Clippings by bramasole

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RE: Still no flowers (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: tdogdad on 06.13.2008 at 10:44 am in Plumeria Forum

You do not need to stick your plant. Your tip either got too cold or got a little tip black spot and the tip growth was stopped. The new branches will now grow through the season and will not flower this year. Next year they most likely will begin flowering again. I would cut the extra pieces on the top so it flattens down and then go to the hardware and get a tube (caulking gun tube) of DAP cedar tan Acrylic latex caulk plus silicone and put a dab on the end and spread evenly with a popsicle stick or foam brush. You can use black tree cutting tar but it cracks. You can use household spackle but it also hardens and is white. You can use waterbased paint. However, the DAP looks great, stretches as the plant grows and has a chemical that deters fungus. You can just leave it but because it is upright it will eventually form a pit and hold water which encourages bugs and rot. Bill

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clipped on: 06.23.2008 at 10:01 pm    last updated on: 06.23.2008 at 10:01 pm

MSJC: Flower & Garden Sale Pix !!! (06-08-08)

posted by: hawaiianbuilt on 06.09.2008 at 02:01 pm in Plumeria Forum

HEY GARDENWEB FOLKS !!!

June 7-8, 2008 marked the Mission San Juan Capistrano Flower & Garden Sale in San Juan Capistrano, Southern California !!!

With many local Southern California vendors onsite, there were both Native California plants as well as Tropicals such as our favorite ... Plumeria !!!

This was definitely an event not to have missed !!!

Here are some of my pix taken that Sunday afternoon ...

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The courtyard to the festivities ...

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Awesome Spring color ...

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Some of the great items for Sale !!!

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And some artificial Plumies !!!

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And who was on site ?? Monalisa's Tropicals selling PLUMIES !!!

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Quick break for an informative lecture ...

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Quick stop at the Koi fountain ...

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Then my favorite time ...

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Then it was time to admire the architecture of the San Juan Capistrano Mission ...

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Then it was time to say ...

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After leaving the Mission San Juan Capistrano, I headed to Costa Mesa at "The Plant Stand" where they just received their latest shipment of ...

You guessed it ... PLUMERIA !!!

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All in all a wonderful experience that Sunday afternoon ...

Total damage to my wallet:

Two Multi-branched Cuttings from Monalisa's Tropicals ...

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And one Multi-branching Rooted Plumie from The Plant Stand ...

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Rodney

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clipped on: 06.13.2008 at 12:15 am    last updated on: 06.13.2008 at 12:15 am

Floating Shelf (Follow-Up #38)

posted by: wyndyacre on 11.27.2007 at 07:54 pm in Greenhouses & Garden Structures Forum

Here's some closeups of my hanging shelf, Mudhouse.

It is one 12ft length of the ubiquitous wire closet shelving supported by two 12ft pieces of galvanized electrical conduit piping. The conduit is hung from 4 pieces of aircraft cable (available at HD). Not very thick gauge as you can see but very strong. The cable is looped over thick shafted screws with large heads that have been screwed into the wooden joists. The cable is held together with cable clamps.

It is very strong...as you noted it supports a tremendous amount of weight (I'd be afraid to add it up!) of clay and porcelain pots and has been installed for 5 years.

I took these photos this evening....

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The mammillaria gets smothered by pink blooms. The echiverias in the bonsai dishes are babies I started from leaves last winter. My one precious agave (hard to find and expensive here) I won at a silent plant auction a couple years ago. The barrel hasn't bloomed for me yet but I've had others that did when left outdoors for the summer.

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clipped on: 06.10.2008 at 10:26 pm    last updated on: 06.10.2008 at 10:26 pm

RE: Greenhouse set up (Follow-Up #24)

posted by: mudhouse on 11.25.2007 at 07:21 pm in Greenhouses & Garden Structures Forum

Lots of great stuff to look at here! (Greenhouser, I want all the spiky plants in your third photo for Christmas, please.)

Heres my layout for my 10x12 HFGH (Stressbabys tip about Paint has saved you from my pencil scrawls.)

Heres how the benches on the south wall looked before I moved in the plants.

Heres the same wall, with plants. My GH is not full of lovely huge tropicals with huge leaves and exotic fruits like the rest of you...just smaller prickly plants with bad attitudes! The thing that looks like a flying TV in the upper left corner is a hanging box that holds my thermostats for the fan and heaters. I covered it with scraps of Aluminet to shield the thermostats from the sun. It looks funny, but it seems to work, and it keeps the thermostats out of my way.

Here's the north wall, with plants

Close up of some of the north side plants, Echeverias and other non-spiny succulents that like a bit less sun.

My potting/sink area on the north side. I did a mosaic countertop, using up scrap tiles, and had lots of fun doing it.

Theres a hole in the center so I can brush potting soil into a plastic bin below. The removable cover is just a metal trivet from Hobby Lobby, painted.


Sheri

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clipped on: 06.10.2008 at 10:23 pm    last updated on: 06.10.2008 at 10:23 pm

RE: Plumeria in pots or ground (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: tdogdad on 04.14.2008 at 04:21 pm in Plumeria Forum

Dee- My suggestion is that you plant them in 5 gallon pots and take a half inch drill and drill a bunch of holes in the sides of the pot. Pick up a 7 gallon pot and dig a hole in the ground deeper than the 7 gallon. Put some pea gravel in the hole until the 7 sits at ground level on top of the gravel. Put the 5 gallon in the center of the 7 and fill around with fast draining soil with some fertilizer mixed in. At the end of the season, cut around the 5 gallon and remove the plant in the pot for storage during winter. Remove the extra two gallons of used soil and roots and toss. Next spring repeat. This will work for years and create a very good growing environment for your plant. this is just a form of managed root pruning. Make sure when you prune you remove all the leaves so you do not draw too much liquid from the stem. Bill

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clipped on: 06.08.2008 at 11:45 pm    last updated on: 06.08.2008 at 11:45 pm

My plumeria is getting to big for its pot,--Now what?

posted by: last1earth on 02.27.2008 at 05:41 pm in Plumeria Forum

I rooted a plumeria two years ago, in a pot. Now it has grown too big for the pot and I can't keep upgrading to bigger pots. So what can I do?

The growth (leaves) are ONLY at the tips of them, so if I trim it down, won't the plumeria start lacking nutrients (lack of leaves) and die? Or will new growth sprout from other areas (although it has'nt yet, only the tips seems to have leaves).

If I CAN trim, should I immedietly pot up the cut parts, will they root?

Thnaks for any info guys!

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clipped on: 06.08.2008 at 11:12 pm    last updated on: 06.08.2008 at 11:12 pm

Going dormant pictures (So.Cal-12/12/06)

posted by: tdogdad on 12.12.2006 at 11:19 pm in Plumeria Forum

With all the talk about plants going dormant, I went outside today and took some pictures to help people recognize some signs of dormancy. Bill
A few leaves turn yellow in the midst of green and some flowers:
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A celadine decides it is time to shut down all at once:
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A Guillott's sunset dumps leaves but keeps flowering (many won't open):
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Some mature branch tips have no claws, others do, others will drop:
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Often all that will be left is seed pods which will grow through the winter:
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Hope this answers some questions and stimulates a few more. Bill

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clipped on: 06.08.2008 at 12:02 am    last updated on: 06.08.2008 at 12:02 am

Thankyou AL for the best kept secret!

posted by: meyermike_1micha on 04.24.2008 at 02:13 pm in Container Gardening Forum

UNBELIEVABLE!!
It feels great to express the RELIEF and JOY of being able to water my plants FREELY,and not have to worry about root rot. I have ALL my plants in Al's mix now, and it is awsome. They are doing SO good,and they do not dry to a wilt by the time I get home. The first day or two when my plants hit this soil, they do, the pots dry out fast, but, once the bark, and clay pots, and other ingrediants absorb moister over a few waterings!!!..WOW. I no longer have to rush home to water. It is also awsome to know I can do a mass watering and hit every plant at once, and yet they love the water, because it drains soo freely and the soil only stays moist, not wet. It is fun to watch evrythin in the pot wet fast, and also drain fast. No worries of salt build ups here!!lol This soil mix that Al' gave us on this forum is a blessing and a miracle!! My plants are thriving, just from the first few days they are in it!! I have all new growth coming fast, and NO insects anymore on these potted plants!!
In the soils in which I add gypsum, I fertilize with his mix.
Then in the soil no gypsum, just the soil ingrediants with no added fertilizers or minerals, I water with just Foliage Pro I got on the internet, and the plants LOVE it!!
Foliage pro has everything your plants need for great nutrition!!
THANKS AL!!! for one of the best things anyone could of offered everyone in the plant hobby!!!:-)
It was the best kept secret, until you shared!!:-)
Mike

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clipped on: 04.26.2008 at 05:07 pm    last updated on: 04.26.2008 at 05:08 pm

RE: Neem oil safe for edible plants? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: violet_z6 on 06.23.2007 at 04:52 pm in Vegetable Gardening Forum

Neem oil is fabulous, but since you know your pest, you should be as specific as possible about how you choose to control them. Take the time to learn that there is not a "cure all" for every pest at every stage of it's life cycle. Some won't work if it's going to rain. Some don't work well if it's too hot, etc.

Pest management is complex, if you wish to use chemical products, do so responsibly which goes further than reading the label. If you want to learn, a good place to start is here:

Integrated Pest Management
This lecture is presented in two parts. Each part is 90-minutes in length. Recorded in Sacramento County in California's Sacramento Valley, this lecture is by Mary Louise Flint, Ph.D., Director, IPM Education and Publications, UC Statewide IPM Project and Extension Entomologist & Cooperative Extension Specialist.

Education:
B.S. Plant Science, University of California, Davis
Ph.D. Entomology, University of California, Berkeley

Appointment:
100% Cooperative Extension

Research Interests:
Integrated pest management of landscape, agricultural and garden pests; biological control of arthropod pests; alternatives to pesticides; adoption of alternative practices by practitioners; innovative delivery of pest management information.

Topics discussed in the Integrated Pest Management Lecture:

* IPM references and resources
* Preventing pest problems
* Natural common enemies
* Making less toxic pesticide choices
* Controlling aphids, scales, caterpillars, coddling moths, tree borers, snails and slugs, and lawn insects.

You can watch the programs now online:

Just make sure you have Real Player installed or download it free.

Real Player Logo
Integrated Pest Management Part 1 90 minutes

Real Player Logo
Integrated Pest Management Part 2 90 minutes

You'll want to bookmark the following link to Professor Flint's Lab Research on:
Controlling Pests in Gardens and Landscapes: Vegetables and Melons

I promise you'll learn one or two things to put in your gardening bag of pest management arsenals.

;)

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clipped on: 12.29.2007 at 05:53 pm    last updated on: 12.29.2007 at 05:53 pm

RE: Time for some newbie inspiration! (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: dem_pa on 12.24.2007 at 06:17 am in Winter Sowing Forum

Four years ago when I started winter sowing, donn_ had his instructions posted and I copied them. I have used them ever since. Thanks donn_.

These were taken April of this year. 4" up mark for arch window on opposite sides of handle. Drainage holes in the botttom. I use a piece of mini-blind tied to the handle with a number on it to identify the contents of the jug. (With a corresponding entry in a book) Plastic bag with hole cut in top for openning for snow and rain.


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These needed ventilation and planting.


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dem_pa

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clipped on: 12.29.2007 at 03:23 pm    last updated on: 12.29.2007 at 03:23 pm

RE: Time for some newbie inspiration! (Follow-Up #17)

posted by: vera_eastern_wa on 12.28.2007 at 10:35 pm in Winter Sowing Forum

burry...

Some people just cut their jugs in half and then tape around. In spring the lids can be propped as need be with a clothspin or whatever.
These jugs with the plastic baggie over than had just a window cut out in the front (dem_paw made two windows) where the seeds are sowed thru that. In spring you can lift the bag up or down as you need it :D
It's just a preference thing.
I used sturdier zip lock and just cut a hole in bottom center for the mouth of the jug and pulled it down over to the bottom but did not zip. I had to make about a 1/2 slit on each seem to make them slide over easy.
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clipped on: 12.29.2007 at 03:22 pm    last updated on: 12.29.2007 at 03:22 pm

RE: My petit potager (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: steveningen on 06.12.2007 at 12:54 am in Potager Gardens Forum

Natal told me on the Cottage Garden forum that I had fresh posts on this thread. Sorry folks, I had forgotten I posted this here. Thanks for all the nice comments. Fern, the bed is small, only about 14 feet by 7 feet. And thanks for the tip about the pea gravel Jean. I think perhaps you are right. It's such a small space. There's just something about pea gravel that takes me back to Paris though.

At any rate, here's a pic of the potager all growed up:

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This is how it looks incorporated into the rest of the garden (so I don't get in trouble with the city):

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Steven

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clipped on: 12.22.2007 at 03:43 pm    last updated on: 12.22.2007 at 03:43 pm

RE: My petit potager (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: steveningen on 04.16.2007 at 01:14 am in Potager Gardens Forum

The pavers were left over from our patio project two seasons ago. The border is just the cheepo redwood mulch from HD. Quick fix. It's going away this fall to be replaced by a pea gravel path.

Here's a pic of the potager all planted up. I did it this afternoon and my arms feel like anvels. Tomatoes are double dug down 22 inches. Cabbage, Swiss Chard, peppers and beans slightly less, but they are dug just fine. I put 5 inches of straw over everything and pulled it away from the young plants. I can't wait for my first yummy tomato!

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clipped on: 12.22.2007 at 03:42 pm    last updated on: 12.22.2007 at 03:42 pm

My petit potager

posted by: steveningen on 04.14.2007 at 11:59 pm in Potager Gardens Forum

Here's my first effort at a potager. Tomorrow it gets planted. I've got four heirloom and two smaller determinate tomatoes (along with sturdy cages), swiss chard, Dutch flat cabbage, golden bell and red bell pepper, and some blue lake beens that will run up a tall trellis. At the far end in the curvey bit I'll be planting a variety of herbs. I may not be able to get it all in there, but we'll see.

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clipped on: 12.22.2007 at 03:41 pm    last updated on: 12.22.2007 at 03:42 pm