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Countertop Geology, Part 5: Marble, Quartzite and other Favorites

posted by: karin_mt on 01.14.2014 at 06:22 pm in Kitchens Forum

This is round five of the Great Rocks Thread!

Please post your rock questions here. I've copied the basic info about quartzite and marble here because this is the most frequent question.

Quartzite and marble are hopelessly (deliberately?) mixed up in the decorative stone industry. My point, aside from just loving rocks, is to help folks learn how to tell the difference between the two so you are not at the mercy of a sales rep when a multi-thousand dollar purchase hangs in the balance.

Quartzite is much harder than marble and will not etch when exposed to acids. You can tell the difference between quartzite and marble by doing the scratch test and the etch test.

Scratch Test
Take a glass bottle or a glass tile with you when you go stone shopping. Find a rough, sharp edge of the stone. Drag the glass over the edge of the stone. Press pretty hard. Try to scratch the glass with the stone.

Quartzite will bite right into the glass and will leave a big scratch mark.
Any feldspar will do the same. (Granites are made mostly of feldspar)

Calcite and dolomite (that's what marble and limestone are made of) will not scratch. In fact you will be able to feel in your hand that the rock won't bite into the glass. It feels slippery, no matter how hard you press.

PS - don't press so hard that you risk breaking the glass in your hand. You shouldn't need to press that hard!

Etch Test
Etching is when the surface of a rock is dissolved from acids like lemon juice, vinegar, wine, etc. It is the primary bummer about using marble in a kitchen. Etching is most noticeable on polished rocks. Etching is not prevented by sealers, no matter what you hear from the sales rep!

Doing the etch test is simple: bring home a sample of the rock and put lemon juice or vinegar on it. Even after a few minutes the results are usually obvious. Etched areas look duller and are discolored compared to the rest of the slab.

Some people get conflicting results with these two tests, but normally anything in the marble family will not scratch glass and it will etch.

Quartzite and rocks in the granite family will scratch glass and will not etch.

For reference, here are links to the other rock threads, in which many types of rocks have been discussed.

Rocks 101: The Lowdown on Super White

Rocks 102: Marble, Quartzite and Other Rocks in the Kitchen

Rocks 103: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Rocks part 4, Marble, Granite, Quartzite

With that, let the rock conversations continue!
-Karin

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 04.07.2014 at 09:22 pm    last updated on: 04.07.2014 at 09:22 pm

Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

posted by: karin_mt on 05.25.2013 at 09:51 am in Kitchens Forum

This is round three of the Great Rocks Thread! It appears we at GW have a large appetite for discussing and sharing pictures of rocks.

Please post your rock questions here. I've copied the first post from Rocks 102 here to lay the foundation.

Quartzite and marble are hopelessly (deliberately?) mixed up in the decorative stone industry. My point, aside from just loving rocks, is to help folks learn how to tell the difference between the two so you are not at the mercy of a sales rep when a multi-thousand dollar purchase hangs in the balance.

Quartzite is much harder than marble and will not etch when exposed to acids. You can tell the difference between quartzite and marble by doing the scratch test.

Take a glass bottle or a glass tile with you when you go stone shopping. (Glass tile idea is courtesy of MaggiePie11, what a good idea!) Find a rough, sharp edge of the stone. Drag the glass over the edge of the stone. Press pretty hard. Try to scratch the glass with the stone.

Quartzite will bite right into the glass and will leave a big scratch mark.
Any feldspar will do the same. (Granites are made mostly of feldspar)

Calcite and dolomite (that's what marble and limestone are made of) will not scratch. In fact you will be able to feel in your hand that the rock won't bite into the glass. It feels slippery, no matter how hard you press.

PS - don't press so hard that you risk breaking the glass in your hand. You shouldn't need to press that hard!

For reference, here are links to the other rock threads, in which many types of rocks have been discussed. If you read through both of these threads you will earn an honorary degree in Kitchen Geology.

Rocks 101: The Lowdown on Super White.

Rocks 102: Marble, Quartzite and Other Rocks in the Kitchen.

With that, let the rock conversations continue!
-Karin

NOTES:

also links to the first and second threads.
clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 10:09 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 10:10 pm

Laundry detergent for Miele- whites, coloreds, darks etc

posted by: GWlolo on 07.24.2013 at 07:28 pm in Laundry Room Forum

We usually buy whatever is on sale at Costco. For the new house, we were lucky enough to get a barely used 220v older pair (W1918/ T1515). DH who is our laundry chief would really like to make sure we use the best detergent to give us the cleanest clean and make the clothes last longer. So what do I get to try - do liquid or powder matter?

NOTES:

good post on products for Miele.
clipped on: 11.06.2013 at 08:01 pm    last updated on: 11.06.2013 at 08:02 pm

Whole House Surge Protector - Advice Needed

posted by: vivi68 on 04.22.2012 at 01:27 pm in Electrical Wiring Forum

I am looking for a whole house surge protector that I can mount next to my circuit breaker panel. I have looked at the Leviton 51120, the 51110 and the 42120.

The 51120 has no neutral to ground or line to ground protection from what I can see.
The 51110 has only a 20mm MOV vs 40 mm for the 51120 and the 41120.
I have seen the 51110 for around $60; the 51120, about $200; and the 41120 for around $400.
Is ground protection needed? Is the 41120 overkill for a single home? Do I need to spend $400 for adequate protection?

It's very important to me to protect all my appliances and electronics. We experience too many power failures. Desperately need advice.

NOTES:

lots of explainations on surge protection from brickeyee and bud, with dissing of westom
clipped on: 08.11.2013 at 11:00 am    last updated on: 08.11.2013 at 11:03 am

Rocks #4 marble, granite, quartzite

posted by: Peke on 06.25.2013 at 06:24 pm in Kitchens Forum

Karin, I looked for #4, but couldn't find it.

Kksmama, your slab will look wonderful. I can't wait to see it.

Am I still in last place? I haven't had time to look at slabs lately because of American Range oven issues. It will probably blow my house up then I can start the remodeling process all over again. Maybe I should find a cave to live in. Go back to simpler times. 😁

Warming drawer and microwave drawer were delivered. I guess my cabinet guy did me a favor by not finishing my kitchen. I had time to redo the island plans. Now if I could just get him here.

So if I take the Sea Pearl I will have to totally change the colors I wanted to use. No blues. 😞

If I take the Sea Pearl I will have to settle for a bridge on the back of the rangetop. There will not be enough slab to leave it in one piece. Will this be strong enough to support the Bluestar range top? It is pretty heavy.

My only other choice is to make the island smaller. Much smaller! I need the storage and prep space though.

What does everyone think about the bridge? Yes or no?
Peke

NOTES:

rock thread with KarinMT
clipped on: 08.10.2013 at 10:53 am    last updated on: 08.10.2013 at 10:54 am

New To Kitchens? Posting Pics? Read Me! [Help keep on Page 1]

posted by: buehl on 07.16.2013 at 10:22 pm in Kitchens Forum

Welcome! If you are new to the Kitchens Forum, you may find the following information and links helpful.

Note: This will probably be the final "Read Me" thread. The FAQs are almost done!


The Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)/Articles pages contain helpful information about how to navigate this site as well as the world of kitchen renovations.

The Kitchen Forum Acronyms will help you understand some of the acronyms used frequently in posts.

The Finished Kitchens Blog has pictures and information about many GW members' finished kitchens. Not only can you see them alphabetically, but you can also use the "Find-A-Kitchen" function to utilize several search options if you're looking for specific things like a kitchen w/a Beverage Center or a kitchen w/a mix of dark and light cabinets. Access "Find-A-Kitchen" via the via the menu bar at the top of any FKB page. Additionally, "Find-A-Kitchen" contains a link to "In-Progress Kitchens" for those members' kitchens that are not quite ready for the FKB. There is also a link to "Coming Soon Kitchens" for those kitchens that are ready for the FKB but have not yet been added. To access the "In-Progress Kitchens", the "Coming Soon Kitchens", and the "FKB Categories", see the links on the menu bar at the top of any FKB page.

The Appliances Forum is very useful when you have questions specific to appliances.

To start off the kitchen remodel process...take the Sweeby Test. Then, move on to Beginning a Kitchen Plan.

Other topics such as layouts, planning for storage, and stone materials are discussed in later topics in this thread. Even more information can be found by doing a search on the forum.

Tips:

  • Before posting a question, please search the forum. There's a very good chance someone has already asked the question.

  • When using the "search" function, be sure to use the search box on the bottom of the page, not the top!

  • Note, however, that you will probably have better luck searching if you use Google (or similar search engine) than if you use the Forum search function. When using Google, to limit your results to Garden Web, include the following in your search criteria: ***site:ths.gardenweb.com

  • In the Subject, the site changes the double quote used as the inches indicator (") to a single quote ('). We don't know why. To compensate, use two single quotes and it will appear as a double quote in the Subject. Luckily, the double quote works in the message box.

  • When composing a new thread, you have a couple of options:

    • Have replies emailed to you: check the box offering this option. However, you must have "Allow other users to send you email via forms at our site." box checked in your profile for this to work (see the "Your Profile" link at the very top of the page) [See the post later in this thread with the Subject: Getting Emails Sent To You...3-step Process]

    • Insert a link: When you "preview" your message, you will be provided with two boxes for a link...one is for the link itself and the second is for the name or description of the link.

  • New! A new function was recently added, you can now edit a post that you've submitted. So, if you discover a typo or realize you made a mistake, select the "Edit Post" link in the upper right corner of the post under the "Clippings" section. One thing, it's good etiquette to add a comment as to what you changed. (No, it's not required.)

  • When using the "Clip this post" option (far upper right corner of each post, small print), remember that only the current post is clipped, not the entire thread. Also, you are allowed a maximum of 50 clippings. Once you reach this max, you will no longer be able to clip or email posts.


How are the home page and the Forum organized? (based on the Kitchen Forum's FAQs entries)

  • The Kitchens Forum home page lists 30 thread titles, starting with those that don't yet have a response. After the unanswered threads, threads are listed in order of most recent response. That first page displays the last 2 hours or so of activity. (If there is no response to a thread in an hour or two, the unanswered thread usually starts to drop.)
  • Below the thread list are page numbers 1-67 for the total 67 pages of threads available -- capturing maybe 2 months or so of threads, less when the Forum is busy.
  • Below that (and at the top of the thread list as well) is a space for you to switch to the Conversations or Gallery "sides" - these are set up similarly but are not nearly as active.
  • Next down is a Search box -- very important! This is also the Search box you should use (not the one at the top of the page.)
    • Always refresh the page two or three times b/f assuming a thread has disappeared right after starting it.
    • As to searching...a thread will not be found doing a GW search for up to 24 hours after it has been started. This may seem too technical, but...searches are done against what are known as "indexes". Indexes use key fields/words to find things. iVillage only indexes threads once a day. So, that means that until your thread is "indexed", it won't show up in a search. If you start a thread just before the index is taken, you will be able to retrieve your thread by searching soon after creation. If, however, you start your thread right after the daily index, then you will have to wait almost 24 hours for the next index.

  • Next is a place for you to start a new thread. And finally there are some instructions and links at the bottom.


Kitchen Forum "Sides"

Discussions: This is the "side" you are on. It is for on-topic discussions concerning kitchens...renovations, use of, etc.

Conversations: This is the "side" where you can post off topic threads such as regional get-togethers and non-kitchen subjects.

Gallery: This is the "side" where members often post pictures...especially if you're posting a lot or a finished kitchen.


Again, welcome and good luck! The journey is wild, sometimes bumpy, but fun and very rewarding in the end!


Note: The links in this Read Me thread have been updated to reflect the new Finished Kitchens Blog (thank you StarPooh!)

NOTES:

This may be the last thread on "New to Kitchens?..." that buehl has maintained. 8-10-13
clipped on: 08.10.2013 at 08:33 am    last updated on: 08.10.2013 at 08:35 am

Mongoct, Noopd, or Others, Please Advise Me on My Shower Plan

posted by: enduring on 04.18.2013 at 12:00 am in Bathrooms Forum

As I stated on another thread I loved Noopd's bathroom. The shower includes the Hansgrohe Raindance E 420 Air 2jet Overhead Shower along with a handheld.

Noopd's shower picture This is the GW thread that has Noopd's shower pictured - the first picture posted 1/2 way down.

I am just beginning my second bathroom remodel. I want a mounted shower head as well as a hand held shower head. I would like to consider the use of the Raindance 420 shower head. I only have the room for a 3'x4' sized shower (Kohler cast iron pan) that will be enclosed.

Purist Shower base

The shower head is 17" wide by 8" deep. It projects from the wall on an integrated arm by about 17 or 18" at the end of the fixture. So that means the head will be nearing the center of the shower footprint.

I can not go into the ceiling to mount the shower head because it is a cold attic.

The italics below is edited information to correct the error message that was popping up with my original link

To see the Raindance E 420 Air 2jet go to the home page of the PRO Hansgrohe, at:
http://pro.hansgrohe-usa.com

Select Hansgrohe, to showers, to Raindance. On the Raindance page the E420 2 jet should be on the bottom row of the first page of products in this category. Again there is a link to the "Assembly Instructions" on the actual product page. See page 4, and 31-38 for details of this shower head.

Questions:
1) Is this head too large for my sized shower space?
2) Is a 2" drain large enough for the shower head, plus a hand held shower, if both are running at the same time? 3) The specs state that the drain is to have a capacity to drain >50 liters/min (>13.2 gal/min). I can not interpret the graph that shows water output using the different combo options of shower heads. The graph is on page 33 of the "Assembly Instructions"
3) If the shower head is too large, are there other Hansgrohe options that will provide a nice shower experience? My DH loves showers with some gusto. He works hard farming and I would love to have a well thought out shower for him.

Other thoughts are welcome as well. Thank you very much for taking the time to help me.

This post was edited by enduring on Fri, Apr 19, 13 at 9:23

NOTES:

about the Hansgrohe Raindance E420 2jet.
clipped on: 04.19.2013 at 01:33 pm    last updated on: 06.16.2013 at 10:13 am

Help with Choosing Bypass Shower Doors.

posted by: enduring on 05.24.2013 at 09:45 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Hi there, I am getting ready to make my door selection for my shower. I have decided to get a bypass door to save some space. I would like information on the Cardinal Skyline. I saw this door online and a local glass company uses Cardinal, so I am considering it for my bypass door. Also the CRL Serenity bypass door that another local glass company uses is nice. Both are stainless steel with exposed roller systems.

Any feedback would be much appreciated :) I bumped a thread on the topic from this past winter. In that thread someone said that they always see problems with Cardinal. Is that other's experience as well? It's hard for me to believe that my local glass company would use an inferior/inconsistent product.

ps, I hope you are all having the beginnings of a nice holiday with your loved ones. We just went out to the local biker bar (runner up best in Iowa) for supper and a drink. Biker as in bicycle.

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 05.25.2013 at 02:56 pm    last updated on: 05.25.2013 at 02:56 pm

Appliance Surge Protectors

posted by: richard_f on 04.23.2013 at 07:44 pm in Laundry Room Forum

Several years ago we had a new GE Profile refrigerator that stopped cooling, so we called GE and scheduled a service call. When the repair person arrived he checked it out and told us the main control board was dead and that they'd replace it since it was under warranty. I asked him if there was anything that might have caused the failure he told me that it was almost certainly a power surge.

So I asked him why he was so sure and he told me that mine was the third dead appliance control board he'd seen on my street in the last 24 hours, which means that our local utility had had an issue causing a surge, probably due to work they were doing in the area. So for all of us who have expensive laundry appliances with electronic control systems, an appliance surge protector is cheap insurance.

I like this one because it has a high joule rating, will continue to pass power to the appliance after a surge (very important for a refrigerator or freezer) and has an indicator light that tells you when it's ability to protect the appliance is exhausted and the unit should be replaced, but I'm sure there are other good ones out there.

It's an RCA PSAPP1R Appliance Surge Protector for people who want to google it instead of using the link to amazon below.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004AM5Z5O/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00 ?ie=UTF8&psc=1

NOTES:

clipped 5-11-13
clipped on: 05.11.2013 at 07:36 pm    last updated on: 05.11.2013 at 07:36 pm

How do I Prep/Insulate Stud Walls For Moisture Protections (exter

posted by: enduring on 04.21.2013 at 10:52 am in Remodeling Forum

HOW DO I PREP/INSULATE STUD WALL FOR MOISTURE PROTECTION AND INSULATION (BOTH EXTERIOR & INTERIOR)

I am now on to my 2nd bathroom. I didn't ask this insulation question at the time of the first bathroom remodel so I don't really know how to do this. I just assumed I knew on the first job.

THE PLANNED DESIGN:
I have an exterior wall that will need insulation. Then the wall covering. I plan to have a vanity and toilet up against this exterior wall. I may or may not tile a wainscot in the open areas of the wall. Other wise the walls will be painted, and cabinets, vanity and toilet installed. The plumbing will come up from the floor and not in the wall.

I will have an exhaust fan in the room vented through the roof.

I will have a shower and washer and dryer along an interior wall that is also torn down to the studs. The other side of the wall is lathe and plaster, plaster keys visible in the wall space.

THE SITUATION:
There was some mold growing on the dry wall that was placed over the original plaster in the room. the mold was probably a result of moisture leaking around the drop in sink, and the shower surround. Everything is now out, down to the studs. The studs will be looked over by my carpenter. I will not be doing the structural repairs, he will do what needs doing.

What I see looking at the sheathing of this old house is silver dollar sized holes at every stud, on the outside black material. I do know that there is 12" siding of a pressed material and painted on the exterior. I had thought that the old lab narrow siding was still under all, but this appears to not be the case as the holes are indication to me that insulation was blown in after it was built. I am thinking that the old lap siding was removed in the 70's and it was resided after insulation blown in. I will see DML later today and will ask her if she remembers this part of the remodel from the 70's.

Then 5 years ago my DML put up Sears vinyl siding over the 12" pressed board siding. There was a layer of closed or open cell insulation that they installed under the vinyl.

QUESTIONS:
1) Do I just get the paper backed insulation and staple it in place with the paper facing into the room?

2) If this exterior wall would have a shower against it, how would I do the insulation, the same?

3) Is the siding layers an issue in the insulation/moisture protection strategy?

4) I would like to treat the wall with the wash/dryer to help with sound deadening, as this wall is shared with the living room where the TV is located. How can this be done?

5) Do I insulate the interior walls too? There will be some pocket doors so those wont have insulation needs.

I have to run, but I can post a plan view and some elevations of my project this early afternoon if that is helpful.

This post was edited by enduring on Sun, Apr 21, 13 at 10:54

NOTES:

my post on insulation and vapor protection on exterior wall.
clipped on: 04.22.2013 at 06:54 pm    last updated on: 04.22.2013 at 06:55 pm

RE: What's the proper way to judge counter/backsplash, cabinet co (Follow-Up #22)

posted by: davidahn on 02.10.2013 at 04:52 am in Kitchens Forum

First, don't take this as preachy, and if you do, know I'm also preaching to myself, as no one is as guilty as I of believing that only making the BEST choice will make me happy.

But psychologist Barry Schwartz (among others) claims that having FEWER choices leads to MORE satisfaction with the choice made. In other words, when you have 4 choices, you can be fairly certain you made the best choice. When you have 25 choices, you are likely to make a GREAT choice but be UNHAPPY because you can never be sure there wasn't a better choice: it's called "opportunity cost."

I read another study which I can't seem to find now that showed that decisions arrived at by gut feeling lead to more satisfaction than decisions made after extensive analysis. I have since tried to be in touch with my gut feelings when deciding. But I am prone like most GWers to overanalysis. Fight it!

Here is a link that might be useful: TED Talk - The Paradox of Choice by Barry Schwartz

NOTES:

interesting thoughts on choice.
clipped on: 03.04.2013 at 07:27 am    last updated on: 04.21.2013 at 10:03 am

decent calcatta marble-like tile

posted by: kcts on 10.09.2012 at 03:21 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Hello. I am in the process of remodeling my bathroom due to water leaking. Because I did not expect this happening, I cannot afford to use expensive, real marble tiles that I like. Could you recommend good quality, but not expensive alternative? I like the look of calcatta gold marble. I checked the past forum discussion, but I found only expensive alternative. Thank you for your advice!

NOTES:

porcelaine marble tile recommendations :)
clipped on: 04.19.2013 at 01:53 pm    last updated on: 04.19.2013 at 01:54 pm

LED users: advice from your experience

posted by: joel_bc on 03.29.2013 at 12:56 pm in Lighting Forum

I realize a lot of people have used fluorescent tubes for shop lighting for a long time, but I never liked that. I've got two 60w incandescents in a household-type fixture over a workbench and then individual 60w directed-light lamps on the workbenches themselves. I find myself replacing a bulb every couple months (which case is said to be very different if you've got LED) - plus I know the setup I use now draws much more electricity than it needs to.

I'm interested in screw-base LEDs that would work in the current fixtures and be similar to the light output of 60w incandescents (plus, ideally, would have a pleasing coloration to the light).

I'd like to hear about your experience with household-type, screw-base LEDs - not what the manufacturers say.

Are your LED bulbs actually lasting a long time? If you can remember bulb brand names, that would be good to know (but don't be shy about posting if you can't remember that). Do you remember about how much you paid per bulb?

(If you're in Canada, where did you buy your bulbs?)

Thanks

NOTES:

talks about bulbs
clipped on: 04.18.2013 at 02:30 pm    last updated on: 04.18.2013 at 02:30 pm

LED recessed cans guide for kitchen ...

posted by: davidtay on 01.30.2012 at 01:27 am in Lighting Forum

A collection of tips/ answers
Since kitchens have higher lighting requirements, I like to use 35 lumen per sq ft as a rule to compute the number of lights. If there are additional sources of light that will be used, the output (lumens not watts) from those sources can be deducted from the total.

Placement/ layout
1. Cans should be > 24 to 30 inches from the wall (on center). Most countertop spaces have upper cabinets (typically ~ 12" deep) + crown molding. The edge of the can may be spaced ~ 12" away from the edge of the crown molding (if present or cabinet if there is no crown molding) making the average distance between 26 to 30 inches.

2. Assuming the need for a fairly uniformly lit space @ 35 lumens per sq ft, the cans may have to be spaced closer together - between 3 - 4 ft apart (if all general lighting is provided by recessed lights). A fairly regular pattern is preferable to a random layout.

3. The actual layout of cans will be impacted by the location of ceiling joists, HVAC ducting, electrical wiring, plumbing, ceiling height, fire suppression sprinklers and other obstructions above the ceiling.

Dimming
The Cree LR6 series lamps do not dim as well as the later models (CR6, ...). ELV dimmers probably work better with LR6 than incandescent dimmers since the total load of the lights may not meet the minimum load requirement for the incandescent dimmer.

Dimmers such as the Lutron Diva CL dimmers work well. The max output is 95%.

Some Choices (in order of preference) and notes
Cree CR6 or ECO-575 (Home Depot branded CR6)
ECO4-575 (Home Depot branded Cree CR4 4" recessed light)
The above are only available in 2700k light color.

Cree LR6 series - including the LE6.

The Cree CR6 and LR6 lamps will not fit into 5" housings.

The standard LR6 behaves more like a surface mount than a recessed light as the LED emitters are close to the surface and the recess is shallow. Some may not like the amount of light spillage (standard LR6).

There is a higher output version of the LR6 that has a much deeper recess.

To prevent the Cree lamps from falling out, the 3 prongs have to be fully extended and a slight clockwise twist made when push installing. The slight clockwise twist will ensure that the prongs are fully extended.

The Cree lamps are currently the best available today (2012).

Sylvania RT-6, RT-4. The lights could be easier to install than Cree lamps as they utilize the torsion spring mechanism. However, the lights do not look as pleasant as the Cree lamps.

The Cree and Sylvania lamps do outperform 26W CFLs (and incandescents) in a standard recessed can in terms of light spread and output as the standard bulb in a can solution traps a significant amount of light. The Cree and Sylvania recessed lamp solutions referenced above have all the LED elements facing outwards so that the effective light output is higher.

The CRI (Color Rendition Index) of Cree and Sylvania recessed lamps > 80.

There is no warm up time required for Cree recessed lamps, unlike CFL light bulbs.

Most recessed lighting is used with flat ceilings. Sloped ceilings would require special solutions such as the LE6 or some other form of lighting (i.e. -non recessed lighting).

Some common objections to recessed can lights stem from
1. looks and performance of traditional can lights (standard bulb in a can)
2. swiss cheese effect from too many holes.

NOTES:

LED can lights
clipped on: 04.18.2013 at 02:26 pm    last updated on: 04.18.2013 at 02:27 pm

RE: Rain shower ? Want to decide if I should install one (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: noopd on 04.05.2013 at 09:30 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Here's my experience:

I never like rainshower head that much before.. I tried them a few times at hotels/resort, and they are all kinda weak and I keep getting water in my eyes.. so I didn't understand all these craze for rainshower head past few years.

For our home remodel, since we have a few bathrooms, I actually picked a rainshower head for my master bathroom. Why? I like this particular one because it's pretty wide. I want to get a "waterfall" showerhead. and I want to have an open bathroom/open shower for the master. Rain shower head have the water go straight down from the showerhead and you don't get a lot of splashes. It looks mordern and I save money on huge glass panels.

So, now, my master bathroom has a rainshower with waterfall feature, and a hand shower. I found I like this one quite a bit. The rain fall is nice,, it has this "air" technology to make the waterdrop really big and nice even with waterflow standard. I can actually get a good shower and I can duck out my head and still give good water coverage for my body. If I need extra water, i can switch to the hand shower or the rain fall.. So, I'm quite please with this model. I have been using it for a year and a half.

In your case, I think you will regret it if you only have the rainshower head because it will take a long time to rince shapoo out for long hair. But if you have a hand shower too on the side, then it's fine..

When you shop for rainshower head, beware of the kind of rainshower head that just give small streams of water, and not rain drop like.. i think those sucks.

In my guest room, we have hand shower and bodyspray.. those are nice too if you like lots of water

Info:
Showerhead: Hansgrohe Raindance E420 Air 2
http://bit.ly/Y3D6od
http://bit.ly/XuzoZX
control, diverter, thermostat: Hansgrohe Axor Urquiola
http://bit.ly/WdFckY

This post was edited by noopd on Fri, Apr 5, 13 at 22:38

NOTES:

beautiful shower Axor hansogrohe
clipped on: 04.10.2013 at 08:42 pm    last updated on: 04.10.2013 at 08:43 pm

Floor Prep Questions Before Stone Tile Install

posted by: enduring on 05.25.2012 at 07:09 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Hi, I have removed my plaster on 2 walls getting ready for new BR remodel. I have removed the fixtures and the old linoleum. Now there is glue residue that is covering the old T&G fir flooring that I wanted to keep as a subfloor. Last fall I asked this forum about prep for this floor and now need help getting some clarification on my plans.

I need to get my floor ready for tile and warming system. What I have planned is to keep the 3/4" diagonal subfloor & the 3/4" fir flooring, creating about 1.5" of subfloor. The wood is all old wood with nice grain. The joist at this point are 21" OC and I will be adding another joist between each of these. I will not sister these joist, nor will I use blocking. I will screw these joist into the diagonal subflooring. The long joist run about 10' free span. The width of the room is about 6.5'. There are 5 joist total. The joist become about 10" OC, I guess, after inserting the extra joist. The crawl space to do this will be inconvenient but can be done (I'm going to have my 21yo son do it).

So, now that I have the linoleum off. I was going to screw down 3/8" exterior grade plywood, into the top layering of flooring. I was not going to glue the plywood. I was not going to remove the old linoleum glue either. I was just going to make sure that the fir flooring was smooth before installing the plywood.

Then, having a nice surface to work with I will apply my electric floor warming system. I will cover this heating system with self leveling compound (SLC). I have read Staceyneal's post on this topic and will use her techniques that she learned from Mongoct, to seal any gaps, preventing escaping SLC. She had a great post on the use of SLC for her BR remodel.

Ditra applied over the SLC using modified thinset.

Install 12x6" slate tile with unmodified thinset over the Ditra.

Questions:
1) Is my plan sound?

2) Is it ok to not remove the adhesive before putting in the plywood? I REALLY think it is TOO hard to remove this adhesive!

3) How close together do I need to space my screws on the plywood when I install it over my fir T&G?

4) Do I need to prep the plywood before the SLC?

5) Do I have the plumber come in and put in toilet, tub, and sink rough-ins before the SLC or after?

6) Have I missed something?

Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you have input I would welcome it.

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 04.09.2013 at 06:51 pm    last updated on: 04.09.2013 at 06:51 pm

Self Leveling Compound In

posted by: enduring on 09.16.2012 at 12:53 am in Bathrooms Forum

Got my floor warming system in and the self leveling compound in tonight! I had my DH read Stacyneil's thread on how she installed the SLC. After we were finishing up he came into the house and chuckled, "I just realized what 'DH' stands for", explaining that he didn't know what Stacyneil meant when using "DH".

I got the floor ready for stone tile by having my DH add extra joist and my DS1 screw down a plywood underlayment over my existing subfloor and fir T&G. I got the floor warming wires installed today. I put a layer of plastic lath over the wires. Primer went on the ply prior to laying down the wires. Everything so far is working as planned. My DS2 helped us with with tonights pour of SLC. Thank goodness he was here to help. The finished depth of the SLC is about 3/4" (under 1/2") Here are some pictures:

Initial caulking, and other support to keep SLC in place. The wood lath was used to support the foamy roll. I didn't want the SLC to spill into the stud space. I hope I can get the lath out but its caulked in place pretty good. The walls where the drywall is in place, I put 3/4" self sticking weather stripping to add as an expansion joint. I am hoping that when I remove the wood lath I can have a nice space between the SLC and the studs. The foamy stuff was caulked in place too, so if I can't get the lath out I still have a thin expansion joint:
Photobucket

Wires in place, still have to add the sensor. I used the metal strips to secure the wire as well as a hot glue gun. I was about 8" short from complete. I call that perfect:
IMG_2618 rotated

Green lath carefully stapled in place:
Photobucket

2 buckets poured. I used a notched window washer squeegee to spread the material:
Photobucket

Completed and drying:
Photobucket

Next Friday I will have the tub installed then I can finish the walls.

NOTES:

my post
clipped on: 04.09.2013 at 06:50 pm    last updated on: 04.09.2013 at 06:51 pm

Olychick, and others that have vanity appliance garages

posted by: enduring on 04.06.2013 at 04:05 am in Bathrooms Forum

I would like to ask about your appliance garage layout and how you did it. What would you definitely keep and what would be re-worked with the setup if you could make changes? I'm looking for tips for the layout and any functional issues with this concept.

NOTES:

electrical outlets in an appliance garage in the bathroom
clipped on: 04.06.2013 at 10:44 pm    last updated on: 04.06.2013 at 10:44 pm

Adding Joist to Existing & Intact Floor

posted by: enduring on 11.12.2011 at 01:18 pm in Remodeling Forum

Hello, I want to tile the floor of this 6.5'x9.5' bathroom. This was an add on in the 30's or 40's. The problem is that the 2x8 joists are 21" OC and not adequate to to support stone tile installation. I have added pictures of the crawl space to illustrate the current conditions. This add on has joist running perpendicular to the rest of the house.

picture #1. general area of concern:
Photobucket

My plan is to add 2x8 joist in between the existing joist for a total of 4 additional joist.

Picture #2. Close up of the far end resting probably 8" on the ledger (or what ever it's called).

Picture #2:
Photobucket

Picture #3. This is the end that meets the existing house and is kind of poorly secured in my opionion.

Picture #3:
Photobucket

Questions:

1) So can I add hangers to all the ends that have just toe nailed attachments to the joist at the main house as in picture #3?

2) How would it be best to add additional joist in between the existing joist?

3) How do these additional joist get fastened to the sub-floor?

BTW the bath room floor is as follows:
1) joist
2) diagonal 3/4" x 4"
3) 3/4" fir tongue and grove
4) layer of old linoleum

Any information would be very helpful. Thanks for your help.

NOTES:

Joist question
clipped on: 11.13.2011 at 10:05 am    last updated on: 03.24.2013 at 05:18 pm

Skirted Versus Non-Skirted Toilets

posted by: sandy808 on 06.23.2011 at 10:26 am in Bathrooms Forum

We are in the process of selecting toilets for our new house and are looking for just a basic toilet that actually flushes. There seem to be complaints about them all but the American Standard Cadet 3 seems to have excellent reviews, and offer both skirted and non-skirted versions.

I feel that many toilets are overpriced and over gimmicked, which I have an ethical issue with.

The skirted look like they would be the easiest to clean....at first glance. When looking into the specs on the various brands of skirted toilets, they have open backs behind the skirt. This does not appear to me to be a great thing. You can't exactly move the toilet out to clean in there, and who would want to anyway. Sooner or later, the crud would get back in there. The American Standard skirted does not look like it fits snugly against the wall behind the skirted portion.

We did see a Kohler that fit closer to the wall, but we haven't been impressed with Kohler toilets.

Please share your experiences with the skirted toilets and the cleaning issues associated with them, as we need to get them very soon.

Thanks in advance!

Sandy

NOTES:

good toilet info and herring maven posts.
clipped on: 03.23.2013 at 07:21 pm    last updated on: 03.23.2013 at 07:21 pm

Looking for Narrow French Doors

posted by: enduring on 03.21.2013 at 08:22 pm in Remodeling Forum

I would like to consider cutting an opening in a room to the outside and add a set of french doors. I would like to add french doors because the room is small and there is not enough room for the swing of a full door. A sliding door won't work either for the same reason. I am not at home to measure but I think a rough opening of 36" would be great. Maybe a 48" rough would work, but again, I'm not home to measure (on vacation). I realize this will make mighty small doors. Is there such an animal? Is there such a thing as custom made insulated glass doors?
Thanks.

NOTES:

recommendation of narrow doors for use in french door configuration.
clipped on: 03.22.2013 at 09:13 pm    last updated on: 03.22.2013 at 09:14 pm

The lowdown on Super White

posted by: karin_mt on 10.26.2012 at 07:01 pm in Kitchens Forum

I am mostly a lurker here so far, and as our kitchen remodel plans take shape I have been enjoying seeing other people's progress and taking comfort that there is a strong community of kindred spirits who like to sweat all the glorious details of a kitchen!

I'm a geologist so perusing the slab yard is always fun. Rarely do you get to see so many fascinating rocks all in one place.

So today when I picked up my backsplash tile and put down a deposit for some small slabs (a separate story), I had a great time visiting various slabs with one of the fabricators. We talked about the minerals and textures that make some rocks winners in the kitchen, and others not so good.

I asked to see some Super White, knowing there is a lack of clarity about what this rock really is. He gave me a piece to bring home and I did some diagnostics. Maybe this is common knowledge to you all, but here's the lowdown.

The rock is dolomitic marble. It's not quartzite - it's not even close to quartzite in terms or hardness or resistance to acid.

Dolomitic marble is a sibling to regular marble. Regular marble is made of calcite. Dolomite is made of calcite plus magnesium. Calcite is CaCO3 and dolomite is CaMgCO3. So this rock started out as the sedimentary rock called dolomite then was metamorphosed (heat + pressure) to cause the grains to recrystallize into dolomitic marble.

My hunch is that this marble would be slightly more resistant to etching than regular calcite marble. But it is still just as soft as marble and has all the other requirements of caring for marble. It sure is a beautiful rock. But no way will it wear like granite or quartzite.

The decorative stone industry has a whole different way of naming and classifying rocks than geologists do. (The first time someone showed me a back granite I protested loudly. There is no such thing as black granite!) But I am coming around to understand how the rocks are classified from the countertop point of view. So yes, the terms are contradictory and confusing, perhaps even deliberately so in some cases. But at least in this case I am certain of what the actual rock type is.

I hope that's helpful or illuminating. And if you have questions about the real identity or geologic history of your countertop, I may be able to shed some light!

Karin

NOTES:

part 1 of the rock thread by karin_mt.
clipped on: 03.22.2013 at 12:32 pm    last updated on: 03.22.2013 at 12:33 pm

Marble, quartzite and other rocks in the kitchen

posted by: karin_mt on 02.27.2013 at 11:35 pm in Kitchens Forum

The thread about Super White, quartzite, marble and all things stone has run its course up to the 150 post limit. Who knew we'd all have so much fun with that topic? So we'll start a new one here. I guess the first thread was Rocks 101, so this one must be Rocks 102.

I'll reiterate some key points here:

Quartzite and marble are hopelessly (deliberately?) mixed up in the decorative stone industry. My point, aside from just loving rocks, is to help folks learn how to tell the difference between the two so you are not at the mercy of a sales rep when a multi-thousand dollar purchase hangs in the balance.

Quartzite is much harder than marble and will not etch when exposed to acids. You can tell the difference between quartzite and marble by doing the scratch test.

Take a glass bottle with you when you go stone shopping. Find a rough, sharp edge of the stone. Drag the glass over the edge of the stone. Press pretty hard. Try to scratch the glass with the stone.

Quartzite will bite right into the glass and will leave a big scratch mark.
Any feldspar will do the same. (Granites are made mostly of feldspar)

Calcite and dolomite (that's what marble and limestone are made of) will not scratch. In fact you will be able to feel in your hand that the rock won't bite into the glass. It feels slippery, no matter how hard you press.

PS - don't press so hard that you risk breaking the glass bottle. You shouldn't need to press that hard!

That aside, we can talk about other rocks too. Coal, pumice, sparkly crystals, you name it. OK, I guess we're mostly interested in kitchen rocks. :)

Here is a link that might be useful: the lowdown on Super White (aka Rocks 101)

This post was edited by karin_mt on Wed, Feb 27, 13 at 23:41

NOTES:

part 2 of this rock thread
clipped on: 03.22.2013 at 12:32 pm    last updated on: 03.22.2013 at 12:32 pm

Help, am I buying everything I need for Hansgrohe shower?

posted by: james_444 on 01.27.2013 at 08:08 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Hello all,

First thanks in advance for the help. I want to buy the plumbing components for my shower. I've decided on a rain head with a hand shower on a shower rail. I don't want side sprays.

Here is what I think I need.

1. Hansgrohe 27474001 Raindance Downpour AIR Showerhead, 10-Inch, Chrome

2. Hansgrohe Shower Arm

3. Hansgrohe 01850181 3/4-Inch iBox with Service Stop

4. Hansgrohe 04231000 S Thermostatic Trim With Volume Control And Diverter, Chrome

5. Hansgrohe 27454002 Wall Outlet, Chrome

Am I missing any components?

Thanks

PS. By the way a reviewer on Amazon hates the Theromstaic trim and diverater. (Item 3) Has anyone have any bad experiences with it?

NOTES:

good info on shower, and a few links to more info down on the thread.
clipped on: 03.16.2013 at 10:04 am    last updated on: 03.16.2013 at 10:04 am

How Do I Put Together a Simple Wall Shower System

posted by: enduring on 02.16.2012 at 09:38 am in Bathrooms Forum

Hello, I have cross posted these questions to the Plumbing forum.

I would like to know a little about putting together a shower system. I am wanting a simple shower with some style. I like the idea of having a wall bar and a movable shower head that runs up and down the bar for different heights. I want the shower head to function as a hand held shower as well, to help with cleaning the shower. I have not determined if I will replace the tub for a tub/shower configuration or make this into a shower only system. This is a daily used BR but is very small - about 5'x7.5'.

I know there has to be some behind the scenes parts and this depends if the water mixes behind the wall or in the exposed fixture. BUT I don't know a whole lot more than that:)

In the bath in question for this post I would like to look into options to use a line of Axor.
1. Can I piece this together out of parts?

2. What parts does one need to install a wall shower with wall bar and tub
filler?

3. What parts are needed for just a wall shower with wall bar an
handshower?

4. Are there other quality showers that are cheaper?

As a side note, I like the Axor Montreux look. And would consider this line for my shower. I might rather use a modern minimalist style for easier cleaning though.

In my larger bathroom I am going to install an Axor Montreux tub filler with handheld shower. There will not be a shower surround, but a cast iron tub.
Photobucket

Thanks for any thoughts or ideas that you can share.

NOTES:

my question on how to put shower together last year 2012.
clipped on: 03.15.2013 at 06:04 pm    last updated on: 03.15.2013 at 06:04 pm

RE: We're DIY'ing A Shower Stall - Looking For Any Help/Tips (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: mongoct on 03.10.2013 at 07:16 pm in Bathrooms Forum

I'm the same as Bill. Kerdi for steamers, Hydroban for non-steamers.

I'll start you off in the direction of a cast iron receptor for your shower pan. If they are not in your budget, come back and we'll move on to the other options.

With any base, your walls will be a piece of cake. Cement board over the studs, then the cement board covered with Hydroban. Then tile. Tile size is up to you, but it can depend on the how flat you get the wall. The flatter your walls, the larger tile you can use.

But let's solve Step One, the pan. Do you like CI? At $500-$800, are they in your budget? Don't forget that it's ready to go. Set it and forget it. Or do you prefer an acrylic/plastic pan?

NOTES:

good brief instructions on hydrobaning a shower and CI pan.
clipped on: 03.10.2013 at 10:24 pm    last updated on: 03.10.2013 at 10:24 pm

Pantry photos/ pics of pantries

posted by: rhome410 on 02.03.2009 at 02:58 pm in Kitchens Forum

There are some great pantry threads that will eventually be lost and Starpooh suggested I post links here so that others can post and, hopefully, we'll keep some of these resources alive for those planning pantries in the future. (She pointed out that threads 'live' longer here than on the discussions side of the forum.) There is one thread, in particular, that has awesome photos of pantry interiors that I can open through a link I've saved, but if anyone posts on it, it doesn't become current again. Starpooh has put it in .pdf form and it is too large to download here, so I've linked it below.

Here is another walk-in pantry thread with helpful shelf spacing guidelines/recommendations:
http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/kitchbath/msg0518351723171.html

There is also a previous thread with photos of closet style pantries, which I'm still trying to track down. Of course, photos of pantry cabs will be helpful to people, too.

Anyway, here's hoping people will start showing off their pantries here, so we form a pantry album for others to consult.

Here is a link that might be useful: Thread as .pdf: Anyone Willing to Share the Inside of their Pantry?

NOTES:

archived pantry threads by Rhome
clipped on: 03.01.2013 at 07:43 am    last updated on: 03.01.2013 at 07:43 am

Show me your fridge surrounds with pullout pantry

posted by: susanne283 on 02.11.2013 at 12:33 am in Kitchens Forum

We plan on having a fridge surround custom built. Our house had a new kitchen when we moved in, but the fridge was in a small closet off the kitchen. We have moved it into the kitchen and are looking for ideas. Many thanks.....

NOTES:

pantry pullouts, see all on this thread. Lee Valley is mentioned as site to get quality pullouts.
clipped on: 03.01.2013 at 07:41 am    last updated on: 03.01.2013 at 07:42 am

Best inexpens. brand shower door

posted by: dee__dee on 01.14.2012 at 04:56 pm in Bathrooms Forum

I need to replace a sliding glass door on a standard size tub. I've had a 'custom' quote with install for 800 and I've seen the standard doors at Home Depot for 300-400.
I'm trying to find something inexpensive, but with finishing handles etc that don't look as cheap as the Home Depot brands. Can anyone suggest a few brands that are inexpensive yet have a more custom/expensive look to the hardware?
Thanks, appreciate any help.
Dee

NOTES:

recommendations of good shower doors
clipped on: 02.28.2013 at 06:52 pm    last updated on: 02.28.2013 at 06:52 pm

What type of hardware for pocket door?

posted by: kaysd on 09.12.2012 at 05:24 pm in Bathrooms Forum

We are installing 2 new pocket doors in our master bath - one from the bedroom into the vanity area, and one from vanity to the shower and toilet area. The doors will be 30" x 80" with recessed opaque glass panels, so they will be heavy because of the glass.

Our walls are open, so we can use any type of hardware. I have seen Johnson hardware recommended several times on this site, but is there any particular Johnson door frame or sliding hardware you would recommend? I told my GC to use Johnson hardware, but I don't think he is familiar with the brand.

NOTES:

read the whole thread for mongo and brickeye info.
clipped on: 02.28.2013 at 06:33 pm    last updated on: 02.28.2013 at 06:34 pm

RE: Kitchen lighting - size of recessed LED cans (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: davidahn on 02.28.2013 at 04:59 am in Kitchens Forum

I have to agree with your designer friend: I too believe 6" cans are outmoded. I feel even 4" cans look dated, but look a lot better than 6".

Our 10' high flat ceilings in the dining and kitchen (30'9" x 19'8") were completely redone (they were tray and vaulted before), and we put 26 3" mini-cans with 3.5W LED bulbs for general lighting, 16 3" mini-cans for task lighting (4 over main sink, 8 over main island, 4 over second island), 10 50W PAR20 incandescent bulbs in our 72" hood being replaced by 5W LED bulbs, and 3 pendants over the dining table which will have CFL bulbs in them.

I have replaced eight 6" can lights in my living room with 14 3" mini can lights with 3.5W bright white LED bulbs (350 lumens). While only 10 lumens/sq ft, this seems to offer adequate light for our 25' x 20' living room with 13.5' ceilings, with white ceilings, walls, and white marble (Botticino Fiorito). We have about 60 4" 12V MR16 can lights, and we've replaced the 40W halogen bulbs with 3.5W bright white LED bulbs. We have slightly less general light in these rooms than with the 40W halogen.

Your six 4" LED cans will likely be bright enough at 27 lumens/sq ft, but will depend on your wall, floor, and counter colors (darker surfaces absorb light, light surfaces reflect and diffuse light). I have 14.7 lumens/sq ft of general lighting, which feels a bit dim on their own despite white ceilings, white counters (Caesarstone Nougat), and white marble floors (Botticino Fiorito). With the island lights on (13.5 more lumens/sq ft), we have very good, bright light with 28 total lumens/sq ft. With the over-sink lights, range hood lights, pendants, and 41 lineal feet of in-cabinet accent lights on, we will have football field class lighting.

NOTES:

more info on can lights. 6" dated, get 3"
clipped on: 02.28.2013 at 06:14 pm    last updated on: 02.28.2013 at 06:15 pm

RE: Pendant Lighting? (Follow-Up #41)

posted by: davidahn on 02.28.2013 at 03:36 pm in Kitchens Forum

@Laura, there's another thread on GW about whether 6" cans are dated... my answer is "yes." With high wattage LED lights offering as many lumens as 75-100W R40 bulbs, you could go with 3 or 4" incandescent can lights with LED bulbs. 3" cans usually use GU10 (110V) or GU5.3 (12V), 4" cans usually use edison base R20/PAR20 (110V) bulbs, and there are LED replacements for these. A 10W LED would give you about 900 lumens.

Re: separates vs. kits, I always recommend buying kits at HD or Lowes, much cheaper than housing + trim separately. If you buy complete LED lighting kits, make sure the LED bulbs are replaceable (some LED lights are hard wired to the housing). I usually buy housing kits from HD, then LED bulbs from China (I have a source but eBay is convenient). Even after buying 10-20% extra due to the failure rate nets you 50-75% savings over the huge markups on "specialty" LED lighting from a US store.

As for whether 6 x 900 lumens is enough general lighting depends on your kitchen size. General lighting recommendations are 25-50 lumens/sq ft, task lighting about 75-150 lumens/sq ft. Remember general lighting lights your island work areas, so the total of task + general lighting should equal 75-150 lumens/sq ft (depending on how bright you like it). You do have generally reflective colors, which is a plus.

@rebeccamom, your pendant, which looks kind of cool and very retro, has an 18W CFL option, which would give the equivalent of about 70W of incandescent light, would offer quite a bit of brightness spaced 3-4' apart.

NOTES:

recommendation of lumens/sf for general light and for task light.
clipped on: 02.28.2013 at 06:05 pm    last updated on: 02.28.2013 at 06:06 pm

For those of you with the Kohler cast iron shower pans....

posted by: joannemb on 07.03.2012 at 11:09 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Which one do you prefer, the Purist or Kathryn? Is the only difference between the two the no-slip grip design? If so, for those of you who have seen both in person, which do you think would be easier to clean? Which looked nicer (less obvious) in person? I have to order from online, and it's soooo difficult to see in the pictures. Thanks so much!

NOTES:

shows how one tiles the front of the pan.
clipped on: 02.27.2013 at 12:28 am    last updated on: 02.27.2013 at 12:28 am

What Kind of Shower Doors?

posted by: enduring on 02.26.2013 at 08:16 pm in Bathrooms Forum

What kind of shower doors are best with the Kohler 3x4 cast iron shower pan? I would like to have something that is durable, not necessarily the most beautiful.

I plan to begin working on my second bath in the next 6 months and I need to start somewhere so thought the shower door would be a good place to start. I will be posting other questions over the next few weeks, trying to narrow down my ideas and product types/names.

In a shower door I need ease of use, stability, longevity, and if available beauty. I am thinking a framed door would be more stable but I could be wrong. Any and all ideas are welcome. As with my nearly finished bathroom, I am remodeling for the next generation as well as for DH and me, as we age in place. This is a family farm house, and we are the 3rd generation to inhabit it. We hope our son will live here in the future. I always consult him on my ideas too ;)

NOTES:

#1 question for little bathroom 2-26-13
clipped on: 02.26.2013 at 08:16 pm    last updated on: 02.26.2013 at 08:17 pm

If I Where to Remodel Another Bath, Thinking W/D Too?

posted by: enduring on 11.27.2012 at 12:03 pm in Bathrooms Forum

I wanted to take a break from remodeling but...

I have a small full bath that I have been thinking about putting a stacked washer/dryer into, along with a new shower. Is this feasible? The room gets pretty steamy even with the exhaust fan running. My concern is moisture damage to the washer/dryer equipment because of shower fog. Is this an issue? And if it is, are there remedies or appliances that accommodate for this?

Thanks.

NOTES:

my original post on small br?
clipped on: 02.25.2013 at 07:31 am    last updated on: 02.25.2013 at 07:31 am

RE: Any clever bathroom storage ideas? (Follow-Up #19)

posted by: allison0704 on 01.29.2013 at 10:33 am in Bathrooms Forum

Mine's not exactly clever, but we maximized storage in our MBath by installing a bump-out set of drawers in the center and sitting a tall cabinet on the counter (no problems with water on its sides, btw)

DD2 recently gutted her MBath. Replaced a enormous garden tub (no jets, ???) with a smaller jetted tub. This left +12" between tub and wall, so DH built a bookcase for towel storage and accessories. You can only see the shelves if you're in the tub or shower, but she keeps it neat anyway. I suggested covered boxes if she needs any additional storage for seldom used items.

NOTES:

thread with lots of bathroom storage ideas.
clipped on: 02.19.2013 at 10:13 pm    last updated on: 02.19.2013 at 10:14 pm

DIY Soapstone People Show Your Counters !

posted by: enduring on 03.01.2012 at 10:17 am in Kitchens Forum

For those who asked about DYI soapstone counters on Angie_DYI 's post (new soapstone in her backyard) inquiring if there has been a post to show DYI counter...

Lets show them.

First counter installed, small one that was very pretty:
Option 3 Backsplash Tile, Cream or off white cracked glaze shiny ceramic tile. Rather large for my purposes I believe. I like this color and texture, very nice.

Large sink portion with seam down the center that Dorado pre cut for me that was very good! I glued! This is before I had a local fabricator come out and cut my sink hole:
Photobucket

Recent install of several scraps I glued together to complete my "nook". No factory cut seam here but take my word for it, you can't tell the diff with my cut and glue. It is very good. I am proud. I still need to caulk in place and put a tile backsplash to finish it off:
Photobucket

My other short wall area with 2 pieces installed:
Photobucket

Glamour shot with my marble backsplash:
Photobucket

Whats Next?
I've got 30sf of SS remnants that I am going to use in my bathroom remodel, which is just off the kitchen. I will make my own soapstone sink. I've got plenty of material to practice.

NOTES:

Post started my me that has a lot of DIYer's postings showing soapstone construction.
clipped on: 02.07.2013 at 06:13 pm    last updated on: 02.07.2013 at 06:14 pm

RE: Celticmoon? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: msrose on 01.27.2008 at 03:03 pm in Kitchens Forum

Duh - I remembered someone giving me the directions for gelstain before, but I didn't remember it being Celticmoon. I just checked my documents and found the directions. I just want to make sure I understand completely. You didn't remove the previous finish, just roughed it up a little bit? I mentioned using gelstain on the decorating forum awhile back and someone said that it just coats the woods and doesn't soak in like a regular stain, which means it will scratch off easily. Does the clear urethane keep that from happening? Do you see any cons to using the gel stain over a regular stain?

Laurie

Background Story:
My cabinets are frameless, good condition and good layout. But the finish had gone orange and ugly, with the oak graining too busy for me. Cabinets are 18 years old, very poorly finished oak veneered slab doors. Plain with no crevices. They hadn't even take the doors off to finish them!!! No stain or finish was even on the hinge side edges, just dirty ol naked wood. Cheesy, huh?
I looked into changing out cabinets, but that was way too much money, since my layout was OK. And I am cheap, er, frugal. Painting didn't seem right because the doors were plain slabs. I considered new doors but that still meant a lot of money. For a few years I tried to figure a way to add molding toward a mission look, but the rounded door edges made that impossible. Then trolling in a kitchen emporium showroom this last year I noticed dark wood slab doors, kind like mine, but darker. That was the answer.
First I tried Minwax Polyshades. Dicey product. Hard to brush on neatly, then gummy, then seemed to leave a sticky tacky residue. I did a thread on the Woodworking site "Evil Polyshades to the Rescue" which elicited a lot of conflicting "expert" opinions and arguments that one must strip. I stripped the whole first floor of a Victorian once. No thanks. Jennifer-in-clyde (in the same boat)and I stumbled around to get to our method. Found the General Finishes products to work much better. Very easy to apply. Texture is like almost-done pudding, real silky. Just smear it on and wipe off the excess. Couldn't be easier. (see Generalfinishes.com for more info including where to find products. Disclaimer: I have no relationship to them other than being a satisfied customer.)
Here is the play by play:
SUPPLIES TO GATHER:
screwdrivers (for dismantling doors and hardware), box-o-disposable gloves from Walgreen's, old socks or rags, fine sandpaper, disposable small plastic bowls or plates, and plastic spoons or forks, mineral spirits, miracle cloth (optional), General Finishes Java gel stain (or another color) and General Finishes clear top coat (Both are poly based). Optional: General Finishes Expresso water based stain as another layer for maximum darkness.
PLANNING:
You will need a place to work and leave wet doors to dry overnight - I set up 2 spaces, garage for sanding/cleaning and basement for staining/sealing. Plan on blocks of 20-30-minutes for sanding/cleaning bundles of say, 6 doors at a time. Then just 10 minute sessions to wipe on coats.
PROCEDURE:
1)Remove the doors and all the hardware from one section of the kitchen. 4-6 doors is a good amount.
2) Clean the wood surface thoroughly. Then go over the wood lightly with sandpaper, just a very light skim sand to give the existing finish some tooth. No more than a minute a door. Rough up the surface is all. A miracle cloth is great for getting off the dust. Then wipe well with mineral spirits to clean well.
3) Open and stir the can o gel THOROUGHLY with your fork or spoon. Spoon some gel into your plastic bowl and reseal the can. This keeps you from contaminating the gels with crud or grit.
4) Put on the disposable gloves and slip an old sock onto one hand. Scoop some gel up and smear it on (It feels really nice and doesn't even smell too awful), then wipe down to remove the excess. I did the coats in the following order and let each dry well overnight:
-General Finishes Expresso water based stain (1 coat) I used this because I wanted really dark. You can probably skip this one to get to a deep rich brown
-General Finishes Java gel stain (couple coats) or whatever color you choose.
-General Finishes Clear urethane gel topcoat in satin (couple coats).
4) Reassemble the doors and drawer fronts and check the color evenness. Touch up with more gel stain where needed and let dry. Add a coat or two more of the clear gel for super durability.
5) Replace hardware.
I was brazen because the cabinets were so cheap and ugly I had nothing to lose. I went kinda thick and didn't wipe everything off perfectly. And I didn't sand between coats. You will think the Expresso coat fades as it dries but it redarkens later. I wanted a very deep dark color, like melted dark chocolate. It is not perfect in tone, there is unevenness in the coloration, but you have to really look to see it. The feel of the finish is really wonderful, smooth and satiny.
Raised the pass through upper run, recycled 2 glass cabinets doors from DR, resurfaced the Corian and got some smashing hardware. It came out pretty great and the finish has held up fine for over a year now. Link to pictures below.
Couple other tips: Go to the bathroom first and tie up your hair. Keep an apron or old workshirt handy for the gel coats' work. Keep a phone nearby either in a baggie or wrapped in a clean rag. Skip these steps at your peril. Oh, and stir the can very well each time and spoon some into a disposable bowl - keeps the can from getting contaminated. Lastly, the socks or rags you use for poly gels should be disposed of carefully as they are flammable and volatile. Rule is to have a bucket of water and dispose into that as you go - then get rid of it all at the end per local ordinances.
RE: Expresso vs. Java. Expresso is blacker, Java is more a red brown, like mahogany furniture. My cabinets had such a faded orange cast, that putting on an Expresso coat after sanding seemed to yield a bit darker end product. Java alone wiped on makes a nice, rich Sienna brown color, but I was wanting it to be much darker than the Java alone would get me to. The other difference is of course that Expresso is water based, so an easier cleanup. Being a gel, the Java can go on much thicker. And the last clear coats provide the nice satin finish - stopping at Java has nowhere near the smoothness and sheen. I found it helped to hang the doors, etc after one clear coat so I could check the color. If I missed a spot, I'd do a Java touchup wipe there. Let dry. Then clear coat wipe.
BTW, with the Expresso, each coat dissolved the one prior - weird. So a second coat didn't seem worth it to me. And even with the Java, if you rub too hard when it is wet you end up removing the color. Letting it dry well between coats is essential. You have to figure about 5 days at one coat a day. I used my kitchen all the way through - who needs doors?
Good luck to you. It is a pain in some ways, but in my case it was really worth it. The worst is definitely the prep. Once the surfaces are ready to coat, it is really short work to glove up, slide a sock on your hand and wipe on a coat.

NOTES:

Post on gel stain instructions that celticmoon said were like the instructions she used.
clipped on: 01.13.2013 at 09:27 am    last updated on: 01.13.2013 at 09:28 am

Kohler Hi-Rise Faucet

posted by: viva99 on 07.02.2010 at 11:03 am in Kitchens Forum

I posted this question yesterday, but it landed on page 3 in less than 24 hours (a record?) with no response.

I need to know whether the Kohler Hi-Rise independent sidespray (it comes with it's own on-off/temperature handle) could be used as the SOLE fixture for my 12" diameter prep sink. My concern is that when the unit is sitting in its base in "hands-free" mode, the spray will reach past the front edge of my relatively small sink, and I'll get drenched!

Any thoughts/advice/experience would be hugely appreciated!

Here is a link that might be useful: very cool little unit -- check it out!

NOTES:

hi rise side spray information from 2010
clipped on: 01.06.2013 at 11:00 am    last updated on: 01.06.2013 at 11:00 am

RE: New To Kitchens? Posting Pics? Read Me! [Help keep on Page 1] (Follow-Up #137)

posted by: Angie_DIY on 12.09.2012 at 07:54 pm in Kitchens Forum

Love After Love
Derek Walcott

The time will come, when with elation,
you will greet yourself arriving
at your own door, in your own mirror,
and each will smile at the other's welcome
and say, sit here. Eat.
You will love again the stranger who was your self.
Give wine. Give bread. Give back your heart
to itself, to the stranger who has loved you.
all your life, whom you have ignored
for another, who knows you by heart.
Take down the love letters from the bookshelf,
the photographs, the desperate notes,
peel your own image from the mirror.
Sit. Feast on your life.

NOTES:

kitchen thread with all of the beautiful POETRY that Angie_DIY started.
clipped on: 12.15.2012 at 10:23 am    last updated on: 12.15.2012 at 10:23 am

Floor is Grouted at Last!

posted by: enduring on 11.08.2012 at 11:44 pm in Bathrooms Forum

I have finished the floor (except for the caulking of the tub and threshold). I used Laticrete Spectralock Pro Premium epoxy grout. I mixed a custom color using 1 part Silver Shadow and 3 parts Platinum. I may have been able to just use the Platinum and been happy, but I thought I'd do this just to make sure the grout line had some contrast.

I know I have posted this floor a lot in varying degrees of completion but here are some more pictures.

Grouted but threshold not caulked yet:
slate tile grouted with Laticrete epoxy grout, 1part Silver Shadow and 3parts Platinum

Samples of Silver Shadow and Platinum grout colors and the blend that I used:
Laticrete samples, Silver Shadow on the top and Platinum on the bottom. Mixed grout 1part silver shadow and 3 parts platinum

To get to this point in the bathroom remodel, and the floor in particular, the steps involved include:
1. re enforce the existing joist with hangers
2. add new joist (old corn crib wood from the turn of the last century, and it was beautiful) to make 10" o.c. joist.
3. secure the new joist to the subfloor and T&G floor from above with screws.
4. Add exterior 3/8" grade plywood to existing 2 layers of subfloor and fir T&G original floor. Screwed every 4" o.c. throughout (I forgot I was told to do 6" o.c.). Thanks Bill V. for help in designing this floor prep.
5. Laid floor heating wire, 2 temp sensors, plastic lathe, SLC
6 Ditra-Set (unmodified) to set the Ditra and to set the tile
7. Tile was cut using Mongoct's fantastic formula to achieve the correct tile width needed for the herringbone design to fit/layout correctly. He also gave great instructions in laying out the herringbone.
8. Laid tile with 1/4" grout spacing.
9. Cleaned all the thinset out between the tiles really well.
10. Used 2 coats of Miracle 511 penetrating sealer.
11. TODAY GROUTED, as per instructions!

This floor was a laborious effort and many people on GW (bathroom and remodel forums for the most part) have helped me problem solve issues and instructed me on the how to. Thanks so much everyone.

NOTES:

grout recipe for my bathroom herringbone floor.
clipped on: 12.13.2012 at 11:01 am    last updated on: 12.13.2012 at 11:02 am

Got My Floor In :) Sans Grout

posted by: enduring on 10.31.2012 at 11:00 pm in Bathrooms Forum

High everyone. Good news. At last my floor is set! I have cleaned the stone, put sealer on it, twice.

I still have to clean the thinset out of the grout spaces better, then grout it. I will caulk around the threshold.

The tile is Brazilian black slate that I cut in half from 12x12. I have radiant heating under this.

Here it is:
Photobucket

Space ship's view:
Photobucket

Trust me, I've got some lippage going on:
Photobucket

I will be slowly posting the progress of this extremely slow remodel.

NOTES:

my Bathroom floor project
clipped on: 12.13.2012 at 10:56 am    last updated on: 12.13.2012 at 10:56 am

Slate Tile Floor Progress :)

posted by: enduring on 10.04.2012 at 06:24 pm in Bathrooms Forum

How does it look you guys? I have hemmed and hawed over this floor for a long time. It is Brazian slate, gauged. I purchased it by special order from HD. I then cut the tile in 1/2 to get 6x12". I got a perfect saw for rent at HD. It was a MX 660. Portable and did an accurate job of cutting.

This is the Ditra, set with Ditra-Set (unmodified) over my self leveling compound (SLC), which encases my floor heating wires. Note the waviness. It is due to my inexpert hand. I cut away the more awkwardly raised sections of Ditra, to remove the uneven dried thinset, and reapply it level. I don't have a picture of the fixed area but it worked:
Photobucket

Here is the halfway mark (or less). It is being set with unmodified Ditra-Set as well. Using 1/4 grout spacing. I have centered the chevron to the doorway, pointing to the tub:
Photobucket

Closeup of my pattern and grout spacing:
Photobucket

NOTES:

my Bathroom floor project
clipped on: 12.13.2012 at 10:51 am    last updated on: 12.13.2012 at 10:52 am

RE: Fiberglass or tile tub surround DIY?? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: mongoct on 09.07.2012 at 09:15 am in Bathrooms Forum

"If the studs are not even enough to form a smooth plane, presumably I can fix that with shims or even sistering new wall studs under the cement board, am I correct in that notion? "

Yes, credit to StoneTech for mentioning that earlier. Stringing the wall is an easy way to get the new wall flat and plumb.

I do recommend kiln dried lumber as it's pretty stable being that it has a fairly stable moisture content. One thing that sometimes happens is if you buy green lumber (lumber that is not kiln dried) is that you might buy straight studs. But if they sit in your house for a few weeks they can bow or twist a bit as they acclimate to your house's environmental conditions.

So string the walls, then the least expensive build would be a 6-mil poly barrier stapled to the studs, then cement board over that, then tile on the cement board.

You shouldn't be without a shower for long. An easy schedule would be to do the demo and clean-up on Day One. String the walls, re-stud, add poly, and hang the cement board Day Two. Tile Day Three. Grout Day Four. Sleep in Day Five.

You could even combine Day One and Two above.

Though some try to do it with fast-setting compounds so they can plow through the project, I recommend NOT grouting on the same day you tile.

As to the "easiest tile to work with", if you are going to go with a subway or a 4" to 6" square type of tile, look for tile with the self-spacing nibs on them.

My technique? I want the wall tile to be level. The tops of tubs are not always level, so I level the tile independent of the tub.

I lay out a line on the wall where I want the BOTTOM EDGE of the second row of wall tile to fall. I'll then set a straight edge at that point, a "ledger" so to speak. I make it level, shimming it off the edge of the tub deck or rim.

Now you can thinset a few feet of the wall and run your tile up the wall. It can go quite quickly.

When done, remove the ledger and tile the bottom row.

NOTES:

how to tile at the tub
clipped on: 12.06.2012 at 03:51 pm    last updated on: 12.06.2012 at 03:51 pm

Gel Stain Instructions (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: buehl on 10.23.2012 at 12:25 am in Kitchens Forum

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 12.06.2012 at 03:01 pm    last updated on: 12.06.2012 at 03:01 pm

How to Seal Your Stone (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: buehl on 10.23.2012 at 12:25 am in Kitchens Forum

Steps to sealing a stone surface, if it needs it.

http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/kitchbath/msg0105254810134.html

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 12.06.2012 at 03:00 pm    last updated on: 12.06.2012 at 03:01 pm

Miscellaneous Information (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: buehl on 10.23.2012 at 12:23 am in Kitchens Forum

Contains:

  • Links from the "Read Me" thread
  • Pantries
  • Useful Information (NKBA links, Other Forums)
  • Helpful Threads (a myriad of past & present threads containing useful/helpful information)
  • Tile Information.
  • Stone Information (how to shop/test/install stone counters, how to remove stains)
  • Cleaning Your Kitchen
  • Custom Cabinetmaker Sample Agreement


    http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/kitchbath/msg0105344116836.html

  • NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 12.06.2012 at 02:59 pm    last updated on: 12.06.2012 at 02:59 pm

    Getting Emails Sent To You...3-step Process (Follow-Up #6)

    posted by: buehl on 10.23.2012 at 12:23 am in Kitchens Forum

    NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 12.06.2012 at 02:58 pm    last updated on: 12.06.2012 at 02:59 pm

    The Next Step...Planning For Storage (Follow-Up #5)

    posted by: buehl on 10.23.2012 at 12:22 am in Kitchens Forum

    Planning your storage, including where items are commonly stored.

    http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/kitchbath/msg010523449014.html

    NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 12.06.2012 at 02:58 pm    last updated on: 12.06.2012 at 02:58 pm

    How THIS thread is organized (Follow-Up #1)

    posted by: buehl on 10.23.2012 at 12:21 am in Kitchens Forum

    To make this thread more readable and to make it easier to find a specific topic, I have created separate threads for each topic and just point/link to them from here.

    We will continue to bump this thread, but not the other threads I created. Please, do not bump the "subject" threads I will be linking to from here. We do not want to flood the first page with all those threads. To do so would knock threads from members asking for help, etc. off the first page and would be counter-productive!

    NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 12.06.2012 at 02:56 pm    last updated on: 12.06.2012 at 02:56 pm

    New To Kitchens? Posting Pics? Read Me! [Help keep on Page 1]

    posted by: buehl on 10.23.2012 at 12:20 am in Kitchens Forum

    Welcome! If you are new to the Kitchens Forum, you may find the following information and links helpful.

    The Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)/Articles pages contain helpful information about how to navigate this site as well as the world of kitchen renovations.

    The Kitchen Forum Acronyms will help you understand some of the acronyms used frequently in posts.

    The Finished Kitchens Blog has pictures and information about many GW members' finished kitchens. Not only can you see them alphabetically, but you can also use the "Find-A-Kitchen" function to utilize several search options if you're looking for specific things like a kitchen w/a Beverage Center or a kitchen w/a mix of dark and light cabinets. Access "Find-A-Kitchen" via the via the menu bar at the top of any FKB page. Additionally, "Find-A-Kitchen" contains a link to "In-Progress Kitchens" for those members' kitchens that are not quite ready for the FKB. There is also a link to "Coming Soon Kitchens" for those kitchens that are ready for the FKB but have not yet been added. To access the "In-Progress Kitchens", the "Coming Soon Kitchens", and the "FKB Categories", see the links on the menu bar at the top of any FKB page.

    The Appliances Forum is very useful when you have questions specific to appliances.

    To start off the kitchen remodel process...take the Sweeby Test. Then, move on to Beginning a Kitchen Plan.

    Other topics such as layouts, planning for storage, and stone materials are discussed in later topics in this thread. Even more information can be found by doing a search on the forum.

    Tips:

    • Before posting a question, please search the forum. There's a very good chance someone has already asked the question.

    • When using the "search" function, be sure to use the search box on the bottom of the page, not the top!

    • Note, however, that you will probably have better luck searching if you use Google (or similar search engine) than if you use the Forum search function. When using Google, to limit your results to Garden Web, include the following in your search criteria: ***site:ths.gardenweb.com

    • In the Subject, the site changes the double quote used as the inches indicator (") to a single quote ('). We don't know why. To compensate, use two single quotes and it will appear as a double quote in the Subject. Luckily, the double quote works in the message box.

    • When composing a new thread, you have a couple of options:

      • Have replies emailed to you: check the box offering this option. However, you must have "Allow other users to send you email via forms at our site." box checked in your profile for this to work (see the "Your Profile" link at the very top of the page) [See the post later in this thread with the Subject: Getting Emails Sent To You...3-step Process]

      • Insert a link: When you "preview" your message, you will be provided with two boxes for a link...one is for the link itself and the second is for the name or description of the link.

    • When using the "Clip this post" option (far upper right corner of each post, small print), remember that only the current post is clipped, not the entire thread. Also, you are allowed a maximum of 50 clippings. Once you reach this max, you will no longer be able to clip or email posts.


    How are the home page and the Forum organized? (based on the Kitchen Forum's FAQs entries)

    • The Kitchens Forum home page lists 30 thread titles, starting with those that don't yet have a response. After the unanswered threads, threads are listed in order of most recent response. That first page displays the last 2 hours or so of activity. (If there is no response to a thread in an hour or two, the unanswered thread usually starts to drop.)
    • Below the thread list are page numbers 1-67 for the total 67 pages of threads available -- capturing maybe 2 months or so of threads, less when the Forum is busy.
    • Below that (and at the top of the thread list as well) is a space for you to switch to the Conversations or Gallery "sides" - these are set up similarly but are not nearly as active.
    • Next down is a Search box -- very important! This is also the Search box you should use (not the one at the top of the page.)
      • Always refresh the page two or three times b/f assuming a thread has disappeared right after starting it.
      • As to searching...a thread will not be found doing a GW search for up to 24 hours after it has been started. This may seem too technical, but...searches are done against what are known as "indexes". Indexes use key fields/words to find things. iVillage only indexes threads once a day. So, that means that until your thread is "indexed", it won't show up in a search. If you start a thread just before the index is taken, you will be able to retrieve your thread by searching soon after creation. If, however, you start your thread right after the daily index, then you will have to wait almost 24 hours for the next index.

    • Next is a place for you to start a new thread. And finally there are some instructions and links at the bottom.


    Kitchen Forum "Sides"

    Discussions: This is the "side" you are on. It is for on-topic discussions concerning kitchens...renovations, use of, etc.

    Conversations: This is the "side" where you can post off topic threads such as regional get-togethers and non-kitchen subjects.

    Gallery: This is the "side" where members often post pictures...especially if you're posting a lot or a finished kitchen. (Note: This is where StarPooh, our FKB person, wants you to post your finished kitchen prior to having it added to the FKB.)


    Again, welcome and good luck! The journey is wild, sometimes bumpy, but fun and very rewarding in the end!


    Note: The links in this Read Me thread have been updated to reflect the new Finished Kitchens Blog (thank you StarPooh!)

    NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 12.06.2012 at 02:55 pm    last updated on: 12.06.2012 at 02:56 pm

    Thermostatic valve or pressure balance valve?

    posted by: janesylvia on 11.26.2012 at 09:39 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    I am considering Delta 17 series or 17T series shower kit. 17 has pressure balance valve, while 17T has thermostatic valve and I need to buy each item separately because 17T series does not come with handheld shower head.

    I know pressure balance valves safeguard against sudden and unexpected temperature shocks while in bath or shower. When a toilet is flushed or dishwasher or other faucets are turned on, it automatically balances hot and cold water pressure. Thermostatic valves allow you to precisely preselect your water temperature beforehand.

    Does thermostatic valve also safeguard against sudden temperature shocks if dishwasher is turned on, toilet is flushed, or faucets are turned on? Is it better to choose thermostatic or pressure balance valve for a shower stall? I am living in the San Francisco bay area.

    Any input is greatly appreciated.

    NOTES:

    several good brands mentioned.
    clipped on: 11.29.2012 at 10:36 am    last updated on: 11.29.2012 at 10:37 am

    New toilet leaking?

    posted by: alan_s_thefirst on 11.28.2012 at 03:25 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    Thought my project was finished, but now I see marks on the floor next to the toilet that suggest it's leaking.

    I had problems fitting it, the flange was broken, and also crooked. I used a repair ring over it, and it sat nice and firm, but this leak is just the last straw...

    With the repair ring, it's now quite high, especially on the high side of the flange. I thought I was okay since the toilet seated on the floor all right, but this mark (a pee mark off to the side of the toilet, people living in the house didn't mention it, but I saw it.)

    So I'm not going to feel comfortable until I remove the thing and see what's what.

    Flange sits above a concrete basement floor, more or less without gap on one side, a fair amount of gap under the flange on the other. I did put silicone under the repair ring but it didn't sit all that well on the flange, but it was as good as I could get it to sit - didn't have a lot of time to choose repair flanges, I literally got into Home Depot a few minutes before closing on a Sunday night.

    I assume the only way to be sure is to replace the flange?

    Would an extra height wax ring help? Bear in mind the top of the flange sticks up a fair bit, quite a bit on the high side. I assume the taller wax ring just squishes more wax around the thing, hopefully sealing it.

    Am I going to have to replace the flange, and if so, how can I be sure it's going to sit any flatter? I assume the elbow within the floor is crooked, so is there some sort of shallow repair flange that's going to nestle in there with some wiggle room, and, presumably, some sort of seal?

    Presumably you use a dremel-type inside pipe cutter, and hammer drill away some concrete? Bathroom is all nice and new, so I'd like to avoid messing things up. Flooring is vinyl.

    NOTES:

    waxless toilet flange mongoct.
    clipped on: 11.29.2012 at 08:09 am    last updated on: 11.29.2012 at 08:10 am

    RE: Toto Washlet: best value/features? (Follow-Up #9)

    posted by: herring_maven on 04.02.2012 at 11:43 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    kmcg: "We just returned from a trip to Japan, and my husband thinks I'm a little nutty to want one of these."

    Your husband will come around. When we are sweaty, we take a shower with water; we do not dry wash our bodies with paper napkins. The same considerations apply to cleaning the nether regions.

    Almost all of our family are Japanese, and most of them live in Japan. We are the only family unit among our extended family who have not had an advanced toilet seat in our bathroom for at least 15 years. The impediment in our home in the United States has been significant wiring issues to hook up an advanced toilet seat in either of our bathrooms, but we have bitten the bullet and overcome that obstacle. Next month -- finally -- we will be the last of our family to have an advanced toilet seat toilet.

    But we will not be getting a Toto Washlet. As twice-a-year returnees to Japan, we have constantly monitored the state of the art in Japan, and what we will be buying here for our own home is an Inax Clessence (for use on a Toto Vespin II, which it fits). We prefer the Inax two-wand design to the Toto one-wand design, and the wand flushing and cleansing system on the Inax looks better to us than the wand cleansing on the Totos, also. It does not hurt that, among Japanese, the Inax brand name carries a higher prestige value than does the Toto brand name. (Prestige always should be subservient to function, but, try as we might, we cannot ignore it.)

    You may come to a different conclusion, but we offer another data point for you to consider.

    NOTES:

    discussion about the Inax Clessence.
    clipped on: 10.06.2012 at 10:28 am    last updated on: 10.06.2012 at 10:29 am

    RE: Is Kerdi-Board Overkill for Tub Surround (Follow-Up #5)

    posted by: mongoct on 09.29.2012 at 04:17 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    "Mongo, will you tell me how to seal the bottom of the board with a hydroban application? How do you "meet" the hydrobanned cement board with the tub flange? "

    Let's say that you installed the cement board right on the studs and held it just above the tub flange.

    Mix up a bit of stiff thinset and fill the gap. Make it flush with the face of the cement board.

    Then when you Hydroban, just Hydroban the face of the cement board, and down and over the thinset-filled gap. That should give you a continuous coverage of thinset all the way to the tub deck, if that makes sense.

    Then when you tile, hold the tile a grout width's gap off of the tub deck. Caulk that gap.

    Sort of like this:

    NOTES:

    how to finish tub & wall, hydroban.
    clipped on: 09.29.2012 at 08:45 pm    last updated on: 09.29.2012 at 08:46 pm

    Haven't bought a bed for 34 years-need help

    posted by: suzannesl on 08.15.2012 at 08:04 pm in Home Decorating & Design Forum

    Really. My husband gave me a waterbed for my 27th birthday and all these years later, we still have it. I love sleeping in my waterbed. Unfortunately, it gets harder and harder to make that bed now that I have arthritis in my fingers. [The edges of the bag of water need to be lifted and the sheets pushed under while at the same time poking down the edges on either side of the corner you're working on so everything doesn't roll right back up. Sometimes you can do it in one try. This is followed by poking all the edges in while the mass of water tries even harder to push those same edges up. Not so fun anymore.]

    We started with a renovation to the kitchen a year ago, and now we've gotten to the last room - ours. It's about half emptied and I bought the paint today. We're a little slowed down by availability - or not - of bamboo flooring to match what we have elsewhere, but clearly a decision on the bed needs to be made soon.

    When did they start making beds so high you need steps to get into bed? Who thought it was a good idea to make the bottoms so low you can't vacuum under there? If we find our bamboo flooring, at least we could get a swiffer under the bed. Some beds we've seen are so creaky they would announce to the whole house every time you turned over, or worse. What's with Memory Foam and gel thingies in Memory Foam, or pillow tops? Maybe the ones from Costco, but those sets are so tall you need a ladder.

    What do you have in the way of beds and mattresses that you like that actually have practical features for practical people?

    NOTES:

    latex bed information and advocates; dislike of synthetic foams.
    clipped on: 08.18.2012 at 09:54 am    last updated on: 08.18.2012 at 09:56 am

    Question Re: Tile cutting/sizing 12x12 down to 12x6

    posted by: enduring on 04.06.2012 at 10:24 am in Bathrooms Forum

    Experienced tile folks I'd be grateful for your help on this idea I have of cutting down my large *12x12* Brazilian slate tiles into *6x12* tiles.

    I have 11 13/16" x 11 13/16" tiles. So with a 3/16" grout line that makes the 12 inch/sq tile.

    I want to see if I can cut these into *6x12* tiles so I can make a pattern.

    Will the blade take out enough when cutting down the large tile? Or, do I need to get a blade that will take out the 3/16" that I need to take out of the middle of each 12x12 so that they fit - with my layout using 3/16" grout lines?

    I believe that after the cut down of my 11 13/16" x 11 13/16" I should have 11 3/16 x 5 13/32". This size tile should fit into a pattern of my larger tiles *12x12*, RIGHT?

    I might want to make a herringbone floor, should this same cut work for that?

    Any advise will be so helpful.

    NOTES:

    read before cutting or installing my bathroom tile.
    clipped on: 06.24.2012 at 08:06 am    last updated on: 06.24.2012 at 08:06 am

    Underlying the tile question for tile experts Bill and Mongo

    posted by: docrck on 06.16.2012 at 01:28 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    Hi

    In anticipation of renovating our bathrooms in a NYC prewar apartment and having read many posts about tile problems/water leak issues I wondered if Bill V and Mongo could clarify my interpretation of the readings I've done. I don't want to be surprised by the contractor!

    Here is my understanding. Am I correct?

    1) Bathroom floors: subfloor--then mortar bed--then Cement Backing Unit (CBU)--then lay tiles with thinset and then grout tiles(laticrete)?

    2) Shower walls in bathroom with tub: CBU--then membrane (?)--then lay tiles with thinset and then grout tiles (laticrete)?

    3) Shower stall floor in bathroom without tub: subfloor--mortar bed--kerdi drain--shower membrane --lay tiles with thinset and then grout tiles (laticrete)?

    Thank you in advance for correcting any mistakes and guiding me.

    docrck

    NOTES:

    how to reenforce corners on hardibacker before hydroban.
    clipped on: 06.17.2012 at 08:45 pm    last updated on: 06.17.2012 at 08:45 pm

    Bathroom Walls - Hardibacker, Densshield or Greenboard?

    posted by: NJHM on 05.08.2012 at 10:28 am in Bathrooms Forum

    Hi, I am sure people have asked this question before but...DH and I are planning to redo our bathroom. Having difficulty finding a tile guy who does not have glazed look when I ask questions. (DH does not ask questions). This is my understanding as to what needs to be done but please correct me if I am wrong.

    -Bathroom has two exterior walls and two interior walls.
    -Studs & Joists are 16" oc. Ceiling Height is 101".

    Shower enclosure:
    Attach 6-mil vapor barrier on the studs (walls and ceiling) and drape it into the shower pan liner.
    Then install 5/8" Durock on the walls and ceiling. Do I need any additional blocking on the ceiling so Durock will not sag?
    One wall of the shower is an exterior wall and we are using open-cell foam to insulate the wall. Will it be a problem with condensation due to open-cell foam and vapor barrier being adjacent to each other?

    Shower Floor:
    Preslope, Oatey Vinyl Liner, Mudjob, Thinset and tile. Trying to find someone who can install Kerdi.

    Remaining bathroom:
    Walls will have tile up 4 feet from floor with painted walls above. I am assuming that you don't need a vapor barrier here since there is no place for the condensation to drip into. Do I need to insulate the interior walls (I was not planning on doing so)? Use Durock for the tiled wall section (4'). Above that (walls and ceiling) what paintable substrate do I use? Hardibacker, Denshield or Greenboard?

    Floor:
    What are the layers that go on the non-shower floor before tile installation? 3/4" plywood subfloor currently in place, Durock (what thickness?), Thinset and tile.

    I greatly appreciate any help you can give me.

    NOTES:

    almost like my walls and there is a link to Bill V. web page.
    clipped on: 05.11.2012 at 08:57 am    last updated on: 05.13.2012 at 06:51 pm

    Tile mortar Help

    posted by: mori1 on 05.03.2012 at 12:10 am in Bathrooms Forum

    I am putting 12x12 porcelain tile on the wall surrounding my tub. I'm using 1/4 x 1/4x 1/4 vesabond mortar but I can't the consistency right. My first day, I made it too thick like thick peanut butter. Had a hell of a time spreading it so today I made it more like a paste. Its a lot easier to spread but its not thick enough on the tile and so I ended up buttering the tile instead which is quite messy. So my question is what am I doing wrong?

    NOTES:

    good tips & instructions on mixing and applying thinset to cement board.
    clipped on: 05.06.2012 at 11:12 am    last updated on: 05.06.2012 at 11:13 am

    ? Wood for Cabinet to Hold Weight of Soapstone Sink?

    posted by: enduring on 03.09.2012 at 07:41 am in Kitchens Forum

    I am having a sink cabinet made for a soapstone sink. What wood material would be the best material to use. The cabinet will be painted. Will pine work or is that too weak? I would think maple would be perfect. This sink will be heavy and then adding H20 will make it VERY heavy. I am thinking my sink may end up being about 10sf of SS, off the top of my head, including the backsplash and small counter sections. This ends up being 200lbs of weight just for the sink alone, without the H20. My cabinet dimentions will be 18" deep and about 36" wide.

    Any opinions on this would be very helpful, thanks.

    NOTES:

    help with designing strong sink base for soapstone sink.
    clipped on: 03.11.2012 at 05:56 pm    last updated on: 03.11.2012 at 05:57 pm

    What is the 'One True Kitchen? I Want Photo Examples Please

    posted by: enduring on 11.17.2011 at 12:08 pm in Kitchens Forum

    My title of this post says it all! What is the "One True Kitchen". I hear it bandied about on the kitchen forum.

    NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 02.22.2012 at 05:17 pm    last updated on: 02.22.2012 at 05:17 pm

    FAQ/Answers Bathroom Plumbing for dummies

    posted by: sheilaaus122 on 06.23.2008 at 11:06 am in Bathrooms Forum

    I hope this is not hijacking the previous thread of Showers- FAQ but I thought since Bill V had offered to answer a bunch, those were more likely to be tiling related. I thought maybe we should start a new one of plumbing related FAQ's and if we get lucky- answers will be posted here too.
    I will start-
    for a shower/tub configuration, what is needed besides the tub spout, the shower head, and the on/off thingy?
    For a shower configuration(like the master bathroom with a separate tub) what is needed beside the shower head and on /off thingy?
    And for both of the above, what optional fixtures do you like? (handheld, stuff like that).

    NOTES:

    info on plumbing needs for bathroom remodel?
    clipped on: 12.04.2011 at 08:19 am    last updated on: 02.16.2012 at 08:09 pm

    laticrete vs polyblend

    posted by: hello8 on 12.04.2011 at 02:41 am in Bathrooms Forum

    I am looking at the type of grout to use on a porcelain bathroom floor, as well as the pebble floor in the shower. I guess it would make sense to use the same material/color throughout the floor. We used Laticrete in the other bathroom floor, which also has pebbles in the shower. Now I am looking at Custom Building Products Polyblend Sanded grout and I've read some old complaints about Polyblend. Besides the difference in installation, is there any difference in long term performance/care between the two? I haven't seen this topic discussed recently on this forum.

    NOTES:

    reasons to use laticrete for grout
    clipped on: 12.08.2011 at 09:10 am    last updated on: 12.08.2011 at 09:10 am

    Renovation of single bathroom - how to

    posted by: sarah_ma on 05.15.2011 at 08:27 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    Hi all-

    My husband and I are finally going to dive in and renovate our single bathroom (DIY). Major items include: walls down to studs, ripping out the semi-ADA shower stall and replacing it with a tub/shower enclosure, replacing the lav, replacing the toilet and tiling the floor.

    I am rather stressed about how to sequence this work to minimize the time where we are without toilet and/or shower. I would love to hear both advice from others who have survived a single bathroom remodel and thoughts on the best order in which to do the work above.

    Thanks!

    NOTES:

    bathroom details on work order by mongoct and preferences.
    clipped on: 12.04.2011 at 08:30 am    last updated on: 12.04.2011 at 08:30 am

    From mid centurty ugly to my dream bathroom 95% done

    posted by: jenskitchen on 12.30.2010 at 03:46 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    We are almost done with our bathroom renovation. I'm too excited about it to wait for the finishing touches before I post it. Still to come is a mirror with 1" bevel to be installed in vanity, frameless glass to be installed in shower and baseboard heat cover being made. Thank you for all of your help during my many mini meltdowns.

    We went from this...

    Photobucket

    There was one electrical outlet in the hole bathroom and it was in the medicine cabinet.

    Photobucket

    We closed off this door and moved the shower to that side.

    So here is our new vanity...

    Photobucket

    Our new shower
    Photobucket

    We will put white wood blinds on the window and a cover for the heater

    Photobucket

    Here are the details:

    Shower fixtures, towel bars: Restoration Hardware Asbury
    Floor and shower walls: 12x12 honed carrara tiles set in a running bond pattern with delorean gray grout
    Floor in shower: Cobsa thin basketweave
    Light: Landmark Lighting
    Knobs: Lookintheattic.com
    Vanity: Custom built
    Makeup Mirror: Kimball Young hardwired
    Paint: Trim and vanity is Glacier White and walls and ceiling is Stonington Gray

    NOTES:

    nice remodel
    clipped on: 12.01.2011 at 06:13 pm    last updated on: 12.01.2011 at 06:13 pm

    Posted from small house forum. Fun color test

    posted by: deedles on 11.26.2011 at 06:04 pm in Kitchens Forum

    See your score and check if your eye for color is as good as you think!

    Here is a link that might be useful: color test

    NOTES:

    link to color test
    clipped on: 11.27.2011 at 06:11 pm    last updated on: 11.27.2011 at 06:11 pm

    Can I Tile this Floor?

    posted by: enduring on 11.11.2011 at 12:40 am in Flooring Forum

    This has been posted on the Bath Forum as well, but I ain't get'n no responses :(

    I would like to put down slate tile, over an electrical floor heating system in my bathroom that connects to my kitchen. I want to know what I need to look for, prep for, and consider alternatives for, with my situation.

    I have confidence that I can do this with my DH's brawn & brains.

    Here is the underside of my bath. The area is 10' x 6'8", the joists are 8x2 (but not quite). Unfortunately the joist are 21" on center. This add on space is somewhat different than the rest of the house which as 16" OC joist. The diagonal flooring boards are 6" or so in width, and I presume 3/4"-1" thick as I estimated the thickness looking at a knot hole. These boards have a slight gap between them:
    Photobucket

    Top side - It appears that there is 3/4" fir tongue & groove flooring over the diagonal boards but hard to tell without taking up the old linoleum - which is the next layer over the suspected T&G. I don't want to add more than 1-1/2" to the height of my floor above the T&G fir flooring, preferably 1".

    1) Will this floor situation as is, (without the linoleum) be stiff enough for tile - with the subfloor and fir flooring?

    2) Is it recommended that 4 more joist go in between the 5 that are there. Currently there is 1 at each edge and 3 filling the middle, at 21" on center.

    3) Do I add plywood atop the T&G to add more rigidity?

    4) I plan to replace the current cast iron tub with another cast iron tub. Is this added weight a concern with the added weight of stone tile?

    5) I may tile the walls. Again, will that added weight be cause for concern?

    6) What is the depth of a slate tile + prep + electric underfloor heating?

    7) Is the tile flooring the last step to be done on a remodel? I will be relocating toilet, sink, putting in new tub, taking out plaster to insulate exterior walls, refinishing walls, adding new electrical, etc.

    Thanks for your consideration.

    NOTES:

    posted in Floor and Bathroom forums
    clipped on: 11.11.2011 at 12:50 am    last updated on: 11.13.2011 at 10:04 am

    Walls, how do they get tiled?

    posted by: enduring on 11.10.2011 at 05:27 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    I will be taking out the plaster on my 2 exterior walls of my 10'x6'8" bathroom. Unless I hear of a better idea:) I want to put in insulation and rewire. This house is from the 1920's. This add-on BR was built on in the 30's and has been quit functional. I don't know of the date of the fixtures. They look like from the 40's to me. The layout will change a little as I consider my options.

    Here is a picture of the bath exterior wall that I will want to tear out and insulate. The window will stay the same size I believe. A new tub will be placed in this location. The cabinet to the right will be replaced and will house the plumbing as it does now unless I get a better idea:). I am not sure about the tile location. I may want to only do a wainscoting style or I might do the whole darn thing:
    Photobucket

    This view is along the sink wall and is another exterior wall that I want to take down to insulate. I am planning on moving the sink across from where it is now. I plan to move the toilet to approximately where the sink is now:
    Photobucket

    My Questions are:

    1) What do I put back up on the wall to cover the studs and insulation to prep for tiling?

    2) What is the recommended procedure to use in setting tile on a bathroom wall?

    3) What are the recommended products to use on a bathroom tile install.

    4) Some of the walls will be the orginal plaster that I want to tile over. Can I do that?...and how do I prep the plaster wall for tiling?

    I want to do this correctly and expect that my installation to last 50 years or more. I'm not kidding.

    NOTES:

    my post
    clipped on: 11.11.2011 at 12:49 am    last updated on: 11.13.2011 at 10:04 am

    Advise wanted please on durable tub options

    posted by: enduring on 11.10.2011 at 02:51 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    I am looking for a 5' or 5.5' apron alcove tub. I just want a tub (no jets). I could get a cast iron tub or, I have been looking at the American Standard Princeton bathtub on line. How has this Princeton model worked out for people? I see that it is made of some lighter material than cast iron. I could get a cast iron one as well. It does not need to be fancy. I am not interested in acrylic.

    I currently have a cast iron tub in my 1940's dated bathroom. I live on a working farm and I want something durable to replace this strong old tub.

    This bathroom is off of my kitchen and near our back door and is used hard by my family. There needs to be some aesthetics to the room. My new tub needs to function as a light utility area sometimes, such as dog baths, filling chore buckets, cleaning large items, etc. The tub wont be abused but does need to be very durable. I had thought about taking it out all together and putting in a utility sink. But, because this is a multi-generational house I anticipate the next generation using the tub to bathe cute dirty kids just as the old tub has for several generations. My adult children have fond memories of taking baths in this tub.

    NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 11.13.2011 at 10:03 am    last updated on: 11.13.2011 at 10:03 am

    Can I Tile this Floor?

    posted by: enduring on 11.10.2011 at 04:43 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    Hi, I would like to put down slate tile, over an electrical floor heating system in my bathroom.

    I want to know what I need to look for, prep for, and consider alternatives for, with my situation.

    I have confidence that I can do this on my own and with my DH's brawn & brains.

    Here is under my bath. the joists are 8x2 (but not quite, is that called nominal?). Unfortunately the joist are 21" on center. The diagonal flooring boards are 6" or so in width, and I presume 3/4"-1" thick as I estimate the thickness looking at a knot hole. These boards have a slight gap between them:
    Photobucket

    Top side - with the toilet removed it appears that there is 3/4" fir tongue & groove flooring over the diagonal boards. Then over the T&G there is an old linoleum floor. I don't want to add more than 1-1/2" to the height of my floor from the T&G fir flooring, preferably 1".

    1) Will this floor situation be stiff enough for tile, as is, with the subfloor and fir flooring?

    2) Is it recommended that 4 more joist go in between the 5 that are there. Currently there is 1 at each edge and 3 filling the middle, at 21" on center.

    3) Do I add plywood atop the T&G to add more rigidity?

    4) What is the depth of a slate tile + prep + electric underfloor heating?

    5) When does the floor go in place? I will be relocating toilet, sink, putting in new tub, taking out plaster to insulate exterior walls, new electrical, etc.

    Thanks for your consideration.

    NOTES:

    floor tile question with Bill V. response and info.
    clipped on: 11.13.2011 at 10:01 am    last updated on: 11.13.2011 at 10:03 am

    Reinforcing floor...

    posted by: Galroc on 09.21.2005 at 03:53 pm in Home Repair Forum

    I am redoing my kitchen in my 1988 house but I have a sag in the floor where the range, cabinets and a bathroom is located. Not much of a sag, but enough for me to notice. On the opposite side from that sag, across the main center joist, was another sag where the main stairs is located to the second floor. I basically doubled up the joists, and added some supports to the basement cement floor, along the basement steps. Doubling up joists alone didn't remove the previous sag...

    Now, I plan on putting a new wood floor in the kitchen, and a new but much heavier range. So, I can double up the joists, but some of the sag will remain.

    Is it possible to put in lolly columns and a beam in the center, or near center of the floor joists span to remove the sag? It wouldn't run the whole house, but only under the floor experiencing the load from the range/bathroom. Also, must the lolly columns have a foundation under the cement floor, which would require me opening the cement floor up (which I don't want to do). I would use anchors in the cement floor to position the lolly columns. I was planning on using about 3 lolly columns over 10" feet supporting a 10' 4 2x10" beam.

    It is a normal basement cement floor, 4-5" thick.

    TIA

    NOTES:

    metal strap idea
    clipped on: 11.12.2011 at 05:05 pm    last updated on: 11.12.2011 at 05:05 pm

    porcelain tile directly over old vinyl tile, with radiant heat?

    posted by: panvc on 10.16.2011 at 08:33 pm in Flooring Forum

    Hi, I've been slowly upgrading my kitchen all year. Now I'm probably going to install porcelain floor tiles.

    Does anyone have warnings about installing the new porcelain tiles right over the existing vinyl floor "tile" (if you can call it that), which is in good shape and not peeling anywhere? The tiler who did my backsplash normally puts down 1/4" backerboard on the vinyl, but reluctantly thinks it should work without it, too. The floor tile will probably be on the large side, at least 16"x16".

    But I'm also thinking to install radiant heat (probably hot water tubes) between the joists under the kitchen. I'm not sure if this would affect how I install the tiles above it.

    Thanks in advance for any insights!

    NOTES:

    info on uncoupleing membrain
    clipped on: 11.10.2011 at 12:25 pm    last updated on: 11.10.2011 at 12:25 pm

    Budget conscious Mirror and Pivot Hardware

    posted by: astralfarmer on 11.02.2011 at 12:06 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    As info we purchased two 18x32" mirrors from our local glass company for a total of $67 and two sets of mirror pivots from DK Hardware (CR Lawrence, Bell Design) for $161.75 including shipping.

    I would have preferred square pivot hdwr like ones from Restoration Hdwr but CRL was the only company I found that sold hdwr separately.

    I think I can sleep comfortably with the savings!

    NOTES:

    dk hardware that has mirror mounting supplies.
    clipped on: 11.06.2011 at 02:40 pm    last updated on: 11.06.2011 at 02:41 pm

    Are kitchens headed in this direction?

    posted by: palimpsest on 11.03.2011 at 11:23 am in Kitchens Forum

    There has been a trend toward more active granites, multiple finishes on cabinets, multiple countertop materials, backsplashes with accent rows and picture-like or medallion like "features" over sink or range, etc. Add to this recessed or close to ceiling lighting, mixed with pendants and a chandelier.

    I think the combination of pattern and variety in kitchens is surpassing that of living rooms, where people still seem to be afraid of pattern, and to some extent color. But a living space, once decorated, has all the layers contents with the exception of magazines and some of the detritus of daily life perhaps.

    In a kitchen however, I think these layers are composed as if the kitchen and the countertops are going to remain empty, and in most cases this isn't true. Start adding the countertop appliances, containers, canisters, food, lists and other objects of daily living and there is a lot of stuff piled onto or in front of these ornamental surfaces.

    So I wonder, if on some level, we are headed into a phase of "aesthetic movement" -style layering: (and layering is something people seem to be really afraid of in other areas of home decor) Do you think we "see" or "not see" these two parts of the house differently?

    Photobucket

    NOTES:

    some interesting ideas.
    clipped on: 11.05.2011 at 05:13 pm    last updated on: 11.05.2011 at 05:13 pm

    Don't make me hunt you down!

    posted by: mama_goose on 09.22.2011 at 12:45 am in Kitchens Forum

    Link your reveal threads and/or albums to your Member Page, so that others can find your pictures. Seems that would be easier than doing a forum search.

    (Cross-posted to Smaller Homes.)

    Here is a link that might be useful: My Member Page

    NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 10.28.2011 at 01:14 am    last updated on: 10.28.2011 at 01:15 am

    Easy Text Instructions (bold, italics, color, etc)

    posted by: solstice98 on 10.03.2008 at 03:50 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

    I enjoy enhancing the text in some of my posts by adding bold, italics or colored text. A couple of you have asked how it's done and I thought a few more might want to do it too. Unfortunately, if I type the instructions directly into this message, it will do exactly what it's supposed to do and the code will disappear! So I've posted it as a picture file. This should work as long as the photobucket link works.
    If you have questions, let me know!
    Enjoy,
    Kate


    NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 10.28.2011 at 12:46 am    last updated on: 10.28.2011 at 12:46 am

    Miscellaneous Information

    posted by: buehl on 01.03.2011 at 05:34 am in Kitchens Forum

    NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 10.26.2011 at 10:33 pm    last updated on: 10.26.2011 at 10:34 pm

    gadget thread.

    posted by: lawjedi on 10.14.2011 at 09:53 pm in Kitchens Forum

    It's been awhile since a gadget thread popped up.

    And I was feeling some gadget love yesterday. I know several of the people have this danish dough whisk (recommended for 5 min artisan bread)... www.amazon.com/chefgadget-Dough-Mixer-11-Inch/dp/B002U85906/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1318643487&sr=8-5

    I do really like it for the bread and mixing cookies etc...

    But I LOVE it for meatloaf and meatballs!!!!!!!!! I cannot even begin to describe how much I hated mixing meatloaf with my bare hands... the texture... the coldness... it made my knuckles hurt!

    well, I used this to mix up meatballs yesterday and grabbed this - not only did it eliminate the use of my hands, but it really mixed it well... and quickly... and didn't "squish" the meat too much, which resulted in a fantastic texture for the meatballs.

    Just thought I'd share.

    What other gadgets are feeling your love?

    NOTES:

    dough mixer on amazon danish dough whisk
    clipped on: 10.15.2011 at 03:54 pm    last updated on: 10.15.2011 at 03:54 pm

    What was your best bathroom remodeling decision?

    posted by: ashlander on 02.19.2007 at 12:40 am in Bathrooms Forum

    We're having a difficult time making decisions for our bathroom remodel: choice of shower stall, toilet, flooring, counter, and perhaps even a fireplace. This will be the first and only remodel for our bathroom, so we hate to mess up.
    Would appreciate any words of wisdom or advice.
    What do you regret? What would you change? What was your best decision concerning the bathroom?

    NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 10.14.2011 at 04:41 pm    last updated on: 10.14.2011 at 05:06 pm

    Shower Pan Recommendation

    posted by: mav3481 on 10.10.2011 at 12:00 am in Bathrooms Forum

    Hello all,

    I am looking to start my partial bathroom redo in a few months and I was pricing things out (Tile will be about $500) and I was hoping to see what everyone suggested for a shower pan.

    The Tile Shop sells a Quick-Pitch (goof-proof) shower pan system, but I was also looking at the Schluter-Kerdi system. That looks even easier (and TV always uses it).

    Does anyone have any recommendations on which to use? Tile Shop priced out the shower floor system at about $300, and it looks like the Kerdi tray is about $450 online.

    Also, one other question..I haven't started pricing out Framless glass shower doors, but I have an opening of about 4 1/2 feet (maximum) by about 6 feet tall to encompass the shower. Anyone have a good idea of a estimated price I should be looking at for this?

    Thanks!!

    NOTES:

    <none>
    clipped on: 10.10.2011 at 07:15 pm    last updated on: 10.10.2011 at 07:15 pm

    Self-leveling compound & radiant heat: what I learned...

    posted by: staceyneil on 11.17.2010 at 04:26 pm in Bathrooms Forum

    Hi all,

    I'm going to post my experience with self-leveling compound here in case these tips might help others. (I found a dearth of good info on line, myself!)

    I have just finished pouring self-leveling compound in my second bathroom. In both cases, the main purpose was to cover electric radiant heat wires prior to laying tile.

    I used loose wire from warmingsystems.com.
    I used LevelQuik RS from Home Depot. (I would have prefered LevelQuik ES -extended set as opposed to rapid set- but it was not available locally.)

    First, the old subfloor was replaced. The new plywood was then primed with the LevelQuik primer per the directions (diluted over plywood.) After the primer is dry, you need to dam up any crevice, gap, or hole where the SLC could run away. In the first bathroom, I did not really understand how important this was!!! I'd heard to go around the edges of the room with Sill Seal (that pink foam strip you use under a house sill) which would create a nice expansion gap with some give. So I taped it around the edges, and around plumbing holes. This was NOT adequate! When we poured the SLC, you could see it moving towards the gaps and trickling down. We even had to do a second pour since we lost so much down into the crawl space below: ouch! In the more recent bathroom we didn't lose any. Here's what we did:
    Fill large gaps at the room perimeters with foam insulation backer rod and Great Stuff spray foam (gap and crack formula).
    Stuff foam rod around toilet drain coming up through the floor.
    To make a dam at doorways and other straight edges, install a 2x4 with the nails not pounded all the way in.
    Go around with a cheapie tube of painters caulk and caulk EVERYTHING!!!! Caulk both inside and outside edges of the 2x4s, and anywhere else there's even a remote change of a tiny hole or gap.

    Next, lay the heating wire. (Chisel down a bit to create trenches for the factory splice and thermostat probe. WE install two probes, and leave the second's wires free behind the thermostat, in case the first one fails at some point in the future.) Our wire came with aluminum tape to stick it down with. I used only that tape in the first bathroom, but the water in the SLC caused to to let go so a lot of the wires floated to the surface :( In the second bathroom, I first laid out my wire with painters' tape, then secured it with a hot glue gun. Brilliant! It worked really well, no floating wires. (I removed the painters' tape after the glue was set.)

    Then get ready to pour. Figure out how many bags you're going to need. This took some heavy math for me, since my second bathroom's floor sloped about 5/8" over 5' and I assumed the SLC would level that out, so I had to figure out the cubic feet needed using calculations for figuring swimming pool volume, then covert to the square footage at 1/8" coverage stated by the SLC manufacturer.

    Have your buckets ready: we assumed we'd need 3 bags and had two buckets already measured with the correct amount of cool water, and then another batch of water pre-measured and ready to pour into the first bucket when it was empty.
    I read that cool water extends the working time -or at least the pot life- of the stuff, so we made sure our water was cold. (We were mixing outdoors in Maine in November, so that wasn't too difficult!) The pot life is supposed to be 30 minutes, and the working time is only about 5 minutes once poured (10 for feathering) so we wanted to make sure everything was set to go.

    Last time I poured, I used a floor squeegee as a spreader. It didn't really work all that well. The instructions call for a gauged trowel (notched) but we didn't want to use a metal implement for fear of hurting the wires. I saw an EXCELLENT how-to on line that recommended cutting a rubber squeegee into notches. I bought an 18" black rubber squeegee head, cut 1" notches out of it with a utility knife, and screwed it onto a broom handle. This allowed me to spread the SLC around in such a way that it was still able to self-level rather than being pulled up into hills like the straight spreader caused.

    OK- so mix the SLC with a heavy duty mixing paddle (I used the round type for paint mixing, about 4 or 5" around) and a 1/2" electric drill. With the water in the 5 gallon pail, have one person running the drill while the other dumps the powder in fairly quickly. We mixed about 1 minute 45 seconds after the powder was all in, then did the next bag, then gave the first bucket another 5-second mix and brought it inside. You'll see how at about 1.5 minutes, the stuff is smooth and a consistency of cake or pancake batter: that's what you want.

    My DH person poured, I spread the SLC with the notched rubber spreader. DH went out and gave the second bucket another quick mix, then brought it in and poured. If we'd needed a third bucket, he'd have gone and quickly mixed that one. It turns out we did not. It looked like it was leveling out beautifully. You can tell how the stuff is flowing by white contour lines on the surface, so we knew it wasn't dripping down any unseen holes. (We later checked in the basement and this was correct, yay!) The mix had been perfect consistency, smooth, flowed well. It all looked beautiful- as compared to the first time when the level kept going down, the tape let go and the wires floated to the surface: yuck!)

    After a few hours I put a long level on it. The surface is beautifully flat, no hills or valleys -so the large-format tile I'm laying should go on well- BUT.... I was surprised to see that the floor still slants in the same direction. it's maybe 1/8" less pronounced, but the slant is still there. It's funny to me that the SLC would level itself out so beautifully in relation to the floor beneath it, but not in relation to gravity as a whole. I'm sure someone can explain why this is... something about surface tension maybe? It's OK- it's not going to be a problem in this bathroom, but it's just curious! I would have expected the floor to be perfectly level now, wouldn't you?

    Anyway- I hope this helps someone!

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 10.09.2011 at 04:13 pm    last updated on: 10.09.2011 at 04:13 pm

    MIT - Most Important Task

    posted by: trilobite on 07.18.2011 at 10:47 am in Organizing the Home Forum

    I am finding the concept of an MIT, a Most Important Task to be a terrific motivator.

    It's exactly what it sounds like, there's one thing you really want to get done and once it's done, the rest of the day is good because that Most Important Task is already done.

    It forces me to organize my thinking. I realize there's often a lot of things I WANT to get done, but then I can't accomplish them all and get frustrated. Too often, a "to do" list with me is just an ongoing memory dump, and I don't ever get a feeling of satisfaction. Whereas if I get the one thing done, that's "good enough" and anything else is even better.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Most Important Task

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 10.02.2011 at 10:11 pm    last updated on: 10.02.2011 at 10:11 pm

    using pinterest for kitchen ideas?

    posted by: home4all6 on 08.29.2011 at 01:51 pm in Kitchens Forum

    Do any of you use pinterest for organizing kitchen or other home project ideas? I think it is such a great idea, but I am not currently on it...yet. Still waiting for an invite...

    Here is a link that might be useful: Pinterest

    NOTES:

    web site
    clipped on: 08.29.2011 at 11:12 pm    last updated on: 08.29.2011 at 11:12 pm

    RE: Grouted Herringbone, the deed is done (Follow-Up #10)

    posted by: dianalo on 08.27.2011 at 07:11 pm in Kitchens Forum

    Not only does the bs look fab-u-lous, but seeing it with the floor makes it work even more (if that is possible).

    If you like purple, a dark jewel tone fabric would look lovely there. It would add a pop of color and you can get kitchen linens to coordinate. The plaid ones does not work because of the colors and the pattern. The black seems too dark and the pattern takes away from the bs.... Keep this simple and get a nice tone on tone dark purple fabric. I think a straight line across would highlight the curve of the valance. YMMV.

    So glad you can appreciate now how nice it came out!

    NOTES:

    good ideas on window treatment
    clipped on: 08.27.2011 at 07:39 pm    last updated on: 08.27.2011 at 07:39 pm

    RE:RE: Grouted Herringbone, the deed is done (Follow-Up #6)

    posted by: blfenton on 08.27.2011 at 06:51 pm in Kitchens Forum

    Not crazy on the fabric choices yet either. What about a roman shade or a board with that type of structured draping. - sort of horizontal pleating. Something that will add a little more softness to the area rather than just your straight board. I don;t think I would follow the curve of your valance either as I don;t think you would get the full effect of the fabric.
    I like the valance as is, but also appreciate the love of having fabrics around you.

    NOTES:

    good ideas on window treatment
    clipped on: 08.27.2011 at 07:37 pm    last updated on: 08.27.2011 at 07:37 pm

    RE: BM Gray Owl paint- anyone use it? (Follow-Up #1)

    posted by: katieob on 08.17.2011 at 09:41 pm in Kitchens Forum

    Hi.

    Check out the blog "For the Love of a House"
    She painted her amazing kitchen in BM Gray Owl, if I recall correctly.

    Katie

    NOTES:

    this blog has great pictures of a new england house remodel and lists all of the paint used, horizon in the masterbath, sea haze somewhere else.
    clipped on: 08.18.2011 at 12:09 am    last updated on: 08.18.2011 at 10:42 am

    Inspiration Images Herringbone, please comment

    posted by: enduring on 08.16.2011 at 09:48 pm in Kitchens Forum

    Here are some images as a result of tonight's internet search for herringbone patterns. Not all are of kitchens.
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    clipped on: 08.18.2011 at 12:11 am    last updated on: 08.18.2011 at 12:11 am

    RE: Has anyone used BM Titanium or White Diamonds Paint (Follow-Up #7)

    posted by: ttodd on 07.04.2011 at 07:04 pm in Home Decorating Forum

    Here is a lin kto a BM Titanium MBR.

    Here is a link that might be useful: For the Love of a House blog

    NOTES:

    this is a great link to beautiful BM Titanium used in a MBR.
    clipped on: 07.05.2011 at 12:12 am    last updated on: 07.05.2011 at 12:13 am

    RE: Small Kitchen Report (Follow-Up #8)

    posted by: enduring on 06.19.2011 at 01:53 am in Kitchens Forum

    Here are some pictures of the kitchen in progress. Unfortunately I don't have pictures of the old kitchen before I tore off the 1980's floral wallpaper. It was cute wallpaper in its day.

    Ignore the man in this picture! Actually he was trying to help me out by holding some large glass shade up to the ceiling for me to judge size for a new fixture I had in mind:
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    Old sink base, had sweet pattern of holes for ventilation:
    old sink base

    Tall cupboards where built after WWII when wood became available. Now recall, the walls had been papered, & now it is removed, exposing the plaster. It was never finished I don't think. A painter told me that in those days if one never planned on painting and only papering then a finish coat wasn't applied. Maybe it was expense. The top row of cupboards were added in the 50's I believe. The Salvation Army Summer Camp that was across the road years ago had a care taker who built the original tall cupboards. I don't know who put up the top row:
    old cupboards sink

    Another view of the base cupboards before demolition. This is the character I was wanting to keep in my new kitchen. Note the worn drawer bottom, every time I opened it, it shaved more wood onto the shelves below! The kids liked these old cupboards:
    old cupboards


    This is a view of the wall that used to accommodate the portable dishwasher and still houses the stove. Note the sharpie drawn cabinets where there previously were none; I had to get a feel for what it would look like! It was pure Sharpie Bliss. You also can see that there are plenty of paint samples on the wall, I think I may have ended up with 14 or so samples before I settled on a beautiful BM pale gray green called Titanium. Unfortunately the plaster didn't survive the electrician's activities so we took it all down and had it drywalled:
    sharpie drawn cabinets

    DH sitting next to the torn apart, drop down table/recessed cupboard, that was put in place in the 30's because his late aunt thought it was a neat idea. The two doors on either side are leading to the shed roofed addition that was added when the house made its 2 mile move to the farm from town. My frig and microwave are kept out there full time. I call it a porch but it is really a room and always has been. DH's dad and aunt hand dug the basement for this house. DH spent many years of his life sitting here with his family:
    lath

    Paint sample not used and a sneak peak of wallpaper that was in place prior to the addition of the bathroom. That paper is probably from the 20s. There is newer paper that was behind the cupboards with dutch boys and girls:
    old wall paper

    Get aload of that paint color! Here is the paper with the dutch children and windmills, and a tiny patch of the most recent floral paper, that I lived with for 20 years, next to & under that blue paint sample:
    old wallpaper

    Drywall underway. The chimney stayed because it would have meant tearing into the next room, and I had to draw the line somewhere. The new cabinet was modified with a shallow shelving to cover the chimney. I primed and painted before the cabinets went in as well:
    drywall

    The cabinet elves are here!
    cabinet install

    They moved like cats. Note the pale gray green color in the backsplash area:
    cabinet install

    Coming together. The cabinets are cherry, honey hand rubbed stain with coffee glaze. They come from Woodharbor Cabinets, an Iowa company (hey Iowa). The stiles and rails were double beveled, I think it is called a hip:
    cabinet install

    Two nice details:
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    My new hole in the wall. I will place a soapstone in there. Kitchen table set against the wall. I plan on using my existing table and chairs. But within the year will have a young man make me 2 walnut chairs out of native lumber from the area, and a cherry drop leaf table to match the cabinets. Can't wait:
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    I really labored over this purchase. Didn't know if the style would work. It is a Hubbardton Forge fixture. I love it:
    Hubberton Forge Light

    Soapstone counters going in. I cut that sucker!
    Option 5 Backsplash Tile

    Well that is it for now. I have yet to finish the sink wall counter in soapstone. I have hired someone to cut the sink hole because this area of the stone was too hard for my tools. The plumber will be next to hook up my new drop in large SS single bowl sink and SS faucet. Dishwasher needs hooked up too. I have dimmable LED lighting under all cabinets and a separate dimmer for the one over the sink. My ceiling incandescent fixture is dimmable too. The carpenter will be here next week to put up my old refurbished trim around window, doors, & baseboard. All trim will be painted in a semi or satin sheen in same color as walls. I have to paint the new window too. Last will be the backsplash which will probably be a 2x3 subway style mosaic marble creamy color tile without any visual action going on.

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 06.19.2011 at 02:43 am    last updated on: 06.19.2011 at 02:45 am

    Small Kitchen Report

    posted by: enduring on 06.18.2011 at 04:06 pm in Kitchens Forum

    In response to plllog's "A message to lurkers and quiet people" posting I will report on my Small Kitchen.

    I live in the midwest and work in a larger city. My husband farms. My goal was to redo the kitchen to make it nicer and a place that he can do farm business with seed dealers and other business related to farming. It will not be a feminine space (I fondly refer to the beautiful white kitchens as wedding dress kitchens). It will be warm looking with wood cupboards.

    The house is a house that actually belongs to his mother but I recently did a total gutting of the kitchen and in the midst of a remodel. I did not make work area changes because 1) it's not my house, and 2) I came to this site late in the game and didn't put a lot of thought into other options. The house originally was located in the small town 2 miles away but was moved to this site in the 30's. DH father and aunt hand dug the basement when the were young. We are the 3rd generation to live in this tiny house that I think may be a Sears "kit house"

    My project grew and grew after the idea came to me to put in new cupboards. First, another run of cupboards and then a range hood, then a new frig, then undercounter lighting, etc. It has been a blast and I would do it again. I really found this site helpful in thoughts and considerations that go into kitchens.

    My kitchen is 7x12, and it has 4 doors, and it has a bathroom through one of those doors! The bathroom was useful when the kids were small, and it has stood in for many functions, caring for sick animals, using the tub to fill up calf bottles, etc. Currently it is were I am washing dishes while things are underway with the remodel. The kitchen is so small that the frig is actually on the porch with the microwave. I like this layout 'cause it gives space in the kitchen for a small table. My mother-in-law had it set up this way and I followed suit when we moved in 20 years ago. She proudly fed a family of 6 (she stood) at a 2x4 foot fold down countertop that covered a recessed cupboard into the wall when in the up position. But it was never up! She did all of her canning, baking, meal preps, and meat preps in this space. She had built in tall cupboards with sliding doors (like closets) in the porch in the 70s, a great idea. With the remodel, and information from this site, I have informed DH that it will now be referred to as "The Pantry". He laughed, he is a wonderful sport with this project, which is my project.

    The old cabinets we replaced where put in after WWII when wood became available again. They were cute in their own right. My younger kids (college age) didn't want to lose them because of their charm. I looked for cabinets that were in keeping with the look. While I took the old drop down table out I had the "hole in the wall" refashioned into a built in shelf. It looks grand. I am nearing completion and will be posting final "reveal" pictures in a few weeks. I call myself the GC on this project.

    Thanks for all the great ideas and critiques that I read.

    NOTES:

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    clipped on: 06.19.2011 at 02:42 am    last updated on: 06.19.2011 at 02:45 am