Clippings by brandon7

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RE: Arborvitae are very hardy and offer good shade, privacy (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: brandon7 on 09.28.2009 at 04:09 pm in Trees Forum

Hmmm, more SPAM from this HIGHLY DISREPUTABLE nursery. This place goes by many names including TN Nursery, Fast Growing Trees, Quick Growing Trees, Tennessee Wholesale Nursery, D & T Wholesale Nursery, Wetland Supplies and who knows what else. This place reminds me of TyTy with all the different names. They are BAD NEWS and have awful Garden Watchdog reviews!!! The owner has posted spam along with ridiculous advice in many forums. If you factor in their poor reviews, the fact that they have to have so many names for their business, and the fact that they are SPAMing this forum (something tsons bethblakely promised not to do when she signed up to participate on this site), I'd suggest anyone considering this business to RUN the other way!

Here is a link that might be useful: Garden Watchdog Review

NOTES:

TN Nursery
clipped on: 09.28.2009 at 04:10 pm    last updated on: 09.28.2009 at 04:11 pm

RE: water drains too fast (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: petzold6596 on 09.15.2008 at 10:46 pm in Professional Gardener Forum

Gravity forces water down between the soil particles, like any other molecule, and is stopped ,held back, by impermeable material. The last time I checked, rocks of any size are much more permeable than potting soil.

NOTES:

Proof that Petzold has no idea how soil drainage works. (see thread)
clipped on: 08.30.2009 at 06:07 pm    last updated on: 08.30.2009 at 06:11 pm

RE: hydrangeas and dead plant ?? (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: brandon7 on 09.21.2008 at 02:23 pm in Tennessee Gardening Forum

Mulch would be very beneficial. It
-improves soil fertility and texture as it breaks down,
-prevents germination of many weed seeds,
-reduces competition for food and water from grass and weeds,
-reduces erosion,
-helps to maintain soil moisture during dry periods,
-often aids drainage by preventing surface crusting and sealing,
-can keep roots cooler during hot summer weather,
-can help to moderate soil temperature fluctuations,
-reduces frost-heaving,
-reduces certain soil-borne diseases by preventing soil and fungi from splashing onto foliage,
-prevents damage from mowers and trimmers,
-and improves the look of the landscape.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.21.2008 at 02:24 pm    last updated on: 11.04.2008 at 02:57 pm

RE: Moving trees (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: brandon7 on 11.04.2008 at 02:48 pm in Trees Forum

Here is a rough guide to how big a rootball should be. Soil type, tree species, and other factors are not taken into account, but it will give you an idea:

For trunk diameter below 1/2", multiply the diameter by 20 to get approximate rootball diameter.
For trunk diameter between 1/2" and 1", multiply the diameter by 18 to get approximate rootball diameter.
For trunk diameter between 1" and 1-1/2", multiply the diameter by 16 to get approximate rootball diameter.
For trunk diameter between 1-1/2" and 2-1/2", multiply the diameter by 14 to get approximate rootball diameter.
For trunk diameter between 2-1/2" and 4", multiply the diameter by 12 to get approximate rootball diameter.

Here are guidelines for rootball depth:

For a rootball with a diameter of 1', depth should be approximately 8".
For a rootball with a diameter of 2', depth should be approximately 1'.
For a rootball with a diameter of 3', depth should be approximately 15".
For a rootball with a diameter of 4', depth should be approximately 18".

A similar chart (measurements are in metric) can be found on Wikipedia, and I will supply a link below.

Here is a link that might be useful: Wikipedia Article on Transplanting Trees

NOTES:

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clipped on: 11.04.2008 at 02:48 pm    last updated on: 11.04.2008 at 02:49 pm