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forcing new growth with rooting hormone.

posted by: ShadyAtBest on 07.12.2014 at 12:20 am in Citrus Forum

I have a three year old potted satsuma that seems to like growing to the side. I have been hoping for the past two years that it would sprout a few limbs from the empty side to help balance it out.
A few days ago I was trying to stimulate my orchids with some keiki paste. It's some sort of rooting hormone in gel form. I thought that I might try it on my Mandarin.
So I took a cotton swab and wiped a little bit in many places on the bark. I stopped it where I thought nodes should be and other places.
That was last Sunday and now my tree is sprouting buds everywhere I put the solution. It's pretty cool, check it out.

This post was edited by ShadyAtBest on Sat, Jul 12, 14 at 0:25

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clipped on: 07.18.2014 at 01:25 am    last updated on: 07.18.2014 at 01:25 am

More New DLS For This Year

posted by: Avedon on 07.05.2014 at 11:45 am in Daylily Forum

Here are some of the new ones I have never posted before:
This is STACK THE DECK--it has been a fantastic bloomer

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clipped on: 07.06.2014 at 12:16 am    last updated on: 07.06.2014 at 12:17 am

quick damage report on UDel arboretum

posted by: davidrt28 on 04.01.2014 at 08:30 am in Trees Forum

I could post a few pics, but my cheapo smartphone's camera is so bad it hardly seems worth it. They hit 3F though I suspect were overall a little milder than my garden because of a miniscule heat island of the university, and the fact that many of the plants have protection of large building walls. I'll just do a quick run down:

Daphniphyllum macropodum - their various trees were fine, and are in fact self seeding in and around the walled garden that houses most of the subtropicals. The seedlings are fine!
OTOH D. humile looks a bit injured, confirming the tendancy of nurseries to rate it zone a bit less hardy.

Edgeworthia was already blooming...mine is probably still a week out, which is a month later than usual!

Mahonia gracilipes - looks dead just like mine
other Mahonias mostly of the X media persuasion - some minor burning but ok, as is my F2 X media seedling

Persea palustris - completely undamaged, which makes it all the more tragic they are being killed by a pathogen

Schima argentea - surprised me by still having some green leaves...I'm really looking forward to the X Schimlinia being released.

Prunus laurocerasus, various cultivars...fine

Ilex latifolia - moderate foliar burning, all other hollies including some you might worry about like X koehneana, X aquipernyi, vomitoria, are fine

Quercus virginiana - foliage almost completely burned but twigs probably ok

Quercus mysinifolia - totally undamaged, confirming how much hardier it is

Cleyera of commerce...fine...even less than the minor burning on mine, but it was protected from morning sun unlike mine

Magnolia yuyuanensis - mostly ok; some other rare Magnolias that were harder to find name tags on were more damaged, like a 'figo'

Camellia yuhsienensis - ok and blooming, some other rare ones like C. octopetala dead or very injured but this area overall not cared for and its hard to be sure what was going on. Even though the flowers are white and small, I'd like this one for being able to bloom so soon after cold weather. No other plants were blooming except witch hazels.

Magnolia 'Little Gem' (not labelled but I am almost sure) - quite burned, my 'Kay Parris' is almost completely undamaged and is obviously hardier

I'm sure I'm forgetting something...I was in a hurry and got sick of unlocking my phone to take pictures...might think of something else later. Oh one more thing, as is the case at the NCSU arboretum, the dry bed of desert plants mostly looked great, which is interesting considering how we had so much cold combined with snow.

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clipped on: 07.03.2014 at 02:33 pm    last updated on: 07.03.2014 at 02:33 pm

Anti-fungal nutrients for roses

posted by: Strawberryhill on 06.27.2014 at 10:35 pm in Organic Rose Growing Forum

I re-post an excerpt from the below link:
http://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/pmarticle/301868/Antifungal-Activity-And-Cytotoxicity-Of-Zinc-Calcium-Or-Copper-Alginate-Fibers.html

"... the fungal inhibitory rates were measured using the plate-count method following shake-flask test. Moreover, an inhibition-zone test and observation by scanning electron microscopy were carried out. The inhibitory rate of the calcium, copper, and zinc alginate fibers were, respectively, 49.1, 68.6, and 92.2 %. The results from inhibition-zone test and shake-flask test show that zinc alginate fibers have the most significant antifungal action and that copper alginate fibers have obvious inhibitory action, but the calcium alginate fibers have weak inhibitory effects. "

See link for nutritional analysis of one cup of whole-grain
corn meal. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5692/2

NPK of corn meal is 1.6 / 0.65 / 0.4 compared to horse manure NPK of 0.44 / 0.17 / 0.35. Corn has higher nitrogen, almost 4 times more phosphorus, slightly more potassium, plus B-complex vitamins, 39% magnesium, 23% iron, 29% phosphorus, 10% potassium, 30% manganese, 37% selenium, 1% calcium, 12% copper, and 15% zinc. pH of dry corn is around 7.5.

Let's compare the ratios of anti-fungal nutrients of zinc, copper, and calcium in red-lava rocks. One neighbor mulch her roses with lava rocks, and I don't see any disease whatsoever in her 50+ roses. The other neighbor who mulched with white lime stones had some black spots in humid weather. See below link for Red lava rocks composition: http://www.palmercc.com/lavarock.htm

Red Lava rocks: pH 8.2, Phosphorus........................................6.0 p.p.m.
Potassium.........................................59.0 p.p.m.
Zinc.........................................................6 p.p.m.
Iron..................................................10.0+ p.p.m.
Copper...............................................5.5+ p.p.m.
Magnesium.......................................2.0+ p.p.m.
Boron.................................................10.0 p.p.m.

Wood ash is a strong anti-fungal agent, let's compare wood ash to lime stone:

Boron 123
Copper 70 ***** 10
Zinc 233 **** 113
Calcium 15 *** 31
Potassium 2.6 *** 0.13
Iron 0.84 *** 0.29
Phosphorus 0.53 *** 0.06
Manganese 0.41 *** 0.05

You can see from above for the anti-fungal agents: wood ash has twice more zinc, seven times more copper, but 1/2 calcium (a weaker anti-fungal of the trio). Wood ash also 2.6 potassium, compared to 0.13 of limestone.

Last year I watched a You-Tube on "Secret of Healthy roses" and the guy put Kelp meal, plus Brewer's yeast as SOLUBLE fertilizer. That didn't make sense, until I check the nutrient analysis for 2 tablespoons of Brewer's yeast:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/custom/1323569/2

Brewer's yeast is VERY HIGH in B-vitamins, which stimulate plant growth. For the anti-fungal trio (zinc, copper, and calcium), here are the values for brewer's yeast:

Calcium 0.0
Iron 1.1 mg 6%
Magnesium 32.0 mg 8%
Phosphorus 0.0
Potassium 633 mg 18%
Zinc 1.5 mg 10%
Copper 1.0 mg 50%

You can see that Brewer's yeast has a HUGE AMOUNT of potassium for blooming, plus to fight diseases. Also 50% copper, a strong anti-fungal agent. That's impressive for 2 tablespoon of brewer's yeast. See below link for the You-Tube where the guy mixed brewer's yeast as the secret for growing healthy roses:

Here is a link that might be useful: Youtube top 10 secrets of growing healthy roses

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clipped on: 07.01.2014 at 02:10 pm    last updated on: 07.01.2014 at 02:11 pm

RE: Looking for Heirloom French-Roman Hyacinths (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: OldGardenHunter on 12.29.2011 at 01:14 am in Southern Gardening Forum

Are you still looking for the french roman hyacinths?

email me
restorationbulbco@yahoo.com

doug

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clipped on: 07.26.2013 at 12:41 pm    last updated on: 07.26.2013 at 12:41 pm

RE: Mauves, Oranges, Etc. (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: pat_bamaZ7 on 07.08.2013 at 04:56 pm in Roses Forum

Lavenders normally struggle in my hot, humid climate, but Royal Amethyst has done amazingly well for me. Ken is right, though, Royal Amethyst does look like Angel Face in the hotter months, but is a much better performer in my climate…my most heat tolerant lavender and smells great. Love Song is new for me this year, but so far, so good…haven’t been able to detect a fragrance yet, and with the weird weather we are having this year, who knows how it will do under normal conditions here, but I love the look of its big, old fashioned blooms. Outta the Blue is my best performing purple, but Wild Blue Yonder is a favorite, too. Over the Moon (always covered in HUGE blooms) and Just Joey are apricots that do well for me. Bronze Star is new for me this year, but I’m really loving it…orangey apricot and very fragrant. Voodoo, Chris Evert and Colorific are good orange blends here.

Outta the Blue:

 photo otb0516_zps84fd4929.jpg

Wild Blue Yonder:

 photo wby0530b_zps30541609.jpg

Over the Moon:

 photo otm0528_zpsb86b6a36.jpg

Voodoo:

 photo voodoo0531b_zpsb83d9e80.jpg

Chris Evert:

 photo ce0526_zps6e0c63d1.jpg

And here's Colorific:

 photo colorific0618c_zps01182af9.jpg

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clipped on: 07.12.2013 at 03:55 pm    last updated on: 07.12.2013 at 03:55 pm

RE: Are there OGRs that don't require spraying? (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: pagan on 09.08.2007 at 08:12 am in Antique Roses Forum

I can add a few names to the list. I am on the southeast coast in SC, AKA Blackspot Heaven!

lessee,did she list:

Maggie

Bon Silene

La Biche

Penelope

Nachidosis Noisette

Mrs. R.G. Finch

Landmark

Francis Dubruil

Beauty of Rosemawr

Calwell's Pink

Snow White

Pink bells

Cherry Drop

Sanguinae

Cramoisi Superior

Nahema

Green Ice

Loius XVI

Bermuda Spice

Thomas Affleck

Lamarque

Chestnut Rose

Dutchfork China

the Charlestonian

Outta the Blue

Homere

Ohio Belle

Baronness Henriette de Snoy

Reve D'or

Maman Cochet

Iceberg

Archduke Charles

Louis Phillipe

Climbing Pinkie

These are the ones in my no-spray Darwinian Rose Garden who stay the cleanest. (Sorry if I repeated any on her list... she is the one who advised ME also!!)

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clipped on: 04.25.2013 at 09:40 pm    last updated on: 04.25.2013 at 09:40 pm

RE: Are there OGRs that don't require spraying? (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: jean on 09.07.2007 at 10:31 pm in Antique Roses Forum

Alkaline soil in KY is rare. You must be sitting on a pile o' serious limestone rock. I have a list of roses I grow here in Nashville without spraying. I have not updated recently, but it's pretty solid here. You may be enough farther north that some of these will be very tender for you. I am in a solid 7a/b climate here.

This list is of roses that are resistant to blackspot here. Some of these are seasonally prone to cercospora. My definition of blackspot resistance means that a rose will not lose more than 30% of its leaves to blackspot without spraying.

Jean

Polyanthas:
� The Fairy
� Cl. Clotilde Soupert
� Cl. Cecile Brunner
� Clotilde Soupert
� La Marne
� Gourmet Popcorn
� Mrs. R.M. Finch
� Perle d�Or
� Phyllis Bide
Hybrid Musks:
� Excellenz von Schubert
� Darlow's Enigma
� Gardindirektor Otto von Linne
Shrubs:
� Carefree Delight
� Earth Song
� Pearl Meidiland
� Carefree Sunshine
� Belinda�s Dream
� Carefree beauty a/k/a/ Katy Road Pink
� Winter Sunset
� Prairie Sunrise
� Knock Out
Ramblers:
� Alberic Barbier
� Francois Juranville
� Aviateur Bleuriot
� Alexander Girault
� Ayrshire Queen
� Paul Transon
� Emily Gray
� Francois Guillot
Chinas:
� Pink Pet/Caldwell Pink
� Arethusa
� Le Vesuve
� Comtesse du Cayla
� Bermuda�s Kathleen
� Ducher
� Napoleon
� Cramoisi Superieur
� Little White Pet
Noisettes:
� Crepuscule
� Blush Noisette
� Souv de Mme. L�Advocat
� Narrow Water
� Nastarana
� Jaune Desprez
� Reve d�Or
� Duchesse d�Auerstadt
� Alister Stella Gray
� Lamarque
� Champney�s Pink Cluster
� William Allen Richardson
� Secret Garden Musk
Teas:
� Lady Hillingdon
� Maman Cochet
� Duchesse de Brabant
� Baronne Henriette de Snoy
� Georgetown Lemon White Tea
� William R. Smith
� Rosette Delizy
� Comtesse Festestics
� Souv. de Pierre Notting
� Rock Hill Peach Tea
� La Sylphide
� Le Pactole
� Jean Bach Sisley
� Clementina Carbonieri
� Etoile de Lyon
� Mme. Maurin
� Alliance Franco-Russe
� Mrs. Dudley Cross
� Monsieur Tillier
� Mme. Joseph Schwartz
� Georgetown Tea
� Hermosa
� Isabella Sprunt
� Mrs. B.R. Cant
� Lorraine Lee
� Enchantresse
� J.E. Murphy's Pink Tea
� Angel Camp Tea
� Puerto Rico
� Safrano
� Mme. Antoine Rebe
� Mme. Berkeley
� Marie van Houtte
� Triomphe de Luxembourg
� Rhodologue Jules Graveraux
� Smith�s Parish
� Cels Multiflora
� Hume�s Blush
� Souv. d�un Ami
� Miss Caroline
� Thomasville Old Gold
� Duke of York
� Niles Cochet
� Mme. Antoine Marie
� Mme. Lombard
� Rubens
� Irene Bonnet
� Mme. Camille
� Paul Nabonnand
� Mme. de la Sombreuil
� Isabelle Nabonnand
� Devoniensis
Hybrid Teas:
� Eva de Grossouvre
� Radiance
� Red Radiance
� Careless Love
� Maman Lyly
� Lady Ursula
Climbers:
� Awakening
� Clair Matin
� Cl. Lady Waterlow
� Westerland
� Autumn Sunset
� New Dawn
Floribundas:
� Strawberry Ice a/k/a Bordure Rose
Bourbons:
� Souv. de la Malmaison
� Mystic Beauty
� Kronprincessin Viktoria
� Souv. de St. Anne a/k/a Miss Abbot

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clipped on: 04.25.2013 at 09:40 pm    last updated on: 04.25.2013 at 09:40 pm

a simple list of blackspot resistant roses....

posted by: serenasyh on 10.24.2009 at 08:24 pm in Organic Rose Growing Forum

Just yesterday, October 23, 2009, wonderful Connie forwarded/emailed me a list of blackspot resistant Roses as a current listing:

Jean's No Spray List

Polyanthas:
� The Fairy
� Cl. Clotilde Soupert
� Cl. Cecile Brunner
� Clotilde Soupert
� La Marne
� Gourmet Popcorn
� Mrs. R.M. Finch
� Perle d�Or
� Phyllis Bide
Hybrid Musks:
� Excellenz von Schubert
� Darlow's Enigma
� Gardindirektor Otto von Linne
Shrubs:
� Carefree Delight
� Earth Song
� Pearl Meidiland
� Carefree Sunshine
� Belinda�s Dream
� Carefree beauty a/k/a/ Katy Road Pink
� Winter Sunset
� Prairie Sunrise
� Knock Out
Ramblers:
� Alberic Barbier
� Francois Juranville
� Aviateur Bleuriot
� Alexander Girault
� Ayrshire Queen
� Paul Transon
� Emily Gray
� Francois Guillot
Chinas:
� Pink Pet/Caldwell Pink
� Arethusa
� Le Vesuve
� Comtesse du Cayla
� Bermuda�s Kathleen
� Ducher
� Napoleon
� Cramoisi Superieur
� Little White Pet
Noisettes:
� Crepuscule
� Blush Noisette
� Souv de Mme. L�Advocat
� Narrow Water
� Nastarana
� Jaune Desprez
� Reve d�Or
� Duchesse d�Auerstadt
� Alister Stella Gray
� Lamarque
� Champney�s Pink Cluster
� William Allen Richardson
� Secret Garden Musk
Teas:
� Lady Hillingdon
� Maman Cochet
� Duchesse de Brabant
� Baronne Henriette de Snoy
� Georgetown Lemon White Tea
� William R. Smith
� Rosette Delizy
� Comtesse Festestics
� Souv. de Pierre Notting
� Rock Hill Peach Tea
� La Sylphide
� Le Pactole
� Jean Bach Sisley
� Clementina Carbonieri
� Etoile de Lyon
� Mme. Maurin
� Alliance Franco-Russe
� Mrs. Dudley Cross
� Monsieur Tillier
� Mme. Joseph Schwartz
� Georgetown Tea
� Hermosa
� Isabella Sprunt
� Mrs. B.R. Cant
� Lorraine Lee
� Enchantresse
� J.E. Murphy's Pink Tea
� Angel Camp Tea
� Puerto Rico
� Safrano
� Mme. Antoine Rebe
� Mme. Berkeley
� Marie van Houtte
� Triomphe de Luxembourg
� Rhodologue Jules Graveraux
� Smith�s Parish
� Cels Multiflora
� Hume�s Blush
� Souv. d�un Ami
� Miss Caroline
� Thomasville Old Gold
� Duke of York
� Niles Cochet
� Mme. Antoine Marie
� Mme. Lombard
� Rubens
� Irene Bonnet
� Mme. Camille
� Paul Nabonnand
� Mme. de la Sombreuil
� Isabelle Nabonnand
� Devoniensis
Hybrid Teas:
� Eva de Grossouvre
� Radiance
� Red Radiance
� Careless Love
� Maman Lyly
� Lady Ursula
Climbers:
� Awakening
� Clair Matin
� Cl. Lady Waterlow
� Westerland
� Autumn Sunset
� New Dawn
Floribundas:
� Strawberry Ice a/k/a Bordure Rose
Bourbons:
� Souv. de la Malmaison
� Mystic Beauty
� Kronprincessin Viktoria
� Souv. de St. Anne a/k/a Miss Abbot

NOTES:

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clipped on: 02.26.2013 at 08:32 pm    last updated on: 02.26.2013 at 08:32 pm

RE: What's on your wish list for this winter? (Follow-Up #23)

posted by: jerijen on 11.29.2012 at 06:10 pm in Antique Roses Forum

My Lady Roberts is less than 3 ft. tall, I think. She's still in a 7-G.

But, here is the more-mature plant in the Sacramento City Cemetery. This one was over my head in April 2011, so I guess it's easily 6 ft. tall now. Very well-shaped -- and of course, covered in that beautiful clean foliage, which sets off the pretty flowers.

Jeri

NOTES:

Lady Roberts and Anna Oliivier- sister roses from Ducher
clipped on: 02.12.2013 at 09:29 pm    last updated on: 02.12.2013 at 09:32 pm

RE: Pat on the Back. . . . Or Kick in the Pants? (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: mike_rivers on 06.10.2011 at 10:53 am in Antique Roses Forum

Hoovb, I think the paper to which you're referring is "Cyclic Nitrogen Uptake by Greenhouse Roses" by Raul Cabrea at UC Davis.

Evidently, right after flowering, roses make new growth mostly from nutrients already stored within the plant. External nutrients in the soil (fertilizers) are taken up mostly after new growth slows and flowers start to form.

Here is a link that might be useful: Cyclic Nitrogen Uptake

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clipped on: 01.11.2013 at 12:24 pm    last updated on: 01.11.2013 at 12:24 pm

RE: Pat on the Back. . . . Or Kick in the Pants? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: hoovb on 06.10.2011 at 02:28 am in Antique Roses Forum

I found a study somewhere on the internet a few years back. I have not been able to find it since.

Study was done by the U of California for the florist rose industry, back when California still had a florist rose industry (before it all moved to countries on the equator).

Tests showed that maximum nitrogen uptake occurred when the roses were in full flush, meaning that is when they want N.

So I started giving my roses that I really want performance from a hit of fast-acting high-n fertilizer when they are approaching full flush. This is in addition to long lasting organic fertilizer (alfalfa meal) once in spring.

Works great!

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clipped on: 01.11.2013 at 12:23 pm    last updated on: 01.11.2013 at 12:23 pm

RE: New Buck Roses? (Follow-Up #32)

posted by: sandandsun on 11.23.2012 at 07:24 pm in Roses Forum

This ProfessorRoush post in his blog earlier this year may be of interest while we wait for updates from others.

Here is a link that might be useful: ProfessorRoush's New Buck Roses

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clipped on: 01.04.2013 at 12:49 am    last updated on: 01.04.2013 at 12:49 am

RE: New Buck Roses? (Follow-Up #41)

posted by: sandandsun on 12.03.2012 at 09:31 am in Roses Forum

Thread link:

Here is a link that might be useful: Help me choose some Buck roses

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clipped on: 01.04.2013 at 12:48 am    last updated on: 01.04.2013 at 12:49 am

Houston Rose Society's Buck Rose Info (Follow-Up #45)

posted by: sandandsun on 01.03.2013 at 09:03 pm in Roses Forum

I found the linked information from the Houston Rose Society very interesting.

Here is a link that might be useful: Houston Rose Society's Introduction to Griffith Buck Roses

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clipped on: 01.04.2013 at 12:48 am    last updated on: 01.04.2013 at 12:48 am

Blast from the past (Follow-Up #44)

posted by: sandandsun on 01.03.2013 at 08:58 pm in Roses Forum

Well, only 5 or so years ago:

Here is a link that might be useful: What's your favorite Buck rose?

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clipped on: 01.04.2013 at 12:47 am    last updated on: 01.04.2013 at 12:47 am

RE: Modern Hybrid Teas (Follow-Up #73)

posted by: roseblush1 on 12.01.2012 at 04:34 pm in Antique Roses Forum

idixierose and bellegallica .....

I am uncomfortable saying this, but how I prune roses can't be found in any garden book or article. I figured it out by some problem solving and experimenting in this garden where summer temps are higher than any I had ever experienced in my rose gardening life.

I had read many articles in the ARS magazines and rose books and gardening magazines about how to prune roses, so I tried to follow the practices in those articles. The roses did OK so I thought I was doing the right thing. The general advice was to bring down the height of the rose by at least a third and remove all dead wood, diseased wood and twiggy growth. You have all seen those before and after photos or drawings.

When I bought this property, I had to learn how to garden on four levels. My time management sucked in the beginning. I couldn't get to all four levels to do the work necessary to prune all of the roses correctly and within the advised time period. The HTs Mrs. J planted out in front were the last roses to get attention. They had been neglected for more than a decade because Mrs. J was in her 90s when I bought the house.

Since I couldn't get out there, the deer were free to chomp on Mrs. J's HTs as much as they liked. So, come spring, they had already been lopped off. For a couple of years, all they got was good watering and feeding and no additional pruning. They didn't bloom much, but each year they seemed to become healthier plants. I finally had time to cage them, but still didn't do much pruning. The roses outgrew their first roses cages within a season and had a lot more bloom, but those blooms really weren't enough to make me want to give them more attention. I did notice that the plants had more bloom, but I thought that was because the deer were not eating the buds.

Kim Rupert (Roseseek) has been my rose mentor for a couple decades. His mantra has always been to "learn from the rose" and that's a principle I've tried to follow ...it ain't easy.

When I came up with the idea of how to keep the rose curculios from breeding in my garden by disbudding all of the roses in the garden during rose curculio season, I noticed that the roses were pushing out more foliage and more buds during the disbudding period. Without really thinking about it, I decided that the plant must be putting out additional foliage to support pushing out the additional buds and that roses had a mandate to bloom.

Then as time went on and the garden was becoming a rose garden, I noticed that the plants that I didn't have time to prune had denser foliage and seemed to have blooms with better petal substance. They also did not seem to wilt in the afternoons when the transpiration rate of moisture loss was higher than the plant could handle by pulling moisture up to the top growth from the roots.

I started connecting the dots. The plants need that foliage to be healthier plants in this climate. (Note: I have zero disease pressure during the summer because my temps are well above 85 degrees every day.) Since the night temps cool down by as much as 50 degrees, the roses ... pruned or not ... were able to bring enough moisture up to the top growth to revitalize the foliage. Additional watering didn't make any difference in the transpiration rate, but additional foliage made a major difference in how the roses handled the high temps.

Another experiment was born. I walked through the garden and noticed that all of that twiggy growth may not produce blooms, but it did produce foliage. So, I started pruning my roses from the bottom up instead of the top down .. removing old unproductive canes from the bottom of the plant and leaving any wood that was healthy. I experimented with cleaning out the center of the roses and not cleaning out the center. I also experimented with not taking off any of the top growth, taking off some of it or pruning it down harder, but always concentrating on how to leave the most wood to produce foliage ... and I kept notes.

I did find that no pruning was not as effective as doing some pruning of the top growth to open up the canopy at the top of the plant because it allowed light to reach the canes that were shaded by the foliage and the rose put up new shoots with even more foliage.

I found that I can't treat every rose exactly the same way to get denser foliage, but have to find out what triggers the rose to produce the foliage. Of course, if it is not genetically programmed to have dense foliage, I'll find that out by my experiments and doing some research.

Over the years, I've been doing this experiment, I have found that every rose, and I do mean "every rose in this garden", where I have pruned for foliage has been more heat tolerant than they were when I followed the advice found in books and articles. My roses also have less cane damage by sunburn and thus are less susceptible to disease (canker) and insect damage by cane borers.

The increased foliage also encourages .. if that is the right word ... the plant to pull even more moisture up to the top growth to maintain that foliage which increases the plant's heat tolerance.

I also noticed that roses with dense foliage tend to have thicker petal substance in the blooms which make them more heat tolerant.

Some roses will never be truly heat tolerant because they do not produce dense foliage and the blooms are not genetically programmed to have the thicker petal substance needed to last in the heat. So not matter what I do, the blooms will fry. Those are the roses that are just not suited for my climate.

I am sorry this post is so long, but it's really not a post about how to prune for heat tolerance. It's really about "learning from the rose."

Smiles,
Lyn

PS ... this spring, I widened the bed where Mrs. J's HTs are planted from 8" to 3' and took out all of the companion plants. I made the deer cages more than twice as large and they have outgrown their cages twice this year. I am going to have to make them even bigger next spring.

NOTES:

PRUNING FOR HEAT TOLERANCE
clipped on: 12.25.2012 at 03:03 pm    last updated on: 12.25.2012 at 03:03 pm

RE: Woodland Rose Garden (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: maureeninmd on 12.04.2012 at 11:00 am in Roses Forum

Here's a link to Kent Krugh's 'A Woodland Rose Garden' on Wayback machine. I am not sure if it is all there. I found it on an old gardenweb thread. It seems impossible to find unless you have the link. It doesn't turn up if you just search the wayback machine site.

RE: Planting Roses: How to Deal with Root Competiton?

Posted by mellifera 7md/dcburbs (My Page) on
Thu, Feb 3, 11 at 21:35

Actually there's a way to access it. There's an internet archive: waybackmachine.org. Some sites they have a more complete cache of than others. I did a search and they have it: http://replay.waybackmachine.org/20090525195623/http://woodlandrosegarden.com/
It seems like most of the photo galleries are broken, but the links to the journals are still up and running.

Here is a link that might be useful: A Woodland Rose Garden on Wayback machine

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clipped on: 12.05.2012 at 03:45 pm    last updated on: 12.05.2012 at 03:45 pm

Green Cure as fungicide for mildew

posted by: Strawberryhill on 07.17.2012 at 10:45 am in Antique Roses Forum

I don't have mildew on roses in zone 5a, usually humid & rainy. But we have a drought this year, roses still don't have mildew due to my watering them overhead with hard well water high in lime.

I was checking on "Stan the Roseman" in zone 5a Colorado to search for hardy rose. He mentioned "Green Cure" worked really well for mildew in his dry climate. "Green Cure" is made out of potassium bicarbonate, and this is 25 to 35 percent more effective than sodium bicarbonate (baking soda). EarthCo., the soil-testing company stated that 1/3 of soil are tested deficient in potassium - necesssary for blooms, strong stem, and to fight diseases.

I also found that lime, or calcium carbonate in water has an inverse relationship with potassium: it drives down potassium level, thus the "octopus canes" with no bloom for Austins in my garden. A farm report documents highest yield in soybean as the result of spreading sulphate of potash and lime pellets together, which beats the yield produced by fungicide alone.

Below is the link to "Green Cure" for mildew:

Here is a link that might be useful: Potassium bicarbonate for mildew

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clipped on: 10.14.2012 at 11:22 pm    last updated on: 12.04.2012 at 06:26 pm

RE: Duchesse de Brabant (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: buford on 07.07.2012 at 08:55 am in Antique Roses Forum

Hi daisy, my DDB has the same problem and I also planted her right by my front door!!!

I am experimenting with a new treatment for thrips, it's a culture that you spray on and supposedly it kills the thrips but nothing else. I was only able to spray it once, and now it's too hot. I have the stuff in the fridge (it's fungible) and will spray again later this year and early next spring. It's called Naturalis. I'm not sure if it's available in Europe, I got it from Rosemania.

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clipped on: 12.04.2012 at 05:58 pm    last updated on: 12.04.2012 at 05:58 pm

RE: Duchesse de Brabant (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: GatorRose on 07.07.2012 at 09:24 pm in Antique Roses Forum

Forgive the hijacking of this thread, however this form of controlling thrips is well worth the interruption.

An unconventional method of helping to control thrips, is to use a red or blue solo cup, paint the outside of the cup with STP motor additive, turn the pot upside down on a stake near the rose of concern. I know this sounds wild...but trust me it works, the thrips stick to the STP and the cups if you hide them behind or in between bushes doesn't look too bad!

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clipped on: 12.04.2012 at 05:57 pm    last updated on: 12.04.2012 at 05:57 pm

RE: Help with Alba KvD (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: olga_6b on 05.23.2012 at 01:33 pm in Antique Roses Forum

Did you regularly cut older canes out during last 8 years? Roses need old canes to be removed on a regular basis. Similar to what you do to lilacs or other bushes. Different roses has different productive cane life. For example, long cane bourbons perform best when all canes older than 2 years are removed. Albas canes in my experience are ready to be removed after approx 3 years. Can be even after 2 years, depending on what look you try to achieve. Older canes help to support the new growth. So it works best to always keep some 2-3 year old canes.
The best time to remove old canes is early spring (before leaves grow). At this time you can see the bush structure and it is easy to make decision what to leave and what to remove. This will not reduce the number of flowers in spring flush. Other canes will bloom more with this kind of treatment. You can also shorten and shape other canes at that time, if you want. Again it will be only beneficial. There will be more laterals produced to give more blooms.
This is one of the old wife tales that roses like albas or gallicas should be always pruned after bloom.

Olga

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clipped on: 12.01.2012 at 11:49 pm    last updated on: 12.01.2012 at 11:49 pm

What climber would you plant on this structure?

posted by: rosylady on 05.04.2012 at 12:01 pm in Antique Roses Forum

Photobucket

This is a little structure I had built to house/disguise our garbage cans.

I am in Western Washington, zone 8, near the water, so no hardiness issues. We have very wet weather except for 2-3 months in the summer where it is bone dry in my garden. I do have sprinklers here, but the soil is very sandy, so it drains very fast. Also, my yard is blackspot heaven!

As you can see, this area is surrounded on three sides by huge Douglas Firs, so even though the front of the structure faces south, it only gets direct sun for maybe six hours a day.

I have an old house, so am looking for an old fashioned looking rose, in the pinks or maybe white (my house is white).

Thank you. This is my first post! I am looking forward to your responses.

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clipped on: 12.01.2012 at 09:13 pm    last updated on: 12.01.2012 at 09:13 pm

RE: Pruning: Teas - when to remove canes to the base. (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: harborrose on 12.27.2011 at 03:06 am in Antique Roses Forum

Here is a thread I clipped from about four years ago that discusses rejuvenating a rose. It has input from Jon, Olga, Cass and Ann and several other really excellent gardeners. Great reading.

Here is a link that might be useful: When Roses Begin to Age thread

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clipped on: 11.18.2012 at 03:29 pm    last updated on: 11.18.2012 at 03:29 pm

Parc de Bagatelle Pics

posted by: windeaux on 11.11.2011 at 11:11 am in Antique Roses Forum

Below is a link to some glorious photos of the rose gardens at Bagatelle that I saved from last spring, knowing that I would have need of them during the long, dank off-season.

Until I saw these pictures, I thought I'd seen and been impressed by Bagatelle. Now I feel like I've never really been there.

Enjoy! (NOTE: At the very end, the blogger/photographer's aged mom utters a rather "salty" comment, so if you're offended by coarse language [even if it is rolling off the tongue of a very old lady], be forewarned and read nothing below the final pic.)

**I'm finding that the link seems to begin loading at the center of the series of photos, so you may need to scroll UP to start at the beginning.

Here is a link that might be useful: Mothers Day 2011 at Bagatelle

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clipped on: 11.14.2012 at 01:04 am    last updated on: 11.14.2012 at 01:04 am

'Crimson Globe' I finally identified that huge red rose.

posted by: luxrosa on 10.15.2011 at 05:20 pm in Antique Roses Forum

A couple of years ago someone brought me an immense red rose blossom to identify, he had found it growing in a friends garden in Berkeley, Ca.
-I'd never seen a rose that size, in person.
-an immense size, far larger than 'Crimson Glory' and a slightly deeper crimson. Though the deeper hue could have been due to the dehydration which takes place when a cut rose blossom has been out of water for a few hours. Facts like this contribute to the difficulty of rose identification, ideally an 18 inch cane with blooms, helps best to identify a rose cultivar or species, along with a photo of the entire plant to show growth habit. There are more than 40 thousand different roses on the planet today.
-great weight of bloom, by far, the heaviest rose blossom I'd ever held in my palm.
I thought about the some thousands of different types of roses I've seen, at vintagegardens and san jose heritage rose garden and other private and public gardens, and none of my notes I've taken over the last ten years mention any red rose that size, with that petal count.
- Its' armature didn't match any red H.P. I've seen.
- I searched helpmefind. com to no avail, no photos of any red rose appeared to even slightly resemble it.
- I only had one blossom to go on, and hardly any foliage or armature on the shortly cut stem to help identify it.
-the bloom was deeply fragrant of Damask.

Then, a few months ago, I remembered;it had stiff brown moss.
I've thought about it often over the last two years and then recently I saw a photo of a huge red Moss rose of the name 'Crimson Globe' that showed the distinct shape of his rose. I had found the name of the Rose!!!

I am tickled pink to know its' name.

Graham S. Thomas didn't seem to think much of 'Crimson Globe', it balled in his climate in England, well it would having c. 60+ petals.
It is a rose that needs heat to open well.
I hope to meet the plant someday.

Luxrosa

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clipped on: 11.12.2012 at 05:42 pm    last updated on: 11.12.2012 at 05:42 pm

Souvenir d'Alphonse Lavalle ...Best HP !

posted by: cupshaped_roses on 06.17.2007 at 02:27 pm in Antique Roses Forum

In 1993 I met this rose in Antibes in Southern France. I could not forget the fragrance and the dark red cupshaped rose. The rose is hybridized by Verdier in 1884 and named after one of the Presidents of the national French Horticultural society.

I tried to order the rose from various nurseries but every time I got the rose Erinnerung An Brod. When travelling I sometimes visit some rosenurseries. One Hybridizer in Franze (Guillot) had the real rose for sale.

It turned out to be the best HP rose I have ever grown. It was healthy, and had good hardiness. The Cupshaped flowers are very beautiful and the colour warry from dark red to deep royal purple when the flower develop. The fragrance is everything one could want from a dark red rose ...strong refined damask rose scent. The rose is excellent for cutting. It grows to a nice 3-4 feet tall and 3 feet wide rosebush in my climate zone. Will probably get taller in warmer climates as I have seen it in France.

Often when I visit some big Rosariums or rosegardens in Europe I see this rose...or rather I see Erinnerung an Brod or Souvenir de Dr. Jamain it is so rare to to see the real SDAL. Most webpages show the imposters... HMF is no exception. See HMF pictures and if you are interested you can cut and past the addresses below. I so would like that roselovers in America would be able to grow this wonderful rose that is not available in America. It has got to be one one the best HPs ever. I will try to contact Gregg Lowery at Vintage Gardens to see if they are interested in Budwood and send it to them so they can propagate plants for Heritage Rosegardens and for sale. Very few Hps are this healthy and has such a good growth habit. But the flowers and the fragrance is of course what makes this rose stand out:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

A personal homepage that portrays Souvenir Du Dr. Jamain as SDAL:

http://images.google.dk/imgres?imgurl=http://valed.free.fr/roseanc/TN_SOUVEN~1.JPG&imgrefurl=http://valed.free.fr/roseanc/page13.htm&h=70&w=70&sz=3&hl=da&start=7&um=1&tbnid=zqgT_BIAW06XGM:&tbnh=68&tbnw=68&prev=/images%3Fq%3DSouvenir%2Bd%2527Alphonse%2BLavall%25C3%25A9e%26svnum%3D10%26um%3D1%26hl%3Dda%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26channel%3Ds%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:da:official%26sa%3DN

Erinnerung an Brod/ portrayed as SDAL

http://www.namen-der-rosen.de/lavallee.html

Erinnerung an Brod/ labeled as SDAL

http://www.rosesdantan.com/pages/souvenir_d_alphonse_lavallee.htm

The real SDAL

http://portraits.deroses.free.fr/pages/Souvenir d%27Alphonse Lavall%E9e.html

A personal homepage that shows the real SDAL:

http://images.google.dk/imgres?imgurl=http://www.danielschmitz-roses.com/images/vignettes/TEMPSPASSE/SouvenirD%27AlphonseLavallee.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.danielschmitz-roses.com/pages/vigntempspastous.htm&h=75&w=75&sz=3&hl=da&start=4&um=1&tbnid=r2wSFRSJQ_vpCM:&tbnh=71&tbnw=71&prev=/images%3Fq%3DSouvenir%2Bd%2527Alphonse%2BLavall%25C3%25A9e%26svnum%3D10%26um%3D1%26hl%3Dda%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26channel%3Ds%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:da:official%26sa%3DN

Botanical artist and Heritage Rose Enthusiast Marieta Visagie made a wonderful portrait of SDAL :

http://www.fineart33.com/portfolio.html

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clipped on: 11.05.2012 at 06:18 pm    last updated on: 11.05.2012 at 06:19 pm

RE: Fertilizing Roses in Pots (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: roseseek on 08.07.2011 at 12:26 pm in Antique Roses Forum

Good morning Susan! Yes, pots require a different method of fertilizing than in-ground roses. The soil in pots suffers greater temperature swings than the ground, both colder and hotter and that puts a great stress on the plants at the extremes. Because it remains warmer during warmer weather, it can also mean the plants grow more quickly and vigorously because warmer soil not only has greater soil bacteria action, but also warmer sap pushes growth in the plant.

If you've ever grown standards, you may have noticed how the warm sap in the trunk can stimulate top growth faster than the same cultivar may produce on a traditional bush. The same happens in a pot. You do want to shade them enough to prevent direct, intense sun from overheating the pots to prevent the roots close to the exposure from literally cooking.

Pots also suffer from greater water stress for obvious reasons. Combine that increase in heat and water stress and you can imagine what some of the more serious fertilizing issues for pots are.

Organics work wonderfully in pots precisely because of the greater soil temperatures. It gets warm enough to get the bacteria cooking, even in areas where the soil temperatures remain on the cusp, or lower, for maximum effect. The size and type of pot affect fertilizing and watering greatly. I guess you're using plastic pots? Black plastic nursery cans will actually work better for your use than terra cotta or ceramic. Yes, black plastic heats up when the sun shines on it, but it begins releasing that heat once the heat source is removed. Terra cotta and ceramic retain and radiate the heat for a long time. Both materials are used to manufacture cookware because of their heat retention and radiation. Long after the sun moves from them, touch them and feel it for yourself.

Of course, smaller pots heat up much faster than larger ones, just like small pools and small sauce pans do. There is a smaller soil ball inside and that heats up more thoroughly than larger ones do. All of these factors will vary the type and amount of fertilizer you can safely use.

Time release types often give a range of time they are effective. Heat and quantity of water are usually what causes that variance. Hotter conditions cause the timing agent to break down faster, releasing more of the salts they contain. The instructions should give the quantity needed based upon the size of the pot. In most circumstances, that is safe to follow. If the weather is significantly hotter, using a smaller amount is generally safer because the potential for burning the plant in extreme conditions is lower. You can always add more later, but it's nearly impossible to remove it once it has begun releasing those salts.

More water also dissolves the coatings faster, releasing the salts faster and flushing more of the nitrogen, which follows water, out the drain holes.

Pelletized, water soluble types can be used with increased care. Most often, their instructions for use in ground state they are effective for a month. In hotter pots with increased water than would normally be used in the ground, they break down much faster and release their salt contents quickly.

You can use water soluble types safely, but they will require more frequent applications and should be used at reduced strengths. All inorganic fertilizers should most safely only be used in pots after they have been thoroughly watered and the plants absorb the moisture.

Nature requires things to be in balance. The water inside the plant becomes the same concentration of the nutrients as that of the soil. The salt form of the nutrient is what the plant absorbs. Organics are "digested" by the soil bacteria and fungi in to their salt forms. Inorganics begin as salts so they can burn more easily, but they are also immediately available for the plant's use, providing a much faster, more often, larger bang for the buck.

The only way for the salts to get into the plant is for water to be removed from the plant into the soil and replaced in the plant by the salts. If the plant is stressed for water, applying any kind of salt, whether it be a fertilizer or "tonic" can pull out enough water and replace it with enough salt to 'burn' the plant. Depending on how stressed the plant was initially and how much salt was put into it, it may just look awful for a while, or it can down right kill it.

If you want the fastest, greatest bang for your buck and time, begin with a good, organic filled potting soil. Once the plants begin to show growth, indicating they are settled in and actively growing, water them well, perhaps the night before you intend to fertilize, or the morning of the afternoon you want to do it. Waiting a few hours will allow the plant to take up all the water it requires. Once the plant is turgid, full of water, applying the fertilizer will pull out water and replace it with the salts without damaging the plant. Using a weaker solution of water soluble type (doesn't matter if it's Miracle Grow, Peters or whomever) of the correct guaranteed analysis, will give the plant a fast feeding. Using smaller doses more frequently provides a more continuous feeding and gets them growing steadily.

Nitrogen is required, along with proper temperature and soil moisture, for the bacteria to begin digesting the organics. If there is no source of nitrogen outside of the plant once they begin, they rob it from the plant to start the process. Often, you can see the plant appear more chlorotic after their application. Once things get working and they provide more nitrogen than they are requiring, things balance out and the plants appear "nourished", alleviating the chlorosis. That's why organics used to correct chlorosis work so slowly. Feeding with an inorganic source, after properly watering to prevent burn, corrects the problem much more quickly.

With that said, if you want faster results, use the inorganic water soluble types per the label directions, or if it's extremely hot, dry and windy, a little less than they suggest. As with the pellet types, you can always add more, but trying to fix a burned plant can be nearly impossible. And, it's far easier to flush too much dissolved salt from a soil ball than it is soggy, partially broken down pellets. You have a great deal more control over the concentration of salts in the soil using the weaker water soluble solution. And, the available nitrogen in that solution will begin feeding the soil bacteria so it won't need to rob it from the plant to begin working.

Of course, the choices are yours to make. Some consider MG "Satan's spawn", and that's their right. If organics are your only choice, that's fine, too. But, now you understand why they work as they do and why so many suggest using inorganics to correct the problems which concern you. They work faster than organics, and if used correctly, will not damage plants nor destroy the soil from salt build up. Proper drainage and water amounts and frequency are necessary.

Does that help? Kim

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clipped on: 10.31.2012 at 01:38 pm    last updated on: 10.31.2012 at 01:38 pm

RE: Pictures of pillars, poles, tripods, trellises, obelisk, etc? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: rosefolly on 03.15.2012 at 01:48 pm in Antique Roses Forum

Kmama, my DH Tom has made me a number of copper pipe climbing structures for the roses in my garden. I also train roses up fences.

There are a good half dozen of the obelisks, which is what I call tower-like, pillar-ish structures, mostly because I can't pronounce 'tuteur' without stumbling. He uses refrigerator tubing for the curved parts on top. He says that these are pretty easy to make. I don't know, never having done any metalwork. There are two in this picture, one close and easy to see, one off the the left and blending into the fence panel.

Copper pipe obelisk

Here is a trellis set out from the house supporting Leander so I can get behind and prune it. He has made me several of these trellises, too, customized to fit the space or slope of each location, something I could never get from a purchased trellis. Most of my garden slopes, so this is a valuable thing indeed. For some trellises and all the obelisks the openings are offset, because it is difficult to get 4-way fittings and he mostly uses 3-way fittings. However, he did find an online source for the 4-way fittings once. The 4-way fittings are some other metal, not copper.

Copper pipe trellis

Another one. The rose is Baltimore Belle. Note the four legs supporting the flat panel for greater security. All the flat trellises are constructed this way. Also, this one is on a slope and has longer legs on one side than the other. Looking at the picture I observe that the side on the right needs to be pushed in a bit! This happens over time. Each spring I go around and make everything more upright. It is part of the yearly tidying.

Baltimore Belle 2010

This long horizontal one supports Buff Beauty perfectly, and also serves as a guard rail to keep me safe. Behind it is a nine foot drop off to a concrete patio. I don't know if it would actually hold me up (though it might), but the thorns keep me from ever testing it. Note that the horizontal bars are offset, since this was made before we found the 4-way fittings and made du with 3-way. I don't think it looks bad.

Photobucket

And finally, a tall, narrow one by the chimney. The rose is Madame Plantier. Note the gopher basket sticking up from the ground. My eyes have become accustomed to them and I mostly don't notice them anymore -- unless I trip over them.
Chimney arbor

In the mild South Bay climate it takes a long time for copper to go verdigris. They darken very slowly. The blue green color shows up first near the solder joints. Some of these are ten years old and are starting to have a light patina all over, but none of them are deep verdigris all over yet.

If you decide to make these, you will be able to buy the pipe at a local big box store, but you may have to buy some of the fittings online. The 4-way is especially hard to source. I'm not sure where Tom found them, but I would like to get more myself. I feel the need for another trellis approaching...

Rosefolly

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clipped on: 10.13.2012 at 12:04 am    last updated on: 10.13.2012 at 12:05 am

Helping Summer-Stressed Roses

posted by: ingrid_vc on 09.25.2012 at 12:19 pm in Antique Roses Forum

In spite of constant watering, some of my roses were looking rather sad, partially defoliated, no blooms - definitely not an ornament in the garden. Without much of a conscious thought process I discovered that they could be remarkably revitalized with some very simple measures.

1. I added a lot more mulch in the form of fallen leaves from my trees. Some of these roses didn't have much mulch left and I'd more or less ignored that situation. Bad gardener!

2. In addition to the usual handwatering, which I discovered did not always penetrate deeper in my dry soil, I directed a trickle of water to these roses, sometimes overnight, to thoroughly drench the soil.

3. If the rose had some buds or they developed because of the extra TLC they were now getting, I ruthlessly pinched them all off. Blooms in high heat are often not something to write home about, so this was not a great sacrifice.

I have to say I was surprised by the results. Filled with gratitude, my roses sprouted new leaves which soon filled out the bush. I then removed the tired old leaves that had still been hanging on and the garden now looks so much better. It didn't cost a penny (except for the extra trickled water), was not a great deal of work and I now have a happy-looking garden. Sometimes the simplest things can bring the greatest rewards. Many of you undoubtedly already do all these things but for some reason I'd never thought of doing all three at the same time, and I'm very excited about the results. It has saved the life of Mme. Joseph Schwartz which had looked skeletal for some time, the the point where I was considering taking her out. She looks great now and even has (tiny) flowers. There were so many buds after she recovered that I didn't have the energy to keep removing them!

Ingrid

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clipped on: 10.04.2012 at 05:47 pm    last updated on: 10.04.2012 at 05:47 pm