Clippings by amare_al_giardino

 Sort by: Last Updated Post Date Post Title Forum Name 

Tips and Tricks-Milk Jugs

posted by: monte on 01.29.2007 at 11:08 am in Winter Sowing Forum

Milk jugs. Very popular, very useful containers.

From what I've read here some folks have found them to be difficult to keep closed when a door is cut into the side. Tape can come loose, clothespins can pop off and so on.

I also have found it to be cumbersome to evenly sow the seed thru a side opening but that may just be me. What I did find is that by adding a couple of small slits just above the cut line you can use paper clips to secure the door fairly well. If flaps work for you this may be something you can use.

Securing The Door Flaps

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Close Up

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

I prefer to open the entire top leaving a small hinge under the handle. This method allows full access. If you are looking for more precision you can use a template to make egg crate dividers that neatly divide the container into individual cells.

The arrangement I prefer is nine cells. In practice it is actually 8 since the one under the handle has somewhat limited head room. Large index cards work well here. I mark out a few with the template and place a marked one on top of a few unmarked ones and cut them as a group. It takes just a few minutes to cut up an entire pack.

9 Cell Flip Top Jugs

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

9 Cell Template Components

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Template Close Up

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Hole Punched Corner

At first i was using the paper clip trick to keep the halves closed. This worked but if you wanted to lift the jug it would come free. This meant I would have to keep the jugs in crates or something else if I wanted to move them for watering or whatever. Lots or jugs means lots of crates and my place is crowded enough without needing to store stacks of milk crates.

Then I came up with the idea of using the hole punch to make a pair of holes at each of the corners.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Then I can use a bit of wire to secure the lid. I found that floral wire was perfect for this. Easily cut and very soft so it is easy to twist. Once secured with the wire you can move the jugs individually eliminating the need for a secondary holder.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

As an aside to making the cell dividers for the milk jugs I found that the same dividers would fit into an ice cream container. again I used the hole punch to ventilate the sides and cut out the lid using some 6 mil poly for a top.

9 Cell Ice Cream Containers

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 06.22.2007 at 12:48 pm    last updated on: 06.22.2007 at 12:48 pm

RE: Winter Sowing Annuals in Zone 5 (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: webkat5 on 01.25.2007 at 12:58 am in Winter Sowing Forum

I will be sowing in three rounds this year:

The first round (tomorrow) will be hardy perennials which require cold stratification (many that don't need it, too)

The second round will be in mid-third week of February which will be those perennials that don't require and extended period of cold strat, and some annuals that do need a short period...

The third round will be annuals and leftover perennials that don't benefit in the least from a cold strat period. I will put these out in mid-late March.

If you have annuals that would generally reseed themselves from one year to the next, you are safe to sow them now.

But if you want to break it up a bit....

Hope that helps!

NOTES:

guidelines for when to sow what...
clipped on: 06.21.2007 at 10:15 am    last updated on: 06.21.2007 at 10:16 am

RE: A question for Steven on building a berm. (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: steveningen on 06.12.2007 at 04:47 pm in Cottage Garden Forum

Hi Stephanie! I meant to respond last night, but by the time I started, I was so wiped out I scrapped it and went on to bed. After looking at your pix over in the Gallery, your plans for building a berm are excellent and well-thought out. Since ours was such a relatively small berm, it's a little difficult to compare the two projects. Yes, we used all the soil that we dug for the paths (about 5" in depth). To that, we added about 12 cubic feet of amendments. But keep in mind, our soil is rather heavy clay and requires lots of amending.

I first tilled the berm area with my Mantis to the depth of about 10". Then we started digging the paths and dumping the soil over that. As the berm got taller, I would go back with the mantis and periodically till in more compost and composted manure until we got it to the heigth and shape we wanted. Once the berm was the size we wanted, we both just sort of walked all over it to compact it a bit. Not much, just enough to keep it in place. We gave it a couple of days to settle, watering twice daily. I then planted it up and Brian followed with the irrigation system. You may not need water delivery at all since you get summer rain. That's really all there was to it. We still need to go back and add the finished paths. At that time, I'll put in some sort of edging to keep the berm from washing onto the paths during the winter rains.

I can't wait to see your project completed. I think it's going to be fantastic!

Steven

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 06.12.2007 at 05:22 pm    last updated on: 06.12.2007 at 05:22 pm

Updating Want Lists

posted by: bakemom on 06.09.2007 at 09:45 pm in Winter Sowing Forum

I notice that many of us are noting that some plants are now on a want list. How about putting them on your member page. Around Christmas, folks start want list posts that are a lot of fun. In the meantime, there's a lot of fun stuff on the exchanges.

Are YOU making your want list? Are you putting it on your want list? Are you posting on the exchange? Chances are, someone has your seeds and would love to trade, or send them.

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 06.12.2007 at 10:32 am    last updated on: 06.12.2007 at 10:33 am

Building a berm

posted by: steveningen on 05.06.2007 at 02:20 am in Cottage Garden Forum

After months of planning this particular area, we spent the day digging out the paths for the front garden. The dirt was scooped out and put into the center to form a berm. It was then amended like crazy and compacted just enough to hold it in place. There is much tweeking still to do, but it has begun to take shape. The most important guest in the new bed has been planted, my Fairy rose. It sits at the top of the berm. Don't judge the bed by these pix because we are not finished, but here goes:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Tomorrow brings a trip to Annie's to buy grapeseed mulch and heaven's know what else. Today brought a bit of closure and was so satisfying. Things are coming together. I'm tired in that good way that only gardening can do.

Steven

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 06.11.2007 at 09:26 am    last updated on: 06.11.2007 at 09:27 am

How my garden fared

posted by: steveningen on 06.06.2007 at 01:26 am in Cottage Garden Forum

A few of you asked how my garden made out while we were in Costa Rica. I couldn't believe how much it had grown in just ten days. At the risk of appearing totally narcissistic, here's a few shots:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Much as I loved the jungle, this was nice to come home to.

Steven

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 06.11.2007 at 09:23 am    last updated on: 06.11.2007 at 09:23 am

How we made our garden (a whole bunch of pix)

posted by: steveningen on 04.24.2007 at 12:25 am in Cottage Garden Forum

I've been asked recently by a couple of folks to post some shots of how this place looked when me moved in and what we've done along the way. For anyone who is frustrated by creating a garden from scratch, it can be done. Here's proof. It's so worth the journey!

The back, um, garden. April 2004:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

And so we begin. May 2004:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Here's the front, which will be finished this spring. It was mulched with a two inch layer of glass (to keep the cats out!) when we bought the place. As if the concrete wasn't enough of a deterrent. Brian reminded me that we don't have a picture of that because we hired someone to remove most of it before I could get my camera to record it for posterity.:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

We clearly have much more to do. But it's getting there. Of course I could live here another twenty years and continue tweeking my little garden. It's been a labor of love.

Steven

NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 06.11.2007 at 09:19 am    last updated on: 06.11.2007 at 09:22 am