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Color Scheme and Fabrics for basement Renovation

posted by: kswl on 03.01.2014 at 09:56 pm in Home Decorating & Design Forum

I have the preliminary color scheme for the basement, the fabric samples, lamp choices, drawings for the fireplace wall, etc. My favorite colors are red and green, and those are represented but are accessory colors, with the main color a beautiful pumpkin spice. We still need to choose a wall color and are thinking a stone color / light taupe. This scheme represents a shift from the lighter and clearer colors I usually gravitate towards. It will be cozy and very autumnal feeling.

Almost all the fabrics are from Duralee. I told ID I didn't want to go crazy with fabrics---it is a basement, after all---so the selections are between $45 and $65, which puts them right in the range, and all have a high cotton content, another requirement. The two trims are from Samuel and Sons, a red leather piping for pillows and a great tape that has little blocks of velvet in ever lighter colors. They are both around $30 per yard. I am already thinking how wonderful the tape would look around the bottom edge of the sofas...

Sofa color in spice, decorative tape trim, and throw pillow fabric. Trim is for the pillows but I am thinking about it for the bottom edge of sofas:

Here is another possibility for the sofa and pillows, or for the swivel chairs. The velvet is a medium weight 100% cotton:

The stripe will be on the bolster pillows on the daybeds with the honey colored mattress shown, and the paisley piped with red leather MAY be the throw pillows. I like the pattern but am thinking a lighter paisley colorway would be....lighter :-)

May go with green pillows on the daybeds:
Closeup of the trim:
Green pillow fabric with paisley:

This post was edited by kswl on Sat, Mar 1, 14 at 22:45

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clipped on: 03.23.2014 at 08:49 pm    last updated on: 03.23.2014 at 08:50 pm

RE: Banquette anyone? (Follow-Up #79)

posted by: hoffman on 12.16.2007 at 01:26 am in Kitchens Forum

These are from Ballard, custom made with stain-resistant outdoor fabric. The tops lift up for storage. (There will eventually be a table between them!):

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clipped on: 12.10.2013 at 03:59 pm    last updated on: 12.10.2013 at 04:00 pm

Pictures please? Show me your paneled DW in inset cabinets?

posted by: ppbenn on 05.12.2013 at 04:25 pm in Kitchens Forum

I'm needing some pictures to show my cabinet maker. Also what is your make, model and are you in love with it?
Thank you so much.

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clipped on: 10.11.2013 at 10:42 am    last updated on: 10.11.2013 at 10:43 am

Can't figure out Bosch cutom panel dishwasher template

posted by: Pendleton123 on 10.10.2012 at 11:38 am in Appliances Forum

Bosch is making me feel dumb. The template that came with my panel ready SHV68R53UC dishwasher doesn't make any sense to me. I'm hopeful someone else had the same problem.
You're supposed to slide the template up so it hits the underside of the countertop. Then you mark the edges of the template at the same height as the surrounding cabinet doors/drawers. But then when you tape the template to the door with the marks aligned with the top as the instructions state, the locations for the pilot holes are off. If you secured the panel to the DW like that, the panel would end up too low. The top holes end up very close to the edge of the panel and it makes no sense to me. I had another person look at it and they thought it looked like I was doing as they instructed and agreed it made no sense. (This picture is not from my exact template, but the instructions look the same.) What am I missing?

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clipped on: 10.11.2013 at 10:42 am    last updated on: 10.11.2013 at 10:42 am

RE: Post pics of your frigerator area (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: buehl on 01.01.2010 at 09:59 pm in Kitchens Forum

Yes, the crown molding extends out onto the wall...closeup...

During remodel...

Our wall is approx 24" deep. We did this deliberately so we wouldn't have to have a filler b/w the wall & refrigerator (we had to have a wall for HVAC to the upstairs MBR).

We also have filler above for a future taller refrigerator...our alcove is only 70" or so tall (IIRC) and refrigerators are approaching 72" now...so we have some wiggle room above in the future.

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clipped on: 09.27.2013 at 11:37 am    last updated on: 09.27.2013 at 11:38 am

Small Old Garden Roses for Small Gardens

posted by: ThomasLearning on 09.01.2013 at 02:32 am in Antique Roses Forum

Small Old Garden Roses (OGR) for Small Gardens

Here is a revised list of small Old Garden Roses for small gardens. I will post a new list from time to time as I learn about new roses. Many of the roses were suggested by this forum’s members. Thank you again. I would love to hear from any one who has grown these roses for 4 years or so and who prune these roses (if needed). Please share your tips for keeping the size small and the roses beautiful.

1. Archduke Charles (China / Bengale circa 1825)
2. Barbara's Pasture Rose (Hybrid Perpetual, found rose)
3. Beauty of Rosemawr (Tea, 1903)
4. Boule de Neige (Bourbon, 1867)
5. Captain Harry Stebbins (Hybrid Tea discovered 1980)
6. Comtesse du Cayla (China 1902)
7. Devoniensis (Tea, Foster 1838)
8. Duke of Edinburgh (Hybrid Perpetual, 1860 to 1869)
9. Enfant de France (Hybrid Perpetual, 1860)
10. Francis Dubreuil (Tea 1984)
11. Green Rose (China prior to 1845)
12. Kronprinzessis Viktoria von Preussen (Bourbon 1888)
13. La France (Hybrid Tea 1867)
14. La Reine (Hybrid Perpetual, 1842)
15. Lady Hillingdon (China, 1910)
16. Madame Cornelissen (Bourbon introduced 1860 to 1869)
17. Maggie (Bourbon)
18. Marchesa Bocella (Hybrid Perpetual, 1842)
19. Old Blush (China Hybrid, 1852)
20. Souvenir de la Malmaison (Bourbon introduced 1843)
21. The Doctor (Tea Hybrid, 1936)
22. Westside Road Cream Tea
23. White Pet (Polyantha, 1879)

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clipped on: 09.05.2013 at 11:44 pm    last updated on: 09.05.2013 at 11:44 pm

'Pretty' Faucet that has pull down?

posted by: 2LittleFishies on 02.07.2012 at 12:52 pm in Kitchens Forum

I was looking at faucets today and the ones I really liked were more feminine and some were bridge faucets. HOWEVER, I really only want one lever to put on the water. I think two would drive me nuts when trying to get the correct temperature. Also, The "pretty" ones had a separate sprayer and I think the pull down is really convenient.

Anyway, I am looking at the Moen Woodmere in Chrome.

s7208c

Here is my inspiration pic(s):

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OLDD_YellowKitchen

Any other options? Or is this pretty much the direction I need to go?

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clipped on: 08.18.2013 at 09:14 pm    last updated on: 08.18.2013 at 09:14 pm

RE: Let's talk Polyanthas (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: TNY78 on 12.06.2011 at 08:43 pm in Antique Roses Forum

Here's my list of polyanthas Sorry, I cut and pasted from my database...I'm feeling lazy tonight :)

1. The Fairy (1932-Bentall) Polyantha / 2.5 x 4 ft
2. Clothilde Soupert (1890-Soupert & Notting) Polyantha / 3ft
3. Perle d� Or (1870-1879 � Rambaux) Polyantha / 6-8 ft
4. Aunt Margys Rose (??) Polyantha / 4 ft
5. White Koster/Blanche Neige (1929-Grootendorst) Polyantha/2-3 ft
6. Doc (1954-DeRuiter Innovations) Polyantha
7. Sneezy (1955-DeRuiter) Polyantha/
8. Grumpy (1956-DeRuiter) Polyantha/
9. Dopey (1954-DeRuiter) Polyantha /
10. Phyllis Bide (1923-Bide) Climbing Polyantha / 8-10 ft
11. Sleepy (1955-DeRuiter/Netherlands) Polyantha / ? / ?
12. Bashful (1955-DeRuiter/Netherlands) Polyantha / ? / ?
13. Excellenz von Schubert (1909-Lambert)Poly / 5x5 ft

My favorite of the group is Phyllis Bide, I have few health problems with her, and her flushes are so beautiful. She is on a trellis with Carolina Jesamine, which I love together!

I also have a fondness for my 7 dwarves roses (minus Happy thanks to my dog). In the middle of my 6 dwarves I grow White Koster as my "Snow White." They have a flower bed all to themselves, but White Koster is the standout here!

I also love Clothilde Soupert! I always forget its a polyantha which its large blooms!

The rest are new and too small to get a good read on...maybe next year I'll have a more formed opinion :)
~Tammy

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clipped on: 08.17.2013 at 09:37 pm    last updated on: 08.17.2013 at 09:38 pm

Favorite Polyantha

posted by: brenda_l_w on 08.11.2013 at 12:06 pm in Antique Roses Forum

My observation is that polyanthas were mentioned several times in the recent "easiest to grow" thread but only once in the "most beautiful" thread. I'd like to point out that for a newbie like me, if they grow well in your area, there is not a better rose to boost your rose growing confidence. And they can be quite beautiful in their own small way. Here is my Mrs. William G. Koning which I received from Vintage in June.
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I hope you can see all the buds that I do not bother pinching off. Mrs. William G. Koning has especially shiny green leaves. Meanwhile other roses like Grandmother's Hat and Snowbird sulk in their pots, their leaves yellowing or blackspotting and not putting out any new growth.
Other polyanthas I have are Lullaby, Lady Reading, Cecile Brunner, Rita Sammons, Marie Pavie, Marie Daly, and Margo Koster. In the future I'd like Little White Pet and maybe Leonie Lamesch - I think that's a rose I have to see in person to decide. Another great thing about polyanthas? If i don't have space I can probably keep them in a pot, resulting in more roses and less real estate used.

So what is your favorite polyantha?

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clipped on: 08.17.2013 at 09:23 pm    last updated on: 08.17.2013 at 09:24 pm

Quartzite countertop

posted by: NaRo on 01.09.2012 at 04:21 pm in Kitchens Forum

Our counters-to-be, if all goes well.

Does anyone have experience with Calacatta Macaubus quartzite?

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clipped on: 03.20.2013 at 03:32 pm    last updated on: 03.20.2013 at 03:32 pm

RE: Non-counter depth refrigerator. How did you handle yours? (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: Co-Co on 08.05.2011 at 04:55 pm in Kitchens Forum

We extended the cabinets out 3" (simply to avoid a filler piece on the other run) and the cabinet vendor ordered us a 30" gable. We're really pleased with the effectively built-in look. It's a 22cuft fridge BTW, so not overly huge.
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clipped on: 03.11.2013 at 11:05 am    last updated on: 03.11.2013 at 11:05 am

Corner Cabinet Space Calculations and Analysis

posted by: davidahn on 02.20.2013 at 02:06 pm in Kitchens Forum

This is an attempt at putting some numbers to the age-old question: what do I do with this darned corner?!? I have answered this question for myself, but thought my analysis might be helpful to others pondering this same question.

Methodology:
- Tried to standardize on a 24D x 48W blind cabinet
- Lazy susan & corner drawers required 36 x 36 corner cabinet
Total usable space is calculated based on the interior space of the drawer/pullout
Usable space given is PER TIER and calculated based on the footprint of the box
Multiply usable space by number of tiers/drawers for total storage area
Drawers and pullouts are 22” deep minus 5/8” drawer front/back
Drawer widths are box width minus 3/4” box sides, 1/2” drawer slide clearances, and 5/8” drawer sides
- Your cabinet builder’s specs may vary slightly from my numbers

Corner Cabinet Studies

Shelves & Non Corner Drawers
Plain shelves (not shown) maximize space use (88% of footprint due to plywood box sides and back) but minimize accessibility. The gold standard is drawers (see 'Non Corner'), balancing space utilization and accessibility (only 73% of footprint due to hardware and clearances), but obviously, two drawer stacks are NOT an option for a corner. Space efficiency should be compared to the drawer 'gold standard' rather than plain shelves which are a terrible idea for any deep cabinet, especially corner cabinets!

Corner Drawer
The corner drawer solution (53% of footprint, 73% of non-corner drawers) does have LARGE dead dead space in both corners, and awkward angles all over the drawers. The pluses are: you can store a lot of stuff by having 4 drawers (2728 sq in), and you can have access to ALL of your stuff. 4 corner drawers offer 81% of two 24W drawer stacks, but takes up 12.5% more floor space.

Super Susan
The super susan (60% of footprint, 82% of non-corner drawers). It’s impractical to do more than 2 tiers, and it lacks a certain sex appeal, and stuff can fall off and get lost in the dead space areas. There’s a maximized version of the Super Susan called the Korner King, which looks like it stores a LOT of crap, but it looks like a Frankenstein’s cabinet, an esthetic purist’s nightmare. For those not offended by its looks, functionally it has a lot of broken up pieces of storage of which only about 10-40% of your stuff is accessible at a time.

Custom Corner
My 'custom corner' (narrow pullout, wide side slide), my choice, has the same usable space as drawers per tier (73% of footprint), but a lot less accessibility due to the limitations the corner imposes. I chose it because while we have lots of storage space, I still wasn’t ready to seal off the corner. The large sideways slideout is perfect for items like our 60 and 100 qt pots that wouldn’t fit in drawers anyway (we occasionally cook for LARGE groups). The main pullout would have 3 tiers for more often-accessed items, for a total of 1494 sq in (514 s.i. x 1 full height slideout for big pots, 327 s.i. x 3 for front pullout), a decent amount of storage including a very large, full height side-slide. 2 L + 3 S tiers would give 2009 s.i.

Dead Corner
The simplest corner solution, the 'dead corner,' only gives 29% of the footprint in storage, or 40% of the storage of 48' of non-corner drawers. But if you use a 4-drawer stack, you get a lot of functional storage - 1348 sq in, though no room for tall/large items.

Magic Corner
Hafele’s Magic Corner offers that WOW factor when you see it gleaming and gliding in and out with soft-close. But it’s only 536 s.i. per tier (49% of footprint, 67% of non-corner drawers), 1072 total s.i. It could store more, but it’s designed to fit in more applications (21D cabinets, narrower cabinets), and therefore has a lot of dead space.

Thoughts
- Unlike straight base cabinets where there’s clear consensus that drawers are best, corners are ALL about limitations and compromise (and debate, with everyone having their own favorite corner solution that fits their needs)
- Drawers offer the greatest accessibility, and by using 3 or 4 drawers, you quickly make up for less space efficiency over 2-tier solutions. For example, even though the dead corner only offers 29% of the footprint of storage per tier, multiply that by 4 drawers = 1348 sq in, more than the Magic Corner’s 1072 s.i. and almost as much as the Super Susan’s 1550 s.i. with 144 s.i. smaller footprint. Despite the large dead spaces, the Corner Drawer offers a LOT of potential storage, up to 2728 s.i. with 4 drawers, though losing large item capability.
As impressive as the 'Magic Corner' solutions are to demo (I too “ooooh”ed at first), they are extremely costly (about $900 and up after hardware and baskets) and optimized to fit in shallower cabinets so have more dead space than other solutions.
My custom corner maximizes total use of the footprint area and also maximizes large and bulky item storage with relatively limited access to the inside corner area, while minimizing cost.
- As with marriage, there is no perfect match, only great or poor fits for your needs. If you’re unhappy with your corner solution, either ignore the limitations or find a better solution. Just don’t expect perfection!

Here is a link that might be useful: Korner King - not for me, might be right for you?

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clipped on: 03.11.2013 at 10:35 am    last updated on: 03.11.2013 at 10:35 am

RE: *My LAST cabinet question - Painting mitered doors (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: SparklingWater on 02.13.2013 at 08:28 pm in Kitchens Forum

About to embark on cabinet finish selection as yourself, I've read some about PCV (post catalytic conversion colorant varnish) which many fine cabinetry manufacturers are now using, a switch typically from a pre-catalytic (and other technique) lacquered varnish finish (non-conversion coating film). The advantage of PCV is a far more durable, UV inhibiting finish (no yellowing) which withstands household chemical cleanup, is hard to scratch, better resists water stains and buys the owner time on a colorant finish. It's higher in solids so it requires less coats (benefit to manufacturer) and in fact a high build of finish (5mil) will make the finish brittle. Most manufacturers don't go over 3mils. Cure time is immediate giving manufacturers an edge up on turnaround/efficiency. The biggest downside to PCV finish however is it's hard to repair, especially on site. The process of building conversion coating films is an irreversible process (there are various types, 2k, acid catalyzed and oil based). No process, including PCV finish is bullet proof. However, the selection of a MDF door and drawer front with PVC apparently is felt to be a leader in the industry for those choosing paint (actually colorant) based finish which lasts. This finish technique is worth discussing w.r.t. to your desire for a mitered door.

The alternative and still widely used manufacturer paint finish, pre-catalyzed lacquered varnish, has the great advantage of being repairable. The chemical process is reversible (forms the film by solvent evaporation alone, for example, as using single component lacquers). The film is not normally damaged when re-dissolved, so standard lacquers are easier to repair (on site too). Builds to 3 mils to 5 mils are tolerable (but lower builds are more common, even as low as 1.5 mil by one cabinet maker I recently reviewed). The con to a lacquered finish is the cure time: it takes 3 to 4 weeks (not the same as the stack time), so it takes longer for an order to be properly finished.

These points are taken from my notes, and experts will have more knowledge. When it comes to paint (now often called colorant) finish, it is helpful to know about these two techniques and use them to help pick your cabinet doors/drawers product selection (mdf vs plywood) as well as finish technique for longevity with minimal cracking. There is no perfect finish is always worth remembering. Hope this helps.

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clipped on: 02.28.2013 at 09:32 am    last updated on: 02.28.2013 at 09:32 am

RE: Quartz that looks like Marble... Corian? Granite? (Follow-Up #14)

posted by: hollysprings on 11.03.2011 at 01:14 pm in Kitchens Forum

Which is the real stone?

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clipped on: 02.27.2013 at 03:15 pm    last updated on: 02.27.2013 at 03:15 pm

RE: Painted cabinets - how to get the right look (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: sandn on 11.21.2011 at 01:50 pm in Kitchens Forum

Ideagirl,
I couldn't agree with you more about the aesthetics of factory applied painted finishes.
And call me insane, because I hand painted my own custom cabinetry to get the look I wanted. I worked with my cabinetmaker who primed and scuff-sanded everything for me. Then, after all the cabinets had been fitted and installed, I gradually painted our kitchen, bit by bit. The Blum hardware we opted for throughout meant I could remove doors and drawer fronts with ease. My cabinetmaker built some of the cupboards so I could easily remove the inset side panels and waited to caulk some seams until I'd finished. My only regret is that I didn't get my cabinetmaker to spray just one coat of the paint over the primer, which would've saved quite a bit of time.
I love that the hand painted finish can be easily touched up, or even changed completely down the road. I used Farrow and Ball paint in their eggshell finish in Slipper Satin and Off-Black. The degree of sheen is beautiful. The look is polished, but handpainted--a big contrast to many of the factory finishes.
I don't have a photo loaded of my black island, but here's one of my upper glass cabinets in F&B slipper satin:

I don't regret the time at all.

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clipped on: 02.26.2013 at 10:54 am    last updated on: 02.26.2013 at 10:54 am

RE: shade of white subway tile backsplash with white cabinets (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: boxerpups on 01.27.2012 at 08:04 am in Kitchens Forum

Willtv,
Beautiful!!!
~boxer

If you can get some samples of different white tiles
You can see which you find to be the best match for your
cabs.
keep in mind things like gloss, matte, grout color,
lighting and brand can change the shade of white.
I personally think matching the warm to warm or
cool to cool to the cabs can help as in WillTv's kitchen.

Tile brand and price can vary.
American Olean .22 cents per tile from lowes or
Dal-tile $4.00 per tile
or $8.00 Walker Zanger or Modwalls Glass subway $10 per tile




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floor

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mixing whites
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marble and granite

not white but very pretty
wood top island


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subway white tile

Dark tile (not sure I like this)
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clipped on: 02.26.2013 at 10:34 am    last updated on: 02.26.2013 at 10:34 am

RE: Wich Buck rose to pick? (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: jeffcat on 04.14.2011 at 09:24 am in Roses Forum

I've got pics of Quietness, Dorcas, and a few others but I never got around to uploading them.
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Earth Song
Earth Song
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clipped on: 05.15.2012 at 08:09 pm    last updated on: 05.15.2012 at 08:10 pm

The Fawn: An amazing shrub rose!

posted by: shellfleur on 10.16.2007 at 09:49 am in Roses Forum

I just thought i'd share my very positive experiences regarding The Fawn. I purchased it four years ago as a tiny band from Heirloom and planted it in a half-whiskey barrel container in early fall of that year. It stayed outside during the winter and did fine. It was very vigorous and was spilling out and over the container within one year. It has a lax, somewhat trailing habit. It benefits from "haircuts" between flushes. The Fawn covers itself in beautiful 3" light pink blooms. You can barely see the foliage when it is in full bloom. The blooms are very double and often quartered. I do not detect any scent. That is perhaps, its only fault. I do spray fungicide but even when I am lazy with my spray schedule (letting a few weeks pass), it stays clean. It is well foliaged with shiny, apple green leaves. It would make an excellent ground cover rose, particularly for someone looking for sumptuous double blooms.

I noticed that it did not do as well this year in terms of vigor and bright color of leaves...so I decided to plant it in the ground and free it from its container. It was very difficult to free this rose from the whiskey barrel. Its roots were tangled throughout and in trying to get it out of the container, a large piece actually broke off. We lost all the feeder roots and it had no rootball to speak of. I should never have moved this rose in August but I just decided to do it. I planted it in a nice sunny location in the front of my house.

I am happy (amazed actually) to report that after significant leaf loss and yellowing, the Fawn is now (2 months later) completely foliaged and covered once again in buds ready to bloom soon. I can't believe how well it recovered. This is one tough and beautiful rose.

Here are a coule pictures of The Fawn. I hope you enjoy them. Shelley

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Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

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clipped on: 05.15.2012 at 08:06 pm    last updated on: 05.15.2012 at 08:07 pm

Ridiculously Healthy Roses here in zone 4

posted by: celestialrose on 11.27.2008 at 08:44 pm in Roses Forum

I grow well over 350 roses by now and as I add more each year I notice that I am not consistent in keeping up with
my spraying regimen. For most of my short summers here I have little problem with diseases until around August when blackspot becomes an issue. Now that all my roses have gone beddy-bye for the winter I am looking back over the past summers and recalling those roses which stayed 100% clean for me and rarely, if ever, were sprayed. In addition to their blackspot and mildew resistence, they were all vigorous growers and bloomers.

Here, in pictures, are those heroes of my garden. It takes
a great rose to not only stay healthy here, but to also
brave our zone 4 mountain-region winters and rally every
spring. Instead of closeups of individual blooms, I tried to capture whole bushes to show their qualities. These
were all taken in late August to mid-Sept. when most roses
here are looking pitiful.

Celeste

HEAVEN ON EARTH....surprisingly winter-hardy, I don't bother to give her any special attention and she barely
has tip damage come spring. She pumps out dozens & dozens of IMMENSE apricot blooms and her foliage stays glossy and green all summer. A light tea fragrance. One of my favorites and always an attention-getter.

heaven on earth

PRAIRIE JOY....this rose is under-rated, in my opinion. I don't understand why more people don't grow this rose....maybe they need some enabling? This rose needs no
winter protection and comes back fully each spring. It pumps out loads of pretty pink blooms and never has a speck of disease. And she is full and bushy without pruning.

prairie joy

MORDEN SUNRISE....Where do I start? I love this charmer!
The sunny blooms, the glossy & healthy foliage, its winter-hardiness, and even fat rosehips in the fall.

morden sunrise


QUIETNESS....if only she had fragrance, she would be a perfect rose. Winter-hardy, vigorous, everblooming, disease-free, and perfection of form and color. (sigh)
She is beloved by me. Here she is, after a rainstorm, a little bedraggled but still glorious.

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ROSARIUM UETERSEN....this climber has consistently stayed
disease-free for years. The leaves are so thick and glossy they remind me of holly. It does have minor winter
damage but then again, I don't protect it. No fragrance, just huge clusters of long-lasting colorful blooms that light up my rosegarden. I am amazed by the lasting powers of the blooms. This cluster was 2 weeks old!

rosarium uetersen

RHODE ISLAND RED...one of the Brownell climbers. Huge, red
blooms adorn a climber with large healthy leaves. Gorgeous
and disease-free for me.

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OCTAVIA HILL....why, oh why, is this rose so overlooked?
I very seldom hear of it. But she is amazing. She sends out dozens upon dozens of pale pink, Austin-like blooms in clusters, set among her super-shiny and healthy leaves.
Very robust and disease-free all summer.

octavia hill

THE GENEROUS GARDENER....This Austin doesn't seem to be very popular, maybe because the waterlily-like blooms shatter quickly, or maybe because this rose wants to be a small climber. And that's exactly how I grow it. On an obelisk, she grows to about 6 feet and the leaves are so shiny people have accused me of spraying something on them.
Surprisingly good winter-hardiness unprotected. Not a speck of disease, ever.

the generous gardner

THERESE BUGNET....the queen of my June garden. There is nothing but perfection from this rose. She is one of the hardiest roses on the planet and needs zero protection or coddling. She grows tall, with lovely leaves and scented flowers of pink perfection. Her canes are reddish for winter interest and she even sets hips. An elegant, no-fuss rose that everyone can, and should, grow.

therese bugnet

PRETTY JESSICA....OK, I have enabled many here into getting this beauty, but in case you missed it, you will want this rose! She is drop-dead gorgeous, her fragrance is strong and sweet, her form is compact & bushy, she is
healthy, she braves our winters with minimal dieback, she makes wonderful flower arrangements....she is perfect.

pretty jessica

MYSTERY CLIMBER....the tag said "Pink Queen", a Brownell climber, but I have researched and never found any rose by that name. Brownell did have several pink climbers, some only bearing number identifications. So I don't know the real identity of this lovely climber. What I DO know is that it is amazing. The leaves are so wonderfully healthy and shiny I use both the leaves and the blooms in arrangements. This rose has a very unique fragrance, so demure and sweet, like a fine perfume. Maybe someone can
identify it? Whatever it is, it is a keeper.

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MOTHER OF PEARL....OK, the photo is blurry, but you get the idea. Loads and Loads of blooms, no disease. This and Pope John Paul II are my healthiest hybrid teas.

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ANOTHER GREAT, HARDY AND HEALTHY ROSE THAT I DIDN'T PHOTOGRAPH, IS CHAMPLAIN. That is one blooming-fool of a rose! Cluster after cluster of bright red blooms, winter-hardiness, and good health. I am ordering another one for spring.

Celeste

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clipped on: 07.04.2011 at 10:15 pm    last updated on: 07.04.2011 at 10:15 pm

RE: Suggestions for Partial Shade Roses (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: Jason_D_B on 03.28.2011 at 03:17 pm in Antique Roses Forum

Try the cornelia rose.
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clipped on: 06.29.2011 at 10:37 pm    last updated on: 06.29.2011 at 10:37 pm

RE: Newbie advice for floribunda mardi gras & lovestruck (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: phatboyrose on 06.23.2010 at 01:54 pm in Roses Forum

I have both Lovestruck and Mardi Gras, this will be their third year. Mardi Gras is planted in the ground and I really don't care for it mush, the blooms are short lived but this maybe just this bush, on the other hand Lovestruck is in a pot and does just fine a bloom machine.
I spray both bushes and use Mill's Easy feed on both. Good luck with your roses.
Harold

LOVESTRUCK
LOVESTRUCK

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clipped on: 06.23.2011 at 11:29 am    last updated on: 06.23.2011 at 11:38 am

Overwhelmed with new garden

posted by: texasfreckles on 05.30.2011 at 10:00 am in Cottage Garden Forum

Good morning gardeners! I feel bad that my first post is a bit of a cry for help, but I guess we all have to start somewhere.

My husband and I rebuilt an older house in a charming neighborhood last year. The yard was a total mess from years of neglect and the construction process. When finished construction last year, it was a bad time to lay sod, so I threw out some annual rye and waited for better weather. I had originally planned very large, deep beds all the way across the front yard and we installed them last fall, but I've been slow planting them. This spring when it was time to lay sod, I was able to convince my husband to let me plant my dream cottage garden instead.

Now, I'm overwhelmed. I spent so much time working on my pathways and fence, that now it's blazing hot here (it was 97 on Saturday) and I feel like it's getting too late to plant anything that I hope will survive the summer. My garden looks terrible!

I know it's going to take time. When my neighbors walk by and comment, I usually tell them, "Just wait a couple of years, it's going to be beautiful!" I can see it in my head, but the reality is I'm dealing with hard black clay full of rocks and soaring temperatures.

My biggest problem is that I want to consider what will be in bloom at what time of year and how tall things will get so that nothing is hidden or shaded. I want to work in some evergreens so it's not completely bare in the winter (I've got some wax myrtles, rosemary, lavender in there already), but I'm stumped. My house faces east and one side of the yard is shaded by a large pecan tree and the other is full sun. Here's that I have planted so far:

In the shade/part shade:
hostas
wood fern
holly fern
Asparagus fern
dwarf Wax Myrtles
Aspidistra
coral bark Japanese Maple
Salvia Greggii (I need to move this, it's in part-shade)
Shasta daises (in part shade and not doing well)
Columbine (in the shade and already died)
Dianthus (part-shade)

Sun:
Wax Myrtles
Knock Out roses
two old roses (a Tea and a Bourbon)
Stella de Oro daylilies (which are turning yellow since planting)
Sedum
Rosemary
Lavender
Lantana
Turks Cap
a low-growing Japanese Yew
Texas Sage
Hot Lips Salvia
Bee Balm
Rock Rose
Echinacea (started from seed - growing extremely slowly)
Rudbeckia (started from seed - growing extremely slowly)

This post is getting too long, but I guess I'm just looking for some advice. I keep working the soil as I go, removing rocks, hauling some of the clay to the backyard and amending with a variety of composts, but it's taking so long that I just end up planting things wherever the soil is ready and I feel like it's becoming really random and haphazard.

So there it is. I'm Melanie from Fort Worth and I am overwhelmed with my new zone 7b cottage garden.

More gardening
I've got vegetables and herbs growing in pots. The wood raised bed is sweet potatoes.

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I don't know that to do under that window. I don't want a hedge or shrubs, but I don't want it to be bare in the winter.

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We still need to finish the fence; it will go all the way around to the house. This is the shady side of the yard.

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All of the rocks (limestone) lining my paths and sitting around are rocks I dug up right there in the yard.

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clipped on: 06.23.2011 at 11:35 am    last updated on: 06.23.2011 at 11:35 am

Spring Pictures (alot of them)

posted by: reginaz on 06.06.2011 at 11:53 am in Cottage Garden Forum

Last year was a difficult year which led to many things going wrong in the garden. My fence and arbor got pulled down from the weight of the roses. My beds were full of the kind of grass with long runners on it so I had to dig them up, you know take out all the plants, dig up the beds and them put them back. Another arbor rotted and fell over. So much of back porch wood rotted because I had so many things too close to the house. We had the porch fixed and everything else is a work in progress. And that was the easy part! I had to deal with the loss of my sister, brother and dog of 17 years. Why that makes the garden problems a"piece of cake"! OK, enough about that.
Here are some pictures:

This is one bed full of that weedy grass and in the background you can see the fence on the ground. The wooden arbor was laying in a pile somewhere. April 9, 2011
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It's getting there! The fence is up with a new arbor and gate. April 29, 2011
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Looking better. May 31, 2011
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clipped on: 06.12.2011 at 10:59 pm    last updated on: 06.23.2011 at 11:17 am

Tree Peonies and other blooms

posted by: thyme2dig on 05.14.2010 at 11:50 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

The tree peonies are finally starting to bloom! I absolutely love them! There are about 6 more in the backyard area that haven't popped yet.

The tulips are still going and now amsonia and deutzia have joined the show.

Kerria blooming in a very shady spot.

Sinocalycalycanthus 'Hartlage Wine' just starting with spirea 'Gold flame' as a backdrop.

Ajuga 'Chocolate Chip', deutzia and the bane of my existence sweet fern (constantly ripping it out so it won't take over) on the stone staircase.

'Popcorn' Viburnum in the new backyard area. This is such a great shrub.

I happened to place 2 new pots of tiarella next to a ligularia 'Britt Marie Crawford' and I think I'll wind up planting them right near the ligularia now. I like the color combination.

I'm just not sure what I would ever do without my garden. I'd probably be very bored with long (clean) nails! LOL!

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clipped on: 06.23.2011 at 11:12 am    last updated on: 06.23.2011 at 11:12 am

RE: Garden today (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: mary_lu on 06.20.2011 at 11:30 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

schoolhouse and luckygal, yes we have the colors. We actually started the painting "saga" 2 years ago when we built our garage. That got painted that summer. Then last year we started on the house. Last year we got most of what can be seen from the street painted :-) now this year we need to get the back side (garden side) done. One problem with the colors is that I don't think they will look quite as nice when the garden room is in bloom. Most of the flowers in the garden room are pinks, reds, whites and blues. The colors for the house are green, yellow/tan and terracotta! Not sure how the terracotta will look with the flowers. Oh well, it does look nice on the garage and house though...
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newyorkrita, it doesn't compare to your gardens! You have such lovely terraces, and color! Our yard is completely flat which does not give nearly as much interest.

plantmaven, thank you. High praise coming from you!

freezengirl, love your name! Yes the heat and humidity has been bad for so early in the summer. But so far everything is doing well, although the blooms are not lasting as long as usual. We have been painting for 2 years, we are so ready to be done!

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clipped on: 06.23.2011 at 10:40 am    last updated on: 06.23.2011 at 10:41 am

Garden today

posted by: mary_lu on 06.20.2011 at 04:34 am in Cottage Garden Forum

The roses on the fence are almost done, but the rest of the garden is in full bloom. Took a few photos today. This is the first year that I have not changed/moved/taken out/added something in this garden. Some areas still need some tweaking but it is about done.

Ignore the multicolored walls on the house. I had hoped to get that part of the house painted before the roses had their June flush. I really wanted to see what it would look like with the green vs. the pink siding. Oh well, maybe next year?
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clipped on: 06.23.2011 at 10:40 am    last updated on: 06.23.2011 at 10:40 am

Julia Child

posted by: hosenemesis on 04.24.2011 at 01:00 am in Rose Gallery Forum

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I like these colors together.
Renee

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clipped on: 06.20.2011 at 11:00 pm    last updated on: 06.20.2011 at 11:00 pm

Country Dancer...a fan favorite in my garden!!

posted by: ronda_in_carolina on 04.22.2011 at 10:50 pm in Roses Forum

His favorite!! (for reference, he is 6' 3")

Big Blooms!!

Love this rose!! So does everyone else who comes to my garden!

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clipped on: 06.20.2011 at 04:10 pm    last updated on: 06.20.2011 at 04:12 pm

RE: Favorite Pink Shrub, Buck or Floribunda (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: erasmus on 07.27.2008 at 02:28 pm in Antique Roses Forum

There are so many good pink ones! Some people say Bonica is ho hum but to me it is very charming, and I agree, it's a good bloomer. Gets a little bs. I like Country Dancer and Earth Song very much but it's hard to beat Carefree Beauty for bloomingness. Pappu's Carefree Wonder is stupendous..and the blooms really are pretty with the white reverses. Belinda's Dream is a must have.
Carefree Beauty, small in comparison to some:

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Linda

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clipped on: 06.20.2011 at 04:08 pm    last updated on: 06.20.2011 at 04:11 pm

Pinkie is starting to bloom

posted by: hosenemesis on 05.07.2010 at 12:40 am in Rose Gallery Forum

My new Pinkie is starting to bloom, and I got so excited I have to show you:
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Poor St. Patrick lost its main cane to disease, so now it is a pillar rose:
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And Julia and Marmalade Skies are still going strong:
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Renee

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clipped on: 06.20.2011 at 03:43 pm    last updated on: 06.20.2011 at 03:43 pm

What's blooming in my neck of the woods (picture extensive)

posted by: jerseywendy on 05.23.2010 at 05:12 pm in Rose Gallery Forum

Hellow fellow rose lovers. I thought I'd share what's currently blooming in my garden. I apologize ahead of time that there will be some pictures NOT rose related.

Let's start of with my tree peony, going on 4 years:
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Next up DA's Pat Austin:
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DA's Teasing Georgia
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One of my big garden helpers, Oscar
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DA's Abraham Darby
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DA's Portmeirion
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HT Double Delight
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Madame Isaac Pereire
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Fl Gruss an Aachen
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DA's William Shakespeare 2000
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DA's full bush shot...yes, in a pot
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DA's Portmeirion...also in a pot
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HT Heirloom
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HT (standard tree) Melody Perfume'
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Zepherine Drouhin inter-twined with Cl Iceberg
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Full bush shot of my enormous Teasing Georgia
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Ok, that's it. Wait...I just HAVE to post the picture of the love of my life ;)
Niko(lai), B&G Macaw, 7 months old
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Thank you all for looking, and happy gardening. :)

---
Wendy

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clipped on: 06.20.2011 at 03:37 pm    last updated on: 06.20.2011 at 03:37 pm

Julia, Pinkie, and yard for Ingrid lots of pics

posted by: hosenemesis on 05.16.2010 at 02:44 am in Rose Gallery Forum

I can't get over Julia Child. What a pretty rose.
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And I knew I could do better on Pinkie!
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For Ingrid- here is the rest of the yard looking toward the chicken coop. This is the veggie garden.
Potager from pond
March Bridal Wreath Spiraea:
bridal wreath spirea
Mike's croquet course and the coop, with what appears to be a dog cookie in the middle of the lawn.
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Happy gardening!
Renee

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clipped on: 06.20.2011 at 03:35 pm    last updated on: 06.20.2011 at 03:35 pm

More Huntington Rose Photos 3

posted by: aimeekitty on 05.03.2010 at 02:39 pm in Antique Roses Forum

Alister Stella Gray
 
Georgetown Noisette

Crestline Mulberry

Kimberlina

La Marne

Lilac Rose, this looked like a smaller plant? Or is it just young?

Also appeared to be a smaller, charming plant, Anne Boleyn

Another shorter, charming rose, Crystal Palace

Mayor of Casterbridge

White Grootendorst Rugrosa
I'd never noticed a rugrosa before... I really like the leaves...!

Pink Grootendorst Rugrosa

Roseraie Del hay

Wil Alderman Rugrosa

Belle Poitevine Rugosa
I WANT A RUGROSA NOW. :D

Rugrosa Rubra

Mystery polyantha... anyone know what it is?

Is this Zepherine Drohin? People say it doesn't do well here... but this one seems to be doing well? Maybe Huntington has magical gardeners (they probably do.)

Champney's Pink Cluster

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clipped on: 06.19.2011 at 05:34 pm    last updated on: 06.19.2011 at 07:41 pm

The garden today (lots of pics)

posted by: mary_lu on 06.03.2010 at 12:09 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

Every day more blooms are opening while others drop their petals. Is a garden ever really in full bloom? We had rain last night which caused many of the flowers to hang low due to the weight of the blooms, but it still is appealing to the eye. I tried to capture some of the beauty to share here with everyone. Hope you enjoy it as much as I am.
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clipped on: 06.13.2011 at 03:53 pm    last updated on: 06.13.2011 at 03:53 pm

Garden Pictures (many pics)

posted by: reginaz on 06.30.2008 at 03:03 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

This years weather was cold, then boiling hot, then so humid with thunderstorms that managed to knock over everything but not enough rain. I didn't get around to taking many early June pictures but my husband took some with his 35mm. Here are a few:

Some poppies and iris
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These were taken during the heat wave in full sun with digital camera, not the best time to take them.
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Appleblossom rose, buddlea a. with monarch and mockorange.
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From upstairs window
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Locust Tree and Violette rose
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A few more
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clipped on: 06.12.2011 at 11:04 pm    last updated on: 06.12.2011 at 11:09 pm

RE: Do you have a goal for your garden? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: mollydog on 11.02.2009 at 07:23 am in Cottage Garden Forum

Over the years I, too, have "weeded" out perennials that demand too much care. I have incorporated more shrubs and recently planted serbian spruce in the beds. I am almost 60 now and I figure by the time the spruce take over too much of the beds, it will be a good thing...there will be just enough garden for me to tend.

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clipped on: 06.12.2011 at 11:03 pm    last updated on: 06.12.2011 at 11:07 pm

Late June Garden (3 Pictures & Link)

posted by: reginaz on 10.24.2008 at 12:24 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

Well things are winding down around here and I'm looking forward to my winter quilting. I'm not looking forward to cleaning all my flats but the plus side is that growing plants from seed is one of the most rewarding aspects of gardening for me. Some plants that did well for me this year were Nicotiana species, Emilia, Salvia farinacea, Shirley Poppies, Cynoglosum, and fragrant sweet peas. On the down side, I'm removing two roses that have Rose Rosette Disease. And some parts of my garden are starting to look like a jungle!
Anyway, here are the late June Pictures:
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My Gardens

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clipped on: 06.12.2011 at 10:58 pm    last updated on: 06.12.2011 at 11:05 pm

RE: Matching SW Paint colors in DR (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: bonniee on 06.29.2007 at 09:36 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Hi Va Rosemary........I did have Ivorie painted in my DR when I first moved in 3 yrs ago , then changed it to Restrained Gold because of the yellow flower in my drapes. The DR drapes were custom done so I couldn't throw them away when we moved & brought them with me to the new house. The drapes show up much better with the Restrained Gold. My LR, foyer, FR, master bedroom & bath are all Ivorie is you wanna peek. I will post a pic of the DR in the restrained gold for you. Good luck with your painting!
Bonnie

Here is a link that might be useful: Bonnie's

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clipped on: 09.14.2007 at 12:04 am    last updated on: 09.14.2007 at 12:06 am

RE: Help me see if this brown is too brown! (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: lmhall2000 on 07.24.2007 at 08:20 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Here are the fabrics I'm working with, I hope to move them to this next house....the valances will go in the breakfast room that will be wide open to the living room and hoping to get these drapes into the living room...my problem is that the bookcase extends out in front of the window so I might have to make new toppers instead....my furniture coordinates with all these, sage chairs, plaid couch with all those colors in them and I'll be buying a square ottoman in a tweed type fabric with button holes...

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clipped on: 09.13.2007 at 11:00 pm    last updated on: 09.13.2007 at 11:01 pm

RE: Middle to high-end upholstery (Follow-Up #26)

posted by: rmanbike on 02.02.2007 at 01:19 am in Furniture Forum

Actually mid to highend upholstery manufacturers on the east coast ie: NC Miss. Ohio etc. will use poplar lumber or plywood or a combination of both. Almost never will you see oak or ash inside a upholstery frame, unless its exposed. On the west coast they will use Alder instead of poplar.
How well your upholstery furniture will last is more based on design of all the elements: frames, springs, padding, fabric and skills used in assembling. A poorly designed sofa will never last or sit well no matter who makes it. A well designed sofa with sinous (no-sag) wire springs will sit more comfortable and last longer than most 8-way hand tied coil springs. An 8-way hand tied sofa works best when it has a spring edge, which very few manufacturers offer spring edge on their sofas. Only the very high-end custom shops do.You will be lucky to find a salesperson in a furniture store that understands exactly how each manufacturer makes their furniture, let alone each individual style. I suggest when you find something you like, note the manufacturers style number, then call the manufacturer, ask them for this exact style, how is it constructed, is frame hardwood or plywood, they use springs or elastic webbing or?, The density of the foam in the arms and back (should be 1.8 or better). The standard cushions are they a HR foam or marshall unit ( springs) or if you can upgrade to a better cushion. Ulta-cell foam is a good choice, however a 2.0 density HR is much better. Most manufacturers outsource their seat & back cushions, but I doubt they will tell you which company. Back cushions should have atleast 2 separate channels for up to 18" height, 3 channels if taller. Conjugated fiber is most popular filling, next would be a blend of half feathers/down and half of the same type of fiber (blend-down).The higher the ratio of down to feathers will increase the price, comfort and usually last longer. But all will require fluffing. Leather cushions should breath very well if not then the life of the filling will be greatly reduced. I think one of your best resources for information on upholstery is your local reupholstery shop thats been in business for long time 10 years or more. Many furniture stores will have them do repairs instead of shipping back to the manufacturer, and which stores or manufacturers stand behind what they sale based on how they handle the repairs with them. Please dont buy furniture based solely on brand name and how it looks on the outside.

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clipped on: 02.18.2007 at 06:58 pm    last updated on: 02.18.2007 at 06:59 pm

Fabrics (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: squirrelheaven on 10.27.2006 at 09:03 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Some nice fabric shops:

http://warehousefabricsinc.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=BYM&Category_Code=

http://www.fabricsandhome.com/fabrics.asp

http://www.fabricsandpapers.com/intro.htm (UK, exp)

http://discountdecorator.com/Common.asp?Hdr=srchres special order high-ends

http://www.fabrictothetrade.com/defaultproduct.asp

http://www.BeautifulHomeFabrics.com

http://www.DecoratingFabrics.com

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clipped on: 01.25.2007 at 10:41 pm    last updated on: 01.25.2007 at 10:41 pm