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RE: Finished bathroom! (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: stephanie_and_tim on 12.15.2011 at 01:09 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Specs

Fixtures:
Hand shower: Hansgrohe
Other shower fixtures (rain shower, thermostatic, volume controls, etc.): Rohl
Sink: Grohe
Tub: Vintage tub clawfoot package with fixtures
Toilet: Toto Ultramax and Toto Washlet S300
Vanity: Beverly (from Amazon)
Tile: Manahattan 4x8 subway, calacutta gold mini brick mosaic (Stone Center online), Saime Zen Zero Natif light floor tile
Medicine cabinets: Home depot
Towel bar, light fixture: Pottery barn
Paint: BM Gray Wisp, I think :)


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clipped on: 06.04.2012 at 12:33 pm    last updated on: 06.04.2012 at 12:33 pm

Finished bathroom!

posted by: stephanie_and_tim on 12.15.2011 at 01:01 pm in Bathrooms Forum

I posted a while back looking for layout suggestions, see here.

Now the bathroom is done! We went with that layout basically.

Before:

After!




I didn't post that much during the renovations, but I certainly read LOTS and LOTS of posts, so thank you all very much!

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clipped on: 06.04.2012 at 12:32 pm    last updated on: 06.04.2012 at 12:32 pm

RE: Finished bathroom! (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: stephanie_and_tim on 12.15.2011 at 04:26 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Thanks everyone! We are very pleased.

@ writersblock: We didn't use the faucets that came with the vanity. Our plumber recommended against installing them as the threads were not very good. We bought Grohe faucets instead.

Forgot to mention a little extra that we really like... we had the contractor put outlets in the medicine cabinets.


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clipped on: 06.04.2012 at 12:31 pm    last updated on: 06.04.2012 at 12:31 pm

RE: Finished bathroom! (Follow-Up #24)

posted by: stephanie_and_tim on 12.17.2011 at 10:49 am in Bathrooms Forum

We did not have a window before. That was one thing I really wanted to get some natural light.

I actually haven't missed the large mirror at all. The medicine cabinets are mirrored on the inside as well, so that's nice, and we have the giant mirror in the closet.

We enlarged the bathroom by taking over a closet that stored the hot water heater (accessible from the outside). Last year, we moved to a tankless water heater on the wall of the house in preparation for the eventual remodel.

Old Floorplan

Rough new floorplan - the window we ended up with is 48" wide, we have a pocket door to the toilet room, no door to the bedroom


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clipped on: 06.04.2012 at 12:30 pm    last updated on: 06.04.2012 at 12:30 pm

RE: Master Bathroom window covering - (Follow-Up #18)

posted by: annz on 04.24.2012 at 11:42 am in Home Decorating Forum

Here's another pic I thought I had included in my other post. Very similar to what you found.
House in Sonoma traditional bathroom

CountryCurtain has chrome tension rods and if the end is too large you could always spray paint any tension rod of your choice. CC may also have the curtain you're wanting but the length may have to be adjusted. You can easily do adjustments, or make the curtains, by using fabric glue or fusible tape.

I would do individual curtains and the window doesn't look like it'll need any wood strips for the tension rod.

Here is a link that might be useful: Chrome rod


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clipped on: 04.24.2012 at 06:59 pm    last updated on: 04.24.2012 at 06:59 pm

another bathroom remodel with pics (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: staceyneil on 10.17.2011 at 10:14 am in Bathrooms Forum

And our master bathroom, of which there are several different threads.

Here is a link that might be useful: Spa-like semi-modern master bathroom


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clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 08:25 pm    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 08:25 pm

RE: Semi-modern bathroom photo update... (Follow-Up #43)

posted by: staceyneil on 01.27.2010 at 02:17 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Some updated pics with the shower door and mirror up, and door hung. The door is the original 1956 back door (exterior door) that we removed when we removed that exterior wall during the kitchen reno. Its a lovely old door. I'm going to put privacy film on the glass panels (like etched glass) next week, and we have a beautiful old chrome knob set to install. Also hoping the vanity hardware shows up soon...


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clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 08:23 pm    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 08:23 pm

Master Bath Finished

posted by: bethpen on 05.11.2011 at 06:44 pm in Bathrooms Forum

In 1989 my husband and I built our house on a super low budget. The shower he built lasted until about 1995 or so, when we ripped it out with hopes of a remodel. One thing led to another and we just didn't get it done until now. Luckily we had two other showers to use as well as an outside shower that he loves and uses from May until October.

Here are some before photos..

We are usually DIY'ers, but we just couldn't wrap our heads around what to do. We met with a couple of different designers who were also General Contractors. One of them stood out and we really liked her design ideas. It was a real treat to have someone else do all the work, though it was expensive.

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And the Elfa Closet!! My clothes are not worthy!

Beth P.

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clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 07:51 pm    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 07:51 pm

finished bathroom

posted by: jimnyo on 12.05.2011 at 01:10 am in Bathrooms Forum

sorry, our bathroom was very small and very hard to take pictures. we ran into a couple glitches, mainly that the chair rail couldn't be raised b/c the mirror would be too high, so they lowered it and then found out that it ran through the path of the shower trim, so we had to carve away some of the chair rail...sigh. so, not perfect, but just glad it's done. the tile people were not fantastic, i think, but here are the pix:

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clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 07:32 pm    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 07:32 pm

RE: shopping for shower fixtures. do you love yours? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: mydreamhome on 03.24.2012 at 10:03 pm in Bathrooms Forum

I feel your pain, elle3. We had a very hard time with selecting our plumbing fixtures as well. The thing we found that helped was to look at fixtures online first to help narrow down the choices then find out which plumbing supply houses had those fixtures in their showroom for us to see in person.

For our master shower, we went with the Delta Lockwood in Aged Pewter with a slide bar in Delta's Addison line for the handshower & absolutely love it. The spray out of the shower head is the perfect pressure & size. The handshower is on a slide bar & has the different massage settings on it (you can select a different handshower without the massage feature if you like). We were worried about water spots with using a dark finish (we have well water), but those worries turned out to be unfounded. In contrast, our chrome fixtures in the kids' bathrooms are a whole other story--I'm constantly in there scrubbing away at the water spots! The aged pewter finish was just discontinued by Delta so you might be able to find it at a really good price if you like it. Here's a pic of our shower (4'x7')...

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Another thought on this would be to look into one of Delta's In2ition showerheads. It's similar to the Grohe posted above, but without the slide bar and is VERY cost effective. We installed the Delta Madison In2ition showerheads in our last house and LOVED them. The only reason we didn't use them in the current house is because we were going for a different look.

Hope this helps!



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clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 04:56 pm    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 04:56 pm

RE: 5 ft drop in or undermount tub (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: lynneblack on 04.19.2012 at 05:35 pm in Bathrooms Forum

floor to top of tile is 20" width of deck from outside edge of tub to edge of tile is 6". I use the shower, the tub is my husband's and he loves it; he says it's super comfortable. He's 5'11 about 165 lbs


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clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 04:21 pm    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 04:22 pm

RE: 5 ft drop in or undermount tub (Follow-Up #19)

posted by: lynneblack on 04.20.2012 at 12:34 pm in Bathrooms Forum

thank you for the compliment, we are very happy with it- we were blessed to have a friend who is a GC =). The tub is 30". We debated about getting the 32" but the 30" seems to be fine (if it wasn't my husband would be whining about it lol)


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clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 04:20 pm    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 04:20 pm

RE: 5 ft drop in or undermount tub (Follow-Up #14)

posted by: lynneblack on 04.19.2012 at 12:10 am in Bathrooms Forum

we have a 5' Underscore, drop in with tile for a surround. Sorry the picture isn't great, it was taken through the glass that separates the tub from the shower
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Possible tub for MB.
clipped on: 04.22.2012 at 04:18 pm    last updated on: 04.22.2012 at 04:19 pm

RE: Limestone or Travertine With Glossy Tiles (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: olychick on 12.06.2011 at 02:22 pm in Home Decorating Forum

because I've posted it so much, I hesitate again, but I think it meets your criteria. I have limestone tile counter and tub deck with a really slick, almost sparkly backsplash. The leaf tile is also shiny. The shower isn't limestone, but a close lookalike for ease of care.

. Sanijet and sparkly tile

c. Vanity and linen tower

Here is a link that might be useful: bath link


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clipped on: 12.07.2011 at 11:20 am    last updated on: 12.07.2011 at 11:20 am

RE: I hate my dining room! Would this curtain fabric work? (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: gobruno on 11.01.2011 at 02:14 pm in Home Decorating Forum

vidyaram, yes, the great room is 2 stories. The wall of windows, however, is 12 feet high and it slopes upward to about 15 feet. There are then a row of clerestory windows that reach up to the 2 story height. Does that make sense. Sorry I don't have any good pictures of the finished product. Here is an older photo just after we moved in of the 2 story part of the great room:

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Here is my best picture of the window wall:

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I do like the great room, and that's the feel I'd like in my dining room. Although there are still a few things that I'm tweaking in the great room (like pillows, etc).

I have my lamps plugged into floor outlets that are just under the edges of the couch.

kimiko, yes, I agree that the tension in the room between traditional and contemporary is wrong. May be what I am hating about it is that the curtains are too traditional? I have tried to "fix" it and like it for over a year, and have finally given in to the fact that I don't like it bc things are just off.

What is so frustrating about this room is that like many of you pointed out, it has great bones, and I feel like I have put it together in a way that does it the least justice to its great bones.

Btw, I hate the chairs too! I'm still trying to figure out what to put there instead. I'm going to first start with walls and curtains though. The chairs are for our old dining room table, and they aren't in the best shape. If you have suggestions for chairs, I'm all ears!


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chandelier shape, possibly something like this for our entry?
clipped on: 11.01.2011 at 02:36 pm    last updated on: 11.01.2011 at 02:36 pm

RE: Show me your entryways (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: nini804 on 09.23.2011 at 08:30 pm in Home Decorating Forum

This is our recently completed new build.
This is the foyer...our door is stained mahogany, the stair rail is stained oak and the trim is SW Extra White painted wood. Note the panel detail we had the carpenters do inside the cased opening to the dining room on the left. It is repeated in the very large cased openings on two sides of the family room.
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Chandelier style
clipped on: 09.24.2011 at 06:49 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2011 at 06:50 pm

DIY budget elegant bathroom, almost done: pics...

posted by: staceyneil on 02.02.2011 at 10:11 am in Bathrooms Forum

Hi everyone,

Thanks for all your support and advice along the way with our latest project... we're ALMOST done but sort of stalled. We just need to add the door threshold and some pretty natural wood shelves above the toilet, but DH has moved on to other woodworking projects, so those little projects have been shoved down the list of priorities. Since it may be months before I get those shelves (and art/decor) up, I thought I'd at least post some pics of the room as it is now. Forgive the crappy lighting: it's snowing hard so there's no natural light :(

Project scope:
1956 bathroom with 1980's/90's tile, vanity, toilet. Tub was original but sadly unsalvageable: the enale was totally wrecked and stained and impossible to clean.
Suspected some subfloor issues due to leaks.
Budget: $2,500. (final total was a bit under $3,000... so we didn't do too badly :))

The layout was awkward, the door swing used so much of the floor space and only allowed a very small vanity. Since this is the hall/guest bath as well as the primary bath for my teenage daughter, we really needed to maximize storage and vanity space. I drew a new plan which involved moving the doorway to the perpendicular wall. As much as my DH balked at adding additional work, he admitted it was TOTALLY the right thing to do once we finished. The room feels SO much bigger now.

OLD BATHROOM and layout:

Some photos from during the renovation... which was planned to take 4 weekends and ended up taking about 6 or 7.....
DD sledge-hammering the old tile down

lots of rot in the subfloor

Self-leveling-compound poured over the radiant floor heat cables in the floor

The shower area waterproofed with Hydroban (LOVE LOVE LOVE that stuff!)

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NEW BATHROOM and layout plan:

DETAILS:
Since our budget was soooo tight, and we wanted to use quality materials and get a unique, custom bathroom, we had to get creative!!!

Tile:
I had a small amount (it was mostly random pieces and offcuts) of very $$$ calacatta marble mosaic tiles left over from a previous project that I knew I wanted to use. The other materials were chosen around that starting point. I designed niches to use that tile in, as accent, based on the quantity I had. I used inexpensive white marble baseboard pieces from Home Depot for the shelves.

For the rest of the tile, I needed to use super-cheap stuff (the entire room is tiled to chair-rail height), but I didn't want it to look cheap or ubiquitous. I would have used subways, but DD emphatically vetoed them. It's her bathroom, and we let her have a LOT of design input. Since we have other areas in the house that use square tile in a running-bond pattern, I decided to use 4x4s, which are the cheapest anyway, but in a running bond rather than stacked pattern. After bringing home samples of the big-box cheapies, I decided to "splurge" (20 cents more per tile, I think, it was about $2.35 per sf after sales and discounts)) on Lowes next-step-up American Olean Ice White, which has a slight rippled surface that catches the light and adds a layer of interest that the flat, cheaper Gloss White doesn't have.

For the floor, we used American Olean 12 x 18 Pietra Bianco, a limestone-look ceramic tile that I'm surprisingly happy with :) Underneath the tile is radiant-heat cable, so the floor is wonderfully cozy and warm.

Floor grout is Latapoxy epoxy.
Wall/shower grout is Tec Accucolor XT, a super-modified grout that supposed to be a lot more stain-resistant (PITA to work with, though!)

Hardware:
DD wanted girly, vintage-looking stuff, a big departure from DH and my modern aesthetic. We narrowed down the style range, then I started watching eBay for deals. We scored about $750 worth of valves and faucets and stuff for about $275.
Vanity faucet: Moen Monticello
Shower faucet valve, trim, tub spout: Moen Monticello with Thermostatic valve
Shower head: Grohe Relexa Ultra on slide bar (LOVE!)
(after working with a bunch of faucets recently, I can say that the Moen monticello stuff is pretty cruddy compared to the Grohe RElexa, Kohler Purist, and HansGrohe stuff I've used recently.)
Towel bars and tissue holder are Ginger Hotelier.
Curved shower rod is the Crescent Rod. I tried some expandable ones they had locally, but this one (ordered on line for the same price) is SO much sturdier and nicer-looking. It also makes the shower space much larger.

Toilet:
Toto Carolina that we got at a yard sale for $150 including the Washlet seat (which we removed). We were driving down the street and DD -who professes to HATE anything renovation-related- said, "Hey, look, Mom... isn;t that one of those skirted toilets you like?" SCORE.

Tub:
American Standard Princeton ~$300 at Lowes. yeah, we chipped it right away by dropping a tool on it while installing the faucets; luckily there's a repair kit that actually does a pretty amazing job :) We used the American Standard "Deep Soak" drain, which adds a couple inches water depth for baths. I wanted DD to use her OWN bathtub rather than my new one in the master bath :)

Vanity:
an old dresser. We bought it on Craigslist for $40, and DH reworked the drawers to fit the plumbing. He also added modern drawer slides so that they work easily. We bought fabulous vintage glass knobs on eBay (if you're looking for vintage knobs, check out this seller: billybobbosen.)

I painted it BM Dove Wing.
We totally went over budget on the vanity top. I'd intended to bet a remnant of granite... but of course couldn't find one DD and I liked. Then we found this little slab of Vermont White quartzite in the "exotics" bone pile at a local yard. It was over budget but we loved it. Then, of course, we decided that rather than a plain square front, it had to be cut to fit the curvy front of the dresser... which added about $100. So the vanity top was our biggest expense at $480.

Medicine cabinet:
A salvaged cabinet we got at the local Habitat for Humanity REStore about 2 years ago. We framed it into the wall (where the old door used to be), painted it, and I tiled the little shelf area with my calacatta mosaic accent tiles and marble baseboard pieces from Home Depot.

Lighting:
Pottery Barn wall fixture from eBay
Ikea ceiling fixture (like $8 each and rated for bathrooms!)
Fan/showerlight combo is a recessed, can-style fixture by Broan/NuTone. It's AWESOME. Quiet, unobtrusive.

That's all I can think of right now. I think once we have the natural wood shelves up over the toilet, with DD's shell collection and a plant on them, it will give a little but of softness/naturalness which the room needs. It's a little TOO "elegant" right now :)

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clipped on: 08.30.2011 at 12:43 pm    last updated on: 08.30.2011 at 12:43 pm

RE: Can I see your gray 12x24 tile? (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: skoo on 02.02.2010 at 01:16 pm in Kitchens Forum

Here's ours, Mirage Slate porcelain tile, 12x24


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Gray with wood accents works. Large format tiles.
clipped on: 08.30.2011 at 12:21 pm    last updated on: 08.30.2011 at 12:22 pm

Bathroom # 2 Master

posted by: tanem on 07.08.2011 at 04:56 pm in Bathrooms Forum

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Vein cut travertine floor and wall. Absolutely gorgeous!
clipped on: 08.30.2011 at 12:17 pm    last updated on: 08.30.2011 at 12:17 pm

RE: How do you 'dress' your bed? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: dlm2000 on 08.09.2011 at 11:15 am in Home Decorating Forum

This was last winter. Similar to bkw but without the smaller decorative pillows. We use 4 king pillows that stay on the bed and 2 king pillows in shams that get moved off the bed at night. I use a top sheet and a duvet cover but with nothing in it. Depending on the season, air conditioning, open windows, ceiling fan.... there may or may not be something folded at the foot of the bed. It will vary with the weather and my decorating mood du jour and could be a down blanket, a thin wool blanket, a matelasse coverlet, a quilt.... I like options!

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Great window treatment (possible idea for my library)
clipped on: 08.09.2011 at 02:39 pm    last updated on: 08.09.2011 at 02:40 pm

RE: Show me Your Apothecary Jars (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: mustangs on 01.25.2010 at 10:13 am in Home Decorating Forum

In the guest bath I have a collection of soaps from hotels I have stayed in. I could kick myself that I didn't start saving them IN THE WRAPPERS showing the name of the hotel until years later. I now have only a few jars of wrapped soap from may favorites like Waldorf Astoria, Atlantis, Ceasars Palace, Coeur d'Alene Resort, St Francis, etc. What was I thinking, well I wasn't thinking about a collection, I was thinking about my packages of toiletries for the shelter, but I could have at least saved the wrapped soap!

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clipped on: 01.26.2010 at 09:54 am    last updated on: 01.26.2010 at 09:54 am

RE: my3dogs- question, please (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: my3dogs on 10.26.2009 at 06:20 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Hi, Suzanne,

Sorry I didn't see this til now. That is a window treatment that I make for many of my windows. I use no pattern, and it's very easy. The instructions have been posted here many times. I have placed them below the pics, which show several versions in some of my rooms. You can change the look a lot by choosing different fabrics and trims.

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Easy to sew valance directions

They ARE EASY - but the directions are long, because I am trying to give you enough detail, even if you are a beginner. Read them all the way through so you understand them, and ask any questions you may have. If you are a real novice, you may want to make a sample using just muslin, or other inexpensive fabric, til you get the hang of it. This is a no-pattern valance that I started making last summer. It requires just straight stitching. My windows are generally about 50" (more or less)in height. If your windows are very short or very tall, you may want to vary the length of the fabric you use. I would say to err on the 'buy more' side though, so they don't look skimpy. The fullness adds richness. I generally use 1 1/4 yards of 54" wide home dec fabric to make the valance. You will need an equal amount of lining fabric. If you choose to put trim on the bottom (it adds a lot to the treatment, IMO) buy 1 1/2 yards of trim to make sure you have enough to go across the length of your 54" wide fabric. If your fabric is wider than 54", buy enough trim to cover its width. Cut your valance fabric and lining to equal lengths. I always measure the side edges of my fabric and mark the length before cutting. It may have not been cut straight at the store, and you want to be sure that your left side is the same length as your right side. Pin the two rectangles of fabric together on all sides, with the RIGHT (front) sides of the fabrics inside, facing each other. Before putting the fabrics together, I mark lightly on the back which is the TOP of the print (if using a print) and which is the bottom, so your print will end up right side up! Depending on the type of rod you plan to use for the valance, you need to leave openings on each side that will become your rod pocket. Continental rods (the flat wide plain ones) need a 4" rod pocket. If you use a decorative rod, with finals on the end that screw off, I would recommend making your rod pocket 2" wide. For a small tension rod, I'd make the rod pocket 1.5" wide. You don't want to force your fabric onto the rod - allow room to make it easy for you. Measure down from the TOP of your pinned together fabric, and make a light mark with pencil on each side, the size of your chosen rod pocket, plus 1/2". That 1/2" is going to be the width of your top seam. You'll be making a mark on the left and right sides 4 1/2" down from the top if you use a Continental rod, for example. Stitch from these marks down each side to the bottom, using a 1/2" seam. You'll need to leave an opening in the top or bottom to turn your valance inside out when you're done stitching. I'd suggest a 4" - 6" opening for turning. If your rod pocket openings are 4", you don't need to leave another opening, you can use them to turn it inside out. Mark the opening you need to leave, then stitch across the top and bottom edges, using a 1/2" seam, leaving your opening...well...OPEN! Clip your fabric corners off OUTSIDE of your stitching. This is just a small triangle of fabric from each corner. This will allow you to get nice sharp edges on your corners when your turn the valance right side out, as it reduces the bulk of fabric there. Turn your valance right side out, pulling it through the opening you left. I use a wooden chop stick to push the fabric gently at the corners to make them nice and square, once I have turned mine right side out. Don't push too hard, or you may poke a hole through your valance! At this point, you should have a lined rectangle of fabric, with rod pocket openings near the top of each side. Close the opening you left for turning, either by folding and pressing the edges in and hand stitching it closed, or use 'stitch witchery' type of fusing tape to do it. You can also sew it closed with your sewing machine, but you want to do it right at the edge. You want to make this closure as 'invisible' as possible, so I always use fusible tape. Carefully iron your valance. Use your fingers to work the edges, so that you have your seam right in the middle of each edge, so you don't see the front fabric on the backside, and you don't see the lining from the front. Now, to stitch the rod pocket. You will be making one row of stitching across the front of your fabric from side to side. Measure down from the top edge, so you have the same length opening on each side. The size of the opening you left on each side was determined above by the type of rod you're using. You can lightly pencil on the line that you need to stitch across, or do what I do - Place the fabric on the sewing machine, and put the needle down on the place where you'll start stitching. Take a 4" (approx) length of masking tape, and lay it against the upper edge of the fabric, to the right of the needle, and stick it to the sewing machine base. You can use this tape edge as a guide to hold the top edge of your fabric against as you stitch across. It helps you make a straight, even rod pocket. My sewing machine has tape on it for all different widths of rod pockets! If you chose to put trim on the bottom of your valance, do it now. I use 'Aleen's OK To Wash-It' fabric glue that you can get at WalMart or a fabric store. If you use glue, just follow the directions on the bottle to glue your trim evenly to the front bottom of your valance. I lay my valance on my kitchen island, and let it set overnight, while the glue dries. You can also stitch your trim on, either by hand or by machine. I prefer the glue, because you see no stitching on the back side. (I'm anal.) Now to make the ties. You can simply buy ribbon (such as grosgrain) or use purchased cord (see my dining room silk ones in the link) or make them out of fabric. Use either the same fabric or a coordinating one. Here, you first need to decide if you are going to tie your valance up with bows, or do knots. Bows take longer ties. Allow yourself a MINIMUM of 36" long ties. You can always cut them shorter if necessary, but you can't make them longer. I suggest hanging your valance up and using string to tie them up temporarily to see how long you need to make your ties. (It's longer than you think!) Cut your strips of fabric approx 4" wide and the length you have decided on above for your ties. Fold and pin the strips in half the the short way, so you have a long strip of fabric that is 2" wide. Make sure the right sides are together, (inside) because you are going to turn them inside out after stitching. Stitch along the pinned edge of each strip, about 1/4" from the edge. Now the fun part - turn those narrow strips inside out. My chop stick comes in handy for this, but use whatever method you choose to accomplish this. Press the ties just as you did the valance rectangle, making sure your seam is even on the edge. I fold in the raw ends and use my fusible tape to close them, but you can machine stitch them closed or do it by hand - Your choice. Your valance is done! Put it on your rod, using the rod pocket. Hang it in your window. Now, take the ties, and simply drape them over the rod on each side, having half of the tie fabric strip hanging in front, and the other half of the tie hanging behind the valance. Now, gather up one side of the valance in your hands, and reach behind it it grab the dangling tie in back. Tie up the valance, by tying the front and back pieces of the tie together, either in a knot or a bow. Do the same with the other side, making sure your ties on each side are tied up at the same length. Now stand back and make sure your valance looks even at the bottom on each side. Use your hand to 'finger fold' and drape your fabric until the look is what you want. You'll be surprised at what a difference it can make in the look by spacing your ties closer together, or moving them further apart on the rod. Also by tying the ties higher or lower... This is where you need to play around until you get the look you want. On the HGTV message board, a woman made these and kept posting pics asking for advice - Higher? Lower? Move the ties apart or closer...It's really all up to you. Hers looked GREAT when she was done, and she was so pleased to have made her own custom valance. I hope you all feel the same way, if you try them!

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clipped on: 10.27.2009 at 10:02 am    last updated on: 10.27.2009 at 10:02 am

Msrose, I have bedroom pics for ya....

posted by: scoobyruby on 09.30.2009 at 03:06 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Hey Laurie,
I am usually on my Mac (I have the lemon ) and my email is not working well so I apologize if I have missed any emails.

Were you able to view the other pics? I know you had asked for some bedroom pics. I loaded them on the photobucket so hopefully it will work if you try to copy them.

Hope your doing well:0
Smiles:)

If anybody has any ideas about how to lengthen this bedskirt w/o alot of sewing....I'm all ears. These rice beds require a long bedskirt & I tried living without one but prefer a bedskirt.
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Couldn't remember if you asked for bathroom pics or not....but here they are.
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clipped on: 09.30.2009 at 08:54 pm    last updated on: 09.30.2009 at 08:55 pm

Finished bathroom pictures

posted by: shannonaz on 06.11.2009 at 10:11 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Well, our bathroom remodel is finally finished! Thanks for all the inspiration, ideas and suggestions from all of you. I have tried to include lots of comments and details in my photobucket album. Thanks!!
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top of her vanity
fixture placement and niches
water closet
Her vanity area

Here is a link that might be useful: Bathroom album

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clipped on: 07.21.2009 at 09:06 pm    last updated on: 07.21.2009 at 09:06 pm

RE: All you sewers.. I have a ?. My3dogs valance (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: southernheart on 05.23.2009 at 01:24 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Brutuses recently reposted the directions (she had saved them, too), so I am reposting them courtesy of Bru :) It says below that she uses 1 1/4 yds of the fabric for her valances, so it seems that she has more length...that would allow her more horizontal gathering and fullness.

"Posted by my3dogs (My Page) on Thu, Jul 17, 08 at 20:01Hi everyone! Here are the directions for the valances that you saw in the post linked below. They ARE EASY - but the directions are long, because I am trying to give you enough detail, even if you are a beginner. Read them all the way through so you understand them, and ask any questions you may have. If you are a real novice, you may want to make a sample using just muslin, or other inexpensive fabric, til you get the hang of it. This is a no-pattern valance that I started making last summer. It requires just straight stitching. My windows are generally about 50" (more or less)in height. If your windows are very short or very tall, you may want to vary the length of the fabric you use. I would say to err on the 'buy more' side though, so they don't look skimpy. The fullness adds richness. I generally use 1 1/4 yards of 54" wide home dec fabric to make the valance. You will need an equal amount of lining fabric. If you choose to put trim on the bottom (it adds a lot to the treatment, IMO) buy 1 1/2 yards of trim to make sure you have enough to go across the length of your 54" wide fabric. If your fabric is wider than 54", buy enough trim to cover its width. Cut your valance fabric and lining to equal lengths. I always measure the side edges of my fabric and mark the length before cutting. It may have not been cut straight at the store, and you want to be sure that your left side is the same length as your right side. Pin the two rectangles of fabric together on all sides, with the RIGHT (front) sides of the fabrics inside, facing each other. Before putting the fabrics together, I mark lightly on the back which is the TOP of the print (if using a print) and which is the bottom, so your print will end up right side up! Depending on the type of rod you plan to use for the valance, you need to leave openings on each side that will become your rod pocket. Continental rods (the flat wide plain ones) need a 4" rod pocket. If you use a decorative rod, with finals on the end that screw off, I would recommend making your rod pocket 2" wide. For a small tension rod, I'd make the rod pocket 1.5" wide. You don't want to force your fabric onto the rod - allow room to make it easy for you. Measure down from the TOP of your pinned together fabric, and make a light mark with pencil on each side, the size of your chosen rod pocket, plus 1/2". That 1/2" is going to be the width of your top seam. You'll be making a mark on the left and right sides 4 1/2" down from the top if you use a Continental rod, for example. Stitch from these marks down each side to the bottom, using a 1/2" seam. You'll need to leave an opening in the top or bottom to turn your valance inside out when you're done stitching. I'd suggest a 4" - 6" opening for turning. If your rod pocket openings are 4", you don't need to leave another opening, you can use them to turn it inside out. Mark the opening you need to leave, then stitch across the top and bottom edges, using a 1/2" seam, leaving your opening...well...OPEN! Clip your fabric corners off OUTSIDE of your stitching. This is just a small triangle of fabric from each corner. This will allow you to get nice sharp edges on your corners when your turn the valance right side out, as it reduces the bulk of fabric there. Turn your valance right side out, pulling it through the opening you left. I use a wooden chop stick to push the fabric gently at the corners to make them nice and square, once I have turned mine right side out. Don't push too hard, or you may poke a hole through your valance! At this point, you should have a lined rectangle of fabric, with rod pocket openings near the top of each side. Close the opening you left for turning, either by folding and pressing the edges in and hand stitching it closed, or use 'stitch witchery' type of fusing tape to do it. You can also sew it closed with your sewing machine, but you want to do it right at the edge. You want to make this closure as 'invisible' as possible, so I always use fusible tape. Carefully iron your valance. Use your fingers to work the edges, so that you have your seam right in the middle of each edge, so you don't see the front fabric on the backside, and you don't see the lining from the front. Now, to stitch the rod pocket. You will be making one row of stitching across the front of your fabric from side to side. Measure down from the top edge, so you have the same length opening on each side. The size of the opening you left on each side was determined above by the type of rod you're using. You can lightly pencil on the line that you need to stitch across, or do what I do - Place the fabric on the sewing machine, and put the needle down on the place where you'll start stitching. Take a 4" (approx) length of masking tape, and lay it against the upper edge of the fabric, to the right of the needle, and stick it to the sewing machine base. You can use this tape edge as a guide to hold the top edge of your fabric against as you stitch across. It helps you make a straight, even rod pocket. My sewing machine has tape on it for all different widths of rod pockets! If you chose to put trim on the bottom of your valance, do it now. I use 'Aleen's OK To Wash-It' fabric glue that you can get at WalMart or a fabric store. If you use glue, just follow the directions on the bottle to glue your trim evenly to the front bottom of your valance. I lay my valance on my kitchen island, and let it set overnight, while the glue dries. You can also stitch your trim on, either by hand or by machine. I prefer the glue, because you see no stitching on the back side. (I'm anal.) Now to make the ties. You can simply buy ribbon (such as grosgrain) or use purchased cord (see my dining room silk ones in the link) or make them out of fabric. Use either the same fabric or a coordinating one. Here, you first need to decide if you are going to tie your valance up with bows, or do knots. Bows take longer ties. Allow yourself a MINIMUM of 36" long ties. You can always cut them shorter if necessary, but you can't make them longer. I suggest hanging your valance up and using string to tie them up temporarily to see how long you need to make your ties. (It's longer than you think!) Cut your strips of fabric approx 4" wide and the length you have decided on above for your ties. Fold and pin the strips in half the the short way, so you have a long strip of fabric that is 2" wide. Make sure the right sides are together, (inside) because you are going to turn them inside out after stitching. Stitch along the pinned edge of each strip, about 1/4" from the edge. Now the fun part - turn those narrow strips inside out. My chop stick comes in handy for this, but use whatever method you choose to accomplish this. Press the ties just as you did the valance rectangle, making sure your seam is even on the edge. I fold in the raw ends and use my fusible tape to close them, but you can machine stitch them closed or do it by hand - Your choice. Your valance is done! Put it on your rod, using the rod pocket. Hang it in your window. Now, take the ties, and simply drape them over the rod on each side, having half of the tie fabric strip hanging in front, and the other half of the tie hanging behind the valance. Now, gather up one side of the valance in your hands, and reach behind it it grab the dangling tie in back. Tie up the valance, by tying the front and back pieces of the tie together, either in a knot or a bow. Do the same with the other side, making sure your ties on each side are tied up at the same length. Now stand back and make sure your valance looks even at the bottom on each side. Use your hand to 'finger fold' and drape your fabric until the look is what you want. You'll be surprised at what a difference it can make in the look by spacing your ties closer together, or moving them further apart on the rod. Also by tying the ties higher or lower... This is where you need to play around until you get the look you want. On the HGTV message board, a woman made these and kept posting pics asking for advice - Higher? Lower? Move the ties apart or closer...It's really all up to you. Hers looked GREAT when she was done, and she was so pleased to have made her own custom valance. I hope you all feel the same way, if you try them!"

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clipped on: 06.30.2009 at 10:14 pm    last updated on: 06.30.2009 at 10:14 pm

RE: Should I do sconces on the mirror? - please check out pic! (Follow-Up #35)

posted by: boymom on 04.28.2009 at 10:57 pm in Bathrooms Forum

But kate, pendants would give me the same problem! Three would look funny (the middle one would have all kinds of space around it), while the side ones would be crammed in there. Right?

So, yes. Sconces. I am considering quite a few. Depends on whether I do a chandelier where my two further back cans are now. But I'd love help deciding! Bathroom is nearly done, but I don't want to take the final pics until that mirror and sconces are in. So here we go:

First of all, my bathroom has lots of white trim, with a greenish grayish blue wall. Tub, toilet, sinks are white. Floors are 16 x16 jerusalem gold with 1 x 1 in floor and ceiling of shower. Tub desk is more jg, with a wood paneled front (like inspriation photo) in it's own octagonal "room", thru an arched entrance next to shower

Faucets are Jado Victorian. Cabinet knobs are RH Victorian glass.

The look I'm going for is romantic/vintage/spa. The "spa" is mostly how clean and simple the stone work is. Here was my inspiration (and my same faucets):
PhotobucketPhotobucket

There's a leaded glass window between shower and tub "room". And another in the bathroom "hallway":
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This rug is going on the floor in front of vanity:
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And here are the type of sconces I'm considering, from Pottery Barn and RH.
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I also like these, but it might be too much glass?
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But then I go insane and think... well, if I do a chandelier behind the sink area, maybe I should go with some candle sconces. Probably not, though.

Would love suggestions.

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clipped on: 05.25.2009 at 08:42 pm    last updated on: 05.25.2009 at 08:42 pm

RE: How do you layer your bed? (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: jeanninepc99 on 01.31.2009 at 08:50 am in Home Decorating Forum

Can I first say that I LOVE IT when people's dogs make it into their pictures?

That being said, I *might* have the same set up that you're thinking about. Now, pardon the wrinkles, but I have a coverlet with a duvet (fluffy, down alternative comforter inside) on my bed. I like weight and warmth, so I also have a blanket between the flat sheet and the bedspread.

I know it's not a perfectly made bed. I can deal with it if you can. :)

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clipped on: 04.22.2009 at 11:24 am    last updated on: 04.22.2009 at 11:26 am

RE: More fun with remnant fabrics! New breakfast room WTs (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: persnicketydesign on 03.25.2009 at 04:29 pm in Home Decorating Forum

I'm terrible with instructions, so bear with me. :o)

Each finished panel is 21" long and 54" wide (I used 54" wide fabrics). There are 9 tabs per panel, but if I were to do it again I'd probably only use 7. Here's the supply & cut list...

1-22" piece of floral fabric
1-22" piece of contrast fabric #1 or lining (for back)
1-54" piece of cording
1-2" X 54" piece of contrast fabric #1 (to cover cording)
9-7" X 4 1/2" pieces of contrast fabric #2 for tabs
36 buttons that have been covered with contrast #1
1-54" piece of trim for bottom edge

Lay out your floral piece right side up on your work surface. Lay contrast panel #1 on top of it so that your right sides are together. Take your cording and wrap the 2" piece of fabric around it. With the open edges facing towards the top, place it between the two panels along the top edge.

I didn't trim the salvages in the pic, but you should do so for your project. :o)
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Using a zipper foot or (if you're lazy like me) the needle in the farthest left position, stitch the full length of your fabric being sure to stay tight up against the edge of the cording.

With right sides still together seam the bottom edge. Next do the sides. Be sure to leave a 3" space open on one of the sides so you can turn the fabric! Turn it inside out and press. Set aside for now. :o)

Take each of your tabs and fold them in half lengthwise. Stitch and press. If you have a serger, clean up the open ends. If not press the raw edges to the inside.

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Lay your panel out flat. Evenly space your tabs 3" from the top edge. Turn the top edge of your tab under 1/4" and pin in place. Turn under the bottom edge of your tab and pin it in place 7 1/2" from the top of the panel. Stitch in place. This will make large "loops" for your rod. I then placed my rod through one of the loops to see how big it needed to be to fit snugly. I pinned it down and made a second row of stitching on both the top and bottom of the tab. In my case it was 1 1/4" from both the top & bottom of the tabs, but it might be different depending upon the size of rod you use.

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Here's the back of it.
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And here are all the tabs stitched in place.
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Cover all 18 of your buttons. Your thumbs will hate you for a few days!
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Just stitch your buttons on the tabs and topstitch your trim at the bottom.

This is the rod & bracket. It stood out too far from the window for this WT, so I took the first tab and hooked it over the bracket. :o)

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That's it!

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clipped on: 03.27.2009 at 09:15 am    last updated on: 03.27.2009 at 09:16 am

painting my cabinets dark... the process!

posted by: girlwithaspirin on 10.06.2008 at 11:45 pm in Kitchens Forum

Hey kids. Long time, no type. :) I hope all's well with all my old pals here.

In the last few weeks, I've gotten at least 15 emails asking how I painted my cabinets. Such a nice surprise, considering how long it's been since I posted! I wish I could remember who I initially gleaned all this info from. You guys were an immense help, so now I'm just paying it forward.

Supplies:
Benjamin Moore Satin Impervo Alkyd in Bittersweet Chocolate
Purdy angled brushes
Thick plastic dropcloths
Sandpaper
Mineral spirits and rags for clean-up as you go

-Remove doors.
-Clean and lightly sand everything.
-Remove dust with a tack cloth.
-Rest each door on its bottom edge. Do not paint that edge -- you’ll do it once the doors are re-hung.
-Paint the backs first with a thin coat of Satin Impervo. Thin coats give more of a handrubbed look and also avoid drips. If you do see some drips, try to catch them early -- once the paint starts to dry, you’ll make a mess trying to smooth them out. Let dry at least overnight, preferably a few nights to avoid smudges when you flip the doors around.
-Paint the fronts in the same way.
-Let cure for as long as you can stand it. A week would be ideal.
-In the meantime, paint the cabinet boxes. I didn’t paint the insides, and I’ve never regretted it.
-After a week’s gone by, re-hang the doors. Paint the bottom edge of each. Do any touch-up.
-Depending on your wood, the paint may keep absorbing in certain places. I kept the paint can in my kitchen for a month, doing quick touch-ups wherever necessary.

If you have oak, keep in mind, you will see grain through the paint. If you'd rather not, you'll have to use some kind of putty to fill the grain, then prime, then paint. I just didn't have the energy for it, and it turns out, I love the look -- people mistake it for a handrubbed stain all the time.

I'm so happy with how the cabinets have stood up over time. Not a single chip or scratch! To be honest, I cut so many corners in the prep (by choosing not to prime), I thought for sure I'd be dealing with the aftermath now. I credit the paint and patience for 100% of the success. Seriously, this paint is the real deal.

Here is a link that might be useful: girlwithaspirin kitchen... before & after

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clipped on: 10.08.2008 at 07:40 pm    last updated on: 10.08.2008 at 07:40 pm

RE: Scratches on Stainless steel appliances: Help (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: ktmast on 10.28.2006 at 08:36 pm in Cleaning Tips Forum

Somewhere along the line during our kitchen remodel my new stainless steel cook top got scratched. I had heard of a product called Micro Mesh. I got mine from Scientific Instrument Services. www.sisweb.com/micromesh/ I got the kit for metal finishing kit (MX-90) . The company that makes the Micro Mesh has a web site too. It's www.micro-surface.com. It took me about 10 minutes to remove the scratch.

I first heard about this product from a doll collectors group. Some of the women had discovered that the very fine micro mesh could be used to remove scratches from the vinyl doll.
I have no affiliation with this company. I'm just a very happy consumer!

Katy

Here is a link that might be useful: Micro Mesh

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clipped on: 08.20.2008 at 01:42 pm    last updated on: 08.20.2008 at 01:42 pm

RE: How do you clean your oven racks? (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: kristianne on 09.23.2006 at 04:38 pm in Cleaning Tips Forum

I just got finished doing this myself. I got this tip from the Queen of Clean website. Put the oven rack in the bathtub, cover it just enough with hot water and pour a cup of granular dishwasher soap and let it soak for an hour. I left mine in overnight and the grit and grime literally floated off. I was pleasantly surprised. I wiped them down with an old wash cloth and rinsed them off in clean wather, dried them off and in the oven they went. Simple and effective.

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clipped on: 08.03.2008 at 08:50 pm    last updated on: 08.03.2008 at 08:50 pm

RE: Bath remodel pics (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: sch9171 on 07.27.2008 at 09:05 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Thanks! The lights are made by Dolan Designs. This is them (we didn't buy them online, but from one of the bricks and mortar locations of the same store).

By the way, my wife pointed out that there wasn't a picture that shows the whole side with the tub and shower, so I added this one:

It's hard to get all the angles in such a small room!

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clipped on: 07.28.2008 at 09:40 pm    last updated on: 07.28.2008 at 09:40 pm

Bath remodel pics

posted by: sch9171 on 07.27.2008 at 08:23 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Our bathroom remodel (from hell) is finally basically done. I posted before and after photos on my blog.

Here are a couple of the "after" photos.

Also, FWIW, here is my original thread about the remodel.

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clipped on: 07.28.2008 at 09:39 pm    last updated on: 07.28.2008 at 09:39 pm

Zuzu's room (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: meg711 on 07.14.2008 at 02:48 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Here is Zuzu's room, in all its glory, so that you can see what it would like with a round table in the middle:

zuzus room

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clipped on: 07.27.2008 at 08:31 pm    last updated on: 07.27.2008 at 08:31 pm

RE: SoonerMagic Answers Questions (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: aussies on 03.30.2008 at 05:42 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Hi,

Absolutely beautiful house! I love the granite in one of your bathrooms - could you please tell me what the name of it is?

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clipped on: 07.19.2008 at 02:36 pm    last updated on: 07.19.2008 at 02:37 pm

Easy to sew valance directions

posted by: my3dogs on 07.17.2008 at 08:01 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Hi everyone!

Here are the directions for the valances that you saw in the post linked below. They ARE EASY - but the directions are long, because I am trying to give you enough detail, even if you are a beginner. Read them all the way through so you understand them, and ask any questions you may have. If you are a real novice, you may want to make a sample using just muslin, or other inexpensive fabric, til you get the hang of it.

This is a no-pattern valance that I started making last summer. It requires just straight stitching. My windows are generally about 50" (more or less)in height. If your windows are very short or very tall, you may want to vary the length of the fabric you use. I would say to err on the 'buy more' side though, so they don't look skimpy. The fullness adds richness.

I generally use 1 1/4 yards of 54" wide home dec fabric to make the valance. You will need an equal amount of lining fabric. If you choose to put trim on the bottom (it adds a lot to the treatment, IMO) buy 1 1/2 yards of trim to make sure you have enough to go across the length of your 54" wide fabric. If your fabric is wider than 54", buy enough trim to cover its width.

Cut your valance fabric and lining to equal lengths. I always measure the side edges of my fabric and mark the length before cutting. It may have not been cut straight at the store, and you want to be sure that your left side is the same length as your right side.

Pin the two rectangles of fabric together on all sides, with the RIGHT (front) sides of the fabrics inside, facing each other. Before putting the fabrics together, I mark lightly on the back which is the TOP of the print (if using a print) and which is the bottom, so your print will end up right side up!

Depending on the type of rod you plan to use for the valance, you need to leave openings on each side that will become your rod pocket. Continental rods (the flat wide plain ones) need a 4" rod pocket. If you use a decorative rod, with finals on the end that screw off, I would recommend making your rod pocket 2" wide. For a small tension rod, I'd make the rod pocket 1.5" wide. You don't want to force your fabric onto the rod - allow room to make it easy for you.

Measure down from the TOP of your pinned together fabric, and make a light mark with pencil on each side, the size of your chosen rod pocket, plus 1/2". That 1/2" is going to be the width of your top seam. You'll be making a mark on the left and right sides 4 1/2" down from the top if you use a Continental rod, for example. Stitch from these marks down each side to the bottom, using a 1/2" seam.

You'll need to leave an opening in the top or bottom to turn your valance inside out when you're done stitching.

I'd suggest a 4" - 6" opening for turning. If your rod pocket openings are 4", you don't need to leave another opening, you can use them to turn it inside out.

Mark the opening you need to leave, then stitch across the top and bottom edges, using a 1/2" seam, leaving your opening...well...OPEN!

Clip your fabric corners off OUTSIDE of your stitching. This is just a small triangle of fabric from each corner. This will allow you to get nice sharp edges on your corners when your turn the valance right side out, as it reduces the bulk of fabric there.

Turn your valance right side out, pulling it through the opening you left. I use a wooden chop stick to push the fabric gently at the corners to make them nice and square, once I have turned mine right side out. Don't push too hard, or you may poke a hole through your valance! At this point, you should have a lined rectangle of fabric, with rod pocket openings near the top of each side.

Close the opening you left for turning, either by folding and pressing the edges in and hand stitching it closed, or use 'stitch witchery' type of fusing tape to do it. You can also sew it closed with your sewing machine, but you want to do it right at the edge. You want to make this closure as 'invisible' as possible, so I always use fusible tape.

Carefully iron your valance. Use your fingers to work the edges, so that you have your seam right in the middle of each edge, so you don't see the front fabric on the backside, and you don't see the lining from the front.

Now, to stitch the rod pocket. You will be making one row of stitching across the front of your fabric from side to side.
Measure down from the top edge, so you have the same length opening on each side. The size of the opening you left on each side was determined above by the type of rod you're using.

You can lightly pencil on the line that you need to stitch across, or do what I do - Place the fabric on the sewing machine, and put the needle down on the place where you'll start stitching. Take a 4" (approx) length of masking tape, and lay it against the upper edge of the fabric, to the right of the needle, and stick it to the sewing machine base. You can use this tape edge as a guide to hold the top edge of your fabric against as you stitch across. It helps you make a straight, even rod pocket. My sewing machine has tape on it for all different widths of rod pockets!

If you chose to put trim on the bottom of your valance, do it now. I use 'Aleen's OK To Wash-It' fabric glue that you can get at WalMart or a fabric store. If you use glue, just follow the directions on the bottle to glue your trim evenly to the front bottom of your valance. I lay my valance on my kitchen island, and let it set overnight, while the glue dries. You can also stitch your trim on, either by hand or by machine. I prefer the glue, because you see no stitching on the back side. (I'm anal.)

Now to make the ties. You can simply buy ribbon (such as grosgrain) or use purchased cord (see my dining room silk ones in the link) or make them out of fabric. Use either the same fabric or a coordinating one.

Here, you first need to decide if you are going to tie your valance up with bows, or do knots. Bows take longer ties.

Allow yourself a MINIMUM of 36" long ties. You can always cut them shorter if necessary, but you can't make them longer. I suggest hanging your valance up and using string to tie them up temporarily to see how long you need to make your ties. (It's longer than you think!)

Cut your strips of fabric approx 4" wide and the length you have decided on above for your ties. Fold and pin the strips in half the the short way, so you have a long strip of fabric that is 2" wide. Make sure the right sides are together, (inside) because you are going to turn them inside out after stitching.

Stitch along the pinned edge of each strip, about 1/4" from the edge. Now the fun part - turn those narrow strips inside out. My chop stick comes in handy for this, but use whatever method you choose to accomplish this.

Press the ties just as you did the valance rectangle, making sure your seam is even on the edge. I fold in the raw ends and use my fusible tape to close them, but you can machine stitch them closed or do it by hand - Your choice. Your valance is done!

Put it on your rod, using the rod pocket. Hang it in your window. Now, take the ties, and simply drape them over the rod on each side, having half of the tie fabric strip hanging in front, and the other half of the tie hanging behind the valance.

Now, gather up one side of the valance in your hands, and reach behind it it grab the dangling tie in back. Tie up the valance, by tying the front and back pieces of the tie together, either in a knot or a bow. Do the same with the other side, making sure your ties on each side are tied up at the same length.

Now stand back and make sure your valance looks even at the bottom on each side. Use your hand to 'finger fold' and drape your fabric until the look is what you want.

You'll be surprised at what a difference it can make in the look by spacing your ties closer together, or moving them further apart on the rod. Also by tying the ties higher or lower...

This is where you need to play around until you get the look you want. On the HGTV message board, a woman made these and kept posting pics asking for advice - Higher? Lower? Move the ties apart or closer...It's really all up to you. Hers looked GREAT when she was done, and she was so pleased to have made her own custom valance. I hope you all feel the same way, if you try them!

Here is a link that might be useful: several shown here - all the same instructions

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.18.2008 at 12:44 pm    last updated on: 07.18.2008 at 12:44 pm