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Kitchen Reveal - Traditional Quiet White Kitchen

posted by: ArchitectMamma on 03.03.2013 at 09:57 pm in Kitchens Forum

When the second oven blew out last summer on our 20 year old Viking, we knew the writing was on the wall to renovate the kitchen. Our home was built in 1919 and when the previous owners had renovated the kitchen in 1990, they “modernized” the kitchen, removing some of the original moldings that matched the rest of the house, adding black formica, checkerboard tile, and a professional, albeit oversized, range. We wanted to create a new kitchen with style choices appropriate to the simple detailing of our red brick Georgian home, restore the moldings, and create more storage space. The first thing we did was to remove the soffit that ran around the perimeter of the kitchen. Sure enough, it was hiding piping that offset just below our finished ceiling. We were able to abandon a redundant radiator on the floor above and re-route the piping into the ceiling. This gave us not only more storage but also the feeling of a much higher ceiling than 8’-3.” We were able to keep the flooring intact and re-use the existing dishwasher. In addition to my role as designer, I also was the GC. Although I am pretty quiet here on the forum, I learned quite a bit from all of you and just knowing we were all going through the same thing together helped quiet my nerves when I thought I couldn’t take another day of this. Thank you!!!

Cabinets: Custom inset shaker style by Dutchwood Cabinetmakers painted Sail White
Hardware: Westerly pulls by Amerock in Satin Nickel, Hafele butt hinges in Satin Nickel
Paint: Walls: Benjamin Moore_Coastal Fog // Trim: Benjamin Moore _Linen White
Tile: Dal-Tile Rittenhouse 3x6 in Biscuit
Countertops: Madreperla Quartzite
Range: 36” Wolf, all gas
Hood: Vent-a-hood
Refrigerator: 36” SubZero French Door
Dishwasher: Re-used KitchenAid
Sink: Franke KBX11028 with sink grid
Faucet: Rohl/Perrin & Rowe Traditional Bridge Faucet
Filter Faucet: Kohler Traditional Wellspring Beverage Faucet
Filter: Multi-Pure
Recessed lights: Halo 4” incandescent
Pendant lights: Restoration Hardware, 8” Benson pendant in Satin Nickel
Undercabinet lighting: Kichler Xenon

Before:
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After:
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More photos are on photobucket, if they ask for a guest password, it is Gardenweb.

This post was edited by ArchitectMamma on Mon, Mar 4, 13 at 7:46

NOTES:

Useful for clark house renovation
clipped on: 03.11.2013 at 09:15 am    last updated on: 03.11.2013 at 09:16 am

RE: what gauge stainless steel sink? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: sherilynn on 01.20.2008 at 11:32 am in Kitchens Forum

FYI: about any stainless steel sink. I recently had a huge compliment from my brother, a builder of high end homes. He was very impressed at how good my sink always looks. He is not a fan at ALL with SS. He prefers porcelain, which chips.

I asked him why he was so impressed with my sink and hates SS? It was because he has had to replace multiple high end sinks before closing because a workman or someone would have used a new homeowners SS sink and caused a 'scratch' in the bottom of the sink. The new homeowners would insist on a brand new sink before they would close.We all know that we can tolerate the damage that we do to our stuff, but not anyone else! When you spend well over a $1,000 to $1,800 for a sink, of COURSE you want it to be unblemished!

Well, I told him my 'secret' to keeping my 12" deep single basin Franke sink looking good. I've used this 'method' on ALL of my sinks and I just love it! My sink glows because of the 'patina' that it now has...and yours can, too. The finish looks better each time you use my method, too.

I use my sink! I also have a large family that I cook for and use some commercial size, heavy pans. Guests sometimes want to help in the kitchen, or teens, and they bang up the bottom, scratching the sink, and it will look just awful when they're done. They always apologize because they think they've ruined my sink. Never fear. I can 'fix' it in as little as 3 minutes from start to finish.

I've now trained my teens on how to help me maintain a good looking sink. AND if they scratch it, they restore it! It's that simple.

Here's what I do. About every other day, I use Bar Keepers Friend and one of the green scrubby pads that you can buy just about anywhere. It will keep average use to your sink 'maintained' between 'restoration' cleanings.

When there are scuffs and deeper scratches in the sink, I use sandpaper to wet-sand the metal in different grades of paper to restore the sinks. I prefer the black 'wet or dry' sandpaper by Norton that you buy at HD. I already have about 3" squares in multiple grades already cut out and in a baggy under my sink, so I'm ready when I need to 'do this'.

I start with about 150 grit working on the problem areas when I get to them, then work up to at least a 400 grit. I use small circular pattern and overlap all of my work. I never just 'rub' a scuff or scratch in a straight pattern; I always blend my work.

I start in the furthest back left corner and work across the back of the sink moving left to right, just as you would work if you were writing on lined paper. I do the entire sink bottom, then move to the sides. I start with 150 grit paper, then change to 220, then 320, then 400. I rinse the sink after each grit paper is used. Sometimes I use a little soap or BKF depending on my needs so I can move faster with the paper. Once you try it, you will understand what I mean.

I finish off with a good soapy rinse with a rag, then apply a 'finish' of Franke Inox cleaner or a wiping coat of vegetable oil. I have even used Rain-X to help repel spots. I'm just out of it right now and have been using up products I have under the sink. I use 'whatever' to just help the sink repel water right down the drain a.s.a.p..

My brother now had one of his guys using my method on their Franke sinks before final walk thru before closing on a new home. Guess what? They're not having to replace sinks anymore.

After you clean your sink a few times, your sink will start to gain a beautiful patina and smoothness to the finish and you will start to love stainless steel. I also use this method on my $10,000 Thermador Range top. It glows. I just love it.

NOTES:

Kitchen sink maintenance
clipped on: 12.19.2012 at 07:53 pm    last updated on: 12.19.2012 at 07:53 pm