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Kitchen for our 1909 Craftsman -- almost done pictures

posted by: gregincal on 08.04.2012 at 04:47 pm in Kitchens Forum

OK, the project isn't done but it's pretty close. After a couple years of coming up with ideas, 9 months of intense planning and investigation and almost 5 months of construction (and living at my parents house), we've moved back in and are cooking. The main point of the remodel was to connect our house more with the back yard. Common to most old houses, the back rooms were work rooms and the house felt very cut off from the garden and patio. I wasn't really aiming for a period kitchen, which is difficult for a 1909 house, but rather more of a riff on the style of the other rooms in the house. The fact is that back then kitchens were working rooms and didn't have the charm that the architects put into the rest of the house anyway. Since the kitchen had been remodeled multiple times in the past I felt more free to change things (the current kitchen was 80's arched oak).

This project has been a bit of a gender reversal from most on GardenWeb. Although my wife and I made all the major decisions together, I was the one that did all the research, spent all my time on these forums and came up with the broad vision for the kitchen. Perhaps it shows, the kitchen is probably a bit more masculine than many here, but then I always think of craftsman design as being a fairly masculine in general. I do know that my wife asked whether I would consider white cabinets at one stage and I vetoed it (I don't know why there appears to be a clear gender difference there either). Not that I have anything against white cabinets. I did them in my last kitchen remodel when I was a bachelor in the '90s, but that was in a 1930 cottage revival house and our current house is all about the stained woodwork.

Some of my suggestions were adopted (inset stained cabinets with a somewhat more detailed design than shaker, backsplash design, banquette seating) and some weren't (soapstone countertops [too dark, not enough green, too easily damaged], copper sink [scratched too easily]). Some things were left entirely to me (range selection, trim design). Some things we agonized over together (stained glass design, flooring, paint colors, tile color, cabinet selection).

The usual thanks for the help and advice I've gotten from this forum. It really is invaluable in planning a kitchen. Our (hopefully) last decision was how to do the banquette cushions. I had just started doing some research last week and up pops a thread discussing that very topic.

I'll warn you about the pictures. These are pictures with the kitchen how we really use it, and we definitely aren't clean counter people. Our goal in the kitchen is to make cooking as convenient as possible, so things that help are out on the counter and things that get in the way are put away. When we get back from vacation the project will be done with a sun tunnel for better lighting, a breakfast table and cushions and the dining room finished. At that stage the kitchen designer is going to have professional pictures taken for her web site and I'll post the "pretty" pictures with stuff artfully staged around the kitchen.

So here goes. First some context pictures of our house to set the scene.

Outside of house:

Greg and Suzanne: misc junk &emdash; IMGP2020

Living room:

Greg and Suzanne: misc junk &emdash; IMGP1377.JPG

Entryway:

Greg and Suzanne: misc junk &emdash; IMK50596

Dining room before (I don't yet have an after, because that part is still under construction):

Greg and Suzanne: misc junk &emdash; IMGP1355.JPG

Here is the yard we wanted to connect to (that was actually the first project we undertook after buying the house):

Greg and Suzanne: misc junk &emdash; IMK50774

and here is how it looked looking back from the old kitchen:

Greg and Suzanne: misc junk &emdash; IMK50299

and here is the before picture for the rest of the kitchen:

Greg and Suzanne: Kitchen remodel &emdash; 01

I've posted this before, but here is my SketchUp vision of how I wanted the kitchen to look. It evolved as the planning went on, but isn't too different from what I had a couple years ago, and this final version was completed 6 months before construction started:

Greg and Suzanne: misc junk &emdash; kitchen render2

and here is how it turned out:

Greg and Suzanne: Kitchen remodel &emdash; IMK50796

Greg and Suzanne: Kitchen remodel &emdash; IMK50788

Greg and Suzanne: Kitchen remodel &emdash; IMK50799

Greg and Suzanne: Kitchen remodel &emdash; IMK50773

Greg and Suzanne: Kitchen remodel &emdash; IMK50807

Greg and Suzanne: Kitchen remodel &emdash; IMK50762

Greg and Suzanne: Kitchen remodel &emdash; IMK50760

Greg and Suzanne: Kitchen remodel &emdash; IMK50767

Details:

Cabinets: Ovation cabinets in natural cherry, Slater inset door style
Countertop: "Tuscan Green" granite (for whatever good the name is, I believe it's from India)
Flooring: site finished select maple
Lights: Cherry Tree Design
Range: Wolf all gas
Sink: Rohl Allia
Faucet: Rohl country kitchen pull-out
Island top: eucalyptus plank from Green Mountain
Stained glass: Custom from local shop (Designs in Glass)
Doors and windows: Marvin
Refrigerator: Samsung

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clipped on: 09.15.2012 at 05:16 am    last updated on: 09.15.2012 at 05:16 am

RE: Tell me about your Green Mountain Soapstone (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: marthavila on 04.06.2012 at 12:55 pm in Kitchens Forum

I have Green Mountain Original PA. Comparatively speaking, it's among the hardest of soapstones on the market, with little or no veining. That's also why it primarily reads black. Although it's not the case with all GM stone, mine also has small,caramel-colored flecks throughout and occasional, unusual multi-colored veining which look like either dried river beds or snake skins. Here's a close-up of it:

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clipped on: 05.12.2012 at 11:21 pm    last updated on: 05.12.2012 at 11:21 pm

What keeps soapstone darker longer. . .The answer! ! !

posted by: florida_joshua on 10.24.2007 at 04:47 pm in Kitchens Forum

So I did a little test to answer the question.

The products:

Clapham's Beeswax Salad Bowl Finish
Bee's Oil
Regular Mineral Oil
Mystery Oil

First a brief discription (my opinion)

Clapham's: It is a paste, inbetween a wax and a liquid. Goes on easy and feels amazing after you put it on. On the touch catagory it is the best of the bunch.

Bee's Oil: It is a wax. A little harder to get on but if you heat it up it would be easier. Has stay power. This is at the top when it comes to keeping the patina on the stone.

Regular Mineral Oil: Needs no discription. It's easy to apply. Would keep a bottle around for those lazy days. Feels oily compared to the wax or paste. That feel goes away quickly though (whithin a hour or two if you wipe it down with a rag).

Mystery Oil: It is a liquid similar to the mineral oil. Not so crazy about the warning lable. Feels a little bit more oily than the mineral oil at first. Seems to react similar to the mineral oil. In my opinion I would rather use the mineral oil just because of convienience considering the warning about it being combustable.

The proof:

This is unoiled stone.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

This is the stone just after application
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

This is a picture of the sheen each gives off
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

A day after the first oiling
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

I then oiled it twice more over the next 2 days and waited 4 days to see what we had. Here it is.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

The mystery oil evaporated the quickest, then the mineral oil, contiuing on to the clapham's, and finally the Bee's oil.

I could continue the process but I do believe that you will continue to see the same results. Over time I think you wouold spend less time applying with the wax products but I would keep the mineral oil around for quick touchups or lazy days.

This test also gives people a good idea of how soapstone will react when it is installed in their home. This process of oiling and or waxing lessens with time. Each variety of soapstone can react differently as well. This means some stone evaporates the oil or wax products off quicker and or slower. Some people leave it unoiled some oil it often. Some like it inbetween and only oil it sometimes. . . So it really is up to the owner to choose how the stone fits your lifestyle. I still have not figured out how describe to someone who does not know about soapstone in one or two paragraphs. I know it sounds cheesy but I feel it's an experience. If you don't touch it, feel it, live with it, you'll never really understand it.

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clipped on: 05.12.2012 at 11:17 pm    last updated on: 05.12.2012 at 11:17 pm

Green Mountain AP Soapstone is in the House! (Pic heavy)

posted by: celtinNE on 07.10.2011 at 12:04 pm in Kitchens Forum

First, thanks so much to jalsy6 and prill, for recommending CESS. Dave was really great and did the majority of the fabricating in my driveway! The process was beyond cool and completed in 1 day :) Their craftsmanship was awesome. And they left me the waste so I can make ice cubes (ask if you're interested) and grilling stones! To their credit, they didn't even say anything when I oiled the island and began to cry tears of pure joy. Many, many thanks!

Sorry about the pic quality, had to use the phone because I can't find camera charger in the chaos.

I lived with mustard yellow Formica (counter and backsplash) since 1994. Here's a glimpse when the dishwasher could not wait for the actual demo. RIP my old friend.

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nothing against it but when the ss rolled in...

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The yippee dance began.

In progress, befores and afters.

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I just love how the veins wrap down the edges! OK I'm in love with all of it.

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Thank you GW for all the lurking and finally postings that brought this rock home:)

PS, I still can't manage to got the pics smaller. Sorry!

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clipped on: 05.08.2012 at 05:31 pm    last updated on: 05.08.2012 at 05:31 pm

RE: Does harder soapstone mean more oiling? (Follow-Up #18)

posted by: bungalowdawn on 03.18.2008 at 05:05 pm in Kitchens Forum

OK, I just called Green Mountain Soapstone to get the word from the horse's mouth. Here's what they said:

What comes from their current quarry is technically called Original PA (which stands for something Altos - the location of the mine). This just indicates what mine it comes from. It is different from what they used to sell called Original because it's a different mine. But the old "original" quarry is all mined out so PA is all they're selling now and they call it just "original" still now (without bothering with the PA).

The old original is the more green and soft stone. Original PA (the newer quarry) is dark, almost black with white veins and a harder stone.

I was told that the reason my sample is flashing off so quickly is because it is sanded too finely. He said they recommend sanding a countertop to 50-60 grit! So that it definitely has some texture to it. And that they buff out swirl marks with steel wool.

He said at that lower grit, it shouldn't flash off so fast (and might be more forgiving of scratches? definitely easier to buff out scratches when they happen).

So I'm feeling a little better about this if I can just get my fabricator to sand it to a lower grit instead of the higher grit he usually does. The GMO guy did know my fabricator and felt good about him so that was a good vote of confidence too.

Oh, and FL Josh, when I mentioned that we'd love to use you and how knowledgeable you are, he said he knew you (I guess via your old boss at Bucks County who he spoke very highly of). He was surprised to hear you were in FL.

So that's it. Straight from the horse's mouth.
Thanks for everyone's insight in getting to the bottom of this (or at least getting me over this last hump before I commit!).

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clipped on: 05.07.2012 at 11:24 pm    last updated on: 05.07.2012 at 11:24 pm

RE: Does harder soapstone mean more oiling? (Follow-Up #14)

posted by: raynag on 03.18.2008 at 08:25 am in Kitchens Forum

Dawn - I am crazy about my GM Original - a soft grey-green with all those big green veins. I have absolutely no intention of oiling it. As a matter of fact, the sample Garden State Soapstone (NJ) gave me back in October had been oiled and was dark. He did tell me it was one of the softer varieties, btw -- and that it comes from the Santa Rita area. I guess this would account for some pieces being black with less veining;similar to what Teixeira calls Santa Rita Venata.

Recently, when I went out looking for backsplash tile (another saga, still not over) I wanted to take the sample that was the same color as the installed stone. I sanded it with 320 sandpaper and lo and behold, it is light again. So I am able to use it as I shop.

Just so you know what Dawn is referring to, in case you missed some of my other posts, here are a couple of pix. My husband keeps lovingly running his hands over the veins - the counter's, not mine - LOL. Here is my favorite part of the island.
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And here's the piece on the vanity in the powder room (wallpaper will be replaced).
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clipped on: 05.07.2012 at 11:21 pm    last updated on: 05.07.2012 at 11:21 pm

not my soapstone... (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: focylrac on 05.30.2010 at 09:11 am in Kitchens Forum

I recently had Belvedere soapstone installed. It is considered "hard" by soapstone standards, and I think it has plenty of "veining"...nary a scratch, ding or chip, and I am completely IN LOVE with it!!!

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clipped on: 05.06.2012 at 09:14 pm    last updated on: 05.06.2012 at 09:15 pm

RE: Names of hard soapstone (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: donatelolee on 06.03.2011 at 04:21 am in Kitchens Forum

Here something might be useful a video about soft and hard soapstone http://bit.ly/soapstonesoftvshardvideo

Soapstone Hardness Levels
The stone industry has issued a MOHS scale of harness. Here it is:
Talc (Mg3Si4O10(OH)2) 1
Gypsum (CaSO4�2H2O) 3
Calcite (CaCO3) 9
Fluorite (CaF2) 21
Apatite (Ca5(PO4)3(OH-,Cl-,F-)) 48
Orthoclase Feldspar (KAlSi3O8) 72
Quartz (SiO2) 100
Topaz (Al2SiO4(OH-,F-)2) 200
Corundum (Al2O3) 400
Diamond (C) 1600
Soapstone is between a 1-4 on the MOHS scale.
Here is the breakdown of our types of soapstone and their ranking on the hardness scale:
Minas � 2
Porto Alegre � 2
Sao Luis � 4
Brazilian Duro � 2-4 ( this is a funny stone, some of the stone is very hard and some of it is much softer. This needs to be tested container/container).
Verde Minas � 4
Minas Duro � 4
Jucca � 2
Iguazu � 4
(Note: to see these soapstones images click here >> http://bit.ly/hHuZUK (videos available too)
Granites are generally a 4-6
SileStone, HanStone, CeaserStone � 6-7
Corian � 3-4

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clipped on: 05.04.2012 at 05:02 pm    last updated on: 05.04.2012 at 05:02 pm

soapstone island pix

posted by: mmhmmgood on 02.01.2012 at 03:51 pm in Kitchens Forum

The drama surrounding my soapstone island is over finally! Yay! I have reached an agreement with the fabricator regarding compensation for the mistake made and am looking forward to putting it all behind me. I still would rather have paid full price and had the island oriented the direction we had been planning and I'm still a bit sad. But since there's no going back I'm not going to keep looking back. Onward from here to the completion of the rest of the details that will give me a functioning kitchen! Here are some pix as promised, and there are more in the photobucket album if you want to see more.

Again, I appreciate the opportunity to vent last week and look forward to your comments on the island as is. I don't need coddling, you can give me your honest opinion!

Enjoy!

install in progress:
Soapstone install in progress

Overall kitchen:
Soapstone install in progress

Island from above unoiled:
Island from above unoiled

Oiled close up:
soapstone install: island from above oiled

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clipped on: 05.04.2012 at 04:47 pm    last updated on: 05.04.2012 at 04:47 pm

RE: Calling all happy soapstone owners! (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: remodelfla on 05.23.2011 at 10:30 pm in Kitchens Forum

Monsoon Wave from M. Texiera. I cant say enough about how much we LOVE LOVE LOVE this stone. It's indestructible. Has different looks to go with different moods. Looks dramatic and gorgeous when waxed and we love all teh different subtlies as it fades.It's a harder stone and doesn't scratch or ding. Can you tell we love it! It's wild, veiny, and chock full of spectacular seaglass colored veining that knocks my socks off.
From Drop Box

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clipped on: 05.04.2012 at 04:27 pm    last updated on: 05.04.2012 at 04:28 pm

RE: Beleza vs. Minas - why, oh why can't I decide? (Follow-Up #25)

posted by: karlarock on 01.14.2009 at 04:31 am in Kitchens Forum

worldmom, here are some pics of our leathered beleza. once we saw it, we fell in love! Our kitchen isn't finished yet, as you can see, but it's coming along...slowly. We started out wanted minas too, preferred the black/gray look. Found this by accident, in so. cal even! The green is very dark with black veins and some white. Very rich looking. Hope these pics help. Sorry if this further confuses you. Good luck, karla

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leathered beleza
clipped on: 04.30.2012 at 11:46 pm    last updated on: 04.30.2012 at 11:46 pm

RE: Beleza vs. Minas - why, oh why can't I decide? (Follow-Up #19)

posted by: donna214 on 01.09.2009 at 10:01 pm in Kitchens Forum

I went in thinking I wanted the veining found in Minas, but I fell in love with the uniqueness of Beleza. While at the stone yaed, I waffled between the Minas and Beleza, I ultimately went with Beleza. It is very hard, and I can practically rub out light scratches with my fingers. It also looks fabulous unoiled or oiled. I have tried it both ways and currently am enjoying it in it's unoiled state. It shows more variation unoiled.

Here's a pic unoiled
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and oiled
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clipped on: 04.30.2012 at 11:41 pm    last updated on: 04.30.2012 at 11:42 pm

RE: Who has Minas soapstone? There is hope for me yet! pics ple (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: wascolette on 09.04.2008 at 07:09 pm in Kitchens Forum

I have Minas. I'm in So. Cal. and got it through Tom Shadley. It's beautiful. We haven't oiled it yet as we are still not finished in the kitchen but I took a picture of it wet, which while not quite the same, is still a good idea of how it looks. I love it, and especially the veining. It is very dark with no green, and hard. It is not the greatest picture. I'll try to remember to take some closer ups tonight when I get home.

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clipped on: 04.30.2012 at 09:29 pm    last updated on: 04.30.2012 at 09:29 pm

RE: Please Help Finish Kitchen - Double Pendant Light (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: donna214 on 01.14.2009 at 07:08 pm in Kitchens Forum

I also have a double pendant from Archtects and Heroes and I love it. I think I picked the most unfussy of their models, although it is in antique bronze, not satin nickel. The shades also comes in white.

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NOTES:

Different post claims this is Beleza:

Posters on GW who have Beleza have all reported they oil infrequently and have no problems with scratches or chipping or water marks. donna214 has a beautiful beleza soapstone in her kitchen. If you click on the link and scroll 1/2 way down the page you can see her kitchen.

clipped on: 04.30.2012 at 09:21 pm    last updated on: 04.30.2012 at 09:22 pm

RE: Soapstone Counters: Brazilian Black vs Beleza (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: becktheeng on 05.06.2010 at 10:39 pm in Kitchens Forum

Sorry I didn't see this earlier...you are going to love Brazilian Black...it's hard very dark black when oiled. It definitely isn't as crazy once it's oiled. Here's a link to my pictures. Enjoy your soapstone.

Here is a link that might be useful: My Kitchen

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clipped on: 04.30.2012 at 09:15 pm    last updated on: 04.30.2012 at 09:15 pm

RE: Soapstone Counters: Brazilian Black vs Beleza (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: bizeemom on 04.28.2010 at 08:43 pm in Kitchens Forum

Here are a few pictures of my newly oiled Brazilian Black soapstone counters. They have been in about 4 weeks. We love them. No backsplash yet.
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Here is what it looks like from further away. Lots of character close up, but reads black. Hope that helped.
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clipped on: 04.30.2012 at 09:12 pm    last updated on: 04.30.2012 at 09:12 pm

RE: Soapstone Counters: Brazilian Black vs Beleza (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: firsthouse_mp on 04.27.2010 at 11:29 pm in Kitchens Forum

Here is mine from Texeira. It is Brazilian Black and it came as thick as you see on the edging. It is extremely dark and uniform which is what I wanted for the buffet area. Mysteriously enough, they oiled it about 3 weeks ago at the store, but I haven't had to touch it since :)

From Menlo Farmhouse
From Menlo Farmhouse
From Menlo Farmhouse

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clipped on: 04.30.2012 at 09:11 pm    last updated on: 04.30.2012 at 09:11 pm

RE: Soapstone Counters: Brazilian Black vs Beleza (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: sw_in_austin on 04.27.2010 at 10:21 am in Kitchens Forum

I have Beleza from Dorado in Austin, Texas. I don't have any current close-up pictures of it but here are a couple from the day it was installed.
From soapstone pics

From soapstone pics

And here is an overall picture from more recently:

From Finished Kitchen

The stone has darkened some in the two years we've been using it. We've never oiled it because we liked the way it looked unoiled but it has darkened naturally.

We love the stone. It's quite hard. After two years there are a few tiny dings around the edge of the undermount sink and some minor scratches. The scratches are easily buffed out with a green scrubby pad. We've had absolutely no problems with it no water rings, nothing. It was the only soapstone we looked at (except for the Minas slabs that Dorado had at the same time we picked our stone) and I feel very lucky that it turned out as perfectly as it did.

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clipped on: 04.30.2012 at 09:09 pm    last updated on: 04.30.2012 at 09:09 pm

RE: What molding do you have on craftsman/shaker style cabinets? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: theresab1 on 03.30.2008 at 04:18 pm in Kitchens Forum

we did cove molding to our 8 ft. ceilings:
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Notice the subway style backsplash and wolf cooktop
clipped on: 04.04.2012 at 08:36 am    last updated on: 04.04.2012 at 08:36 am

1904 Southern Colonial - Soapstone is in (pics!), & backsplash Q?

posted by: supra92 on 07.01.2008 at 09:28 pm in Kitchens Forum

All,

As mentioned last week in another thread, my 1904 Southern Colonial's soapstone finally, finally, FINALLY got installed -- and wow am I *so* happy I went with this over granite. I can't even tell you how many times over the past year i grappled back and forth between soapstone vs. a black-ish honed granite (ie, Nordic Antique Black). In the end, those magic words really are true: go with your gut, with what you really want. Seeing and feeling the installed soapstone, it's hard to believe I ever doubted the initial instinct. Hindsight is, as always, 20/20...

So this is two parts. First, the pics! Bear in mind I still have not acquired any mineral oil, and so what you're seeing is the pure, raw, unoiled soapstone. It's actually darker in its raw state than I would've initially figured, but it's definitely begging for an oiling :-) The pics seem to give it a bit of a blue-ish hue, but that's inaccurate as it's just a medium grey in reality.






The sink in that last pic... is the Ticor S105-8. It's the one where the left bowl is 17-3/4" and the right bowl is 13". I hotly debated that vs. the Ticor 405D (21" left, 10" right).... and in the end opted for the "more useable right sink". So far I like what I see, but I'll have a better feel when I start using it. The installers did a great job with the sink cutout, and the very slight negative reveal I requested --- the distance from the front of the sink to the edge of the counter overhang is exactly 4".

Also, I ordered the faucet today -- after a brief dalliance with the "antique nickel" finish of a specific Jado faucet (ultra-$$, btw), followed by a detour towards a Moen, I went with my original choice of the Delta Victorian. Opted for the stainless steel finish instead of chrome, because my kitchen has a mostly "soft/matte" theme going on with the white cabs, matte soapstone, SS appliances, saturated yellow wallpaint, and 100-yr old heart of pine wood floors.

Here's a pic of the Delta Victorian, in the SS finish:


So now, onto the final question, with regard's to deee's marble tile backsplash: I think your backsplash is exquisite, and goes perfectly with your black counters and white cabinets, maintaining that neutral theme. For those that haven't seen it, here's the pic:


My question to everyone here: those beautiful grey-ish marble tiles have that fantastic veining/movement to them. Would that be a good fit above my soapstone countertops, or is there reason to be concerned about the grey tiles' veining competing/clashing with the soapstone's veining?

Also, I have read that marble tiles require lots of regular maintenance, sealing, and are prone to cracks. Is this mostly a concern for floors and counters, or are these concerns valid for counter backsplashes as well?

Cheers!
Supra92

BTW - more pics to follow, once the faucet set arrives and is installed, and after I get the soapstone oiled

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clipped on: 02.07.2012 at 11:30 pm    last updated on: 02.07.2012 at 11:38 pm

chimney cover (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: kpaquette on 03.13.2009 at 11:50 am in Kitchens Forum

Palimpsest, that's what I was thinking - I probably didn't describe it very well but that's what I was trying to say when I asked about buying a 12" cabinet for over the hood to bridge the other two cabinets. I guess I was wondering if that was doable with the type of hood I already have, though I don't see why it wouldn't be. My hood isn't a chimney style, it is wall mount with a flat top but I was going to add a chimney cover for aesthetics. Something like this, but with the cabinets on either side. Can't find a pic that illustrates it exactly.

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Hood: Vent-a-Hood, Nouveau Pro
clipped on: 01.30.2012 at 10:10 am    last updated on: 01.30.2012 at 10:10 am

Can this be done?? Design dilemma.

posted by: kpaquette on 03.13.2009 at 09:21 am in Kitchens Forum

We've run into a design issue. Our cabinets are 42" high, but even still we have a 12" space to fill somehow if we want the cabinets to go to the ceiling, as originally planned. The current plan is to install filler (probably flat board) on top of the cabinets and paint to match (since cabinet co. doesn't make filler big enough) and then trim that out with molding.

The issue is with the range area. The range is on a wall by itself, flanked by 18" upper and lower cabinets.

The problem is our hood. Originally I had thought I'd do a SS chimney cover - made sense at the time but I was not thinking about that gap that needed to be filled - and certainly didn't realize it was as much as it is.

I already have the hood - it's this vent-a-hood, which I bought for a STEAL ($600, originally I think $1200) because it was a floor model.

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It's 18" high, wall mount. The ducting is already in for the vent. If installed at 30", that brings the top of it to 48". The top of the cabinets on either side is 60" - can I just buy a 12" cabinet to put over it, even though it's "wall mount"?? I know we'd have to probably give up the storage in the cabinet for the vent, it would be solely for looks. Then we could continue the same filler/molding all the way across.

The other option is to continue with the SS chimney cover, but not sure how that would look with the top molding on either side of it.

I'm trying to find a pic of the floor plan so you can visualize, but all I have is a PDF and I don't know how to convert it to a .jpg so I can post - I'll work on it. ;-)

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Is this the Vent-a-Hood, Nouveau Pro??
clipped on: 01.30.2012 at 10:08 am    last updated on: 01.30.2012 at 10:08 am

Finished Creamy White Kitchen

posted by: kfroddy on 04.18.2010 at 10:01 pm in Kitchens Forum

I posted this kitchen when we finished it -- about three years ago -- but after getting a couple of follow-up questions, realized that it never got posted to the FKB. Hopefully it works this time.

Here are (hopefully) the pics:

Kitchen

Kitchen

Kitchen

Kitchen

Kitchen

Kitchen

Kitchen

Kitchen

Here are the particulars with my comments about how I like them three years later:

Cabinets: Mouser, custom inset, maple "China" painted finish (almost identical to Dove Wing, Benjamin Moore paint); cherry, burnished autumn (I think that's the finish) under the bar -- These cabinets have held up so well. I don't find them hard to keep clean like I thought I would, and I have two very young children. I just use the Guardsman polish Mouser recommends. They haven't shown any cracking or anything like others had reported about painted white cabinets when I was debating whether I should go ahead with them. I'm so glad I just went with what I loved!

Also, word of advice: make sure to take inventory of everything you own and think hard about where you are going to put it all when designing your cabinets. Not until I did that did I realize that I didn't need a specific "pots and pans" drawer -- the height of my pots could fit in a normal drawer, even when stacked. Using normal drawers allowed me to fit in a shallow top drawer for spatulas, etc. I can't imagine not having that shallow top drawer. Also, consider using the cabinet above the refrigerator as a place to store cookie sheets, muffin pans, extra pot lids, etc. We just put a few dividers in -- wonderful use of space!

Countertops: Black Pearl Antique granite -- I LOVE my countertop! Talk about low-maintenance! The "antique" finish gives it a soft feel like soapstone and shows no fingerprints like a honed finish. The black pearl granite is better than absolute black in hiding dirt because it has a little variation in color. I wanted soapstone, but had to be realistic about my lifestyle, and this was a perfect choice. I get so many compliments about this countertop (got at Marble Systems in Fairfax, VA).

Backsplash: Marble subway tile in Creme Marfil (light cream), polished -- Still lovely, and I've completely neglected it!

Pendant Lights: Restoration Hardware -- They are like jewels, giving the kitchen more interest.

Paint on walls: Silver Sage from Restoration Hardware

Hardware: Cup Pulls from Restoration Hardware, brushed nickel

Range: Wolf 36" all gas -- This is the one thing I'm not totally loving. While I like the look a lot (the red knobs make me smile), we had some issues with the stove-top "exploding" (gas build up b/f turning on with a bang) and then not lighting, etc. The non-sealed burners are a pain for someone who has no time to dote on them. You have to make sure everything is lined up just right. A lot of heat seems to escape from the oven -- it heats up the kitchen a lot, and the outside gets really hot to the touch. If you have the oven going, you can't cook delicate sauces. The oven doesn't really cook things evenly. Whatever is cooking furthest from the convection fan cooks a lot faster than the portion near the fan. If you get a Wolf, get the extended warranty. They are very very good about coming out and tweaking it. While I adore the look, I had better, consistent performance from my old lower-end range. You really need to cook a lot to get a "feel" on how it cooks so you don't burn things.
Hood: Vent-a-Hood, Nouveau Pro -- Does a very good job, although it's pretty loud (not unusually so though)

Sink: Franke Oceania -- Another thing I still absolutely love. A large one-bowl sink is a must! We use the colander as a drying rack, which keeps drying dishes off of the counter and "in" the sink.

Faucet: Grohe Ladyluxe - Looks nice and performs really well

Refrigerator: LG, French door -- I don't love this fridge, but it's fine. I find that if I put lettuce/spinach near the back, it freezes sometimes. A cabinet-depth fridge is a lot less space than I was used to -- thank goodness we kept the old fridge in the garage.
Warming Drawer: GE Monogram - We use this more than we thought we would
Dishwashwer: Bosch -- Nice, basic, quiet DW. Beware of water streaks on the stainless front panel -- just can't get them out, but they aren't super noticeable, so it's not that big of a deal.

Microwave/Additional Oven: GE Advantium -- Much better use of space and money than a second oven, although we don't use the Advantium much because there isn't a lot of guidance about how long to cook things. They mostly tested brand-name processed food and tell you how long to cook those items, but don't give guidance on how to figure out how to program your casserole.

NOTES:

Check out the hood: Hood: Vent-a-Hood, Nouveau Pro

Countertops: Black Pearl Antique granite

clipped on: 01.30.2012 at 10:05 am    last updated on: 01.30.2012 at 10:06 am

Finished White Kitchen

posted by: kfroddy on 12.06.2007 at 12:49 pm in Kitchens Forum

I finally am getting around to posting pictures of our finished kitchen. We are thrilled with the results (and with our contractors -- we were only without an oven for a week and only without a sink for two!) Thanks to everyone who contributes to this forum -- we couldn't have done it without all of your wisdom.
I hope the link below works: http://www.kodakgallery.com/Slideshow.jsp?mode=fromshare&Uc=jwpj7yt.4eluvc9t&Uy=4k5iz2&Ux=0

Here are the particulars:

Cabinets: Mouser, custom inset, maple "China" painted finish (almost identical to Dove Wing, Benjamin Moore paint); cherry, burnished autumn (I think that's the finish) under the bar.

Countertops: Black Pearl Antique granite
Backsplash: Marble subway tile in Princeton/Desert Cream (light cream), polished
Pendant Lights: Restoration Hardware
Paint on walls: Silver Sage from Restoration Hardware
Hardware: Cup Pulls from Restoration Hardware, brushed nickel
Range: Wolf 36" all gas
Hood: Vent-a-Hood, Nouveau Pro
Sink: Franke Oceania
Faucet: Grohe Ladyluxe
Refrigerator: LG, French door
Warming Drawer: GE Monogram
Dishwashwer: Bosch
Microwave/Additional Oven: GE Advantium

NOTES:

Check out the hood: Hood: Vent-a-Hood, Nouveau Pro
clipped on: 01.30.2012 at 10:03 am    last updated on: 01.30.2012 at 10:04 am

RE: Calling all soapstone owners! (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: pluckymama on 02.24.2009 at 09:38 am in Kitchens Forum

This is my soapstone unoiled.

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This is my soapstone oiled.

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The soapstone is Minas, purchased from Dorado Soapstone. The maintenance is going to depend on which soapstone you go with. Most people oil, but there are several on GW that have not oiled and love it. I prefer to use a mineral oil/beeswax mixture that I learned about on the forum. Oiling helps to hide any dings or scratches you might get and depending on your soapstone, some are very hard and don't ding very easily and others are somewhat softer and might get a more distressed look. If you oil when you first get your stone, you will probably oil it every week or 2 and then once a month for several months. The oil does not penetrate the stone (as it is nonporous), but does darken it.

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 10:05 pm    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:06 pm

RE: Calling all soapstone owners! (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: momof3kids_pa on 02.24.2009 at 12:07 pm in Kitchens Forum

I could repeat holligator's post: we have Black Venata (from Bucks County Soapstone, we're in the philly suburbs) and we are NOT at all gentle with it, any dings or scratches go away with oiling. We've had it about 3 months.

And I also LOVE to oil. I have such a love affair going on with my soapstone, oiling is our fornication! And it's not like I love cleaning, I just find such a satisfaction in it.

"Is it as carefree as it seems?" Absolutely, yes.

"Do soapstone and children go together well?" I've got 3 young children and we're so grateful to have the soapstone because it is so forgiving.

"I'm unable to find that post now and wondering if anyone is familiar with a "sparkly" soapstone?" I recall thinking my soapstone was a bit sparkly when it was first installed, but I just went to look at it and am finding no obvious sparkle... maybe it goes away with time?

"What about a soapstone sink? Yay or Nay?" I originally thought I wanted a soapstone sink, but decided against it #1 because I wanted more contrast and attention drawn to the sink, thought ss against ss would just blend too much, so we got white fireclay and it really pops. #2 in hindsight I'm glad I didn't because I think it would be too much maintenance - my sink takes a lot of abuse, and unlike the countertops which are flat and easy to oil, I couldn't imagine having to oil the sink.

Anyway, I also love, love, love my soapstone, and would choose it again in a heartbeat.

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 10:04 pm    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:05 pm

RE: JULIA Soapstone Photos (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: florida_joshua on 06.17.2009 at 09:06 am in Kitchens Forum

Example,

slab just oiled.

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Slab oiled about 4 or 5 times.

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Yes it had been oiled on oposite sides, but you can see the veining is the same. . .these are really old pics. .lol

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 09:58 pm    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 09:58 pm

RE: JULIA Soapstone Photos (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: flatcoat2004 on 06.16.2009 at 03:47 pm in Kitchens Forum

I have had Julia for about a year now. Here's the newly-installed, newly-oiled stone ...

I like it well enough, but there is significant variation in even the small amount of stone that I have. By the range is a more caramel-coloured part, which doesn't oil up as well.

I don't oil it all that often, I like it well enough unoiled. It doesn't hold onto the oil for a long time. It does scratch and ding fairly easily (think of dragging a heavy plate or bowl across it), but scratches and even chips (one surface chip the size of my pinkie nail) are easily dealt with using some sandpaper and then oiling.

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 09:55 pm    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 09:55 pm

Traditional Modern Pearl White Kitchen in New York City

posted by: scottielee on 07.16.2009 at 09:03 pm in Kitchens Forum

hello,
i am reposting for the Finished Kitchen Blog.
thanks to everyone here for generously sharing their renovating experiences, ideas, and wonderful pictures. here are some shots of my little kitchen renovated last year...better late than never right ^_^
cheers
scott

Cabinets: Omega Signature, Maple in Parisian Pearl
Countertop: Statuary White Honed Marble
Islandtop: Craft-Art Brazilian Cherry
Backsplash: Bisazza Damasco Bianco Glass Tiles
Floor: Casa Dolce Casa/Casamood Neutra Silver Porcelain Tiles
Range: Wolf Duel Fuel DF304
Hood: Wolf Pro Wall PW302718
Dishwasher: Miele LaPerla G2830SCi/SS
Refridgerator: GE Monogram
Sink: Franke Kubus KBX-110-21
Faucet: Grohe Ladylux Cafe 33755SDO
Hardware: Bouvet Knobs 5201-25 and Bouvet Drop Pulls 5002-10 & 5008-18
Pendants: Flos Fucsia 1
Undercabinet Lighting: Kichler 10560WH & 10566WH
Stools: Emeco Kong and Emeco Stool

NOTES:

Example of 30" rangetop with an 18" high hood and cabinet depth freestanding frig.
clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 02:51 pm    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 02:52 pm

RE: Let's see your honed granite or soapstone countertops! Help! (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: jeanteach on 07.27.2009 at 11:02 pm in Kitchens Forum

I just installed honed Jet Mist (also known as Virginia Mist) granite last week. It needs to be sealed more (an olive oil bottle left a mark but I got it out) and then hopefully will be easier to maintain. I love how it looks. Here are some pix. (Excuse the unfinished backsplash. Will be beveled subway tile.)

Jet Mist island

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Elkay sink/Blanco faucet

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 10:32 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:32 am

RE: Let's see your honed granite or soapstone countertops! Help! (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: kpaquette on 07.27.2009 at 10:01 pm in Kitchens Forum

If you plan on living in your house for a very long time, I'd put little weight on what a realtor says. I'd get what you want.

That said, I'm definitely partial to soapstone. I know trends vary depending on what region you live in, but where I am soapstone is considered just as high end (if not moreso, these days) than granite. Everyone who has come to see the house has drooled over the counters.

I was all set to get honed granite because I wanted the look of soapstone, but after reading threads on here I decided to get the real thing. Certain types of honed granite are bad with fingerprints and showing rings from liquids (I don't remember which ones but I got scared when I read the thread here about it.) Soapstone however is softer than granite, it will scratch. But it's meant to be part of the look, so if that would bother you then maybe honed (or leathered, or antiqued - I don't know the differences) is the way to go for you.

Here are pics of my Julia soapstone.

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 10:31 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:31 am

Infinite thanks! We are finished!

posted by: jaymielo on 11.17.2008 at 05:27 pm in Kitchens Forum

I want to send out a huge thank you to all the people who lent me advice, opinions and their experience in the last 2 years. I'm an eternally grateful! Pulling those last few things together proved to be very painful, but we are finally almost there. I'm sure some of you observant TKOs will notice the few remaining items to be done, but this is as good as it gets. Here is an overall shot of the space.

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Details... The cabinets are Amish made of quartersawn white oak with miniwax Red Oak stain. The floors are quartersawn red oak with no stain. The counters are Green Mountain Original soapstone.

This is our nook. The table, which we had custom made, comfortably seats our family of four for casual dinners. We have two more chairs and 2 leaves which we can add for a little bigger dinner. The secretary in the hutch folds down and provides a writing surface plus a place to stash mail and odds and ends.

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The kitchen itself sits behind the nook. The formal dining room is through the door at the end of the kitchen. I wanted to wine fridge and "real" fridge as well as the pantry on the edges of the kitchen so they could be accessed by guests or the kids without getting in the way for the cooks.

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We have additional seating for four at the island, which is handy when we are cooking for company or for breakfast or snacks for the boys.

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The faucet is the Kohler Simplice and the sink is the ever popular single bowl Ticor. I'm very happy with them both. You can also see our giant cutting block in this picture. For a while we toyed around with the idea of making part of the island butcher block, but I'm happy with the compromise we struck. The fridge an Amana French door.

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The range is a Blue Star 36", which is dream to cook on. The hood is by Futuro and the backsplash was custom made by Artistic Abode based on some line drawings I provided.

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The Micro is an Advantium 120. It is a convection so it serves as our second oven and we are really enjoying the combination of that with the Blue Star range. Our reach in pantry has custom made cafe doors which match our cabinets and a pendant light which matches the pendants over our island and in the nook.

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And here is the pantry itself. It is small but mighty!

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Thank you again to everyone who patiently contributed to my threads. Building this kitchen was a pleasure. I wonder if I'll ever get to do it again...

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 10:24 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:24 am

RE: Please vote on backsplash concept - balancing vintage/industr (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: ccoombs1 on 01.28.2009 at 09:54 am in Kitchens Forum

Why not do the tiles AND the shelf thingy? I am not a big fan of S/S back splashes....I think they can overpower the kitchen, especially when there are so many stainless appliances to begin with. But my hood has warming lights that I wanted to take advantage of, so I got an IKEA shelf and mounted it to the wall and then tiled over the mounting brackets. I love the result.

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NOTES:

11" hood???
clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 10:21 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:22 am

RE: Rug and decor questions, specifically Arts and Crafts style (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: auntjen on 02.10.2009 at 01:07 pm in Home Decorating Forum

I read through your other thread about this rug yesterday, but didn't respond. As one who has both a strong affinity for Mission furnishings (I bought numerous Stickley pieces several years ago, and can't imagine not having them in my home) and beautiful rugs, I do understand how you want to pull your look together and create an absolutely beautiful room.

That said, I also know only too well what it's like to become "fixated" on one particular rug -- one that costs a small fortune, but you just can't seem to tear yourself away from it! (I've often said I have a "rug fetish"! LOL!) While the rug that you've linked is beautiful, I do indeed think that you can achieve a beautiful room by incorporating rugs that do not speak strictly to the Arts & Crafts/Mission style, and to be honest, I would find a room that held the requisite furnishings and a rug that was more eclectic to be far more interesting than one in which everything screamed "Stickley catalog!"

Here are a couple of examples of rooms that I think are stunning, and as you can see, the rugs used are strictly in the A&C style. (Oh, and I believe the bottom pic featuring the chair is indeed from the Stickley catalog - at least one of the versions that I have!)

This last picture brings to mind the bold, graphic inspiration of the Navajo rug (although I'm sure the rug itself is not Navajo), which has long been a very popular addition to A&C/Mission-style rooms. Now, if I were in the market for a really expensive rug a/k/a work of art, I would dearly love to be able to invest in a room-sized genuine Navajo ... but I can't even begin to imagine having that kind of "rug money" as a part of my disposable income. ;-)

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 10:20 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:20 am

New Soapstone Counter LOVE!! (with photos)

posted by: ebean on 09.15.2010 at 05:37 am in Kitchens Forum

Couldn't be more excited or happy! Our kitchen now has the most beautiful PA soapstone counters and as a very satisfied customer, I want to recommend the company we use. I am always seeing one other company mentioned and never the one we used. Our journey went like this:

I called a few Vermont soapstone companies and had a great talk with Green Mountain Soapstone. They gave my number to Vance Ebbecke - who worked for them for 7 years and had moved down to NY to a company called "Marble Techniques". Vance gave us referrals whom I called and we went out to see as soon as he called us to let us know he got in a new shipment. I have to say that their granite selection was astounding even tho we were there for soapstone. He and his crew were great about walking us through the process and moving around slabs. He helped us understand which slaps were from the same blocks - and would water down slaps (a few times over and over so we could make up our minds). They didn't charge by the slab but by how much we used. After we picked our slabs and before the templating, I placed a few nervous nellie calls to him and he calmly answered each and every one. Templater came and did very exact measurements - reassuring my gc who was on site - and a cad drawing of the kitchen. We worked out the carved runnels to everyone's satisfaction. We were told 2 weeks because they are very busy right now but ended up getting the counters 8 days later because someone canceled their appointment. I was on jury duty yesterday and my husband stayed home with the gc - and he said that they were completely professional and I came home to absolutely perfect counters. My husband said that our gc saw that one corner wasn't rounded (we chose an eased edge with rounded corners) and they took care of it right there. The one seam at the sink is undetecable unless you really look for it. Our GC told my husband that he was very impressed by them (and that's hard to do with our GC!) and that they made all the right choices in how they cut the soapstone - put the veining in the right places for the best wear and tear.
Here's their info: if you want to contact me, please go to my page and email me. I cannot tell you just how happy we are. Below are photos...and a link to our kitchen reno in general. Thank you GW'ers...if it wasn't for this site, we would never have had or considered soapstone counters. I'm in love!

Vance Ebbecke
Field Manager
Marble Techniques Inc.
15-30 131 Street
College Point, NY 11356
P: 718.204.5001 ext 3036
vance@marbletechniques.net

and now, the photos:

unoiled:

From Kitchen Reno

unoiled:

From Kitchen Reno

From Kitchen Reno

look at our new drainboard!:

From Kitchen Reno

1st oiling:

From Kitchen Reno

From Kitchen Reno

From Kitchen Reno

Here is a link that might be useful: Our kitchen gut reno

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 10:05 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:05 am

Soapstone is here!! Pictures, pictures, pictures!

posted by: tinker_2006 on 12.01.2011 at 08:27 pm in Kitchens Forum

We've been working around the clock restoring an old 1937 Florida home, and finally.. it really looks like we are getting somewhere!

Today the rest of our soapstone counters went in (still waiting on a rebuild for laundry room cabinets). I have to admit.. I was a little bit afraid if I'd love in MY house, even though I have always loved in every kitchen picture. I was afraid it would be too dark, but knew I could leave it unoiled (which I fully expected to do) but now that it is here, oiled... it surpasses all my hopes, it is absolutely gorgeous! DH was not sure AT ALL about soapstone, but left the decision up to me, thankfully! Still need to finish the floors, install hardware, lights and appliance... but here is my kitchen so far!

FL Joshua & assistant arrives with soapstone on truck.

From 2011-12-01

They measured and cut everything in the driveway! They started Monday, but the rain came pouring down, and the rest was delivered and installed this afternoon.

From 2011-12-01

I LOVE the Runnels, and would have never purchased soapstone or the runnels without GW - thank you all!

From 2011-12-01

Still missing our window seat - curtains are old, old, dusty rags.. just to have something in the windows as we renovate (we don't live in this house yet)

From 2011-12-01

From 2011-12-01

From 2011-12-01

From 2011-12-01

From 2011-12-01

From 2011-12-01

From 2011-12-01

From 2011-12-01

From 2011-12-01

From 2011-12-01

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 10:03 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:03 am

RE: Life with soapstone--patina pictures galore (Follow-Up #97)

posted by: mac_t on 09.07.2008 at 08:08 pm in Kitchens Forum

Our soapstone is a green-gray with light veins. We have had it about 18 months, during which time I have oiled it 2-3 times. We have had no problems with water marks, and the kitchen gets fairly heavy use.

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 09:56 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:02 am

RE: Life with soapstone--patina pictures galore (Follow-Up #59)

posted by: backinthesaddle on 08.07.2008 at 11:38 am in Kitchens Forum

Ive been trying to add my unintentional experiment to this thread for 2 days now and kept getting interrupted by the kids. :D

I have a large (20X18"?) scrap piece from our last house thats seen some abuse in the last 5 years. There is only one scratch that anyone but me would notice and I dont get any rings, despite my sketchy oiling practices these days. The only thing I have seen strip the oil is dripping hot soap from my daughters latest craft obsession or candle wax that spilled during our last power outage and its easily fixed with a spot oiling.

Here are pictures I took for a friend when it was really dirty (my husband was home alone for the weekend doing demo;), cleaned and then re-oiled. I have no idea what the rings were (lemonade, soda?) but the lower right corner was some kind of oil. Motor oil, perhaps? The smaller pieces are the samples we are interested in now and theyve been getting some pretty harsh treatment too. Large piece is Cobra and the others are Brazilian Black and Rainforest Green.

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You can see a couple spots in this picture but Im pretty sure that was candle wax I didnt bother to scrape off. It really doesnt look this "un-oiled" in person though.
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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 09:55 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:02 am

RE: Life with soapstone--patina pictures galore (Follow-Up #47)

posted by: bayareafrancy on 08.05.2008 at 08:45 pm in Kitchens Forum

I wonder if I was oiling too much? I used the beeswax/mineral oil combo sold by Williams Sonoma. We don't have hard water. It's mountain water. Hmmmm. I'm so surprised that none of you have rubber marks!!

Perhaps it has something to do with how my counters were finished. The company that did it did not seem proficient with soapstone (e.g. on one counter you can see a whole row of circular saw marks).

Regarding my variety--Santa Barbara. M. Teixeira told me it was a very pure soapstone--almost all talc. Then again, they also advertised it as a harder variety. I"m not sure how it could be both. Wouldn't more talc make it softer?

Ah well. The counters look pretty lovely after yesterday's stripping.

Main work area (goodness, I'm starting to laugh at how miniscule my work area is! Yikes!):
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Other work area (don't know what those dark splotches are):
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But the ring from compost jar didn't get removed, despite mineral spirits and sandpaper.
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Watermarks by sink gone:
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f

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 10:01 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:01 am

RE: Life with soapstone--patina pictures galore (Follow-Up #46)

posted by: trailrunner on 08.05.2008 at 08:15 pm in Kitchens Forum

I am in NYC at DB's place but I will post pic of counter from "Kitchen's in Action" thread. I made Buttermilk Bread the other day. This is probably a couple hundred loaves that have been kneaded in this spot since install. So here is how it looks unoiled. It looks lovely and I wipe with a soapy dishcloth several x a day.

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 09:51 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:00 am

Cost Comparison: Soapstone vs. Granite

posted by: coysmum on 01.28.2008 at 08:58 pm in Kitchens Forum

We're in the process of building a new Craftsman Style home in the Pacific Northwest and EVERYONE around here does Granite. I'd love to do something "different".

My husband is a project manager for a flooring contractor and has never had a client ask for soapstone (mostly granite, Silestone, etc...), so he's unsure of it. He's sold on granite, but hesitiates when I mention soapstone. I'm putting together my case but have no idea what the cost comparison would be. I can't ask him to research it, because I've already discovered he's biased.

I've told him there are people on this website that have a love affair with their soapstone, and I want one too!

Thanks for any insight you can offer in advance.

I should also mention I'm aware of the price levels of granite based on the rarity, fabrication, etc... I'm assuming, these same price levels will be in affect for Soapstone as well as far as rarity, difficulty in fabrication.

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 09:36 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:00 am

Soapstone concerns warranted?

posted by: yalisa on 05.07.2010 at 09:55 am in Kitchens Forum

We are trying to decide on our countertops for our in-the-works kitchen renovation. After reading a number of posts on GW I am considering soapstone rather than granite.

I spoke with my kitchen person today and she is not a fan of soapstone. She said that when you put a glass of water down, it leaves a residue ring; there is a lot of maintainance; and that it soaks up the mineral oil so fast that you need to constantly be oiling it. She also mentioned that cooking grease would soak into it, etc. She admits that it LOOKS beautiful - if you rarely use your kitchen.

Now, I am unsure. Are these concerns warranted?

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 09:36 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 10:00 am

New white w/ soapstone (PICS) - Looking 4 ideas to warm it up!

posted by: imlebby on 05.30.2011 at 11:24 am in Kitchens Forum

Now that our kitchen is finally complete (with great thanks to the Garden Web community for so much help), I am looking for suggestions and advice to help warm up the space. Looking for help especially for the space at the end of the peninsula against the backsplash as that is the area you see first when walking into the new space.

First the "before" kitchen - (and to think that we lived with our kitchen this way for almost 11 years!) I think this can be entered into the "most ugly and unfunctional space EVER! contest" - can you say "WINNER!"?

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And, after blowing the above room off of the back of our house...here is the finished product! (We stil need a light over the kitchen table and the stools are temporary until I find something else...)

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Window treatments, accessories, plants, colors? Please share what you would do to warm it up!

Thanks!

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Soapstone countertops and 18" hood (now discontinued)
clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 09:16 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 09:59 am

RE: Life with soapstone--patina pictures galore (Follow-Up #17)

posted by: mary_in_nc on 08.04.2008 at 08:31 pm in Kitchens Forum

I've had my Green Mountain Original P.A. soapstone since May 1 and I am loving it. I've oiled it two or three times. The third time it really didn't need it. It's staying dark. No dings, no scratches (I do not cut on it. I do not want to dull my knives.) Regarding rings, if I let a puddle of water sit then there will be a soft ring that eaily disappears with one small wipe of an oiled cloth. Rarely do I have to do this because most of the time I just wipe up the puddle of water.

To those of you considering soapstone, do not be afraid! Do your research. There are different kinds of soapstone- some high maintenance (softer, need more frequent oiling), some very low maintenance. I consider mine very low maintenance and I love it!
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Green Mountain Original P.A.

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 09:57 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 09:58 am

Life with soapstone--patina pictures galore

posted by: bayareafrancy on 08.04.2008 at 03:27 pm in Kitchens Forum

I've been wanting to post these pictures for so long, but I've had horrible "soapstone elbow" from obsessive oiling, and I haven't been able to type much.

I don't baby this stone at all. In fact, I don't even use cutting boards very often (simply because I have a teeny kitchen with no good place for them). This is terrible for my knives, of course, but I like the nicks and scratches on the stone.

I have 2 kinds of 'wear' on my counter. One that I love, and the other that I don't love!

What I love are the marks of usage--scratches, dings, teeny chips. I want more and more of those. I'm restoring an 80 year old kitchen, and I want the counter to look as old an used as the rest of the kitchen.

Everyday look in my main (teeny) work area (you can see lots of fine white knife marks and scratches):
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Another view:
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After oiling (beautiful, but leads to pesky water marks, rubber marks, etc. as soon as I start using it)
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What I don't love are the water marks! Argh, those pesky water marks! They drive me batty. They are only a problem if I oil the stone. If I leave it gray, the only thing that "stains/marks" it is oil (cooking oil, butter, etc.) but that can be washed off, The water marks mostly happen when something hot (like a dish right out of the dishwasher, or a lid from an in-use pot) is placed on it. The hot item seems to "steam clean" the bee's oil right off the stone. I can't figure out any solution to this.

Removed hot dish from microwave, placed lid here:
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But the water marks I don't quite understand come from non-hot items. If the stone is freshly oiled, and I place a wet drinking glass on it, it will leave a ring. The ring (if faint) sometimes fades in a day or two, but not usually. Actually, I don't think think the ring is actually fading. I think the oiled area is fading to match the ring.

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Water marks from regular glasses of water, and drips/puddles (these drive me batty). Am I the only one who gets these?:
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Oh--the other thing that leaves rings is anything absorbent that can lift the oil out of the stone. So, I get a ring under my ceramic compost jar (the ceramic is unsealed on the bottom). Or flour spilled on the counter. Or rubber bottomed shoes (e.g. if I stand on the counter in sneakers or crocs, it will leave tread marks that won't go away until oiling. Or if I sit an appliance with rubber feet on the counter, it leaves footprints.)

All of these marks disappear with oiling. But constant oiling is hard for me and my poor elbow. So I'm thinking about "going gray."

Here is the everyday look in my other work area:
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Another view (not for the faint hearted):
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Of course, I still adore my soapstone. But I do with I could keep the dark look without battling all the water marks.

I've been painting the kitchen for a couple weeks now. It has been great to have mineral spirits and paint sitting right on the counters without worry. Of course, the mineral spirits stripped the stone back to gray. And I"m thinking of leaving it that way. Luckily, any color of soapstone works in my kithcen. But I do adore it dark.

But, black or gray, spotty or not, I love my soapstone!

:-)

Francy

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clipped on: 01.29.2012 at 09:49 am    last updated on: 01.29.2012 at 09:57 am