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RE: Soapstone Questions (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: yoyoma on 07.18.2008 at 11:44 pm in Kitchens Forum

The person at the stone store said they now get the soapstone with the resin coating automatically. There is no option to not get it, and it's done for shipping reasons, not for the end buyers.

For the particular soapstone the contractor recommended, he says it would look best with its original color, not black after oiling. I was originally looking to get a soapstone for the black color, ie oiling would be ok. So now I'm wondering what I should do.

Here is a photo of the soapstone:

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clipped on: 03.27.2011 at 01:22 pm    last updated on: 03.27.2011 at 01:22 pm

RE: Reasonably priced farm sink?? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: macybaby on 03.15.2011 at 11:43 am in Kitchens Forum

I like the Domsjo sink too - the 36" one is about $300. No matter how I tried, I could not get my husband to go for an undermount or flush mount sink, so when I found this top mount apron front, I just had to have it!

And once we didn't have to deal with a sink cutout, I was able to talk DH into getting soapstone (we did the install).

We had to modify the cabinet slightly as we have 25" deep cabinets and it's made to fit in a 24" wide cab. It's designed to stick out a bit farther than ours does.


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clipped on: 03.15.2011 at 05:43 pm    last updated on: 03.15.2011 at 05:48 pm

RE: Please explain the allure of a farmhouse sink (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: honeychurch on 02.22.2011 at 09:26 am in Kitchens Forum

I have a 33" soapstone farmhouse sink. My last couple of houses all had double sinks and I found them frustrating, mainly because I couldn't fit larger baking dishes, cookie sheets, cutting boards etc in the sink without them sticking up all over the place, interfering with the faucet and being awkward to rinse, etc.

I only handwash a few items and when I do I am a soap-it-up-rinse-it-off gal, not a fill-up-the-sink-and-soak-stuff gal. So the two bowls were not helpful to me in that respect. I also disliked having to clean around the edges (both top mount and undermount), I never felt like I could get them as clean as I wanted.

I second the motion about being able to pile a lot of dirty dishes in there or deal with multiple large items at once. Also, having an old house it does seem to fit with the era more.

In the end, it all comes down to your aesthetic preference. And I certainly have seen many cool double and triple sinks here with built-in drainboards and cutting boards and interesting shapes that I might have considered if my kitchen went another way. Here's my sink:

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clipped on: 02.22.2011 at 07:09 pm    last updated on: 02.22.2011 at 07:11 pm

TA-DA!!!! Finished soapstone and it's unreal.. way pic heavy

posted by: remodelfla on 02.21.2011 at 08:39 pm in Kitchens Forum

Let me first say that Joshua and his assistant Kurt were so wonderful, professional, took so much pride in their craft, and were really concerned about the satisfaction of the client. It was an amazing day. So....here's way too many pics:
See my flush mounted sink?
From Drop Box

Sink to cooktop:
From Drop Box

Crazy corner... I adore this veining
From Drop Box

Can you find the seam? I can't... Josh is phenomenal
From Drop Box

I even assembled and installed a couple of my QS oak drawers!
From Drop Box

Not great pic of the overhang... it's far more spectacular:
From Drop Box

So I hope it's OK I'm screaming the praises of my own stone. OH... and for those who tease me for sneaking pics of me into my post... as soapstone lover and the tired masters:

From Drop Box

Thanks for putting up with me my friends...xo

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clipped on: 02.22.2011 at 04:59 pm    last updated on: 02.22.2011 at 05:00 pm

RE: INDUCTION or no: please weigh in (Follow-Up #38)

posted by: cotehele on 01.28.2011 at 11:18 am in Appliances Forum

plllog, thanks for the compliment! I just spent a week taking care of my 86 year old dad. He has an electric coil stove. The contrast between electric coil and induction is astonishing and extremely frustrating. But I digress; that is not what you asked.

1) Modern aesthetic will not fit well in our period-influenced white kitchen
If you are going for a true period look, induction will not be authentic. But neither will a modern gas cooktop. There are ways to disguise an induction unit. The inspiration for my design was this from the workshop of David T. Smith.

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2) Requires special cookware and dedicated circuit that will cost addl money
This is accurate, but hardly an issue. Any cooktop requires a dedicated circuit. Induction cookware is available at almost any price point. I started with a few pieces and add as I need. Some expensive, some very inexpensive. It gives me time to determine what works best with particular cooking methods.

3) Special cookware is very heavy and as we age it may become too burdensome
Depends on what kind of cookware is used. I have to admit, the cast iron cookware has been a blessing. I can lift more weight now than before I started using it. At some point, I may not be able to manage the cast iron. In my mid-50s I am not there yet.

4) May turn off potential buyers (if we sell for some reason) No one I know has this cooktop and only one of the GCs I spoke with knew what it was
GCs don't know everything! Only the appliance stores knew about induction technology when I was making that decision in 2008. Induction's advantages are becoming well known and prized as the price drops.

5) Can't char a pepper or use a grill/griddle on it
Everyone has their own cooking style, and some features are more important than others to each of us. There are ways to compensate for no flame induction. I roast peppers under the broiler. It is not as fast, but it works. A little torch would work as well. I use more than one grill/griddle at a time (on separate burners) quite frequently.

6) This is not the cooktop of the future but a 40+ year fad for gadgety folk
It may be a 40 year fad, but it will be replaced only when something better comes along. For now, it is the best we've got! The gadgety technology may be difficult for older people to master. I am sure my mid-80s parents and in laws could not get it right. If selling your house in future, you will likely have younger buyers who will demand the best technology. That is not gadgety or gimmicky, it is good sense not to prefer out-dated appliances.

Here are a couple pictures of induction in my period-inspired kitchen. HTH

Using a large cutting board over the cooktop for proofing bread under the lights. The house was cold!

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The cooktop in context

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clipped on: 02.14.2011 at 05:00 pm    last updated on: 02.14.2011 at 05:02 pm

RE: INDUCTION or no: please weigh in (Follow-Up #14)

posted by: honeychurch on 01.26.2011 at 08:01 pm in Appliances Forum

I just switched from an electric cooktop to Bosch induction (gas was not really an option for me unless I wanted to hook it up to propane). I love the induction--it is fast, easy to clean, much better to cook on than my old electric.

I needed new cookware anyway, so not a big deal to pick up new pieces (I found a great deal on Circulon Infinite, it is also nonstick and DW safe, you can use metal utensils on it too). It's not heavy. The few pieces of copper I was sad to see go are now decorations on my wall:
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As far as induction looking stupid or terrible or whatever in a traditional/old-fashioned kitchen, I disagree:
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I think it looks fine, in fact with our counters it is barely noticeable and blends in quite well!

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clipped on: 02.14.2011 at 04:53 pm    last updated on: 02.14.2011 at 04:53 pm