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RE: Selling shortbread update (Follow-Up #23)

posted by: msazadi on 09.12.2006 at 03:45 pm in Cooking Forum

Someone earlier asked about rolling the dough out onto the pan/paper and then cutting. When my friend who worked for a baker showed me how to do sugar cookies, this is what she did. That way the maximum # of cookies could be cut out with the least amount of handling. No worry about lifting delicate shapes either.

Watching the bakers do this, there were very few scraps to reuse. Time and quality were saved. ymmv

NOTES:

could try this if baking on parchment
clipped on: 10.10.2006 at 09:30 pm    last updated on: 10.10.2006 at 09:30 pm

RE: Selling shortbread update (Follow-Up #20)

posted by: canarybird on 09.11.2006 at 09:45 pm in Cooking Forum

Gosh how did I miss this thread.....I'm the one who posted that original recipe from my Aunty Doe! I've been so busy lately that I haven't been able to read everything the last couple of weeks.

As I mentioned on Shaun's new thread, my aunt would form the dough into a large brick - shaped like a large pound of butter and then she'd make thick vertical slices, cutting each slice in two so that they were the size and shape of a small thick rectancular slice or brownie. It's important that it be thickly sliced and yes they were cooked at low temperature for one hour. She also mixed the dough by hand, saying that the warmth of the hands helped to soften and mix the butter in properly.

Jojoco your hearts look lovely ! What a surprise to see this recipe being passed along like this.

SharonCb

NOTES:

Try some baked at 350 and some at 250.
clipped on: 10.10.2006 at 09:28 pm    last updated on: 10.10.2006 at 09:29 pm

RE: Selling shortbread update (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: jojoco on 09.07.2006 at 11:23 am in Cooking Forum

I am soooo sorry. I just looked at it and saw "one cup of butter". It is one POUND. I apologize for my carelessness.

Jo

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clipped on: 10.10.2006 at 09:25 pm    last updated on: 10.10.2006 at 09:26 pm

Selling shortbread update

posted by: jojoco on 09.05.2006 at 03:45 pm in Cooking Forum

Well, I spoke to the person who wants to sell my shortbread. I told him it wasn't really worth it at the small amount he wants to purchase. He asked my prices and I said $9/dozen plain, $11/dipped. He was okay with that. I can make the dough in about 5 minutes and it takes maybe 15 minutes to roll out and cut 24 cookies. Baking takes one hour, and dipping, another 10 minutes. So it is about half an hour of active work. Cost is about $2.50/dozen plain and $3.00 dipped. He wants to try it and purchased 2 dozen this week (definitely not worth it, but he wants to make sure they will sell--anticipates more next week). I said I would try it and see how it goes. If nothing else, I'll discover if my cookies are as good as he seems to think.
Here is what he is getting:
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and a few for him and his wife:
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For those who wanted the recipe, it is from this forum, but I am not sure from whom. It may have been Lindac, but I couldn't find it on the search. I would like to give credit to the proper person :) It was called "Aunto Doe's Shortbread" (perhaps a typo or two?) and is as follows:
one cup butter (I use unsalted)
2 cups confectioners sugar
4 cups flour
Preheat oven to 250. Mix together flour and sugar. Cut butter (chilled) into pieces and drop in flour/sugar mixture. (The original recipe said to mix by hand, but I use my kitchen aid on low for about 5 minutes.) Roll out to about 3/4 inch and bake on parchment paper for one hour.
Don't overwork the dough. Cool, dip in melting chocolate when cool.
Jo

NOTES:

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clipped on: 10.10.2006 at 09:24 pm    last updated on: 10.10.2006 at 09:24 pm

RE: Selling shortbread update (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: jojoco on 09.10.2006 at 08:42 am in Cooking Forum

I've never used the convection setting on my oven (ignorance, anyone with a bluestar out there?) so I can't help with that question. But doesn't convection bake more quickly and at a generally lower temp? I am confused because you wrote that you baked them at 350 for 55 min. Did you mean 250, as the recipe calls for?
I like my cookies on the thicker side, because it emphasizes the layers in the shortbread. I've also done them as triangles with fork lines scored before baking. Then you break them along those lines after baking. That is the more traditional approach. I like the shapes simply for the fun of it. But, if I wanted to include these at a brunch, I probably would do the triangles and not dip them. My yield of 24-26 reflects the size cookie cutter, a 3 inch heart. That was what the person who bought mine requested (actually a circle, but too plain for me).

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clipped on: 10.10.2006 at 09:23 pm    last updated on: 10.10.2006 at 09:23 pm

RE: Seeking bread baking advice (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: triciae on 10.10.2006 at 11:14 am in Cooking Forum

ejord, all rising COULD take place in the frig. It will slow things down considerably though.

I'd skip that 3rd one-hour rise before shaping. That amount of time really isn't accomplishing much. It's not long enough to develop much more flavor. Instead, let the dough rest 15-20 minutes & proceed with shaping saving 45 minutes. Then, you can either bake immediately or put the shaped bread in the frig for holding. It will comfortably hold shaped in the frig a long time (even overnight). Remove the shaped bread about 2 hours before you want to bake it to allow the dough to warm to room temp. Be certain your oven has been preheated for about 30 min. before putting the dough in.

To extend all flavor from your recipe...after the initial rise, punch down and put the dough in the frig for another 12-36 hours (overnight until mid-day the next day would be great). Be sure it's well oiled so a crust doesn't form and cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap.

Then, let the dough come to room temperature and double again. Shape, let rise about 45 min. to an hour and bake.

This would have you baking the bread on the 3rd day after starting...I do this frequently. This works best with plain doughs...no eggs, large amounts of butter, etc. Your bread will actually be better with the longer rising in the frig.
Tricia

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clipped on: 10.10.2006 at 09:20 pm    last updated on: 10.10.2006 at 09:20 pm

RE: Seeking bread baking advice (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: lindac on 10.10.2006 at 10:56 am in Cooking Forum

With a bread like that, I start in the evening with the overnight rise, and take the bread out in the morning when I get up. By 10 or 11 it's started it's rise and can be baked in time to be hot out of the oven for dinner.
Of course, you don't get to do much but be there for the bread, but there can be many at home tasks you can do inbetween punching down and rising.
Linda C

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clipped on: 10.10.2006 at 09:19 pm    last updated on: 10.10.2006 at 09:20 pm

RE: Sauerkraut!! (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: annie1992 on 10.02.2006 at 02:52 pm in Cooking Forum

Kframe, my "magic" formula is 3 tablespoons of salt to 5 pounds shredded cabbage. That link I gave Tracey is for Michigan State University and has some pretty detailed instructions if you run into trouble. Homemade sauerkraut is well worth the trouble, it's so much better than the "pickled" store brand stuff.

Tracey, your sauerkraut is just fine, give it a couple more weeks and it'll be magnificent!

Deb, that Squeezo is a lifesaver for applesauce, I can do a bushel of apples in the time it used to take me to do 1/4 bushel without it. It's great for tomato sauce too. It is quite a contraption, though, isn't it? I wanted one in the worst way and finally mentioned to my mother that I wanted one but wouldn't pay the $50 or so it cost. She had one in the garage that she hadn't used in years, so she gave it to me. I have to store it in the basement of course, no room for it upstairs, but since I only use it during fall apple and tomato canning, that's fine. All my canning stuff is in the basement anyway.

Sherry, I don't use all the stuff I can, I do a lot of canning for Dad. For instance, my stepmother won't make applesauce. I can 48 pints for Dad so he can have it on his pancakes on Sunday morning. I do another bunch for the grandkids, and some for Ashley and I.

I do use much of the stuff I can, though, and remember, I try to not have to buy anything at the store that I can grow or can myself. I need to have a year's worth stored. 41 quarts of green beans isn't even a quart a week, and 50 quarts of tomatoes is only one recipe per week of chili, spaghetti, goulash, etc. Ashley eats a pint of peaches a couple of times a week, if I canned enough just for her I'd have to have over 100 pints, which I most certainly did not do. When you think of it as a year's worth of groceries, it doesn't seem like as much.

Woodie, I agree, pork, sauerkraut and apples. Yum. Of course, Ashley would disagree, it's mashed potatoes, sauerkraut and creamed corn, all in a pile. LOL

Oh, but my house smells...

Annie

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clipped on: 10.07.2006 at 12:35 am    last updated on: 10.07.2006 at 12:35 am

RECIPE: Penne in Cream Sauce with Sausage

posted by: becky_ca on 10.05.2006 at 11:22 am in Recipe Exchange Forum

I made this last night for dinner guests - it's always a hit, so thought I'd share. If you like it spicier, either use the hot sausage or add some hot pepper flakes.


* Exported from MasterCook *

PENNE IN CREAM SAUCE WITH SAUSAGE

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Pasta Tested and Approved

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion -- thinly sliced
3 garlic cloves -- minced
1 pound sweet Italian sausage -- casings removed
2/3 cup dry white wine
1 can diced peeled tomatoes with juices -- (14 1/2 ounce)
1 cup whipping cream
6 tablespoons chopped Italian parsley
1 pound penne pasta
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Melt butter with oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion and garlic and saut until golden brown and tender, about 7 minutes. Add sausage and saut until golden brown and cooked through, breaking up with back of spoon, about 7 minutes. Drain any excess drippings from skillet. Add wine to skillet and boil until almost all liquid evaporates, about 2 minutes. Add tomatoes with juices and simmer
3 minutes. Add cream and simmer until sauce thickens slightly, about 5 minutes. Stir in 4 tablespoons parsley. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Remove from heat. (Sauce can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)

Cook pasta in large pot of boiling salted water until tender but still firm to bite. Drain pasta; transfer to large bowl.

Bring sauce to simmer. Pour sauce over pasta. Add 3/4 cup cheese and toss to coat. Sprinkle with remaining 1/4 cup cheese and 2 tablespoons parsley.

Serves 6.

Source:
"Bon Apptit
February 1997
Landini Brothers Restaurant
Alexandria, Virginia"

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

NOTES : To freeze: prepare sauce up to the point of adding the cream. When ready to serve - thaw, reheat and proceed as usual.

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clipped on: 10.05.2006 at 11:29 pm    last updated on: 10.05.2006 at 11:29 pm

RE: I want to make pickles too . . . (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: annie1992 on 10.05.2006 at 08:56 pm in Cooking Forum

Here are two of my favorites. The first one was originally posted by San. It does have sugar in it, but I don't find it to be at all sweet, it may not be as sour as you like, though. The second one doesn't call for a lot of garlic but additional garlic cloves could easily be added to the recipe.

THE FRUGS PICKLES
In a saucepan, heat on low until thoroughly dissolved:
1 C water
1 tsp salt
1/2 C white vinegar
1/2 C sugar
then stir in:
1/2 tsp celery seed
1/2 tsp mustard seed
pour the above mix over:
2 cukes, thinly sliced (we use english cukes which are very thin-skinned and don't bother to peel them)
1 yellow onion, thinly sliced

cover and refrigerate several hoursthese will keep a couple of weeks with no loss of crispness

Refrigerator Dill Pickles

- 1 qt. crock with a lid that can be tightly closed (or several small wide-mouth, sterilized jars)
- 6 to 10 small cucumbers
- 4 to 5 stems of fresh dill
- 10-15 peppercorns
- 2 or 3 cloves of garlic, cut in half lengthwise
- 1 qt. water
- 5 ozs. white vinegar
- 1-2 T. salt

Select smallish home-grown cukes or 'salad cukes' from the grocer (make sure grocer cukes aren't soft or too wrinkled and dried out).

Wash cukes well; remove the prickly tines on the skin. For even crispier pickles, let the cukes soak in water overnight.
Prick each cuke with a fork in several places, or make very small slashes to each with a knife.Place cucumbers into the crock vertically, packing them in firmly but not too tight while adding fresh dill and garlic as you go.When the crock is full, drop in the peppercorns
Add vinegar and salt to water and bring to a boil.
Pour over the cukes until it reaches the top of the the crock. Slightly close the crock, but not tightly. If you're using jars, screw the lids on loosely. In about an hour, secure the lids more tightly.
Allow the pickles to sit undisturbed for 24 hours, then refrigerate. Test in a week to see if they're ready; if not, allow them more time. The longer they sit there, the stronger they become. If you have a tendency to eat a lot of pickles all at once, you may want to increase the vinegar content in your recipe, and perhaps add a smidgeon more salt so you can eat them sooner. Keep refrigerated.

Annie

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clipped on: 10.05.2006 at 11:04 pm    last updated on: 10.05.2006 at 11:04 pm

RE: I want to make pickles too . . . (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: debbie814 on 10.05.2006 at 08:28 pm in Cooking Forum

Debster, here is the recipe I used for the pickles. They are so easy, and ready in 2-3 days. I will end up with eight pickles, which we will consume over the next month or so. I'll make another batch during the holidays to put on the buffet table.

Olga's Kosher-Style Garlic/Dill Pickles
=======================================
3 lbs. KIRBY pickles, 3-4 inch length are best
6-12 large cloves garlic sliced lengthwise into quarters (more is better)
Brine-5 cups cool water to 1 cup white vinegar plus 1/4 cup Kosher salt
1 rounded Tbsp. dry mustard seeds
5-10 small hot red peppers or red pepper flakes to taste
1-2 Tbsp. pickling spices
fresh dill - when not available, dry dill will be just fine

Preparation: Scrub pickles and cut tips from blossom end of pickles. (According to a PA Dept. of Agriculture advisory, by slicing the tips from the blossom ends of pickles, this cuts out much of the bitter taste in most pickles)

Combine water, white vinegar and Kosher salt in glass gowl, or stainless steel pot. (Salt must be either kosher or pickling salt. Regular table salt will make the brine cloudy and the pickles become discolored and have a poor taste) Set aside the brine.

Select a glass or crockery container, plastic is OK.

Place a layer of dill in bottom of container, cover with half the cukes, cover with more dill and add remaining cukes and cover with dill.

Add garlic and other dry ingredients as you layer the pickles and dill into the container. Slowly add enough brine solution to cover the pickles entirely. If need be, place a weight on top to keep everything submerged in brine. Cover container and place in refrigerator for 2-3 days at which time the pickles will be ready to eat. The pickles will stay crisp and crunchy for weeks if kept cold.

Notes: Mustard seeds help keep pickles crisp and firm. Some hot pepper should be used, but the amount is optional.

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clipped on: 10.05.2006 at 11:02 pm    last updated on: 10.05.2006 at 11:03 pm

RE: LOOKING for: Tried and loved it - Peanut Butter Pie Recipe? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: ginger_st_thomas on 10.05.2006 at 05:17 am in Recipe Exchange Forum

I don't know if it's similar or not but here's one I like:
CHICAGO PEANUT BUTTER PIE
8-10 oz fudge cookies, ground fine
1/3 cup sugar
1 stick butter, softened
8 oz pkg cream cheese, softened
1 cup chunky peanut butter
1 cups confectioners' sugar
1 cup heavy cream, whipped

Preheat oven to 350. Combine the cookie crumbs, sugar & butter until well blended. Press the mixture onto the bottom & up the sides of a 9" pie plate & bake 15 minutes. Cool.
In a processor, combine the cream cheese, peanut butter & confectioners' sugar. Process until almost smooth. Gently stir in the whipped cream & pour into the pie shell. Chill.~~On Magnificent Cookbook

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clipped on: 10.05.2006 at 09:17 am    last updated on: 10.05.2006 at 09:17 am

RE: What is your favorite Daffodil/Narcissis (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: laurelin on 09.14.2006 at 12:12 pm in Bulbs Forum

My favorite is Narcissus poeticus 'Recurvus' - the Poet's Daffodil. It blooms late, and has a wonderful fragrance. I also like 'Geranium' and 'Minnow,' and 'Dickcissel,' and. . . .

Laurel

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clipped on: 10.04.2006 at 01:07 pm    last updated on: 10.04.2006 at 01:07 pm

RE: What is your favorite Daffodil/Narcissis (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: tjsangel on 09.04.2006 at 08:10 pm in Bulbs Forum

I love the little dwarf ones, like Tete a tete. They intermix well with my red tulips. Carlton is a good one for me. Also I'm fond of Narcissus poeticus, Pheasant's Eye. It's the latest to bloom and fragrant.

Jen

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clipped on: 10.04.2006 at 01:06 pm    last updated on: 10.04.2006 at 01:06 pm

RE: What is your favorite Daffodil/Narcissis (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: jackied164 on 09.03.2006 at 07:52 pm in Bulbs Forum

Thalia. I love white daffodils and this one for some reason has really hooked me. Thalia = Spring for me.

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clipped on: 10.04.2006 at 01:05 pm    last updated on: 10.04.2006 at 01:05 pm

RE: What is your favorite Daffodil/Narcissis (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: bria0128 on 09.27.2006 at 10:52 am in Bulbs Forum

Thalia, I believe it is. I just love big pure white flowers.

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clipped on: 10.04.2006 at 01:04 pm    last updated on: 10.04.2006 at 01:05 pm

RE: Annie's Tomato Tart (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: solsthumper on 08.30.2006 at 12:14 pm in Cooking Forum

Glad you've all enjoyed it. Those tarts look great. Thanks Annie for having taking the time to post the recipe in my absence!

Carnelian, I've been on vacation and it looks like I'm late with a reply. Sorry - here's the recipe as originally posted. Hope you'll give it a try.


Tomato Tart

Crust This makes two 9-inch tart shells.
2 cups AP flour
3 tablespoons semolina flour
1 teaspoon salt
12 tablespoons [1 sticks] cold, unsalted butter
3 tablespoons cold solid shortening
Ice water
Preheat oven to 400F. Put the flours and salt in food processor. Pulse a couple of times, just enough to integrate the ingredients.
Add the butter and shortening all at once and pulse until the mixture looks like moist crumbs and no chunks of butter or shortening remain.
Sprinkle ice water over the surface of the dough. Repeat with 3 more tablespoonsful. Pulse to just bring the dough together. The dough should be past crumbly, but holding together. Cut the dough in half and wrap each half in plastic wrap. Press each half to form a disk. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes before rolling out. Then roll out one disk to " thick. Fit into your tart pan, and chill 30 minutes. Dock the bottom of the tart. Line it with parchment or foil, and weigh it down with pie weights or dried beans. Place tart shell on center rack in the oven and bake 10 minutes. Remove paper and weights from the pan. Return it to the oven and bake another 10-15 minutes or until the tart is a light-golden brown. Remove from the oven and set on wire rack to cool.

Filling
12-15 plum tomatoes, cored and cut into "-thick rounds
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard *
1 cup coarsely grated Gruyere cheese
1 teaspoon Herbes de Provence
2 large eggs
cup light cream
1 teaspoon salt
A few turns of freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 375F. Put the tomato slices in a colander and place in the sink. Let them sit for 15 minutes to drain off any excess liquid. Spread the mustard evenly over the tart shell. Sprinkle the cheese over the mustard and sprinkle the Herbes de Provence over the gruyere cheese.
Working from the outside in, lay the drained tomato slices in overlapping, concentric circles, covering the crust completely.
Whisk the eggs in a bowl, whisk in the cream, salt and pepper. Pour this custard evenly over the tomatoes until it comes to about inch from the top edge of the crust. Bake for 1 hour, to 1 hour and 20 minutes, or until the custard is set. Once Upon a Tart.

*Note: I used Pesto instead of Dijon mustard.



Sol

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clipped on: 10.02.2006 at 08:51 am    last updated on: 10.02.2006 at 08:51 am

RE: Annie's Tomato Tart (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: annie1992 on 08.09.2006 at 10:53 am in Cooking Forum

Sure, but it's not mine, it's Sol's. I didn't have any semolina flour, so I just used all purpose. I didn't have cream so I used whole milk. The tomatoes weren't Roma, they were a mix of red and yellow out of my garden. Finally, I crumbled some bacon on top because I like the mix of tomatoes and bacon.

Sol's Tomato Tart

Crust This makes two 9-inch tart shells.
2 1/2 cups AP flour
3 tablespoons semolina flour
1 teaspoon salt
12 tablespoons [1 sticks] cold, unsalted butter
3 tablespoons cold solid shortening
Ice water
Preheat oven to 400F. Put the flours and salt in food processor. Pulse a couple of times, just enough to integrate the ingredients. Add the butter and shortening all at once and pulse until the mixture looks like moist crumbs and no chunks of butter or shortening remain. Sprinkle ice water over the surface of the dough. Repeat with 3 more tablespoonsful. Pulse to just bring the dough together. The dough should be past crumbly, but holding together. Cut the dough in half and wrap each half in plastic wrap. Press each half to form a disk. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes before rolling out. Then roll out one disk to 1/4" thick. Fit into your tart pan, and chill 30 minutes. Dock the bottom of the tart. Line it with parchment or foil, and weigh it down with pie weights or dried beans. Place tart shell on center rack in the oven and bake 10 minutes. Remove paper and weights from the pan. Return it to the oven and bake another 10-15 minutes or until the tart is a light-golden brown. Remove from the oven and set on wire rack to cool.

Filling
12-15 plum tomatoes, cored and cut into 1/4"-thick rounds
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard *
1 cup coarsely grated Gruyere cheese
1 teaspoon Herbes de Provence
2 large eggs
1/4 cup light cream
1 teaspoon salt
A few turns of freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 375F. Put the tomato slices in a colander and place in the sink. Let them sit for 15 minutes to drain off any excess liquid. Spread the mustard evenly over the tart shell. Sprinkle the cheese over the mustard and sprinkle the Herbes de Provence over the gruyere cheese. Working from the outside in, lay the drained tomato slices in overlapping, concentric circles, covering the crust completely. Whisk the eggs in a bowl, whisk in the cream, salt and pepper. Pour this custard evenly over the tomatoes until it comes to about 1/4 inch from the top edge of the crust. Bake for 1 hour, to 1 hour and 20 minutes, or until the custard is set.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

I need to go get dressed now. In about an hour I'm leaving to pick up Katie at the airport, then on to Canning Camp. "See" you all there.


Annie

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clipped on: 10.02.2006 at 08:49 am    last updated on: 10.02.2006 at 08:49 am

RE: Thanksgiving is upon us.....Linda C. (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: HanArt on 11.21.2005 at 10:28 pm in The Garden Party Forum

I've been making CJ for the past few years, since I first saw Linda post it.

Cranberry Jezebel

12 oz bag fresh or frozen cranberries
1 c. water
3/4 c. white sugar
1/2 c brown sugar
3 Tablespoons horseradish
1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard

Wash and pick over the berries. Put water and sugars in saucepan (large enough to prevent boil over) and bring to a boil, add berries and return to a boil, cook on medium for 15 to 20 minutes from the time it returns to a boil, stirring occasionally. Cool to lukewarm then stir in horseradish and Dijon mustard. Refrigerate for a few hours at least and enjoy!

My Notes: Reduce the amount of white sugar and substitute some fresh-squeezed orange juice for some, or all of the water. I also like to add a couple tablespoons of Cointreau. Sometimes I'll stir in a little orange zest along with the horseradish and Dijon.

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clipped on: 09.30.2006 at 11:25 pm    last updated on: 09.30.2006 at 11:25 pm

RE: Thanksgiving is upon us.....Linda C. (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: Lindac on 11.21.2005 at 10:37 pm in The Garden Party Forum

Well since Cindy has posted the Cranberry Jezabel.....and I don't see a thing from Suzanne....I'll post a recipe for green beans that I think is pretty good! Came from someone on the GW....but I don't remember who!....anyhow....here ya go!

Greek Greenbeans

2 16 oz frozen french green beans, thawed
1/4 cup pine nuts (pion nuts)
2 garlic cloves minced
2 tsp Italian seasoning
1 tbsp olive oil
4 plum tomatoes chopped
1 tsp salt
tsp pepper
2 tbsp lemon juice
4 oz feta crumbled
Bake pine nuts at 350 for 6-8 minutes
Drain beans on paper towels, press well
1. Saute garlic in oil for 1 minute, add beans, saute 5-7 minutes. Stir in tomato, cook 2
minutes until heated. Stir in salt, pepper, lemon juice
2. Sprinkle with cheese, pine nuts.
Serves 6

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clipped on: 09.30.2006 at 11:24 pm    last updated on: 09.30.2006 at 11:24 pm

RE: Favorite dilly beans recipe? (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: zabby17 on 07.25.2005 at 11:29 am in Harvest Forum

lexilani,

I made them for the first time last year with GL's recipe, except that I made some with tarragon & dill mixed, which came out great. Also, one small hot pepper gives a GOOD kick after it's been pickleing with the beans for six months, so if you like that (I do!), it's great, but if not, be warned!

Oh, and I think they would be great in potato salad too. Haven't tried that, but I did use some to make a multi-bean salad --- it was great: I just opened a couple of cans of mixed dried cooked beans and rinsed' them, opened a can of the "dilly-gon" beans and added them in, then mixed some of their pickling liquid with lemon juice, olive oil, and a few more herbs, tossed it all together and chilled for an hour.

Easy-peasy delicious lunch.

Zabby

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clipped on: 09.30.2006 at 11:17 pm    last updated on: 09.30.2006 at 11:17 pm

RE: Favorite dilly beans recipe? (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: GardenLad on 07.24.2005 at 08:13 pm in Harvest Forum

Mom, I've never had, or even heard of, dilly beans that were sweet. I wonder what the point of that would be?

Most recipes for them are essentially the same. What varies is the forms the dill, pepper, and garlic take.

My recipe is essentially the same as Linda Lou's, for instance, except instead of using dried red pepper I use whole, small chile peppers.

I also bruise the garlic, slightly, before dropping it in the jars.

Here's the exact recipe:

Dilly Beans

2 pounds snap beans, trimmed and strings removed
4 heads dill
4 cloves garlic
4 small chile peppers, halved
2 1/2 cups vinegar
2 1/2 cups water
1/4 cup canning salt

To each of four pint jars add 1 head dill, 1 garlic clove, bruised, and two chile halves (alternatively, use a whole chile that has had a slit cut in it).

Pack beans lengthwise into the jars.

Combine remaining ingredients in a large pot. Bring to boil. Pour hot liquid over beans, leaving 1/4" headspace. Remove air bubbles, adjust caps, and process 10 minutes in boiling water bath.

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clipped on: 09.30.2006 at 11:15 pm    last updated on: 09.30.2006 at 11:16 pm

RE: LOOKING for: Snacking food (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: glenda_al on 09.30.2006 at 09:56 pm in Recipe Exchange Forum

These are excellent.
Another Paula Deen recipe!

Marinated cheese bits
2 (10 ounce) boxes of Ritz Cheese Bits crackers
cup vegetable oil
1 (1 ounce) package of Hidden Valley Ranch dressing mix
1 tbsp of dried dill
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp celery salt
Place the crackers in a large Ziploc bag or sealable bowl. Mix together the oil, dressing mix, dill, garlic powder and celery salt in a small bowl. Pour the oil mixture over the crackers and stir gently to combine. Seal the crackers and refrigerate for at least 24 hours, stirring the crackers every few hours to keep them well coated. Let the crackers come to room temperature before serving.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.30.2006 at 11:00 pm    last updated on: 09.30.2006 at 11:00 pm

RE: LOOKING for: Favorite Soup Recipes? (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: marigene on 09.29.2006 at 01:33 pm in Recipe Exchange Forum

Here is a great soup.

Brie with Green Chili Soup

1 c Chopped onions
c Chopped celery
4 tb Butter
2 tb Flour
1 cn (16-oz) chicken broth
1 ct (16-oz) Half-and-Half (milk is okay too)
lb Brie
2 cn (4-oz) chopped green chiles (or preferably fresh roasted chiles)
Salt and pepper to taste

Saute onions, celery in butter for 5 minutes. Wisk in flour. Then add in half-and-half and broth. Stir throughly. Add brie to soup in small pieces. Stir until brie is melted (about 10 minutes). Add green chiles, simmer for another 2 minutes and serve

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.30.2006 at 10:58 pm    last updated on: 09.30.2006 at 10:58 pm

RE: LOOKING for: Favorite Soup Recipes? (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: woodie2 on 09.28.2006 at 11:27 pm in Recipe Exchange Forum

These are two of my favorite soups, I think they're both fantastic.

Mini Meatball Soup/Italian Wedding Soup

Recipe courtesy Rachael Ray

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, 2 turns of the pan in a slow stream
2 carrots, peeled and chopped
2 ribs celery, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
2 bay leaves, fresh or dried
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 pound ground beef, pork and veal combined
1 egg, beaten
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Romano, a couple of handfuls
1/2 cup plain bread crumbs, a couple of handfuls
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated or ground nutmeg

6 cups chicken stock or broth
2 cups water
1 1/2 cups dried pasta, rings, broken fettuccini or ditalini
1 pound triple washed fresh spinach, coarsely chopped

In a deep pot over medium heat add oil, chopped carrots, celery and onions and bay leaves. Season with salt and pepper. Cover pot and cook veggies 5 or 6 minutes, stirring occasionally.

While the veggies cook, combine meat, egg, garlic, grated cheese, bread crumbs, salt, pepper, nutmeg. Uncover your soup pot and add broth and water to the pot. Increase heat to high and bring soup to a boil.

When soup boils, reduce heat a bit and start to roll meat mixture into small balls, dropping them straight into the pot. You are making meat dumplings that will cook in the broth. When you are done rolling the meat, add pasta to the soup and stir. Cover and simmer soup 10 minutes.

When pasta is tender, stir in chopped spinach in batches. When spinach has wilted into the soup, the soup is done and ready to serve. Adjust your seasonings. Serve soup with crusty bread

MEXICAN CHICKEN CORN CHOWDER
Serves: 6-8 (2 quarts)

Posted by: Krasna on Fri, Aug 30, 02 at 13:49
Here is another recipe that is pretty good, and it is "tried and true" from an old neighbor.

1-1/2 lb. boneless skinless chicken breasts
1/2 c. chopped onion
1 to 2 garlic cloves, minced
3 T. butter
2 chicken bouillon cubes (I use Better than Bouillon brand)
1 c. hot water
1 tsp. ground cumin
2 c. half-and-half cream
2 c. (8 oz.) shredded Monterey Jack or Cheddar cheese (I use Cheddar)
1 can (16 oz.) cream-style corn
1 can (16 oz.) regular corn
1 can (4 oz.) chopped green chilies, undrained
1 tsp. hot pepper sauce (I use more)
2 medium tomatoes, chopped
Fresh cilantro or parsley, optional

Cut chicken into small, bite-sized pieces.
In a Dutch oven, brown chicken, onion and garlic in butter until chicken is no longer pink.
Dissolve the bouillon in hot water. Add to pan along with cumin; bring to a boil.
Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 5 minutes.
Add next 5 ingredients. Cook and stir over low heat until cheese is melted. Stir in tomato.
Serve immediately; garnish with cilantro or parsley if desired.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.30.2006 at 10:56 pm    last updated on: 09.30.2006 at 10:57 pm

What Have You Put Up 2006, Part III

posted by: zabby17 on 09.27.2006 at 10:21 am in Harvest Forum

Since we've gotten to a nice, round 100 posts on the last of these threads, and then there was a bit of a lull (as much as there can be with this crowd in the thick of harvest season!), I thought I'd start a new one before people's computers get to overloaded with the other.

10 half-pints apple-pear sauce

Made these with some pears a friend donated from her backyard tree. After I'd put the pears through the food mill, the peel and cores were removed but there were still little hard gritty bits of SOMETHING in the puree, which I've never encountered before. I put it through a sieve, grumbling at the extra half-cup or so of pulp I lost, but the result was nice and almost entirely grit-free.

Mixed the puree with that from a basket of local Cortlands, infused by a vanilla bean and a piece of cinnamon. Mmmm....

Zabby

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 10:43 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 10:44 am

RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: Patris on 07.28.2005 at 08:46 am in Harvest Forum

Zabby, this is a great idea. There seem to be lots of us pretty new here. Give us all a chance to get some great new ideas and recipes. Thanks

Oven dried tomatoes

In large bowl combine:
1 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1/4 cup Balsamic Vinegar
1 Tsp. Lemon juice
1/4 cup fresh chopped (or dried) Parsley
1 Tbl. chopped Rosemary
Dried Pepper flacks to your taste, oppt.
Salt & Pepper to taste

Leave skin on and cut tomatoes in to bite size pieces.
Take out any seeds.
Place tomatoes in the mixture and refrg. for at least 2 hours.
Set oven on lowest temp. Max. 200 degrees.
Take tomatoes out of mixture and spread on cookie sheet. It's OK if they touch.
They will need to Oven dry for about 14 to 16 hours. Size of pieces will determine time.
I put mine in about 7pm and get them out the next morning around 10:30am.

Amount of tomatoes is up to you.

You will not be able to stop eating them. I have put most of mine up in the freezer. They are especially wonderful in pasta dishes or salads.

Welcome Leesa and hope you enjoy.
Patris

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 10:07 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 10:07 am

RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: annie1992 on 07.28.2005 at 11:38 pm in Harvest Forum

OK, here are my favorites. The salsa is my own recipe, the soup is Katie C's and the Habanero Gold is wonderful, but I don't know where in the world I got the recipe.

ANNIES SALSA

8 cups tomatoes, peeled, chopped and drained
2 cups chopped onion
1 cups chopped green pepper
3 5 chopped jalapenos
6 cloves minced garlic
2 tsp cumin
2 tsp pepper
1/8 cup canning salt
cup chopped fresh cilantro
1/3 cup sugar
1/3 cup vinegar
16 oz. tomato sauce
16 oz tomato paste
Mix all ingredients, bring to a boil, boil 10 minutes. Pour into hot jars, process at 10 lbs of pressure for 30 minutes for pints.

Makes 6 pints

Roasted Tomato Garlic Soup
Recipe By :Katie
12 tomatoes -- *see Note
2 carrots -- cut in 1" pieces
1 large onion -- quartered
2 whole heads garlic -- peeled (or more, to taste)
olive oil
2 cups chicken broth -- (or 3)

1/2 cup chopped fresh basil -- (or 1 Tbsp. dried)
Core tomatoes and cut in half. Place, cut side up, on foil covered cookie sheet with carrots, onion and garlic. Brush with olive oil. Bake at 400F for about an hour, or until vegies are roasted and a little blackened. Place in a large saucepan with the chicken broth and basil and simmer for about 10 minutes. Blend with a stick blender (or in small batches in a blender) until almost smooth. To can: Process in a pressure canner, pints for 60 min. and quarts for 70 min.For dial gauge canners use 11 pounds pressure at 0-2000 ft., 12 lbs. at 2001-4000 ft., 13 lbs. at 4001-6000 ft. and 14 lbs. above 6000 ft. For weighted gauge canners use 10 lbs. pressure at 0-1000 ft., and 15 lbs. over 1000 ft. *Note: These measurements are approximate...I use whatever it takes to cover the cookie sheet. This makes 1 1/2 to 2 quarts of soup. Cream may be added to taste when the soup is served.

Habanero Gold Jelly

1/3 cup finely sliced dried apricots
3/4 cup white vinegar
1/4 up finely diced red onion
1/4 cup finely diced sweet red pepper
1/4 cup finely diced habanero peppers, including seeds
OR 1/4 cup diced, combined jalapeno and Scotch Bonnet peppers
3 cups granulated sugar
1 pouch Certo liquid pectin

Cut apricots into 1/8 inch slices. Measure into a large deep stainless steel saucepan with vinegar; let stand 4 hours. Individually, cut onion and seeded peppers into 1/8 inch slices; cut slices into 1/4 inch dice. Measure each ingredient; add to apricots. Stir in sugar.
Over high heat, bring to a full roiling boil. Stirring constantly, boil hard 1 minute. Remove from heat. Immediately stir in pectin, mixing well.
Pour jelly into hot jar, dividing solids equally among jars and filling each jar to within 1/4 inch of top rim. Wipe rims. Apply lids.

Process 10 minutes in BWB. Cool upright, until lids pop down, about 30 minutes. When lids are concave but the jelly is still hot, carefully grasp jar without disturbing lid and invert, twist, or rotate each jar to distribute solids throughout jelly. The jar can be inverted temporarily but do not allow it to stand upside-down for prolonged periods.

Repeat as necessary during the cooling/setting time, until solids remain suspended in the jelly.

Annie

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 09:48 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 10:05 am

RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: Readinglady on 07.30.2005 at 02:13 pm in Harvest Forum

Here are two tomato sauce recipes we really enjoy. Both are from the "Complete Book of Small-Batch Preserving."

* Exported from MasterCook *

Chunky Basil Pasta Sauce

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
8 cups (2 L) coarsely chopped peeled tomatoes -- (about 9-12 tomatoes or 4 lb/2 kg)
1 cup chopped onion -- (250 mL)
3 cloves garlic -- minced
2/3 cup red wine -- (150 mL)
1/3 cup red wine vinegar (5 % strength) -- (75 mL)
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil -- (125 mL)
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley -- (15 mL)
1 teaspoon pickling salt -- (5 mL)
1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar -- (2 mL)
1 6-oz/156 mL) can tomato paste

Combine tomatoes, onion, garlic, wine, vinegar, basil, parsley, salt, sugar and tomato paste in a very large non-reactive pan. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 40 minutes or until mixture reaches desired consistency, stirring frequently.

Remove hot jars from canner and ladle sauce into jars to within 1/2 inch (1 cm) of rim (head space). Process 35 minutes for pin (500 mL) jars and 40 minutes for quart (1 L) jars in a BWB.

Yield:
"8 cups"

Note: This sauce also makes an excellent base for a quick pizza.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

* Exported from MasterCook *

Multi-Use Tomato Sauce

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
10 plum tomatoes -- (about 2 1/2 lbs./1 kg)
10 large tomatoes -- peeled and chopped (about 4 lbs./2 kg)
4 large garlic cloves -- minced
2 large stalks celery -- chopped
2 medium carrots -- chopped
1 large onion -- chopped
1 large zucchini -- chopped
1 large sweet green pepper -- chopped
1/2 cup sun-dried tomatoes -- (125 mL)
2/3 cup dry red wine -- (150 mL)
1/2 cup red wine vinegar (5% strength or more) -- (125 mL)
2 bay leaves
1 tablespoon pickling salt -- (15 mL)
2 teaspoons dried oregano -- (10 mL)
2 teaspoons dried basil -- (10 mL)
1 teaspoon granulated sugar -- (5 mL) (optional)
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon -- (2 mL) (optional)
1/4 teaspoon ground pepper -- (2 mL)
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley -- (50 mL)

Combine tomatoes, celery, garlic, onion, zucchini and green pepper in a very large non-reactive pan. Add 1 cup (250 mL) water. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat and boil gently, covered, for 25 minutes or until mixture begins to thicken, stirring occasionally.

Soak sun-dried tomatoes in boiling water until softened. Drain and dice. Add to sauce with wine, vinegar, bay leaves, salt, oregano, basil, sugar, cinamon and pepper. Continue to boil gently until desired consistency, stirring frequently. Discard bay leaves and stir in parsley.

Remove hot jars from canner and ladle sauce into jars to within 1/2 inch (1 cm) of rim (head space). Process in a BWB 35 minutes for pint (500 mL) jars and 40 minutes for quart (1 L) jars.

Yield:
"12 cups"
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

I'm the second generation to make this pickle recipe. It originally appeared in an old USDA bulletin: "Making Pickles and Relishes at Home," but it can still be found on several Extension Service sites.

Crosscut Pickle Slices
(Bread & Butter Pickles)
4 quarts sliced medium cucumber, about 6 pounds
1 1/2 cups sliced onions
2 large garlic cloves
1/3 cup salt
2 quarts crushed ice or ice cubes
4 1/2 cups sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons ground turmeric
1 1/2 teaspoons celery seed
2 tablespoons mustard seed
3 cups vinegar
Wash cucumbers thoroughly, using a vegetable brush; drain on rack. Slice unpeeled cucumbers into 1/8 to 1/4-inch slices; discard ends. Add onions and garlic. Add salt and mix thoroughly; cover with ice; let stand 3 hours. Drain thoroughly; remove garlic cloves. Combine sugar, spices and vinegar. Heat just to boiling. Add drained cucumber and onion slices and heat 5 minutes. Pack hot pickles loosely in clean, hot pint jars to 1/2 inch of top. Adjust jar lids. Process in boiling water bath for 5 minutes (jars will cool the water, so start to count processing time as soon as water in canner returns to boiling). Remove jars and complete seals, if necessary. Set jars upright to cool. Yield: 7 pints.
Note: Process 10 minutes BWB for elevations 1001 feet and above.

Carol

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 09:53 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 10:04 am

RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #26)

posted by: Karen_B on 11.02.2005 at 04:29 pm in Harvest Forum

I know Apple chutney has already been listed but I've received such rave reviews on this recipe I'd like to offer another choice:

Apple Chutney
2 quarts chopped, cored, pared tart apples (about 10 medium)
1 cup chopped onions
1 cup chopped sweet red bell peppers (about 2 medium)
2 hot red peppers, seeded and chopped
1 pounds seedless raisins
4 cups brown sugar
3 tablespoons mustard seed
2 tablespoons ground ginger
2 tablespoons ground allspice
2 teaspoons canning salt
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 quart white vinegar (5%)
Yield: About 6 pint jars

Procedure: Combine all ingredients; simmer until thick, about 1 hour and 15 minutes. As mixture thickens stir frequently to prevent sticking.

Pour boiling hot chutney into hot jars, leaving inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel; adjust two-piece metal canning lids. Process in a Boiling Water Canner 10 minutes for pints or 1/2 pints.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 10:01 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 10:02 am

RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #21)

posted by: annie1992 on 09.17.2005 at 03:56 pm in Harvest Forum

For apple and pear season, here are a couple of my favorite chutney recipes. I double the pear one and have left out the brandy when I didn't have any. It was good anyway:

Pear and Currant Chutney

Makes 2 - 3 cups
1 cup dried currants
6 tbls pear brandy
4 pears, peeled, cored and cut into " pieces
2 ribs celery, cut into " pieces
cup sugar
1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
3 3 inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and grated
pinch cayenne

Put currants and brandy into a medium saucepan and simmer over medium heat until currants are plump and have absorbed most of the liquor, about 7 minutes. Add pears, celery, sugar, lemon juice, ginger and cayenne and stir well. Return to simmer, reduce head to medium low and simmer until pears are very soft and translucent and juices are thick and syrupy, about 1 hour.

Put chutney into a clean jar with a tight lid or hot water bath 10 minutes. If not processed, cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Allow chutney to sit for a couple of weeks, the flavor improves with age.

Pear Apple'n Cranberry Chutney

Prep Time: 45 minutes
Cook Time: 2 hours
Makes 6 half-pints

2 Cinnamon Sticks , broken in half
1 teaspoon Whole Allspice
1/2 teaspoon Whole Cloves
1/2 teaspoon Whole Black Pepper
2 pounds pears, peeled, cored, and finely chopped, (about 5 cups)
1 1/2 pounds green apples, peeled, cored, and finely chopped, (about 4 cups)
3 cups sugar
1 1/2 cups distilled white vinegar (5% acidity)
1 package (6 ounces) dried cranberries or one 12 ounce bag fresh cranberries, chopped
1 medium onion, finely chopped, (1 cup)
1/3 cup Crystallized Ginger, finely chopped
1. Tie cinnamon, allspice, cloves and pepper in a cheesecloth bag.
2. Combine all ingredients in 6-quart saucepot; bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally. Cook until thickened, about 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 hours. As mixture starts to thicken, stir more frequently. Remove spice bag; discard.
3. Ladle into hot half-pint-size canning jars, leaving 1/4-inch headspace. Run thin, non-metallic utensil down inside of jars to remove air bubbles. Wipe rim of jars clean with damp cloth.
4. Cover jars with metal lids and screw on bands. Process in boiling water canner for 10 minutes.

APPLE CHUTNEY

8 C chopped apples (I use Northern Spy's)
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 XL sweet red pepper, chopped (or 2 med)
1 lb golden raisins
1 lb black raisins
2 jalepenos, chopped
2 Tbsp mustard seeds
4 C apple cider vinegar
2 med onions, chopped
4 C brown sugar
1/4 C fresh ginger, chopped (no need to peel)
2 tsp salt
2 tsp grd allspice
2 tsp grd cinnamon
2 tsp grd cloves

Combine all in a large kettle and bring slowly to a boil, stirring often to keep from sticking. Boil till thick. Pour into hot jars, adjust lids and process in BWB 10 min.

Yield: 12 to 14 half pints (maybe?)

Annie

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 10:00 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 10:00 am

Linda Lou's favorites (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: Linda_Lou on 07.30.2005 at 04:20 pm in Harvest Forum

Since I have this up on my computer, I will post it.
Kosher Dill (Heinz Recipe)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
4 lbs pickling cukes
14 cloves garlic, peeled & split
1/4 cup canning salt
3 cups distilled or apple cider vinegar, 5 % acidity
3 cups water
12-14 sprigs fresh dill weed
28 peppercorns

Wash cucumbers; cut in half lengthwise. Combine garlic and next 3 ingredients; heat to boiling. Remove garlic and place 4 halves into each clean jar, then pack cucumbers, adding 2 sprigs of dill and 4 peppercorns. Pour hot vinegar solution over cucumbers to within 1/2 inch of top. Immediately adjust covers as jar manufacturer directs. Process 10 minutes in BWB. Makes 6-7 pints.
Banana Jam

Prep Time: 45 min
Total Time: 2 hr min
Makes: about 8 (1-cup) jars.


4 cups prepared fruit (about 11 fully ripe medium bananas)
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
1 tsp. EVER-FRESH Fruit Protector (optional)
1 box SURE.JELL Fruit Pectin
1/2 tsp. butter or margarine (optional)
6 cups sugar, measured into separate bowl

BRING boiling-water canner, half-full with water, to simmer. Wash jars and screw bands in hot, soapy water; rinse with warm water. Pour boiling water over flat lids in saucepan off the heat. Let stand in hot water until ready to use. Drain well before filling.
MASH bananas thoroughly. Measure exactly 4 cups prepared fruit into 6- or 8-quart saucepot. Stir lemon juice and fruit protector into prepared fruit in saucepot.
STIR pectin into fruit in saucepot. Add butter to reduce foaming, if desired. Bring mixture to full rolling boil (a boil that doesn't stop bubbling when stirred) on high heat, stirring constantly.
STIR in all sugar quickly. Return to full rolling boil and boil exactly 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam with metal spoon.
LADLE quickly into prepared jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of tops. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with two-piece lids. Screw bands tightly. Place jars on elevated rack in canner. Lower rack into canner. Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches; add boiling water if needed. Cover; bring water to gentle boil. Process 5 minutes. Remove jars and place upright on a towel to cool completely. After jars cool, check seals by pressing middle of lid with finger. (If lid springs back, lid is not sealed and refrigeration is necessary.)

I skip the sterilizing of the jars and use clean jars, and process 10 min.


Zucchini Relish

10 cups ground zucchini
3 cups ground onion
5 tablespoons salt
4 1/2 cups sugar
1 tablespoon dry mustard
3/4 teaspoon tumeric
1 1/2 teaspoon celery seed
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
2 1/2 cups cider vinegar
3/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 red bell pepper, ground
1 green bell pepper, ground

Using coarse grinder, grind zucchini and onion. If large zucchini are used, remove seeds before grinding. Combine zucchini and onion with salt and let stand overnight in the refrigerator. Drain thoroughly.

Combine sugar, dry mustard, turmeric, celery seed, pepper, vinegar and nutmeg. Cook over medium heat until it begins to thicken; then add ground bell peppers and cook on low heat for 30 minutes or until desired consistency is reached.

Pour into pint jars, leaving 1/2 inch head space. Adjust lids.

Process in boiling water for 15 minutes.

Yield: 6 pints

Pecan Praline Syrup
2 cups dark corn syrup
1/3 cup dark brown sugar
1/2 cup water
1 cup chopped pecans
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Combine syrup, sugar and water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil; boil for 1 minute. Reduce heat. Stir in pecans and vanilla extract. Simmer for 5 minutes. Ladle hot syrup into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Adjust 2-piece lids, and water bath for 10 minutes.

Yields about 4 half pints.


NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 09:55 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 09:55 am

RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: booberry85 on 07.30.2005 at 07:09 am in Harvest Forum

Ok Leesa, I know some people are holding out on you! Last year it seemed as though I was always printing out new recipes. Here are a couple more off my hit parade. The grape jam is extremely easy and I usually have a waiting list for it! The chutney is nice too. I thought it might help to round out the recipes posted here.

GRAPE JAM
2 qts. stemmed Concord grapes
6 c. sugar
Separate pulp from skins of grapes. If desired, chop skins in a food blender or chopper. Cook skins gently 15 to 20 minutes, adding only enough water to prevent sticking (about 1/2 cup). Cook pulp without water until soft; press through a sieve or food mill to remove seeds. Combine pulp, skins and sugar. Bring slowly to boiling, stirring occasionally until sugar dissolves. Cook rapidly almost to jellying point, about 10 minutes.
As mixture thickens, stir frequently to prevent sticking. Pour, boiling hot, into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch head space. Adjust caps. Process 15 minutes in boiling water bath. Yield about 3 pints.

CERTO Pineapple Chutney
Prep Time: 45 min
Total Time: 45 min
Makes: about 8 (1-cup) jars or 128 servings, 1 Tbsp. each


4 cups prepared fruit (buy about 1-1/2 fully ripe medium pineapples)
1 cup raisins
1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/3 cup chopped onion
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
2 Tbsp. chopped crystallized ginger
2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. ground allspice
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp. ground cloves
1/2 tsp. ground ginger
5 cups granulated sugar, measured into separate bowl
3/4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
1/2 tsp. butter or margarine (optional)
1 pouch CERTO Fruit Pectin

BRING boiling-water canner, half full with water, to simmer. Wash jars and screw bands in hot soapy water; rinse with warm water. Pour boiling water over flat lids in saucepan off the heat. Let stand in hot water until ready to use. Drain well before filling.

PARE and core pineapples; finely chop or grind fruit. Measure exactly 4 cups prepared fruit into 6- or 8-quart saucepot. Add raisins, vinegar, onion, lemon juice, ginger, salt and spices; mix well.

STIR sugars into fruit mixture in saucepot. Add butter to reduce foaming, if desired. Bring mixture to full rolling boil (a boil that doesn't stop bubbling when stirred) on high heat, stirring constantly. Stir in pectin. Return to full rolling boil and boil exactly 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam with metal spoon.

LADLE immediately into prepared jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of tops. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with 2-piece lids. Screw bands tightly. Place jars on elevated rack in canner. Lower rack into canner. (Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add boiling water, if necessary.) Cover; bring water to gentle boil. Process 10 minutes. Remove jars and place upright on towel to cool completely. After jars cool, check seals by pressing middle of lid with finger. (If lid springs back, lid is not sealed and refrigeration is necessary.)

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 09:52 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 09:52 am

RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: booberry85 on 07.28.2005 at 07:53 pm in Harvest Forum

Someone had started a post of favorite recipes a day or two ago. I posted these there too but they're worth repeating. These are two of my favorites I got off of the Harvest forum. Grape jam (Ball Blue Book) is a favorite too. The roasted red pepper spread recipe is Linda Lou's too.

Linda Lou's Apple Pie Jam
4 cups tart apples, peeled and finely chopped
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
4 cups sugar
1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
1 box pectin
1/2 teaspoon butter
Add water to chopped apples to measure 4 cups. Place apples and water into large, heavy saucepan. Stir in lemon juice, cinnamon and allspice. Measure sugars. Stir pectin into fruit. Add butter. Bring mixture to full rolling boil on high heat, stirring constantly. Quickly stir in both sugars. Return to full rolling boil and boil exactly 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam with metal spoon. Ladle quickly into hot, clean jars, leaving 1/4" headspace. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with two-piece lids. Screw bands on finger tight. Process in boiling water bath for 10 minutes.

Roasted Red Pepper Spread
6 lb. large red sweet peppers
1 lb. Roma tomatoes
2 large garlic cloves
1 small white onion
2 Tbsp. minced basil
1 Tbsp. sugar
1 tsp. coarse salt
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
Roast peppers under broiler or on a grill at 425 degrees until skin wrinkles and chars in spots. Turn over and roast other side. Remove from heat.Place in a paper bag, secure opening, cool 15 minutes. Roast tomatoes, onion, and garlic under broiler or grill 10 - 15 minutes. Place tomatoes in a paper bag. Peel onion and garlic. Finely mince onion and garlic.
Measure 1/4 cup and set aside. Peel and seed tomatoes and peppers. Puree in food processor or blender. Combine in a large pan.Bring to a boil over med.high heat, stir to prevent sticking. Reduce heat, simmer until spread thickens. Ladle hot spread into hot jars, leave 1/4 inch headspace. Process in water bath canner for 10 minutes.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 09:46 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 09:47 am

Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa

posted by: zabby17 on 07.27.2005 at 06:27 pm in Harvest Forum

OK, Leesa is new here and she is sad that she'd missed out on so many great-sounding recipes because the search engine on GW is not exactly up to par. So I thought I'd share my best ones (there are only a few, I haven't been at this long) that people have often asked for, in a new thread for her, and maybe anyone else, if you have a minute, you could post one or two, even if you already posted it this season, for Leesa and anyone else new?

Here is one for summer fruit jam (peach, apricot, yellow plum --- we're just coming up to these being ripe around here!), and one for a cranberry-apple relish I like for the holidays.

Cheers!

Zabby

Summer Fruit Jam
[from Foodland Ontario]

Yield: 8 cups

3 c Peaches, peeled & chopped
3 c Apricots, chopped
2 c yellow plums, sliced
2 Tb lemon juice
6 c Sugar


In a Dutch oven, combine 2 c each of the peaches & apricots with the
remaining ingredients excepting the margarine. Mash enough to break
the fruit. Stir in the remaining peaches & apricots.

Bring to a slow boil, stirring. Boil, continuing to stir frequently,
for 20 minutes or until setting point is reached.

Ladle into sterile 250mL (half-pint) canning jars leaving 1/2" headspace. Wipe
rim & seal. Process for 5 minutes in a boiling water bath. Remove,
cool, label & store.

Cranapple Relish
(from _Canadian Living_ magazine)

For each pint of relish:

2 apples
1 1/2 cups cranberries (fresh or frozen)
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup finely chopped onion
1/4 cup golden raisins
4 tsp cider vinegar
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt
dash hot pepper sauce

Peel, core, and chop apples. Chop cranberries coarsely. In heavy saucepan,
stir together apples, cranberries, 3/4 cup water, sugar, onion, raisins, vinegar, cinnamon,
salt, and hot pepper sauce. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium; simmer,
stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes or until thickened and no liquid remains. Ladle into hot sterilized jars and seal. (Or simply refrigerate for up to 3 days.)

* I never bother to chop the cranberries.
* I assumed processing was 20 minutes, like for applesauce.

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 09:44 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 09:44 am

RE: Your Greatest Hit Recipes for Leesa (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: SuzyQ2 on 07.28.2005 at 01:58 pm in Harvest Forum

Here are two of my favorites that I haven't seen posted recently.

Shoot, I did not print out the name of the original poster of this recipe. It's not canning, but it is pretty wonderful...

Sour Cream Walnuts

1 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1/2 cup sour cream
1 teaspoon vanilla
3 cups walnuts

Cook and stir sugars and sour cream to soft ball stage (240 degress F on candy thermometer). Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Add walnuts stirring gently til coated. Spread on pan to cool [no stick wax paper helps later removal]

This next recipe came from KatieC & Annie....

Plum Sauce

4lbs plums
2 cups brown sugar
1 cup white sugar
3/4 cup chopped onion
2 tbls mustard seed
2 tbls chopped green chili peppers (I used jalapeno)
1 1/4x1 piece of fresh ginger (I used 1/2 tsp ground ginger)
1 tbls salt
1 clove mined garlic
1 cup cider vinegar

Pit & chop plums [don't peel], Combine remiaining ingredients in a large pot, bring to boil, reduce heat. Add plums, cook until thick and syrupy, about 1 1/2 hrs. Ladle hot sauce into hot jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Adjust caps and process 20 minutes in a BWB.

Yeild: about 4 pints.

I adore this on egg rolls and chicken fingers (I don't even like chicken). I also like a bit of it mixed w/ balsamic vinager and over a salad.

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 09:43 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 09:43 am

RE: Canning: I'm way late for the party, but... (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: craftyrn on 09.25.2006 at 09:56 pm in Cooking Forum

Hey Stacy-- got red peppers ?-- that PA Sweet Red Pepper Relish is real easy to do & VERY impressive looking -- especially for Christmas giving .

Diane's Home Cookin Chapter: Pickles, Relishes & ChowChows

Pa. Sweet Pepper Relish
=======================
12 large red peppers
3 tablespoons salt
6 large tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped
2 large onions, chopped fine (about 2 cup)
3 cups sugar
1 cup cider vinegar
2 tablespoons mixed pickling spices
. Have, seed, and chop peppers. (You should have 9 cups.) Layer with salt
in a large glass bowl. Allow to stand at room temperature, stirring
several times, 3 hours. Drain peppers well to remove all liquid. (best
to squeeze out moisture with your hands)

Combine drained peppers, tomatoes and onions in a large kettle not
aluminum.; stir in sugar and vinegar. Tie spices in cheesecloth and
crack with a hammer. Add bag to kettle.

Bring to boiling, stirring often. Lower heat; simmer 30 to 90 minutes
or until mixture thickens, stirring frequently near the end of cooking
time to prevent scorching. Time will depend on juiciness of tomatoes
but you want it nice and thick. Remove spice bag. Ladle into sterilized
jars (1/2" head space) and process in hot water bath for 10 minutes.
Makes 6 to 8 (8 oz.) jars.

posted by Ruthanna

You realize don'tyou that you're starting an unbreakable habit --

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clipped on: 09.28.2006 at 09:37 am    last updated on: 09.28.2006 at 09:37 am

RE: Stuffing~ CDN Thanksgiving. (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: traceys on 09.26.2006 at 01:32 pm in Cooking Forum

Monique, This was posted by Cindy5NY. It's her fathers recipe I believe. I absolutely love this and the best thing is it can be prepared the night before.

Tracey

Pa Dutch Potato Filling
INGREDIENTS
5 pounds Idaho potatoes
1 cup diced celery
1-1/2 cup diced onion
3/4 cup fresh parsley (or dried parsley flakes)
4 eggs
2 sticks (1 cup) butter or margarine
3 cups cubed bread
1-2 cups milk, or enough to moisten bread cubes
Salt, pepper and celery salt
Cook potatoes with salt until tender. Saut celery and onions with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper in 2 tablespoons oil until tender and slightly browned. Push to one side of the pan; add 1/2 stick of the butter and soak parsley in butter, then mix with celery and onions.
Drain potatoes; put in large enough container to hold all ingredients. Add the remaining 1-1/2 sticks butter, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper and 1-1/4 teaspoons celery salt. Mix with electric beater. Add eggs and mix thoroughly. Add celery and onion mixture and mix. In the same pan used for the celery and onion mixture, soak bread cubes in enough milk to moisten thoroughly and heat. Add to potatoes and mix. If mixture is too thick, add milk. Add dry bread cubes if too thin. Also use more or less of seasoning to taste.
Put in greased baking dish (or dishes), dot top with butter, and bake at 400 for 1 hour until golden brown.

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clipped on: 09.26.2006 at 08:17 pm    last updated on: 09.26.2006 at 08:17 pm

RE: New Recipes #3 (Follow-Up #62)

posted by: san_ on 09.24.2006 at 04:41 pm in Cooking Forum

thanx to ellen/compumom, we are slowly trying out a new cuisine. had this a couple of nights ago (minus the raisins and saffron) and i'm sure we'll have it again, soon! if you don't have barberries, i think you could easily sub finely chopped dried cranberries.

rice and chicken Persian Morasah-Polow
basmati or long-grain rice, 500 grams
chicken, 800 grams
cooking oil
butter, 2 spoons
barberries (dried), 80 grams
almonds, 50 grams
pistachios, 50 grams
raisins, 50 grams
orange peel, 100 grams
sugar, two spoons
large onions, two
saffron, 1/2 teaspoon
salt
black pepper

Morasah-Polow is an elaborate rice dish which means jeweled rice and is usually made at weddings.
Soak rice in warm water for 2 hours. Wash chicken. Peel and thinly slice onions. Fry in oil until slightly golden. Add chicken pieces and fry until color changes. Add a glass of hot water, salt and pepper and cook over medium heat for about 20 minutes. Add more hot water during cooking if necessary. About 1/2 glass of water should be left at the end. Romove chicken bones.
Wash barberries and raisins with cold water and drain. Fry separately in oil over medium heat for a few minutes. Add some sugar to barberries during frying. Thinly slice almonds and pistachios. Soak almonds in cold water for an hour. Thinly slice orange peels. Boil for a few minutes, drain and repeat. Soak in cold water for an hour, drain, and repeat. Finally boil for a few minutes with a few spoons of sugar, and drain.
Prepare rice using the recipe for polow. When rice is rinsed, pour a bit of oil and hot water in a pot, and add 1/2 of rice. Spread chicken pieces over the rice, and cover with 1/2 of remaining rice. Spread half of almonds and orange peel over rice and cover with remaining rice. Pour chicken-juice and a bit of oil over rice. Dissolve saffron in a bit of hot water and also pour over rice. Cover and cook over low heat for about 30 minutes. Add remainder of almonds and orange peel, raisins, barberries, and pistachios, and mix well. Pour two spoons of melted butter on top, and serve.

we had tried the zereshk polow a couple nights before so i've attached a link to the site for it and other related recipes.

Here is a link that might be useful: persian and iranian dishes

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clipped on: 09.24.2006 at 08:42 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2006 at 08:42 pm

RE: New Recipes #3 (Follow-Up #54)

posted by: vagardengirl on 09.20.2006 at 04:53 pm in Cooking Forum

Pumpkin Apple Streusel Muffins Yield - 24 muffins

2 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups granulated sugar
1 T pumpkin pie spice
1 t baking soda
t salt
1 1/4 cups pumpkin
2 large eggs
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 cups apples, peeled, cored and finely chopped

Topping:
1/4 cup granulated sugar
2 T all-purpose flour
t ground cinnamon
2 T butter

Preheat oven to 350* F.
Grease or paper-line 24 muffin cups.

Combine:
Flour, sugar, pumpkin pie spice, baking soda and salt in large bowl.
Combine pumpkin, eggs and oil in medium bowl; mix well.
Stir pumpkin mixture into flour mixture just until moistened.
Stir in apples.
Spoon batter into prepared muffin cups, filling 3/4 full.

For the Topping:
Combine sugar, flour and cinnamon in medium bowl.
Cut in butter with pastry blender until mixture is crumbly.
Sprinkle over muffin batter.

Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean.
Cool in pans for 5 minutes; remove to wire racks to cool or serve slightly warm.

These are so season appropriate and delicious!

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clipped on: 09.24.2006 at 08:39 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2006 at 08:39 pm

RE: New Recipes #3 (Follow-Up #51)

posted by: vagardengirl on 09.19.2006 at 08:59 pm in Cooking Forum

This is a wonderful recipe. The taste and texture are super!

Ice Water White Cake - from, A World of Baking, by Delores Casella, Published by David White, New York, 1969.

With the exception of the water (which should be ice cold) all ingredients should be at room temperature.

3 and 1/4 cups sifted cake flour
t salt
4 t baking powder
cup butter
2 cups superfine granulated sugar
1 and cups ice water
1 t vanilla extract
1/4 t almond extract (optional)
cup egg whites ~ 3 or 4 depending on egg size

Sift the flour with the salt and baking powder.
Cream the butter and gradually add 1 and cups of the sugar.
Beat until mixture is light and fluffy.
Combine ice water and flavorings.
Add sifted dry ingredients to the creamed mixture alternately with the ice water, beginning and ending with dry ingredients.
Beat until ingredients are mixed, but do not overbeat.
In another bowl, beat the egg whites until foamy, gradually beat in the remaining cup sugar, and beat until stiff and glossy.
Very carefully fold this meringue into the batter, folding just until no traces of white are visible.
Turn batter into 2 (9-inch) round layer pans that have been buttered and floured.
Bake in 350* oven for 25 to 30 minutes, or until cake tests done.
Cool in pans for 5 minutes before turning out onto racks.
Fill and frost as desired.

This recipe also makes wonderful cupcakes!

I think this thread is a great idea and I hope it will continue as it is a perfect way to get to know one another. =)

VAgardengirl

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clipped on: 09.24.2006 at 08:38 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2006 at 08:38 pm

RE: New Recipes #3 (Follow-Up #48)

posted by: vagardengirl on 09.19.2006 at 10:09 am in Cooking Forum

I found this thread by accident and really hope to continue this idea. So here goes...one of our favorite family snacks!

Spiced Zucchini Bars with Cranberries and Pecans - One Smart Cookie

3 tablespoons butter, softened
3/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup whole wheat pastry flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup packed grated zucchini
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/4 cup chopped pecans, toasted

Preheat oven to 350

In a large bowl, beat together butter and brown sugar until creamy.
Mix in egg and vanilla - beat until smooth.

In a small bowl, whisk together flours, baking soda, cinnamon, allspice, and salt.

Add the flour mixture along with the grated zucchini into the butter mixture.
Stir just until combined and then gently fold in the dried cranberries and pecans .

Scoop batter into an 8x8" baking dish lightly coated with nonstick spray.
Bake until the top springs back when lightly touched near the center, about 25-30 minutes.
Cool completely in the pan on a wire rack.

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clipped on: 09.24.2006 at 08:37 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2006 at 08:38 pm

RE: New Recipes #3 (Follow-Up #47)

posted by: woodie2 on 06.09.2006 at 06:05 pm in Cooking Forum

I just made these easy sweet dessert bars and they were a big hit.

ALMOND APRICOT BARS

Prep: 15 min. Bake: 45 min. + cooling
Source: Olga Wolkosky of Richmond, BC (Taste Of Home magazine)

2 cups vanilla or white chips, divided
1/2 cup butter, softened
1/2 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup all purpose flour
3/4 cup apricot jam
1/2 cup sliced almonds

In microwave, melt 1 cup chips; set aside. In a large mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in melted chips and vanilla. Gradually beat in flour. Spread half of the batter into a greased 8 inch square baking dish. Bake at 325 for 15-20 minutes, until golden brown. Spread with jam.
Stir remaining chips into remaining batter. Drop by tablespoonfuls over jam; carefully spread over top. Sprinkle with almonds. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until golden brown. Cool completely on a wire rack. Cut into 9 squares; cut squares in half diagonally, to make triangles.
Yield: 1-1/2 dozen

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clipped on: 09.24.2006 at 08:37 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2006 at 08:37 pm

RE: New Recipes #3 (Follow-Up #21)

posted by: doucanoe on 04.18.2006 at 11:08 am in Cooking Forum

Aside from the two I tried on Sunday, I also tried a couple of other new recipes this past week. These Oven Fries that Ann posted for Cindy are really good, I thought Tim would eat the entire pan of them!

Oven Fries (Cooks Illustrated January 2004)

Take care to cut the potatoes into evenly sized wedges so that all of the pieces will cook at about the same rate. Although it isn't required, a nonstick baking sheet works particularly well for this recipe. It not only keeps the fries from sticking to the pan but, because of its dark color, encourages deep and even browning. Whether you choose a nonstick baking sheet or a regular baking sheet, make sure that it is heavy duty. The intense heat of the oven may cause lighter pans to warp.
Serves 3 to 4
3 russet potatoes (about 8 ounces each), peeled, each potato cut lengthwise into 10 to 12 evenly sized wedges
5 tablespoons vegetable oil or peanut oil
Table salt and ground black pepper

1. Adjust oven rack to lowest position; heat oven to 475 degrees. Place potatoes in large bowl and cover with hot tap water; soak 10 minutes. Meanwhile, coat 18 by 12-inch heavy-duty rimmed baking sheet (see note) with 4 tablespoons oil and sprinkle evenly with 3/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper; set aside.

2. Drain potatoes. Spread potatoes out on triple layer of paper towels and thoroughly pat dry with additional paper towels. Rinse and wipe out now-empty bowl; return potatoes to bowl and toss with remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Arrange potatoes in single layer on prepared baking sheet; cover tightly with foil and bake 5 minutes. Remove foil and continue to bake until bottoms of potatoes are spotty golden brown, 15 to 20 minutes, rotating baking sheet after 10 minutes. Using metal spatula and tongs, scrape to loosen potatoes from pan, then flip each wedge, keeping potatoes in single layer. Continue baking until fries are golden and crisp, 5 to 15 minutes longer, rotating pan as needed if fries are browning unevenly.

3. Transfer fries to second baking sheet lined with paper towels to drain. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste and serve.
********************************

Also made this salad I found on Food Network, and it is a keeper for sure!

Green Bean Salad
Copyright 2005,
Ellie Krieger, All rights reserved

1/2 pound green beans, trimmed
2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley leaves
2 tablespoons chopped red onion
2 teaspoons walnut oil or olive oil
1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
Salt and pepper

Bring a large pot of water with a steamer basket to a boil, add green beans and steam for about 4 minutes. Transfer to a serving bowl.
Toast the walnuts in a small dry skillet over medium heat until they become fragrant, about 2 minutes, and then transfer them to a small bowl to cool. Add the parsley and onion to the walnuts and stir to combine.

In another small bowl, whisk together the oil, vinegar and mustard. Toss the dressing with the green beans, top with the walnut mixture and season with salt and pepper. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Nutrition Information
Nutritional analysis per serving Calories 66
Total fat: 5 grams Saturated fat: 1 gram
Protein: 2 grams Carbohydrates: 5 grams
Fiber: 2 grams

Episode#: EK0101
Copyright 2003 Television Food Network, G.P., All Rights Reserved

Linda

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clipped on: 09.24.2006 at 08:33 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2006 at 08:34 pm

RE: New Recipes #3 (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: doucanoe on 01.04.2006 at 10:53 am in Cooking Forum

Here is a new soup I tried. It is from the current issue of Cooking Light, it is good, but very rich, I would not serve it as a main course soup, but maybe a side or appetizer before a meal.

Quick Avgolemono Orzo and Chicken Soup

6c chicken broth
1 tsp finely chopped frech dill
1/2c uncooked orzo
4 large eggs
1/3c fresh lemon juice
1c shredded carrot
1/4tsp salt
1/4tsp pepper
8oz chicken breast meat cut into bite size pieces

Bring broth and dill to a boil in large saucepan. Add orzo, reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes or until orzo is slightly tender. Remove from heat
Place eggs and juice in blenderand process until smooth. Remove 1c broth from pan with ladle making sure to leave out orzo. With blender on slow, add broth to eggs and process until smooth.
Add carrot, salt, pepper and chicken to broth in pan. Bring to simmerover medium-low heat and cook 5 minutes or until chicken and orzo are done. Reduce heat to low, slowly stir in egg mixture, cook 30 seconds stirring constantly (do not boil).

Yield 4 servings

Linda

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clipped on: 09.24.2006 at 08:32 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2006 at 08:32 pm

RE: New Recipes #3 (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: TriciaE on 12.12.2005 at 02:01 pm in Cooking Forum

For those of you who don't live in the northeast or the Nebraska/Dakotas areas this may sound odd but it's REALLY good...sorta like a carrot cake in texture and the spices are just right for the holidays.

SAUERKRAUT APPLE CAKE WITH SOUR CREAM FROSTING

Special Note: This cake should NOT be made with an electric mixer (hand mixer or stand mixer). It will tear up the sauerkraut.

2 Cups Unbleached AP Flour
2 Teaspoons Baking Powder
2 Teaspoons Ground Cinnamon
1 Teaspoon Ground Ginger
1 Teaspoon Baking Soda
1 Teaspoon Salt
1/2 Teaspoon Freshly Grated Nutmeg
1 Cup Sugar
1/2 Cup Light Brown Sugar, Packed
4 Large Whole Eggs
1 Cup Melted Butter (yeah, yeah, I know....it's the Holidays!)
1 16-ounce Can Sauerkraut, Rinsed & Thoroughly Drained (push out excess moisture with paper towels)
1 Granny Smith Apple, Peeled, Cored, and Finely Chopped
1 Cup Coarsely Chopped Walnuts
1/2 Cup Raisins (soak in 1 tablespoon dark rum for an hour)

FROSTING:

1 8-ounce Package Cream Cheese, at room temperature
1/2 Cup Butter (no subs), at room temperature
1 Pound Confectioner's Sugar
1 Teaspoon Vanilla
2 Teaspoons Ground Cinnamon
1 Tablespoon Grated Orange Zest

Put the raisins in a small bowl, add the rum, stir, cover and let marinate for an hour, or even overnight. Set aside.

When the raisins have been marinated, preheat oven to 325 degrees.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, ginger, baking soda, salt, and nutmeg. Set aside.

In another large bowl, combine the sugars and whisk in the eggs and then the melted butter, blend very well. Stir in the drained sauerkraut, apple, nuts, and marinated raisins. Add the dry ingredients and stir just until moistened. Do not beat. You want to just handle it like a muffin batter.

Pour into a greased 9"x13" baking dish and bake for 35 minutes, or until the top of the cake springs back when touched with your finger and the cake is just beginning to pull away from the sides of the dish.

Cool complely before frosting.

TO PREPARE FROSTING:

In a large mixer bowl, beat the cream cheese and butter until blended. Gradually add the confectioner's sugar, then the vanilla, cinnamon, orange zest, and salt. Beat thoroughly until light. Spread on the cooled cake.

Keep the cake refrigerated until serving time or the frosting becomes too soft. Because of the cream cheese in the frosting, the cake should be refrigerated, but the flavors will be much better if you bring it to room temperature before serving.

Bake in a slow oven at 325 degrees.

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clipped on: 09.24.2006 at 08:30 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2006 at 08:31 pm

RE: New Recipes #3 (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: Zolablue on 01.04.2006 at 12:20 am in Cooking Forum

I made these fabulous pumpkin cookies for Christmas and took to my in-laws house. My BIL began to unload the containers and tasted one and promptly decided to quietly tuck a few to the back of the counter not to be shared. The rest were simpy devoured. They were such a hit when another BIL was leaving he wanted to know if any of those cookies were left. The other BIL kept his mouth shut until his wife found the hidden cookies and proceeded to make a take-home bag for the other BIL.

The next night we went to my family's home and they disappeared as well. DH started begging me to make yet more of these the very week following Christmas and I made him wait until yesterday when I made a fresh batch that he took to his office. He told me they were a huge hit and people were snarfing them left and right. They are like soft, little pumpkin cakes with the most delectable icing. Yum! And they are one of the most fun cookies I've baked to date. (I didn't have the #806 tip so I cut a larger hole in one of my pastry bags and just piped it through that hole.)

Pumpkin Cookies with Brown Butter Icing

(From Martha Stewart Holiday Cookies magazine 2005, page 86)

Makes about 6 dozen

Cookies:

2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/4 teaspoons coarse salt
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 1/4 teaspoons ground ginger
3/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
2 1/4 cups packed light brown sugar
2 large eggs
1 1/2 cups canned solid pack pumpkin (14 ounces)
3/4 cup evaporated milk
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Icing:

4 cups confectioners' sugar, sifted
10 tablespoons (1 1/4 sticks) unsalted butter
1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon evaporated milk, plus more if needed
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

Make cookies: Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg in a medium bowl; set aside.

Put butter and brown sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed until pale and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Mix in eggs. Reduce speed to low. Add pumpkin, evaporated milk and vanilla; mix until well-blended, about 2 minutes. Add flour mixture; mix until combined.

Transfer 1 1/2 cups batter to a pastry bag fitted with a 1/2-inch plain tip (such as Ateco No. 806). Pipe 1 1/2-inch rounds onto parchment-lined baking sheets, spacing 1 inch apart. Bake cookies, rotating sheets halfway through, until tops spring back, about 12 minutes. Cool on sheets on wire racks 5 minutes. Transfer cookies to wire racks; let cool completely.

Make icing: Put confectioners' sugar in a large bowl; set aside. Melt butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Cook, swirling pan occasionally, until golden brown, about 3 minutes. Immediately add butter to confectioners' sugar, scraping any browned bits from sides and bottom of pan. Add evaporated milk and vanilla; stir until smooth. Spread about 1 teaspoon icing onto each cookie. If icing stiffens, stir in more evaporated milk, a little at a time. Cookies can be stored in single layers in airtight containers at room temperature up to 3 days.

Here is a link that might be useful: Pumpkin Cookies with Brown Butter Icing

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clipped on: 09.24.2006 at 08:31 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2006 at 08:31 pm

RE: Soups, stews and crock pot dishes (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: doucanoe on 09.15.2006 at 01:45 pm in Cooking Forum

This one is really good.

Crockpot Beef Stroganoff

1-1/2 lb stew meat cut into cubes
1T cooking oil
1 lb fresh mushrooms, sliced
1/4c minced onion
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1/8 tsp dried thyme, crushed
1 bay leaf
1-1/2c beef broth
1/3c dry red wine
1 c sour cream
1/2c flour
1/4c water
4c hot cooked noodles or rice

In large skillet brown the beef in hot oil, drain. In crockpot combine
beef, mushrooms, onions, garlic, oregano, salt, pepperthyme and bay leaf.
Pour in broth and wine. Cover and cook on low 8-10 hours or on high 4-5
hours.
Discard bay leaf, and turn crockpot to high heat. Mix together sour cream,
flour and water. Stir about 1 cup of the hot liquid into the sour cream
mixture, return all to crockpot and stir to combine. Cover and cook on high
heat for 30 minutes or until thickened and bubbly. Serve over noodles or
rice. Serves 6

Linda

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clipped on: 09.18.2006 at 10:04 am    last updated on: 09.18.2006 at 10:04 am

Container soils and water in containers (cont.)

posted by: jdwhitaker on 03.25.2006 at 09:39 pm in Container Gardening Forum

Al's original post has reached the maximum of 150 replies, and I think this discussion should continue. I'll start the new thread with a reprint of Al's (tapla's) treatise on container soils and water, and end with a link to the original thread...


CONTAINER SOILS AND WATER IN CONTAINERS
Posted by tapla z5b-6a MI (My Page) on Sat, Mar 19, 05 at 15:57

The following is very long & will be too boring for some to wade through. Two years ago, some of my posts got people curious & they started to e-mail me about soil problems. The "Water Movement" article is an answer I gave in an e-mail. I saved it and adapted it for my bonsai club newsletter & it was subsequently picked up & used by a number of other clubs. I now give talks on container soils and the physics of water movement in containers to area clubs.
I think, as container gardeners, our first priority is to insure aeration for the life of the soil. Since aeration and drainage are inversely linked to soil particle size, it makes good sense to try to find a soil component with particles larger than peat and that will retain its structure for extended periods. Pine bark fits the bill nicely.

The following hits pretty hard against the futility of using a drainage layer in an attempt to improve drainage. It just doesn't work. All it does is reduce the soil available for root colonization. A wick will remove the saturated layer of soil. It works in reverse of the self-watering pots widely being discussed on this forum now. I have no experience with these growing containers, but understand the principle well.

There are potential problems with wick watering that can be alleviated with certain steps. Watch for yellowing leaves with these pots. If they begin to occur, you need to flush the soil well. It is the first sign of chloride damage.

One of the reasons I posted this is because of the number of soil questions I'm getting in my mail. It will be a convenient source for me to link to. I will soon be in the middle of repotting season & my time here will be reduced, unfortunately, for me. I really enjoy all the friends I've made on these forums. ;o)

Since there are many questions about soils appropriate for containers, I'll post by basic mix in case any would like to try it. It will follow the Water Movement info.

Water Movement in Soils

Consider this if you will:

Soil need fill only a few needs in plant culture. Anchorage - A place for roots to extend, securing the plant and preventing it from toppling. Nutrient Sink - It must retain sufficient nutrients to sustain plant systems. Gas Exchange - It must be sufficiently porous to allow air to the root system. And finally, Water - It must retain water enough in liquid and/or vapor form to sustain plants between waterings. Most plants could be grown without soil as long as we can provide air, nutrients, and water, (witness hydroponics). Here, I will concentrate primarily on the movement of water in soil(s).

There are two forces that cause water movement through soil - one is gravity, the other capillary action. Gravity needs little explanation, but for this writing I would like to note: Gravitational flow potential (GFP) is greater for water at the top of the pot than it is for water at the bottom of the pot. I'll return to that later. Capillarity is a function of the natural forces of adhesion and cohesion. Adhesion is water's tendency to stick to solid objects like soil particles and the sides of the pot. Cohesion is the tendency for water to stick to itself. Cohesion is why we often find water in droplet form - because cohesion is at times stronger than adhesion, waters bond to itself can be stronger than the bond to the object it might be in contact with; in this condition it forms a drop. Capillary action is in evidence when we dip a paper towel in water. The water will soak into the towel and rise several inches above the surface of the water. It will not drain back into the source. It will stop rising when the GFP equals the capillary attraction of the fibers in the paper.

There is, in every pot, what is called a "perched water table" (PWT). This is water that occupies a layer of soil that is always saturated & will not drain at the bottom of the pot. It can evaporate or be used by the plant, but physical forces will not allow it to drain. It is there because the capillary pull of the soil at some point will equal the GFP; therefore, the water does not drain, it is "perched". If we fill five cylinders of varying heights and diameters with the same soil mix and provide each cylinder with a drainage hole, the PWT will be exactly the same height in each container. This is the area of the pot where roots seldom penetrate & where root problems begin due to a lack of aeration. From this we can draw the conclusion that: Tall growing containers are a superior choice over squat containers when using the same soil mix. The reason: The level of the PWT will be the same in each container, with the taller container providing more usable, air holding soil above the PWT. Physiology dictates that plants must be able to take in air at the roots in order to complete transpiration and photosynthesis.

A given volume of large soil particles have less overall surface area in comparison to the same volume of small particles and therefore less overall adhesive attraction to water. So, in soils with large particles, GFP more readily overcomes capillary attraction. They drain better. We all know this, but the reason, often unclear, is that the PWT is lower in coarse soils than in fine soils. The key to good drainage is size and uniformity of soil particles. Large particles mixed with small particles will not improve drainage because the smaller particles fit between the large, increasing surface area which increases the capillary attraction and thus the water holding potential. Water and air cannot occupy the same space at the same time. Contrary to what some hold to be true, sand does not improve drainage. Pumice (aka lava rock), or one of the hi-fired clay products like Turface are good additives which help promote drainage and porosity because of their irregular shape.

Now to the main point: When we use a coarse drainage layer under our soil, it does not improve drainage. It does conserve on the volume of soil required to fill a pot and it makes the pot lighter. When we employ this exercise in an attempt to improve drainage, what we are actually doing is moving the level of the PWT higher in the pot. This reduces available soil for roots to colonize, reduces total usable pot space, and limits potential for beneficial gas exchange. Containers with uniform soil particle size from top of container to bottom will yield better drainage and have a lower PWT than containers with drainage layers. The coarser the drainage layer, the more detrimental to drainage it is because water is more (for lack of a better scientific word) reluctant to make the downward transition because the capillary pull of the soil above the drainage layer is stronger than the GFP. The reason for this is there is far more surface area in the soil for water to be attracted to than there is in the drainage layer.

I know this goes against what most have thought to be true, but the principle is scientifically sound, and experiments have shown it as so. Many nurserymen are now employing the pot-in-pot or the pot-in-trench method of growing to capitalize on the science.

If you discover you need to increase drainage, insert a wick into the pot & allow it to extend from the PWT to several inches below the bottom of the pot. This will successfully eliminate the PWT & give your plants much more soil to grow in as well as allow more, much needed air to the roots.

Uniform size particles of fir, hemlock or pine bark are excellent as the primary component of your soils. The lignin contained in bark keeps it rigid and the rigidity provides air-holding pockets in the root zone far longer than peat or compost mixes that rapidly break down to a soup-like consistency. Bark also contains suberin, a lipid sometimes referred to as natures preservative. Suberin is what slows the decomposition of bark-based soils. It contains highly varied hydrocarbon chains and the microorganisms that turn peat to soup have great difficulty cleaving these chains.

In simple terms: Plants that expire because of drainage problems either die of thirst because the roots have rotted and can no longer take up water, or they starve to death because they cannot obtain sufficient air at the root zone for the respiratory or photosynthetic processes.

To confirm the existence of the PWT and the effectiveness of using a wick to remove it, try this experiment: Fill a soft drink cup nearly full of garden soil. Add enough water to fill to the top, being sure all soil is saturated. Punch a drain hole in the bottom of the cup & allow to drain. When the drainage stops, insert a wick several inches up into the drain hole . Take note of how much additional water drains. This is water that occupied the PWT before being drained by the wick. A greatly simplified explanation of what occurs is: The wick "fools" the water into thinking the pot is deeper, so water begins to move downward seeking the "new" bottom of the pot, pulling the rest of the PWT along with it.

Having applied these principles in the culture of my containerized plants, both indoors and out, for many years, the methodology I have adopted has shown to be effective and of great benefit to them. I use many amendments when building my soils, but the basic building process starts with screened bark and perlite. Peat usually plays a very minor role in my container soils because it breaks down rapidly and when it does, it impedes drainage.

My Soil

I'll give two recipes. I usually make big batches.

3 parts pine bark fines
1 part sphagnum peat (not reed or sedge peat)
1-2 parts perlite
garden lime
controlled release fertilizer
micro-nutrient powder (substitute: small amount of good, composted manure

Big batch:

3 cu ft pine bark fines (1 big bag)
5 gallons peat
5 gallons perlite
1 cup lime (you can add more to small portion if needed)
2 cups CRF
1/2 cup micro-nutrient powder or 1 gal composted manure

Small batch:

3 gallons pine bark
1/2 gallon peat
1/2 gallon perlite
handful lime (careful)
1/4 cup CRF
1 tsp micro-nutrient powder or a dash of manure ;o)

I have seen advice that some highly organic soils are productive for up to 5 years. I disagree. Even if you were to substitute fir bark for pine bark in this recipe (and this recipe will far outlast any peat based soil) you should only expect a maximum of three years life before a repot is in order. Usually perennials, including trees (they're perennials too, you know ;o)) should be repotted more frequently to insure vigor closer to genetic potential. If a soil is desired that will retain structure for long periods, we need to look to inorganic amendments. Some examples are crushed granite, pea stone, coarse sand (no smaller than BB size in containers, please), Haydite, lava rock, Turface or Schultz soil conditioner.

I hope this starts a good exchange of ideas & opinions so we all can learn.

Al

Here is a link that might be useful: Container soil discussion 1

NOTES:

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clipped on: 09.12.2006 at 11:32 am    last updated on: 09.12.2006 at 11:32 am