Clippings by bzzybee

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Mounts Botanical plant sale this weekend!

posted by: bzzybee on 10.29.2013 at 07:17 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Anyone going besides me? I would enjoy meeting anyone who'll be going, I plan on going Saturday fairly early and making it a day there for the most part. I'll be coming from PGA Blvd via I 95.

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clipped on: 10.29.2013 at 07:17 pm    last updated on: 10.29.2013 at 07:18 pm

Just ordered a Worm Factory 360 and 2000 worms!

posted by: bzzybee on 10.26.2013 at 11:30 am in Vermicomposting Forum

I'm very exited about this next step in my gardening journey. I'm also a teeny bit scared! There's my adult son and I, we eat lots of fruits and veggies so should be able to produce enough scraps for them, maybe even too much at first. I do have 3 regular compost bins that I got from the county several years ago and are used year round so nothing that I can help l let go to waste. Here's my question, given our moderate season approaches I'd like to start it out outside, in a shady spot, somewhat protected from any rain under a fairly densely crowned tree. If this works, will I need to move it indoors when the hot temps return? Or, should I just pick an indoor spot (garage) not cooled though or inside where there is a/c at about 77 degrees. Any of you vermicomposters in Florida, specifically South who have experience and can offer tips, do's and don't' would be very welcome and appreciated.
I'm enjoying reading this forum and hope that some of the experiences will help me make my worms happy, fat and very productive.

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clipped on: 10.26.2013 at 11:31 am    last updated on: 10.26.2013 at 11:31 am

RE: Any good sources for 'unusual' herb seeds? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: noinwi on 01.07.2012 at 01:08 am in Herbs Forum

Richters has a lot of different herb seeds/plants.

Here is a link that might be useful: Richters

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The whole thread has sources incl. Amish mail only.
clipped on: 01.13.2012 at 04:43 pm    last updated on: 01.13.2012 at 04:44 pm

RE: Glad I just started my new Parsley seedlings (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: alexcortez on 10.13.2011 at 10:49 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

I plant callaloo/amaranth for these caterpillars. It is a nice way to deflect them from other plants. Callaloo is typically big and showy and caterpillars zoom in:-)

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clipped on: 01.07.2012 at 12:08 am    last updated on: 01.07.2012 at 12:08 am

RE: Red Lady papaya photos (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: scents_from_heaven on 11.18.2008 at 05:36 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Here are some recipes for papaya seeds

Papaya Seed Dressing

1 1/2 tbsp. papaya seed
1 c. salad oil
1/2 c. tarragon vinegar
1/4 c. sugar
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. paprika
1 tsp. dry mustard
1 tsp. minced onion

For a pepper substitute, try ground papaya seeds

Another papaya seed dressing

1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup honey
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1 cup raspberry vinegar
1 Tablespoon salt
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 small sweet onion, minced
1/4 cup papaya seeds
Preparation:
Place sugar, honey, dry mustard, raspberry vinegar, and salt into a blender. Process until combined.

With blender running, add oil very slowly in a steady stream. Stop blender. Add sweet onions and pulse 3 times.

Pour dressing into a bowl and stir in papaya seeds

Refrigerate any leftovers and shake well before using.

Papaya seed dressing is not only good for green or fruit salads, but also as a marinade for poultry and pork.

Yield: about 3 cups

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clipped on: 01.06.2012 at 11:10 pm    last updated on: 01.06.2012 at 11:10 pm

RE: What plants/crops would you grow in a major crisis? (Follow-Up #72)

posted by: an_ill-mannered_ache on 03.29.2008 at 08:05 am in Florida Gardening Forum

they had a couple of cool rice paddies -- one flooded, one dry-land technique...

Here is a link that might be useful: rice at ECHO

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clipped on: 05.10.2011 at 08:20 pm    last updated on: 05.10.2011 at 08:20 pm

RE: Best Grapes for zone 9b-10??? (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: electricsquid on 05.06.2010 at 03:08 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Thanks for all the quick responses :)

@bigpaulie1972
"Just Fruits & Exotics" has been a gold mine of info for me. Their "Panic Button" links (in PDF) have given me the needed info for growing blueberries, strawberries, pomegranates, and now grapes.

I've become very interested in the Muscadine variety of grapes, but wouldn't even bother with Concord due to their lack of use in wine making (as far as I know at this time).
---------------

@carolb_w_fl
I'm glad to have you respond. I read in another GardenWeb topic that you suggest "Daytona" grapes, and now I know where you got them.

J.A. Dodson Citrus & Tropicals doesn't have any grapes listed on their website at this time, but that might be due to them being a touch out of season for planting (as far as I know). Fortunately, J.A. Dodson's phone number comes up as a Pinellas Park location (though I think that might be their residence so I don't suggest just showing up). They are about 3 miles from me. So I'll have to give them a call one of these days.
---------------

@xentar
Because I'm interested in propagating whatever I grow, I would not want grafted types. Whatever I choose to go with will need to be able to live/survive on it's own root system. For some reason the whole idea of grafting kinda rubs me the wrong way :P

Thank you for sharing your experiences so far, your knowledge will be helpful in my final choice.

Oh, BTW, I only mow our yard 5 times a year, so don't worry about the high grass showing in that pic. It's a welcome sight.
----------------


So I guess I should have added in the original post (forgive me, I'm a bit sick right now), I am looking to have a very well rounded grape that not only does well here in 9b/10, but can be used for wine making, eating raw, and maybe even jellies or jams (in that order).

I would like to make a wine from these grapes that doesn't require a lot of extra sugar to be added to the mash. I would like to keep it as natural as possible. So I'm guessing that I need a naturally sweet, mildly acidic grape to start with.

Please correct me if I am wrong, I am fairly new to this.

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clipped on: 01.19.2011 at 11:50 pm    last updated on: 01.19.2011 at 11:50 pm

RE: Best tasting Peach variety for FL? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: gcmastiffs on 04.28.2009 at 08:46 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

Tropic Snow (White) and Tropic Beauty (yellow) are superb, even in zone 10. I think I have all of the low-chill Peaches, and they rarely disappoint us. I have Mid Pride, Eva's Pride, UF Beauty, UF Sun, Bonanza, May Pride and Flordaprince. I'm sure I'm forgetting some. I have them tucked in all over the property. They are small, neat trees.

The dwarf Bonanzas are the worst producers (3' tall trees in pots on the patio), Tropic Snow and Tropic Beauty are the best. Also, SunRaycer Nectarines are great, early and really tasty! I've been picking them for 2 weeks now.

Now is a bad time to buy Peach/Pear/Plum/Apple trees. Planting in winter, in bare root form, is best.

My favorite source is Bay Laurel Nursery in California. I have had new, bare root trees from them, fruit the very first year! They sell grafted trees on your choice of rootstocks.

Florida King needs about 450 chill hours. That is an awfull lot for zone 9. I doubt you are getting half of that! Your tree would do better up North. Lowes often sells plants that are not suited for the local areas.

Please don't give up on Peaches! They are easy to grow and are very pretty in the landscape. You just need the right varieties for your zone.

Lisa

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clipped on: 01.19.2011 at 10:22 pm    last updated on: 01.19.2011 at 10:22 pm

RE: Red Lady papaya photos (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: whgille on 11.17.2008 at 09:27 am in Florida Gardening Forum

Christine

Green papaya can be used as a vegetable. Cooked, in soups,stir fries. Raw, in salads, relishes.

Vietnamese green papaya salad:

2 fresh hot red chile peppers,minced
1 teaspoon minced garlic
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon rice vinegar or distilled white vinegar
3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
3 tablespoons Thai fish sauce (you can substitute soy sauce)
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
freshly ground black pepper
1 medium green papaya, peeled, seeded, and very finely shredded (about 5 cups)
1 cup finely shredded carrots
1 medium red onion, sliced paper thin
1/2 cup shredded mint leaves
1/4 cup shredded fresh cilantro leaves
1/3 cup unsalted dry-roasted peanuts,coarsely ground

1. Whisk together the chiles, garlic, sugar, vinegar, lime juice,fish or soy sauce, oil, and black pepper to taste in a medium bowl.

2. Just before serving, combine the papaya, carrots, onion, mint, and cilantro, and half the ground peanuts in a large mixing bowl. Sprinkle the dressing over all and toss well.

3. Transfer the salad to a serving platter and sprinkle with the remaining peanuts.

If desired, add shredded poached chicken for a main-course meal.

I hope this can be useful to those out there with green papayas. I know I like it.

Willy

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clipped on: 01.19.2011 at 09:52 pm    last updated on: 01.19.2011 at 09:52 pm

RE: Off my rocker?-Solar water heater? (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: RichDragon50 on 10.14.2005 at 05:26 am in Farm Life Forum

Love solar but why do you need to pay for electricity/solar panels? Being a bit of a mad inventor here goes. Buy/use an old radiator, paint it black and fix an old window over it to absorb more sun. Connect simple copper pipe to radiator on one side (the more flexible the better) wind the copper pipe around a former (round bit of stick)-you might find it earier to fill with sand first before coiling the pipe. Empty the sand out and fill the pipe (use a funnel) with ordinary antifreeze, connect the pipe up to other side of radiator. Sunshine will automatically warm the radiator and convection will force the warmed antifreeze through the closed system and down into the coil part. Place this coil in the pond/water and it will stop water freezing. If you are clever this system will cost you nothing to run and use scrap parts mainly. Make sure that when you fill with antifreeze that there are no air bubbles in the system and for safety reasons you could always put the coil in a metal box so that stock don't accidentally knock it. To be super safe you could replace antifreeze with whisky/hooch so if it spills you are warned by singing drinking donkeys!

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clipped on: 10.14.2010 at 09:55 pm    last updated on: 10.14.2010 at 09:55 pm

RE: Anybody here ever had the Camden Deli's chowder? (Follow-Up #14)

posted by: caliloo on 10.05.2010 at 05:43 am in Cooking Forum

mudlady... you might give this a try. Jasper White makes the best chowder I have ever tasted and following this method it is easily reproduced at home.


NEW ENGLAND FISH CHOWDER by Jasper White

To me, this is the most authentic and most important recipe in this book. It is the gold standard for chowder: a hearty main course with deep flavors, luxurious texture, and generous chunks of fish, onion, and potato. New England Fish Chowder is easy to make, uses simple ingredients, and doesn’2equire you to be fussy or exact. After making this chowder a few times, you will begin to understand the Zen of chowder.

4 ounces meaty salt pork, rind removed and cut into 1/3-inch dice
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 medium onions (14 ounces), cut into 3/4-inch dice
6 to 8 sprigs fresh summer savory or thyme, leaves removed and chopped (1 tablespoon)
2 dried bay leaves
2 pounds Yukon Gold, Maine, PEI, or other all-purpose potatoes, peeled and sliced 1/3-inch thick
5 cups Strong Fish Stock, Traditional Fish Stock, Chicken Stock, or water (as a last resort)
Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 pounds skinless haddock or cod fillets, preferably over 1 inch thick, pinbones removed
1 1/2 cups heavy cream (or up to 2 cups if desired)
For garnish
2 tablespoons chopped fresh Italian parsley
2 tablespoons minced fresh chives

1. Heat a 4- to 6-quart heavy pot over low heat and add the diced salt pork. Once it has rendered a few tablespoons of fat, increase the heat to medium and cook until the pork is a crisp golden brown. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the cracklings to a small ovenproof dish, leaving the fat in the pot, and reserve until later.

2. Add the butter, onions, savory or thyme, and bay leaves to the pot and sauté, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon, for about 8 minutes, until the onions and softened but not browned.

3. Add the potatoes and stock. If the stock doesn’#over the potatoes, add just enough water to cover them. Turn up the heat and bring to a boil, cover, and cook the potatoes vigorously for about 10 minutes, until they are soft on the outside but still firm in the center. If the stock hasn’4hickened lightly, smash a few of the potato slices against the side of the pot and cook for a minute or two longer to release their starch. Reduce the heat to low and season assertively with salt and pepper (you want to almost overseason the chowder at this point to avoid having to stir it much once the fish is added). Add the fish fillets and cook over low heat for 5 minutes, then remove the pot from the heat and allow the chowder to sit for 10 minutes (the fish will finish cooking during this time).

4. Gently stir in the cream and taste for salt and pepper. If you are not serving the chowder within the hour, let it cool a bit, then refrigerate; cover the chowder after it has chilled completely. Otherwise, let it sit for up to an hour at room temperature, allowing the flavors to meld.

5. When ready to serve, reheat the chowder over low heat; don’,et it boil. Warm the cracklings in a low oven (200 °F) for a few minutes.

6. Use a slotted spoon to mound the chunks of fish, the onions, and potatoes in the center of large soup plates or shallow bowls, and ladle the creamy broth around. Scatter the cracklings over the individual servings and finish each with a sprinkling of chopped parsley and minced chives.

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clipped on: 10.14.2010 at 06:29 pm    last updated on: 10.14.2010 at 06:29 pm

Seasoning Mixes (home made)

posted by: rachelellen on 10.14.2010 at 10:41 am in Cooking Forum

My brother (lives Back East) works full time, and has a fair commute. He also has a teen aged son, and likes to eat healthy. His routine on Sundays is to prep as many of his meals as he can for the week. Some meats go into marinades in the freezer. He makes a big batch of salad greens and chopped vegetables to take for his lunches, topped with whatever meats he has available. He doesn't really use dressing for his salads, relying on lots of chopped tomatoes, onions and avocados for moisture and flavor. He even makes up "egg McMuffins" with English muffins, low fat "cheese," egg beaters & ham slices for breakfasts.

I am working on developing some seasoning rubs to enhance quickly broiled, pan fried or roasted meats as a gift. I want also to send him some herb mixes he can blend with low or non-fat mayo/yogurt for guilt-free salad dressings and maybe some sort of low-fat salad sprinkles. Sprinkles would also maybe enhance his veggies, as he mostly steams them.

A few I like and am thinking of sending him are:

Lebanese Spice Mix

4 T ground cinnamon
1 T ground chili
1 T ground cardamom pods
1 T ground cloves

Baharat (Middle Eastern Spice Rub)

1/3 c black pepper
1/4 c coriander
/4 c cinnamon
1/3 c cumin
2 t cardamom
1/4 c nutmeg (yes, that is one quarter cup)
1/2 c paprika
1/3 c curry powder
1/4 c amchur*

*amchur is an Indian spice that has a nicely sour flavor. I think I subbed it for ground, dried limes in the original recipe. If unavailable, I suspect that sprinkling the meats with lemon or lime juice prior to rubbing in the spices would work.

SouthWest Seasoning Rub

2 T chili powder
2 t ground cumin
2 T paprika
1 t black pepper
1 T ground coriander
1/2 t cayenne
1 t crushed red pepper
1 T celery salt*
1 T dried oregano, crumbled fine

*I use my home made celery salt, which has more celery seed, less salt...sub 2 teaspoons ground celery seed and 1 teaspoon salt.

Any favorite mixes, y'all?? Rubs, salad dressing mixes, salad sprinkles??

I'm also wanting to send him some Faux Shake 'n' Bake kind of mix...I have one I make with cornflake crumbs and spices, but am interested in any of yours...

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clipped on: 10.14.2010 at 05:57 pm    last updated on: 10.14.2010 at 05:57 pm

RE: Mediterranean vegetables planting times (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: gardenguru1950 on 08.13.2009 at 12:11 am in Mediterranean Gardening Forum

TO SOW DIRECT IN SPRING (March-April)

VEGETABLES

Arugula
Beets
Carrots
Collards
Corn salad
Cress
Kale
Lamb�s Quarters
Lettuce, head
Lettuce, loose-leaf
Mustard
Onion (or "sets")
Orach
Radish
Spinach

"Transition" (sown late April-May)

Chick-pea (garbanzo)
French (green) bean
Lentil
Lima bean
Runner bean
Sunflower
Sweet corn
Black (turtle) beans
Pinquito beans
Pinto beans
Peruana beans

HERBS

Anise
Chervil
Cilantro, coriander
Marjoram
Parsley
Soup/leaf celery

TO SOW DIRECT IN EARLY SUMMER (late May-June)

VEGETABLES


Drying beans (including: Black/turtle, peruana, pinquito, and pinto,)
Bottle gourd ("cucuzzi")
Chayote
Chick-pea (garbanzo)
Cucumber
French (green) bean
Lentil
Lima bean
Melons (only special kinds)
Pumpkin
Purslane
Runner bean
Summer Squash
Sunflower
Sweet corn
Winter Squash


HERBS

Dill
Epazote
Summer savory


TO SOW DIRECT IN LATE SUMMER (September)

VEGETABLES


Beets
Broad bean (fava)
Carrots
Celeriac
Chard
Chinese Cabbage
Daikon radish
Dandelion
Endive, Chicory
Fennel "bulb"
French (green) bean
Kale
Kohlrabi
Leek
Mustard
Onion ("sets")
Parsnip
Potato ("seed potatoes")
Purslane
Radish
Rutabaga
Salsify
Sorrel
Spinach
Turnips
Tyfon

HERBS


Anise
Chervil
Fennel "leaf"
Marjoram
Parsley
Soup/leaf celery


TO SOW DIRECT IN FALL (October-November)

VEGETABLES


Arugula
Beets
Bok Choy
Broad bean (Fava)
Carrots
Celeriac
Chard
Chinese broccoli
Chinese cabbage
Chinese mustard
Collards
Corn salad
Cress
Daikon radish
Dandelion
Endive, Chicory
Fennel ("bulb" type)
Garland chrysanthemum
Kale
Kohlrabi
Lamb�s Quarters
Leek
Lettuce, head
Lettuce, loose-leaf
Mustard
Onion ("sets")
Orach
Pak Choy
Parsnip
Potatoes ("seed potatoes")
Pea
Radish
Rutabaga
Salsify
Snow peas
Sorrel
Spinach
Sugar peas
Turnips
Tyfon

HERBS

Anise
Chervil
Soup/leaf celery
Cilantro, coriander
Marjoram
Parsley


TO SOW DIRECT IN LATE WINTER (February-March)

VEGETABLES


Arugula
Beets
Carrots
Chinese broccoli
Chinese mustard
Collards
Corn salad
Cress
Daikon radish
Kale
Lamb�s Quarters
Lettuce, head
Lettuce, loose-leaf
Mustard
Onion ("sets")
Orach
Pak Choy
Pea
Potatoes ("seed potatoes")
Radish
Snow peas
Sorrel
Spinach
Sugar peas
Tyfon

HERBS

Anise
Chervil
Cilantro, coriander
Marjoram
Parsley
Soup/leaf celery


TO SOW INDOORS IN WINTER (January-February)
FOR TRANSPLANTING TO THE GARDEN IN SPRING

VEGETABLES


Broccoli
Cabbage
Cauliflower


TO SOW INDOORS IN LATE WINTER-EARLY SPRING (February-March) FOR TRANSPLANTING TO THE GARDEN IN EARLY SUMMER

VEGETABLES (and one HERB)


Basil
Eggplant
Pepper
Tomato


TO SOW INDOORS IN LATE SUMMER-EARLY FALL (September)
FOR TRANSPLANTING TO THE GARDEN IN LATE FALL-EARLY WINTER

VEGETABLES


Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Celery


Joe

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clipped on: 10.12.2010 at 08:54 pm    last updated on: 10.12.2010 at 08:54 pm

RE: Favorite, best tasting okra for nonokra eating spouse- (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: vogt0047 on 08.25.2010 at 11:07 pm in Heirloom Plants & Gardens Forum

I grow Clemson Spineless but I can attest that how you cook the okra makes all the difference in the taste and texture of it.

This recipe convinced my carnivore hubby that even us vegetarians eat well. It is Indian but sooooo good. Never had slimy okra with this recipe.

Skillet Roasted Spiced Okra

3/4 tsp hot paprika
1/4 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp ground corinader
1/4 tsp ground fennel
1/4 tsp tumeric
pinch of cinnamon
2T Vegetable oil
1 lb cut okra
Salt
Juice from 1/2 lemon

In small bowl blend all spices. In large skillet heat oil and add Okra. Cook over high heat 2-3 Min. Reduce heat and cook until lightly brown. Sprinkle with spice blend and cook until tender. Remove from heat and salt to taste. Sprinkle lemon juice just before serving.

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clipped on: 10.10.2010 at 10:58 pm    last updated on: 10.10.2010 at 10:58 pm

Japanese Morning Glories

posted by: karyn1 on 09.29.2010 at 07:47 am in Seed Exchange Forum

I have mixed JMG seeds for trade or SASBE. I couldn't tell you what varieties or how much of each will be in the mix. I just went out and collected all the ripe pods. I have pics posted of some of the varieties in the vines forum.

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clipped on: 10.08.2010 at 10:24 am    last updated on: 10.08.2010 at 10:24 am

RE: Tulip Bulbs (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: loufloralcityz9 on 10.05.2010 at 05:22 pm in Florida Gardening Forum

I suggest you plant tulips that thrive in zones 8 through 10: lady tulip (T. clusiana), Candia tulip (T. saxatilis), and Florentine tulip (T. sylvestris). These tulips do not need chilling before planting in these regions. Buy these types in the fall, plant them in a cool, shaded location, and forget them. They'll flower in spring and likely for many springs to come.

With the bulbs you now have, refrigerate them for ten weeks and plant them mid Dec to mid Jan (zone 10) also in a cool shaded location. If you are using your house refrigerator make sure you double seal the bulbs in two airtight zip lock bags because any other veggies in your fridge gives off xylene gas and that will stop them from blooming.

Lou

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tulips for fla
clipped on: 10.07.2010 at 09:19 pm    last updated on: 10.07.2010 at 09:20 pm

RE: Toxic Organic Sungro Potting Mix (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: soulreaver on 06.30.2009 at 03:59 pm in Market Gardener Forum

Hi anoid1. What I use for my mix changes based on plant type but this is my all purpose mix.

20 quarts peat moss
20 quarts perlite
20 quarts vermiculite
1 cup blood meal
1 cup bonemeal
1 cup kelp meal
2 cups corn meal
2 cups alfalfa meal

The cornmeal is more to feed the beneficial fungus that feed on other fungus that can cause things like blight.

Alfalfa meal (or pellets) is just a good quick source of NPK which helps hold the plants over until bonemeal and kelp meal can kick in. It's not so much a problem for the blood meal since it is a fast acting nitrogen source.

I also find that if you have the time, planting all your plants into a mix like this for the first month of their growth makes a much stronger and healthier plant when you transplant it into the ground. Since most vegetable plants can double their size every 14-15 days or so once they have become established it is a good idea to try and get them to that point as quickly as possible for highest production rates of vegetables.

I see you live in New England like me so it should be very easy for you find all of these things if you want them.

Incase you want info on where to get this stuff I can show you all the websites I buy from which are the cheapest I have yet to find. Just email me at beausorganics@yahoo.com Happy gardening.

NOTES:

organic grow mix
clipped on: 10.05.2010 at 07:43 am    last updated on: 10.05.2010 at 07:44 am