it will say copied - then just below where you type in your msg you will see "Optional Link URL" - put your cursor in that box and then go to the very top menu of your screen and hit "Edit" and then "Paste" - it will put the link into that box. You MUST put a title in the "Name of the Link" box or it will tell you "Message Rejected"

For thosse whose say their pics appear side by side and not on top of each other - when you paste that HTML Code into the msg box, put your cursor at the very end of that HTML Code and then "enter" (or "return" whatever you want to call it) down a few times and then go back to your photobucket acct, click on the next pic's HTML code and go back to your msg, put the cursor at the very end of where you put those returns and paste the next pic HTML Code

The way to get to the very end of your last HTML Code and the returns after it (which you can't see) is to put your cursor back into the msg box where you're typing and hit "CTRL" and "END" at the same time. That's the computer command to go to the very end of the page. One thing I do when I'm going to post multiple pics is to open my photobucket acct at the same time I have the forum open. Then I just click back and forth onto whatever one I need to go to (say photobucket to copy the picture code) and then click back onto the forum page. If that's a bit confusing, you can always "minimize" the open page and then open up photobucket, get your pic code copied, minimize that down and then maximize back up the forum page.

Someone please let me know if I am making sense in my explanations here. Thanks.

Sal

Here is a link that might be useful: Toolbox Pic

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clipped on: 06.07.2008 at 11:46 pm    last updated on: 06.07.2008 at 11:46 pm

RE: ? for Slow (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: slowmedown on 12.10.2007 at 03:27 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

Well, good grief! It scares me to death to be asked "how tos", but here's what I do. I draw w/a permanent marker the size I want to cut on the rim, down to the rim. Sometimes I go all the way through the rim, but most of the time just to it. Then w/the nippers, I cut the rim off, and w/the saw blade, a swipe at a time, I smooth off the edges, using it sorta like a grinder. On the pieces I cut, I nip them where the curve is - some plates, that'll be twice, therefore you get three sizes tiles from one slice. Cutting where the rim is, allows you to use its back side so as to keep the curves lying flatter on your substrate. I guide the plate side up, but when I want to cut through the rim, I turn it over. I'm not using the thing you guide your tiles through the blade, I'm going free-hand - holding the plate firmly. Can't imagine what plate shattered on you, unless it's glass. I've not tried cutting glass w/the saw. Notice when you touch your blade, it isn't sharp like a knife, it's rather smooth. My HM touches it while it's running to show me not to be afraid of it. Hope this helps, and thanks for the welcome back. I missed y'all too.

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clipped on: 12.10.2007 at 03:46 pm    last updated on: 12.10.2007 at 03:47 pm

RE: Sound Advice- here's a couple (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: nmgirl on 11.29.2007 at 08:46 am in Garden Junk Forum

I like these two:
Welcome to our home. You can touch the house dust but please don't write in it.
And:
If you want to see me, come any time. If you want to see my house, make an appointment.

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clipped on: 11.30.2007 at 06:12 pm    last updated on: 11.30.2007 at 06:13 pm

GOG window done - different technique

posted by: yellow-rose on 11.23.2007 at 11:39 am in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

I've finished my window and as promised here is a different techniqe. hgtv.com/hgtv/cr_mosaic/article/0,,HGTV_3258_2219550,00.html

There are a few things I will add. I tape the pattern to my work surface and then the contact is taped over that. This holds it down if I put the glass back up, recut and reposition. Be sure you check the base glass against the cut glass for size. If you don't have a grinder, you can't recut it! You can grind after it is grouted. The best part is to use a 1/16" notched trowel for the silicone, this puts on t






he right amount, little to no cleaning! After it is glued, slide it onto something flat, turn it over and press the glass down. Be sure to wait till dry to remove contact paper. Here is the wip and the finished window. Hope this help some and give you some new ideas!!
Sorry it screwed up - haven't got the time to fix it.

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clipped on: 11.23.2007 at 06:53 pm    last updated on: 11.23.2007 at 06:59 pm

Some Helpful Tips

posted by: d3bbi on 11.22.2007 at 04:46 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

As I was 'shopping' I found these helpful tips both on Warner Stained Glass website. One is Vicki Payne videos and the other are instructional guides (mostly for SG) http://www.warner-criv.com/techtips/tips.aspx.(couldn't figure out how to post both links)

Here is a link that might be useful: videos

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clipped on: 11.22.2007 at 05:32 pm    last updated on: 11.22.2007 at 05:33 pm

Tutorial 4 craftylady morton diamonds

posted by: chickeemama on 10.28.2007 at 08:32 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

Ok here goes...I am not a teacher but I will try!!!! This will be for a 60 degree diamond.

1. I am assuming you already have your strip of glass cut..if not cut a strip of glass to your desired width. Your bar lock will go into hole 16 on the right side of the cutting bar. To do other angles look on page 5. of your booklet

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

2. You need to cut a piece of scrap off the glass to make your first 60 degree angle. DONT THROW THIS PIECE AWAY. I have marked my piece with a "T" so you can see where the top is.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

3. Now this is the tricky part..turn the piece of scrap over, bring down the cutting gauge on the cutting bar and place the glass as shown. You can now see the "T" through the backside of the glass. Place your Glass stop in the hole closest to the piece of scrap and tighten down so the scrap is sitting against the glass stop and against the cutting gauge. Move cutting gauge back up to top of the cutting bar. Remove piece of scrap glass.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

4. Put your strip of glass back under the cutting bar, with first 60 degree angle facing to the left. Cut your first diamond. If the first diamond placed on the glass strip (sorry no pic for this) is wider adjust the glass stop to the right. If the strip is wider adjust to the left.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

I hope this makes it a little clearer!!!!!

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clipped on: 11.20.2007 at 10:10 pm    last updated on: 11.20.2007 at 10:10 pm

Question about scoring glass

posted by: toomuchglass on 11.04.2007 at 07:11 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

I hope all the lurkers and new people see this ..... I've been doing glass for about 8 years and I'm still asking questions & learning ! I saw a demo on the morton system about cutting glass in little squares for mosaics. Did I See right ? --- they scored the glass all vertically - then scored it all horizontally . The scores criss crossed each other . Now - I know you're not supposed to go IN a score line twice ... but across is ok ? Is this how you do it ?

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clipped on: 11.05.2007 at 01:17 am    last updated on: 11.05.2007 at 01:18 am

RE: Leaf casting question (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: blackcrowe on 10.27.2007 at 03:07 pm in Garden Junk Forum

I suspected the ratio as well and tried a 3:1 ratio (increased the sand)on my newest casting. The quikrete worked really well for me but I sifted out the large gravel pieces so I would have something smoother to work with. I've since been advised I shouldn't take out the gravel...oops! I thought I would try the portland/sand mixture because it would save me sifting work. I want to make sure what I use is extra sturdy because I'm making birdbaths and don't want them to break, crumble or leak. Would the vinyl patch cement work for this type of project? Thanks for the advice. I'd post a picture but haven't figured out how to yet!

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clipped on: 10.27.2007 at 09:59 pm    last updated on: 10.27.2007 at 10:04 pm

Leaf casting question

posted by: blackcrowe on 10.24.2007 at 10:49 pm in Garden Junk Forum

I've been making leaf cast birdbaths with quikrete but recently tried the mixture of portland cement and fine sand in a 1:1 ratio with fortifier in the water. When I tried to brush off the remnants of leaves with a wet brush, the cement seemed to be dissolving, which was definitely not what I intended. I have always washed my quikrete castings and never had this happen. Have I done something wrong in the ratio of sand to portland cement?? Help please!!

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clipped on: 10.27.2007 at 09:55 pm    last updated on: 10.27.2007 at 09:57 pm

RE: Leaf casting question (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: nmgirl on 10.27.2007 at 08:59 am in Garden Junk Forum

Finally something I'm familiar with!
First: I suspect your cement:sand ratio is off. I'm not an expert but it seems to me that you have too much cement (or not enough sand) in the mix. This could result in an easily eroded finish. Perhaps try at least doubling the amount of sand. I assume you're measuring the concrete ingredients by volume?
Second: Was the concrete fully cured when you tried to wash it? Remember concrete has to cure, it doesn't dry like plaster.
Third: I never, ever try to brush or wash off leaf remnants from my leaf castings. It's too easy to ruin the detailing. If you set the cured casting outside the leaf remnants will weather off on their own thus preserving the leaf impression.
And last: In the Fall the sugar content in the leaves of some plants greatly increases. This higher sugar content can effect the curing process of the concrete resulting in holes, rough surfaces and/or powdery finishes. There's nothing you can do it about, it's nature.
This sugar effect is often used in the concrete industry to add "age" to cast items. Sugar can be sprinkled in/on the mold or actually mixed in with the concrete to intentionally cause "bubbles" to form. These bubbles will cause the cured concrete to flake and erode thus resulting in the impression of age. Be aware that mixing sugar in with the concrete can result in a weaker finished product because of the bubbles or pockets produced.
Hope something here helps. Let us know how any future castings turn out. Have you tried using vinyl patch cement for leaf casting? Talk about preserving detail! WOW! And the finished casting is lighter in weight than a regular mortar one.

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clipped on: 10.27.2007 at 09:52 pm    last updated on: 10.27.2007 at 09:53 pm

Lally - top portion of a full-figured mannequin

posted by: slowmedown on 10.23.2007 at 06:12 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

Thanks, NT, for suggesting I start the mannequin. It's been fun, but I'm switching to another adhesive rather than GE II - hate that stuff. DID discover, w/ROSIE's tip re the steel wool, a better method of removing it. I used a small screwdriver to take off the blobs of silicon when the razor blade just wasn't cutting it. Then I wadded a bit of steel wool under the screwdriver, and rubbed it vigorously. Works like a charm. Also discovered that GE I is absolutely, positively the strongest. When I started out wrong on the right ta ta, as Hazie so elegantly put it, I didn't like it and tried to remove it. NOT a chance w/o wrecking the fiberglass - these things aren't all that heavy duty material, so I had to just leave my mistake. Haven't a clue how I'll do the bottom yet.
Lally

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clipped on: 10.24.2007 at 12:13 am    last updated on: 10.24.2007 at 12:13 am

RE: Questions about thinset mortar. (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: linlee on 05.05.2007 at 04:37 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

Hi Tiffy,
Ok...I'll bite.

- Do you simply mix with water or are there other additives which must be mixed in?
*If you buy a "modified" thinset the additives are already in there...recommended for glass. And yes, you simply mix it with water.
- Can you mix small quantities at a time?
*Yes. You'll add the dry mix to the water, not the water to the dry mix. Usually I'll do about 1/2 cup of water then add 3 to 4 times that amount in dry mix. You'll
want a fairly stiff mix. I'll tip my mixing pot upside down and when it doesn't move I'm done adding dry mix.
You'll then let it slake (just sit there) for 8 to 12 minutes. Th thinset that you buy will tell you the time frame.

- How long before it sets and the pieces are 'glued'?
*That's all dependant on the humidity and the mix. If you're working on a vertical surface I'll usually have some painters blue tape to hold the pieces while I carry on. But after about an hour the tape can be removed however the thinset is not dry. I would wait about 48 hours before any grouting to allow the thinset to cure.

- How long can you have thinset in a bucket before it is no longer good to use?
* Personally, I've found it to set up too much at about the 25 minute mark. Make sure to stir it up often to keep it workable. The thing that you don't want is a dried skin surface.
- How long before you can place outside to the elements?
Once the grout is cured in about 48 hours then sealed (If that's of interest) it's supposed to be ready for the elements. I'd myself give it a week or so to dry before exposing it...but that's just me.

- Can you add colouring (water based paint) and if so does this affect the integrity of the product?
*Sorry...I have no experience in this.

- Can this stuff withstand freeze and thaw and be left out in the winter?
Yes. If the base that you're are using can be left outdoors and you use a thinset and a grout for outdoors than it is perfectly safe.

I hope I haven't confused you even more.
Good luck!
Linlee

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clipped on: 10.21.2007 at 03:03 pm    last updated on: 10.21.2007 at 03:04 pm

Questions about thinset mortar.

posted by: tiffy_z5_6_can on 05.05.2007 at 10:25 am in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

Some of these questions might seem stupid, but I'd like an answer from those who have used it because I'm about to undertake a project and one of the places I buy my stuff from hires people who don't know a darn thing about the department they work in the store. (They recently hired a friend of mine for the flooring department simply because she answered an 'area' question correctly on a survey. She knows nothing about flooring.)

I know from reading previous posts that it can be used as an adhesive and also be used as a 'grout'and that it does not need to be sealed. If my assumptions on these points are wrong, please let me know.

- Do you simply mix with water or are there other additives which must be mixed in?
- Can you mix small quantities at a time?
- How long before it sets and the pieces are 'glued'?
- How long can you have thinset in a bucket before it is no longer good to use?
- How long before you can place outside to the elements?
- Can you add colouring (water based paint) and if so does this affect the integrity of the product?
- Can this stuff withstand freeze and thaw and be left out in the winter?

My plan is to purchase some stepping stones, glue some porcelain tiles in a fish pattern to them, grout, then place a path around our home symbolizing a school of fish. The main issue here is that taking these stepping stones inside every fall would be out of the question so they would have to remain outside.

Any info would be great!

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clipped on: 10.21.2007 at 03:01 pm    last updated on: 10.21.2007 at 03:02 pm

RE: I'm tired of hunting & gathering! I want to START something! (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: slowmedown on 10.16.2007 at 03:39 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

As I mentioned before, for your hardibacker base for your backsplash, I highly recommend thinset. It marries well w/the hardibacker cuz it's of the same materials - cement-based. I also recommend that if you have a Lowes, go to the flooring section and buy the Mapei UltraFlex 2 adhesive - try the small bag first - 10 lbs. The grout that goes w/it is Mapei Keracolor. Call the 800 number on the pkg, and talk w/the customer service people. They are very patient and w/explain it to you. I did when I first started and it was after talking to them that I began the front walk project as well as the front column. If you can butter a piece of bread w/peanut butter, you can butter a piece of tesserae w/the thinset - it is that simple. I can ALMOST guarantee you that you'll love it cuz of it's stickability. It w/also ensure a successful application. If you want to try it first, put it on a small flowerpot.

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clipped on: 10.17.2007 at 12:53 am    last updated on: 10.17.2007 at 12:56 am

RE: pic of bird bath (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: lyndalu on 03.03.2007 at 06:24 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

Thank you all very much for the very nice comments! I just love the sharing of projects here. It's great to get inspiration from one another. And learn stuff from one another,too. That's invaluable!

Becky - you mentioned the curves - it took a LOT more time for placement of pieces because of the curves, but I also think it adds a lot of interest, so I think it's worth it.

lilym - no, that wasn't a sale price on the bird bath, and in fact, I was at Walmart the other day and they had 2 of them sitting there for that same price. When I bought mine they had a bunch of them - and all different types of bases - some of them way to curvy and detailed to mosaic, so I picked a base with the simplest lines. I used the Tile Lab Penetrating Grout Sealer to seal it with. And yes, it's all plates.

d3bbi - I use MAPEI - Ultraflex 2 - Professional Grade Polymer Modified Mortar as my adhesive. This is what I always use....it's a cement based adhesive and it's good for outside, and since I always work with plates, it's good for building up the thinner pieces. slowmedown mentioned that she sometimes uses this, too. You asked me what color grout I was going to use....the picture must have made it look funny - it's already grouted - in BLACK CHERRY. It's been out in my sister's yard for about a year and a half, and I noticed when I was taking the picture today that the grout in the dish part looks grey, and kind of streaky - so maybe that's why you thought it wasn't grouted. The grout in the base still looks nice and dark - but doesn't really show up as it's true color in the picture. Mine has been out in the yard for about 2 years, and I recently brought it to the garage and cleaned it really good and resealed it....I should probably do the same thing to my sister's. I don't know if it's like this everywhere (or if Florida is worse), but they are pretty much a pain in the butt to keep clean. But that's ANY kind of a birdbath, not just a mosaic one. I recently bought some stuff that's supposed to keep the algae from forming so fast..but I keep forgetting to put it in there! :)

wench - interesting question - "do they birds use it"....the one in MY yard - YES, they do. But this one is in my sister's yard, and she says they don't use it as much as her OTHER birdbath....but my theory is that they don't use it as much because the mosaic bird bath is in direct sun ALL day, and the other one is in the shade most of the day. And in Florida, that water could be REALLY hot. I would choose the one in the shade, too!

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clipped on: 10.15.2007 at 08:09 pm    last updated on: 10.15.2007 at 08:10 pm

RE: mosaic on metal ... (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: slowmedown on 01.12.2007 at 06:04 am in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

The laytex admixture is in the flooring dept. where the tile adhesives/grout are. I just bought some last week - got the Mapei brand. Thinset is a cement-based mortar, and I use it for all outside projects, except for GEII on glass totems, and use it for grouting as well as adhering. Mapei brand already has the polymer added to it. I use the admixture if I'm not using Mapei brand mortar.

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clipped on: 10.07.2007 at 12:15 am    last updated on: 10.07.2007 at 12:17 am

Photo Instructions

posted by: lyndalu on 09.29.2007 at 08:43 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

This is in response to a question on how to post multiple pictures. I've shared these instructions with a few people via emails, and just figured out how to share it here.

I thought I'd put this in a separate post, so we could refer new people to it.

These instructions are for Photobucket. If someone has instructions for some of the other photo sharing sites, maybe they could add to this thread?


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


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clipped on: 10.01.2007 at 02:02 pm    last updated on: 10.01.2007 at 02:03 pm

RE: ring saw and plates, for the curious (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: nicethyme on 04.21.2007 at 07:54 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

I'm sending curbdriver the centers, so after cutting all the edges up, I used the circle cutter to clean them up.

it's just a plastic circle with a small peg, stuck on with double stick tape. You cut in to the outer edge of what you want then stick the peg into the grid and spin the plate as it cuts.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

and here are the results of my labor, ready to ship out to TMG and Curb.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

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clipped on: 09.28.2007 at 02:44 am    last updated on: 09.28.2007 at 02:45 am

ring saw and plates, for the curious

posted by: nicethyme on 04.21.2007 at 07:49 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

Okay, 1st let me say that cutting plates with a ring saw is slow and tedious going so it's not a time saver and you would never want to replace your nippers with this. It's only for more intricate shapes.

I think it was Lyndalu that asked for more info and pics when we talked about the heart charms. So here's my little tutorial

this is the paper hearts glued down on the plates as patterns

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

here's the cutting, very very slowly tracing around the pattern. You can't feed it hard or you jam up the blade.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

I cut them out and drop them in water to dissolve the glue and remove the paper and dust

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

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clipped on: 09.28.2007 at 02:39 am    last updated on: 09.28.2007 at 02:40 am

A Beginner's Tool Review

posted by: mmqchdygg on 09.26.2007 at 08:24 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

So yesterday I realized that the tile nipper doesn't make nice straight cuts like I want, and it's going to take some practice to do this well.
I'm cutting ceramic dishes.
And...the plate foot is a serious problem, as well as curves in the plate that make "border" designs a bit tedious to get off said plate cleanly. Foot must be ground down, and have to find something to fix these border curvies.

Today I learned that I really need some power tools. Ok, but the budget won't allow those for a little while. I go to the tile store where they are having a tent sale. I tell them I need a scoring tool, and a wet saw. Wet saw is evidently going to run me $150 at the tile store, and the scorer 1/2 that. Ouch. (Thanks for the info.)

Off to HD to see what I can procure. Wet saw (small model) will run me about $70 (I figured as much). Don't see a scoring tool...Wait! What's this thingy hanging on a row? "Scores & snaps..." Cool. I'll take it home.

It's a Qep Tile Plier (Model 10004 for those of you keeping score at home- bwahahahahahah!!!! Hey, I just made a funny!!!!!)

Set me back a whopping $7.95. I can handle that. Got it home...it's my new favorite tool. I'm in love with this little gadget! Little wheelie thing makes the score, you pop it into the plier, and SNAP! Nice clean cuts! Not sure how long that wheelie thing will last, or what it'll take to find replacements if need be, but for today, it's working great.

Hmmm...now what am I going to use to get these feet off and sharpen up these UGLY edges that I made last night with the nipper? Let's try this BRUTUS Ceramic & Marble File. Just a little hand-held thing for $11 or $12. Again, in the budget. It does the job, but will definitely need a power-grinder for this task. My forearms don't need to look like Popeye.

So there's today's review. I'm sure I'll be back with other reviews, but maybe some other newbies will find this somewhat useful. "Small Budget" tools work, but I want POWER!!!!

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clipped on: 09.27.2007 at 06:04 pm    last updated on: 09.27.2007 at 06:05 pm

RE: Need help cutting china plates please (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: celestialsdoxies on 07.15.2006 at 12:34 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

Hi, I can help you here! I am an experienced mosaic artist using china and stained glass as my favorite medium to work with. For starters, don't let anyone inform you that you need saws, wet or otherwise, to cut delicate china. China should only be cut with nippers, and or wheeled tile cutters (primarily for glass). You will destroy china if you use tools intended for construction. It will take a bit of patience for you to get the design/cut you want. I am enclosing a link to my several pages of mosaic art, so you can see the hearts, roses and bird focals I cut, solely, BY HAND, nothing else. As far as smoothing them out, the only time you need to really be concerned with smoothing sharp edges, is with fine bone china, like the kind made in England. These are a bit harder to cut than fine pottery china like Laughlin, Salem, etc. They almost feel like glass, but it can be done. Once you adhere the tiles and grout, you will not have a problem, but as far as cutting focals; hearts, circles, squares, etc, ...you can use simple sand paper or a dremmel to smooth edges if you wish.

Marie

P.S. I have also cut 3-D roses, florals from vases with no problem, using the same tool.

Here is a link that might be useful: Moonstone's Mosaics

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clipped on: 09.25.2007 at 07:44 pm    last updated on: 09.25.2007 at 07:58 pm

RE: My first 2 totem efforts (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: carrieanne_22 on 05.28.2007 at 02:24 am in Garden Junk Forum

i still wasn't able to view your pics :-(

i just discovered this site roughly 24 hours ago & this is the advice vela75 gave to me when i also had problems. worked like a charm!

Hello! Here is a copy of how to include photos that I posted in another thread. Hope it helps :-)
Open an account at photobucket.com It's free. I'm assuming you know how to get the pictures on your computer.....so all you have to do for photobucket is log into your account, click on "browse"...you can then "browse" your computer...go to the file you keep your pictures in (mine are in "my documents...my photos")but yours may be somewhere else on your computer. Wherever you store them. Select the picture you want and click on it. The address of that picture will then show up in the space to the left of the browse button...then an "upload" option will show up. Click upload. Once uploaded, scroll down and your picture should be there. Three options will be listed under your picture. One will be "URL Link", one will be "HTML Tag", and one will be "IMG code". The one you want is HTML Tag.It should start with < and the letter a.....click to the left of the <. Then you are going to click again, but this time, hold the mouse button down...while holding the button down "highlight" the whole code (you do this by moving the mouse to the right over the whole code while holding the button down). Then right click on what you just highlighted...a little menu should come up, one of the options should be "copy". Select copy. You have just copied your HTML code!! Now, all you have to do is once you are here and typing, you will right click again where you want to put your picture, now there will be a "paste" option. Click on that. The code will show up. That should take care of it! When you preview your message, you should be able to see your picture. This is really detailed...it isn't hard once you do it...I'm sure it looks like a long process, but it's not. I find it easier to open two internet screens, I have one of them open to Gardenweb, and one open to photobucket...that way you can copy and paste as many pictures as you want without having to completely change websites.

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clipped on: 09.25.2007 at 02:06 am    last updated on: 09.25.2007 at 02:07 am

RE: Mosaicwench-please help! (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: mosaicwench1 on 09.14.2007 at 05:40 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

Lots of questions there - I'll try to answer all.

First of all, what about the backside is "horrible?" Can you be more specific? Is it grout bleed that makes it look bad to you?

I use Weldbond on my windows. It eventually dries clear - sometimes takes weeks or months if the glass piece is big and the the glue thick. I've learned to get around this by gluing only the outside edges of larger glass pieces. This way they dry clear faster and there is less chance of grout bleed underneath. Weldbond on the top of glass comes off when grouting (mostly). Otherwise I go at the finished piece with razor blades and exacto knives.

I use the cheapest black grout I can find (American Adhesives, I believe)- dry (I mix with water and mix it VERY stiff). Too runny grout can encourage grout bleed.

How do I work? It varies on each window but I DO work horizontally - not vertically. I spread the window over two chairs backs which brings it to about the right work height for short little me. Sometimes I work a lot at once and sometimes I inch forward . . depends on the piece. Working horizontally means I can walk away at any time.

I have tried Mac glue and like it's transparency a little better than Weldbond, but (and this is a BIG but) I don't think I'd use it on gog windows because of the way I work. Sometimes I'll lay down a patch of glue and start placing pieces in it. Invariably I get interrupted and have to walk away. If the glue is weldbond I can scrape it off and start over. NOT SO with Mac. It's PERMANENT and thus anything I lay over that dried Mac Glue is now "lumpy" and not in line with the rest of the work.

Wipe my fingers? Good God no. If I had to be tidy I'd take up another calling. I usually have glue on everything and have been known to walk through the house trying to shake off the snippets of things that have dried on my hands . . .

Can you post a photo of your "horrible" piece? Grout bleed can be fixed with a little ingenuity . . .

Did I answer them all?

NOTES:

glass on glass that is grouted also
clipped on: 09.15.2007 at 01:17 am    last updated on: 09.15.2007 at 01:18 am

RE: New Here (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: slowmedown on 06.22.2007 at 02:48 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

You're probably talking about Mapei. That's the kind I use. I buy it by the 25-lb. bags. It has the polymer fortifier already, so you just add water. If you can't get that, any thinset w/do - just add the laytex mixture yourself.

NOTES:

adhesive and grout
clipped on: 09.14.2007 at 12:29 am    last updated on: 09.14.2007 at 12:30 am

Table WIP

posted by: diamondjennie on 09.11.2007 at 06:37 pm in Stained Glass & Mosaics Forum

I still need to grout, will use white. I've made two coffee tables a three tier shelf and a square table to try to sell. The glass looks black, but is burgandy.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Second shelf of coffee table matches the end wood cutouts

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

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clipped on: 09.11.2007 at 11:33 pm    last updated on: 09.12.2007 at 12:12 am