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RE: oh my...what to do when you have extra dough... (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: trailrunner on 03.19.2014 at 09:13 pm in Cooking Forum

I usually use a bechamel sauce 2 Tbsp flour/2 Tbsp butter and 2c milk and make it with sauteed 1/2 c onion and 2 Tbsp minced garlic in it and throw in 1/2 c grated parmesan at the end..makes it richer and more flavorful. I also do spinach when I do the bechamel. I take a 10oz bag of fresh spinach and put it on the large cutting board. I then coarsely chop it, not too much but so it is not whole leaves. I put a small amount of EVOO in a large skillet and saute some onion and then add the spinach in handsful and toss it salt and pepper lightly ...as it wilts I add more till it is all wilted. I let it all get "dark green soft " and then immediately put it in a strainer and let the juice drain off. I press it some too to get it good and dry. If my bechamel is too thick I use some of this juice to thin it !!

I use my homemade ricotta but 8 oz store bought is good too. Add an egg and salt and pepper to it and nutmeg. Fresh mozzarella and grated parm.

Layers:

thin layer bechamel in bottom of 8x11 or 9x9 greased glass pan ( above amounts are enough for this size pan)

noodles then spread small amount of bechamel, spoon spinach in dashes over this and splashes of ricotta .Sprinkle light parmasan . Repeat till all gone. Takes a lot less filling than usual . Place thin slices of mozz on top. Cover and bake. You won't believe how good this is and even people who don't like spinach will love it as it blends in and really 10oz cooked isn't much.

You can omit the ricotta completely with the bechamel if you want...lots of folks do. We love it though and makes it very creamy

If you want a red meat sauce then use very little between layers just a thin thin spread on the noodles and top with the splashes of ricotta and parm and top with the mozz. Good Luck and you MUST post pics. c

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clipped on: 03.20.2014 at 08:52 am    last updated on: 03.20.2014 at 08:52 am

Glazed Doughnut Muffins

posted by: Linderhof1208 on 04.20.2013 at 10:16 pm in Cooking Forum

And I decided to make two varieties -- this one has a glaze!

1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
2 large eggs
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon cinnamon
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup milk

For the Glaze:
3 tablespoons butter; melted
1 cup confectioners’ sugar; sifted
3/4 teaspoon vanilla
2 tablespoons hot water

Directions:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Line 12 muffin cups with muffin liners or spray with nonstick cooking spray.
In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat together butter, vegetable oil, and sugars till smooth. Beat in eggs, one at a time. With the mixer on low speed, baking powder, baking soda, nutmeg, cinnamon, salt and vanilla until just combined. Stir the flour into the butter mixture alternately with the milk, beginning and ending with the flour and mixing until just combined. Do not overmix!
Spoon batter into cups, filling the cups, and smooth tops. Divide batter equally among prepared muffin cups. Bake until muffin tops are a pale golden and springy to the touch, 15 to 17 minutes, rotating halfway through baking time. Cool muffins in muffin tin for 5 minutes, then transfer to wire rack and cool 10 minutes before glazing.
To make the glaze, In a medium bowl mix together the melted butter, confectioners’ sugar, vanilla and water. Whisk until smooth.
When muffins have cooled slightly, dip the muffin crown into the glaze and allow the glaze to harden. Once hardened, dip a second time and allow to harden then serve.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.31.2014 at 02:54 pm    last updated on: 01.31.2014 at 02:54 pm

RE: Bread Dough - Five Day Fermentation ....Pics (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: ann_t on 05.08.2013 at 10:10 am in Cooking Forum

Sandra, I started out using Julia Child's recipe for French Baguettes, and over the years I've made adjustments.
Adding a biga, using less yeast but more water. etc.. I've noted my changes in the recipe below..

Bread is one of those things that doesn't need to be over thought. Just flour, yeast, salt and water will net a great loaf of bread.

Years ago, (20) I used a bread machine to knead wet doughs. I would put six cups of bread in a bread machine that could bake a 2 1/2 cup loaf, and put it through two and three kneading cycles, before finishing the kneading by hand. You have to be careful though, some bread machines have a heating cycle during kneading. Mine didn't . So it was just a matter of resetting to kneading. Obviously, I couldn't have baked a six cup loaf of bread in that machine, but it easily handled the kneading of six cups of flour.

You can also adapt this loaf, making it a cheese and garlic, or adding olives, or adding nuts, walnuts or cranberries and pistachios. (great with cheese).

French Baguette

Julia Child

1 package dry active yeast (2 1/2 teaspoons)
3 1/2 cups unbleached flour (bread flour)
2 1/4 tsp salt
1 1/3 cups cold water plus 1/3 or so additional water

Using Food Processor

Place the flour, yeast and salt in the bowl of the food process. Pulse to mix. Add 1 1/3 cups of water and process until the dough comes together. If the dough doesn't form a ball, add a little of the extra water. Process for about 60 seconds, turn off machine and let dough rest for 5 minutes.

Turn on the machine again and rotate the dough about 30 times under the cover, and then remove it to a lightly floured work surface. it should be fairly smooth and quite firm.

Let the dough rest for 2 minutes and then knead roughly and vigorously. The final dough should not stick to your hands as you knead (although it will stick if you pinch and hold a piece); it should be smooth and elastic and, when you hold it up between your hands and stretch it down, it should hold together smoothly.

Preliminary rise - 40 to 60 minutes at around 75°F. Place the dough into a clean dry bowl, (do not grease the bowl), cover with plastic wrap, and set in a warm place free from drafts. (note the French do not grease the bowl because they believe the dough needs a seat to push up from). This first rise is sufficient when the dough has definitely started to rise and is about 1 1/2 times its original volume.

Deflating:

Turn the dough onto your lightly floured work surface roughly and firmly pat and push it out into a 14 inch rectangle. Fold one of the long sides over toward the middle, and the other long side over to cover it, making a 3 layer cushion. Repeat the operation. This important step redistributes the yeast throughout the dough, for a strong second rise. Return the dough smooth side up the bowl; cover with plastic wrap and again set to rise.

Final rise in the bowl - about 1 to 1 1/2 hours or longer. The bread should be 2 1/2 to 3 times its original bulk. It is the amount of rise that is important here, not the timing.

To Shape,

Cut the dough in half. Set one piece aside and cover with a towel.

On a lightly floured work surface pat the dough into a 14 inch rectangle, squaring it u p as evenly as you can.

Fold the rectangle of dough in half lengthwise and using the heel of your hand, firmly press the edges together whether they meet. Seat well. Pound the dough flat. Now repeat - patting the dough out again and folding it over and sealing the edges. Pinch the edges well and Rotate the dough so that the sealed edge in on the bottom.

Repeat with second piece of dough.

Cover with plastic wrap or loosely with a towel and let rise to more than double again at about 75°f.

Place stone in oven and Preheat oven to 450°F. Slash three long cuts into the loaves and place on the hot stone. Spray loaves with water and immediately toss a number of ice cubes on to the bottom on the oven to create steam. Spray again two or three times, 3 minutes a part. Bake until bread is golden and has an interior temp of 200°F. Takes about 30 minutes.

Making Dough in a Mixer or by Hand

When you are making dough in an electric mixer with a dough hook, proceed in the same general way with the rests indicated, and finish by hand. or mix the dough by hand in a bowl, turn out on a work surface, and start the kneading by lifting it up with a scraper and slapping it down roughly for several minutes until it has body. Let it rest several minutes and then proceed to knead.

MY NOTES:
I use a Magic Mill to do most of the kneading. The Magic Mill can handle over 20 cups of flour at one time.

I use 4 cups for a single batch and 8 cups for a double batch Plus the addition of a Biga. I prefer a wet dough so I add more water.

I usually start this bread with a Biga (Italian)/Poolish (French) a pre-fermentation. Made the night before. Contributes to a more complex flavour and a better texture.

1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon yeast
1 cup of water.

Mix well. Cover and set aside.

Other changes: I mix the Biga, Flour, Yeast and water together,without the salt, and let sit for 20 to 30 minutes to allow the flour to absorb some of the water. I add the salt after this rest, and then finish by kneading.

This dough makes for a wonderful pizza crust. Place dough in fridge and leave it for two to four, even five days. Take it out early (three hours) to give it time to come to room temperature. Allowing the dough to have a long cold fermentation really develops the flavour and the texture of the bread.

EDITED NOVEMBER 2012: I now reduce the amount of yeast called for in the original recipe. When doubling the amount of flour to eight cups of flour and 1 1/2 cups of biga, I use just three teaspoons of yeast.

OPTIONAL: Add Cranberries and Pistachios

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.31.2014 at 11:25 am    last updated on: 01.31.2014 at 11:25 am

RE: Cream Cheese Danish (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: momj47 on 07.19.2013 at 01:21 pm in Cooking Forum

I think it downloads the recipe as a PDF file.

Cream Cheese Danish Coffee Cake
**************************
Ann_T

Dough
1 cup sour cream
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter
1 t. salt
½ cup milk
2 packages instant (bread machine) yeast (4 1/2 t.)
(1 Tbs vital wheat gluten - optional, I like the softness it gives yeast dough)
2 eggs beaten
4 cups all purpose flour

Over low heat in a small saucepan, heat butter, sour cream, sugar, milk and salt until warm and sugar is dissolved. Cool to room temperature.

In large mixing bowl, add flour, vital wheat gluten and yeast.
Mix sour cream mixture with beaten eggs and add to flour. Mix until cohesive dough forms. Will be very soft dough. Cover and put in fridge overnight to rise. (May be done same day. Put in fridge for about 2 to 4 hours, and then proceed.)

Turn dough out onto a well-floured surface and knead 6 or 7 times.
Divide dough into 4 equal pieces and roll each piece out to 12 X 8 inches (the size of the paper the recipe is printed on).

Filling
2 - 8 oz. packages cream cheese (softened)
3/4 cup sugar
1 egg beaten
1 t. vanilla extract
1/8 t. salt
Beat together cream cheese with sugar; add egg and vanilla extract and salt.

Spread 1/4 of filling on to each piece and roll jellyroll style from long side.
Pinch seams and ends to seal.
Place seam side down on parchment paper on a baking sheet and cut about 4 - 6 slashes in top (a single edge razor blade works well)
Danish should be slightly flattened, and about 3 1/2 to 4 inches wide and about 12 inches long.

Cover and let rise until about double in size -approximately 1 hour Bake at 375 for 20 - 25 minutes or until golden. Let cool on wire racks. Cover with foil if the tops start to get too dark.

Glaze
2 1/2 c confectioners sugar
1/4 c milk
1 t. vanilla extract
(toasted sliced almonds)
Combine the first 3 ingredients for glaze. I let the loaves cool some and put the glaze in a baggie with a tiny hole in the corner and drizzled it on.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.30.2014 at 03:22 pm    last updated on: 01.30.2014 at 03:22 pm

RE: Lou's pizza dough recipe (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: shambo on 12.15.2013 at 06:55 pm in Cooking Forum

Here is the recipe I've got for Lou's pizza dough. I used to mix it up in my food processor. Since I got my bread machine, I've been using that.

Pizza Crust
Lou from CF

Makes Three Pizza Crusts

1 cup of warm water
1 Package of rapid rise yeast
2 tsp. sugar
1/4 cup olive oil
1/2 tsp. salt
3 1/2 cups flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.29.2014 at 11:13 pm    last updated on: 01.29.2014 at 11:13 pm

RE: Did you know... (Follow-Up #24)

posted by: chiefy76 on 01.29.2014 at 09:41 am in Kitchens Forum

Just to give yet another alternative (yes, unfortunately that requires a little bit of work)

Reese’s Peanut Butter Cookie Dough Dip

Yield: serves 10-12

A decadent dip filled with chocolate chips and Reese's PB cups.

Ingredients

1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/4 cup creamy peanut butter
8 oz cream cheese, softened
3/4 cup powdered sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup semi sweet mini chocolate chips
8oz pkg Reese's peanut butter cup Minis (or about 1 1/2 cup chopped Reeses cups)

Instructions

In a small saucepan over medium heat, melt butter. Whisk in the sugar and heat until sugar dissolves (about one minute). Remove from heat immediately add vanilla and allow to cool to room temperature (very important).
In a large mixing bowl, beat cream cheese with powdered sugar and peanut butter until creamy (about 3-4 minutes, don't skimp on the beating time). On low, add in brown sugar mixture (that has cooled to room temperature). Mix until combined. Fold in mini chocolate chips and mini Reese's cups. Serve immediately or store in refrigerator until ready to serve. Enjoy with pretzels, animal cracker and graham sticks.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.29.2014 at 04:00 pm    last updated on: 01.29.2014 at 04:00 pm

RE: Did you know... (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: williamsem on 01.28.2014 at 11:43 pm in Kitchens Forum

Because I like you guys so much, here's a safer and not at all more addicting alternative. No baking needed.

They are called Oreo truffles.
1) Buy a family size pack of Oreos (I think it's about 48 cookies)
2) put 36 in a ziplock baggie and crush
3) put 6 in a small Baggie and crush for topping
4) eat remaining few cookies, not worth saving
5) mix with 8 oz cream cheese and roll into 1 in balls
6) coat in melted chocolate chips, sprinkle with crumbs

They are not hard to make, and they are completely safe to eat without cooking. I made some last week and intended to share with my friend Matt, but I got delayed and they didn't make it to his appartment. Good thing I didn't promise him any ahead of time...

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clipped on: 01.29.2014 at 03:59 pm    last updated on: 01.29.2014 at 03:59 pm

RE: The idiot is back with a pizza question. (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: ann_t on 01.10.2014 at 07:04 pm in Cooking Forum

You might try the method I used to make pizza last night.
In the past I've always baked my pizzas on a stone. The stone was on the bottom rack. Oven set to 550°F. But yesterday I tried a new method.

The stone is placed near the top of the oven, eight inches from the broiler. The stone is preheated for at least an hour and just before the pizza goes into the oven, the broiler is turned on for five minutes to boost the temperature of the stone. Then the oven is reset to 550°F and the pizza slid on to stone and baked for five minutes. Then the oven is set to broil and the pizza continues to bake under the broiler for two minutes.

This pizza is just like the pizza from my favourite pizzeria. Only thing missing is the flavour that a wood oven imparts.

Here is a link that might be useful: Link

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clipped on: 01.24.2014 at 05:01 pm    last updated on: 01.24.2014 at 05:01 pm

RE: 7'x11' bath with LARGE floor tile (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: Babka on 08.21.2013 at 11:43 pm in Bathrooms Forum

Still needs something over the toilet. The last photo is my view from the inside of the shower. I really like that bamboo glass, for privacy and no squeegee-ing. The shower curb is just 3" off the floor on the outside and less than 2" where you step in, which makes it very easy for getting in and out.

-Babka

 photo IMG_3476_zpsaa284fad.jpg

 photo IMG_3411_zps872608c9.jpg
 photo IMG_3403_zpsea4b7150.jpg

 photo IMG_3387_zpscd59d8ed.jpg
 photo IMG_3424_zps749b3853.jpg
 photo IMG_3426_zps284c80fa.jpg
 photo IMG_3420_zps82c2d366.jpg
 photo IMG_3427_zps7a07d999.jpg

NOTES:

Note shower design
clipped on: 08.26.2013 at 12:41 pm    last updated on: 08.28.2013 at 03:18 pm

RE: Foolproof DIY chalk paint recipe (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: Miz_M on 07.28.2013 at 05:47 pm in Home Decorating & Design Forum

I have done all our pieces this way:

2 cups paint
5 tbsp PoP
2tbsp water

Dissolve PoP in water, mix into paint.

This is no fail for me, wonderful consistency, not gritty or chalky at all. Sometimes I add just a bit more of PoP. You never want too much water, it will thin it too much, and scratch easier when project is dry.

Re: paint brands ... I've used several. Valspar, Olympic, Glidden, Sherwin Williams, Behr, Kelly Moore, Eddie Bauer, and I can't think of the rest. I've not noticed any difference between the brands whatsoever.

Can't wait to see your finished piece!

NOTES:

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clipped on: 08.10.2013 at 02:16 pm    last updated on: 08.10.2013 at 02:16 pm

Bold Tile, Sunlight Filled Kitchen

posted by: oldbat2be on 12.27.2012 at 11:53 pm in Kitchens Forum

There are two versions of this reveal; this is the better one but it's loaded with pictures. Here's a link to the photoshop version, if that's easier for you:

http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/kitchbath/msg0307394514459.html?26

Many of you have seen progress pictures along the way and given us so much valuable feedback and advice. With the forum's help, we have an incredibly functional kitchen in which it is great fun to cook and entertain.

Our home was built in the mid 60's and the kitchen used to be on the back side of the house, facing north west (never any sun). Our architect suggested relocating the kitchen to the front of the house, and came up with a very functional new plan, which included moving interior walls and adding a skylight dormer, mud room and pantry. We found a builder to perform the demolition and manage the construction. We built a temporary kitchen in our family room, moved the fridge in there with our camping gas burners on a card table, and started the long process of renovating. In the midst of this exciting and frustrating roller-coaster ride, my mom passed away. She was an amazing cook and would have loved watching the progress and seeing how everything turned out. This reveal is dedicated to her.

Cabinetry quotes for all the new areas (kitchen, island, desk area, bookshelves, pantry, mudroom) ranged from $35,000 to $75,000, uninstalled. Long story short: in order to economize, we went with an online Conestoga reseller (Brian Long/theCabinetJoint), who sold a ready to assemble/RTA cabinet, for around $23,000. This included many custom pieces; 18" deep uppers, custom width upper cabinets, 2 custom depth floor to ceiling bookshelves, and custom drawer widths and heights. While we've been very pleased with the quality and functionality, I wonder what the final effect would have been with different cabinets and/or a different cabinet style. DH and I assembled the cabinets ourselves and our builder's crew hung them. DH installed all the appliances (several, multiple times), built a steel bar support system for the island, and did so very much electrical, plumbing and carpentry work. He is one in a million.

As you look at these pictures, I would welcome finishing suggestions. What did we, as DIY-ers, miss or mangle? What stands out as unfinished to your eye and what could I add to a punchlist for a finish carpenter or DH and me? I won't be offended, but to be totally honest, I am not posting any of the bad pictures :)

When it came time to pick a backsplash, I found I had too much white and disliked how the upper run of cabinets looked. With a ton of help from the forum, I picked a bold tile which draws the eye away from the cabinets. (Special thanks to Hollysprings for reminding me that I liked a lot of contrast in my inspiration pictures and to onedogedie, for introducing me to kj patterson).

Before
The kitchen was small and my countertops were always crowded. Still, I feel the need to acknowledge how many wonderful meals came out of that space.

We bumped out the front of the house 5 feet, replacing the foot print of the old covered porch.

We learned we could replace a structural post which would have been out in the middle, with an LBL beam. (Huge thanks to jeff_from_oakville, live_wire_oak, remodelfla, sjmitch, karen_belle and bmorepanic).

Assembling and installing cabinets. There was no magical truck pulling up outside and crews bringing in beautiful, assembled cabinets....

After

Desk area to the right, fireplace to eventually be replaced with gas:

Bookshelves flanking the desk - houseful, you gave me the idea of using 2 of these, to balance the desk area, and I love how this works. Nothing warms a room like books! We also keep the phone and answering machine here.

Birds'-eye view, skylight dormer:

We love our recycling center and the inset composter:

Custom wood hood built by DH. Upper cabinets are 18" deep.

Recycling center on island and shallow cutting board cabinet:

Tiled fire extinguisher niche. This is located behind the ovens; countertops are 30" and ovens were pulled forward by 6".

Upper cabinet knobs:

Baking Area with 30" countertops: (we keep things out on them and still have room to roll out a pie crust or make biscuits).

Top drawer: (note my new XMAS presents, my pink thermapen and my yellow lemon juice squeezer, thanks to zelmar and Breezygirl!)

Middle drawer:

Bottom drawer:

Next drawer stack over to the left, fun storage:

Bottom drawer:

I like the Rev-A-Shelf pull-outs (DH HATED installing these with a passion) but they are flimsy (wobbly) in comparison to my Blum Blu-Motion drawer glides.

In the upper cabinets, DH has built custom spice racks for us:

We were able to find a caulk which matched our grout. We dealt with a local metal working shop to create our stainless steel surround and custom hood liner:

Pantry:
Linen closet at left, eventually washer and dryer at far end. The base cabinet at the end has a single large pullout; this will be for clothes sorting bins.

Filing cabinets and beverage fridge:

Cabinets: Conestoga RTA Cabinets and Doors, Crystal White, Door CRP-10875, Cordovan stain on island.
Counters: Cambria Torquay
Bar stools: Carrington CourtDirect Mitchell 26" bar stools, with COM and custom stain.

Wall paint: BM Aura Vancouver Day

Tile: kj patterson, Fireclay Debris

Cabinet hardware
Upper Hafele Knob Clear/Polished Chrome - HAF-135-75-420
Lower: RH Bistro Pull

Lights:
Varaluz, Nevada (table)
LBL lighting monorail, Lava II
Undercabinet: Philips powercore profile LED strips

Appliances/Fixtures:
Kohler Karbon faucet
KWC Sin Faucet
48" Capital Culinarian
Solon Inset Composter
Sharp 24" MW Drawer
Hood: Prestige insert with remote blower
Franke Peak SS Sink
Silestone Silgranit Sink, Biscuit
TapMaster
Hafele Food Pedals
Miele Futura Dimension

This post was edited by oldbat2be on Wed, Apr 3, 13 at 13:38

NOTES:

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clipped on: 07.20.2013 at 08:26 pm    last updated on: 07.20.2013 at 08:33 pm

RE: Jasdip - your Better Than PAM recipe (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: jasdip on 02.12.2013 at 08:38 am in Cooking Forum

Here you go Sharon. There's talk about it on page 2 on the homemade non-stick shortening thread. I also mentioned how easy it is to use on the bundt pan thread.

Better Than Pam Coating

1/2 cup corn, canola or vegetable oil
1/2 cup shortening, room temperature
1/2 cup flour

Beat all ingredients with an electric mixer until it has increased in volume slightly and resembles marshmallow cream.
Store in a covered container in the cupboard. If it separates upon sitting, just stir before using. You can spread it with a brush, but I just scoop it up with my fingers.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 02.12.2013 at 11:36 am    last updated on: 02.12.2013 at 11:36 am

RE: My 'zinc' counters (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: mtnrdredux on 03.20.2011 at 10:44 pm in Kitchens Forum

Thanks, pollyanna!

I got them at a place called Brooks Custom in Mt Kisco, NY (link below). I didnt go direct, it was thru my GC. In this area of the country we don't find many bargains, and of course my GC earns a mark up, too ... so this may not be representative, but Ive given zinc and pewter pricing below. (not including templating and install)

Note that I only need 12" wide because my uppers sit on the counter --- that reduced my costs. I needed about 17.25 linear feet.

14 Gauge ZINC Countertop $4,811.00
� Matte Finish
� 1 1/2" Thick, Bonded to MDF Core
� L Shape: 12" x 84" x 122 3/4" OAD
� Eased Square Edge
� Joints/Seams as Required
� No Cutouts
� No Backsplash
1 seam
18 Gauge PEWTER Countertop $5,204.00
� Matte Finish
� 1 1/2" Thick, Bonded to MDF Core
� L Shape: 12" x 96" x 110 3/4" OAD
� Eased Square Edge
� Joints/Seams as Required
� No Cutouts
� No Backsplash
2 seams

Here is a link that might be useful: pewter countertop fabricator

NOTES:

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clipped on: 01.06.2013 at 12:15 pm    last updated on: 01.06.2013 at 12:16 pm

Finished Kitchen: Circa 1840 Working Farmhouse, IKEA Budget Reno

posted by: brickmanhouse on 08.19.2010 at 01:46 am in Kitchens Forum

Hi all,

Well, we've finally got a (mostly) finished kitchen! This kitchen's been in the planning stages for 8 years and I've been in and out of this forum for just about that long-- wow, time flies! Whether I've posted or just lurked, the information I've gotten here has been INVALUABLE.

I can unequivocally say that my kitchen would not look anything like what it does without this Forum, and for that I offer my profound gratitude-- there is, quite literally, no way I could have done it without all of you, past and present.

So, here are the photos of the finished result:

From 2010-0818

From 2010-0818

From 2010-0818

From 2010-0818

From 2010-0818

From 2010-0818

From 2010-0818

For the entire album with detailed photos, just click on the link below any of the photos above!

Here are the details:

Cabinetry: IKEA Lidingo White (with glass uppers) for the perimeter, Tidaholm Brown/Black for the island
Island Knobs & Pulls: Anne at Home Farm Collection and Lewis Dolin Glass Cup Pulls (from Myknobs.com)
Perimeter Knobs and Pulls: Anne at Home Horse Collection, generic polished chrome knobs, cup pulls, and bar pulls (from Myknobs.com)
Wall Paint: BM Revere Pewter
Trim, Hood, and Fireplace Paint: Valspar Bright White (from Lowes)
Perimeter Counters: IKEA Butcher Block, stained Black with India Ink and sealed with Waterlox
Island Counter: IKEA Butcher Block, sealed with Watco food safe butcher block sealer
Main Sink: Whitehaus 36" farm sink (from Vintagetub.com)
Island Sink: IKEA single Domsjo, undermounted instead of the usual overmount installation
Faucets: IKEA Hjuvik
Refrigerator: Because we grow a lot of what we eat (so we don't need to store much) and have a large fridge in an adjacent laundry room, we chose a generic small undercounter fridge (Home Depot, off the shelf)
Wine chiller: Sunbeam (Home Depot, off the shelf)
Dishwashers: Kenmore and Hotpoint, both existing and 5-7 years old
Microwaves: 8 year old Kenmores
Island Oven: IKEA Datid 30"
Hood: ProLine 36" range hood (from eBay)
Range: IKEA Praktfull Pro A50
Backsplash Behind Range: Handthrown Williamsburg brick (local brickyard, left over from another project)
Flooring: Lumber Liquidators, Hand Scraped Teak
Island and Sink Pendants: IKEA Ottava
Cabinet lights: IKEA Grundtal single puck lights
Chandelier over the Table: Progress lighting, black 5-light chandelier (Home Depot, off the shelf)
Fireplace: Style Selections 36" Vent Free LP fireplace (Lowes, off the shelf)

A few notes about the remodel, just to hit some discussion points I see come up a lot in this Forum:

Our kitchen lives in a big old 1840 farmhouse, which has been part of a working farm since the day it was built. Originally it was soybeans, but now it's part of a gentleman's farm (horses, heritage gardens and poultry), so everything has to be hard wearing and practical. It needs to stand up to heavy traffic, mud, hay, tools, and the occasional chicken (though usually when they wander in, they don't go much further than the family room, because they like the television). That definitely informed our choices for surfaces-- they needed to be hard cleanable, and ultimately easily refinished or replaced down the line.

Because the entire house already has strong architectural elements (huge moldings and built-ins), we worked within the style we already had-- all the kitchen moldings, mantels, panels and cabinets match (or are closely styled after) what already exists in the house. We definitely didn't do a period kitchen (we wanted a 2010 layout with all the conveniences), but we wanted the kitchen to look like it belonged in the house.

The big thing for us was budget-- believe it or not, the entire kitchen was done for UNDER $20K. Four big things contributed to that:

1/ We DIY'ed the ENTIRE project, start to finish. The only thing we hired out was the gas line install for the fireplace and range, because state law requires it. Other than that, all planning, demo, sourcing, and construction was on us. Might be why it took us 8 years. . .

2/ We reused what we could, and scrounged a lot, especially construction materials (which could have been buckets of money, considering all the custom work we did in the space), and kept what appliances we could. It was also a great way to be environmentally responsible on a project that, let's face it, has a lot of non-necessities involved.

3/ IKEA, IKEA, IKEA. If you're anywhere reasonably close to an IKEA, and you're on anything approaching a budget, go check it out. The cabinet quality for the price can't be beat (except for a few pockets of custom cabinet makers), and there are a lot of great accessories, appliances, lighting and other things to be had for a terrific price. As always, you have to pick and choose your items for quality and value, but at least in our experience, it is definitely there to be had for the buyer with a good eye.

4/ We didn't go for major appliance upgrades. Our whole family LOVES to cook (and eat!), and we wanted a great looking, functional space to do it all in, but we just weren't convinced that we needed more than the basics right now. If we want to upgrade down the line, it's easy enough to do, but right now our Wolf budget is standing in our barn eating hay, and our LaCanche budget is steered towards this Show Hunter prospect I have my eye on . . .

So there's our formula for a great kitchen that works for us considering the (kind of odd!) parameters we had. Hope you all can take at least something useful away from our experience.

I've submitted the kitchen to the FKB, and I'll answer whatever questions you've got. . .

Thanks again, everyone!

NOTES:

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clipped on: 12.18.2012 at 01:49 pm    last updated on: 12.18.2012 at 01:49 pm

RE: frustrated with how the kitchen is turning out and oak bashin (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: francoise47 on 12.07.2011 at 06:56 pm in Kitchens Forum

Oak is making a comeback -- mark my words.

I love my red oak floors -- even though my designer friend told me that "no one does them anymore".

My favorite Minnesota designers/architects, Todd Hansen and Christine Albertsson,
used oak cabinets in their own kitchen (bottom photo)
and in this lovely two-tone kitchen:

Linden Hills Addition traditional kitchen

Photobucket

It is hard for us all to post pictures of our kitchen --
go ahead and give it a try and you will be amazed by the help you recieve.

NOTES:

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clipped on: 12.09.2012 at 10:34 am    last updated on: 12.09.2012 at 10:35 am

RE: Would you do a kitchen with all drawer base cabinets? (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: FiveZs on 04.09.2012 at 08:06 pm in Kitchens Forum

Yes, all drawers. I think it is so much more functional and nicer looking. I have two drawers under my farmers sink and a full pull out under my wetbar sink. I also have corner drawers. The only lower cabinet without a drawer is the mixer lift cabinet.

Photobucket

Photobucket

NOTES:

Cabinet finish, perfect.
Subway with dark grout.
clipped on: 12.07.2012 at 09:45 am    last updated on: 12.07.2012 at 09:46 am

Easy to sew valance directions

posted by: my3dogs on 07.17.2008 at 08:01 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Hi everyone!

Here are the directions for the valances that you saw in the post linked below. They ARE EASY - but the directions are long, because I am trying to give you enough detail, even if you are a beginner. Read them all the way through so you understand them, and ask any questions you may have. If you are a real novice, you may want to make a sample using just muslin, or other inexpensive fabric, til you get the hang of it.

This is a no-pattern valance that I started making last summer. It requires just straight stitching. My windows are generally about 50" (more or less)in height. If your windows are very short or very tall, you may want to vary the length of the fabric you use. I would say to err on the 'buy more' side though, so they don't look skimpy. The fullness adds richness.

I generally use 1 1/4 yards of 54" wide home dec fabric to make the valance. You will need an equal amount of lining fabric. If you choose to put trim on the bottom (it adds a lot to the treatment, IMO) buy 1 1/2 yards of trim to make sure you have enough to go across the length of your 54" wide fabric. If your fabric is wider than 54", buy enough trim to cover its width.

Cut your valance fabric and lining to equal lengths. I always measure the side edges of my fabric and mark the length before cutting. It may have not been cut straight at the store, and you want to be sure that your left side is the same length as your right side.

Pin the two rectangles of fabric together on all sides, with the RIGHT (front) sides of the fabrics inside, facing each other. Before putting the fabrics together, I mark lightly on the back which is the TOP of the print (if using a print) and which is the bottom, so your print will end up right side up!

Depending on the type of rod you plan to use for the valance, you need to leave openings on each side that will become your rod pocket. Continental rods (the flat wide plain ones) need a 4" rod pocket. If you use a decorative rod, with finals on the end that screw off, I would recommend making your rod pocket 2" wide. For a small tension rod, I'd make the rod pocket 1.5" wide. You don't want to force your fabric onto the rod - allow room to make it easy for you.

Measure down from the TOP of your pinned together fabric, and make a light mark with pencil on each side, the size of your chosen rod pocket, plus 1/2". That 1/2" is going to be the width of your top seam. You'll be making a mark on the left and right sides 4 1/2" down from the top if you use a Continental rod, for example. Stitch from these marks down each side to the bottom, using a 1/2" seam.

You'll need to leave an opening in the top or bottom to turn your valance inside out when you're done stitching.

I'd suggest a 4" - 6" opening for turning. If your rod pocket openings are 4", you don't need to leave another opening, you can use them to turn it inside out.

Mark the opening you need to leave, then stitch across the top and bottom edges, using a 1/2" seam, leaving your opening...well...OPEN!

Clip your fabric corners off OUTSIDE of your stitching. This is just a small triangle of fabric from each corner. This will allow you to get nice sharp edges on your corners when your turn the valance right side out, as it reduces the bulk of fabric there.

Turn your valance right side out, pulling it through the opening you left. I use a wooden chop stick to push the fabric gently at the corners to make them nice and square, once I have turned mine right side out. Don't push too hard, or you may poke a hole through your valance! At this point, you should have a lined rectangle of fabric, with rod pocket openings near the top of each side.

Close the opening you left for turning, either by folding and pressing the edges in and hand stitching it closed, or use 'stitch witchery' type of fusing tape to do it. You can also sew it closed with your sewing machine, but you want to do it right at the edge. You want to make this closure as 'invisible' as possible, so I always use fusible tape.

Carefully iron your valance. Use your fingers to work the edges, so that you have your seam right in the middle of each edge, so you don't see the front fabric on the backside, and you don't see the lining from the front.

Now, to stitch the rod pocket. You will be making one row of stitching across the front of your fabric from side to side.
Measure down from the top edge, so you have the same length opening on each side. The size of the opening you left on each side was determined above by the type of rod you're using.

You can lightly pencil on the line that you need to stitch across, or do what I do - Place the fabric on the sewing machine, and put the needle down on the place where you'll start stitching. Take a 4" (approx) length of masking tape, and lay it against the upper edge of the fabric, to the right of the needle, and stick it to the sewing machine base. You can use this tape edge as a guide to hold the top edge of your fabric against as you stitch across. It helps you make a straight, even rod pocket. My sewing machine has tape on it for all different widths of rod pockets!

If you chose to put trim on the bottom of your valance, do it now. I use 'Aleen's OK To Wash-It' fabric glue that you can get at WalMart or a fabric store. If you use glue, just follow the directions on the bottle to glue your trim evenly to the front bottom of your valance. I lay my valance on my kitchen island, and let it set overnight, while the glue dries. You can also stitch your trim on, either by hand or by machine. I prefer the glue, because you see no stitching on the back side. (I'm anal.)

Now to make the ties. You can simply buy ribbon (such as grosgrain) or use purchased cord (see my dining room silk ones in the link) or make them out of fabric. Use either the same fabric or a coordinating one.

Here, you first need to decide if you are going to tie your valance up with bows, or do knots. Bows take longer ties.

Allow yourself a MINIMUM of 36" long ties. You can always cut them shorter if necessary, but you can't make them longer. I suggest hanging your valance up and using string to tie them up temporarily to see how long you need to make your ties. (It's longer than you think!)

Cut your strips of fabric approx 4" wide and the length you have decided on above for your ties. Fold and pin the strips in half the the short way, so you have a long strip of fabric that is 2" wide. Make sure the right sides are together, (inside) because you are going to turn them inside out after stitching.

Stitch along the pinned edge of each strip, about 1/4" from the edge. Now the fun part - turn those narrow strips inside out. My chop stick comes in handy for this, but use whatever method you choose to accomplish this.

Press the ties just as you did the valance rectangle, making sure your seam is even on the edge. I fold in the raw ends and use my fusible tape to close them, but you can machine stitch them closed or do it by hand - Your choice. Your valance is done!

Put it on your rod, using the rod pocket. Hang it in your window. Now, take the ties, and simply drape them over the rod on each side, having half of the tie fabric strip hanging in front, and the other half of the tie hanging behind the valance.

Now, gather up one side of the valance in your hands, and reach behind it it grab the dangling tie in back. Tie up the valance, by tying the front and back pieces of the tie together, either in a knot or a bow. Do the same with the other side, making sure your ties on each side are tied up at the same length.

Now stand back and make sure your valance looks even at the bottom on each side. Use your hand to 'finger fold' and drape your fabric until the look is what you want.

You'll be surprised at what a difference it can make in the look by spacing your ties closer together, or moving them further apart on the rod. Also by tying the ties higher or lower...

This is where you need to play around until you get the look you want. On the HGTV message board, a woman made these and kept posting pics asking for advice - Higher? Lower? Move the ties apart or closer...It's really all up to you. Hers looked GREAT when she was done, and she was so pleased to have made her own custom valance. I hope you all feel the same way, if you try them!

Here is a link that might be useful: several shown here - all the same instructions

NOTES:

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clipped on: 02.09.2011 at 03:11 pm    last updated on: 02.09.2011 at 03:12 pm

RE: my3dogs easy sew window treatment directions (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: jaybird on 02.08.2011 at 11:20 am in Home Decorating Forum


Easy to sew valance directions
They ARE EASY - but the directions are long, because I am trying to give you enough detail, even if you are a beginner. Read them all the way through so you understand them, and ask any questions you may have. If you are a real novice, you may want to make a sample using just muslin, or other inexpensive fabric, til you get the hang of it. This is a no-pattern valance that I started making last summer. It requires just straight stitching. My windows are generally about 50" (more or less)in height. If your windows are very short or very tall, you may want to vary the length of the fabric you use. I would say to err on the 'buy more' side though, so they don't look skimpy. The fullness adds richness. I generally use 1 1/4 yards of 54" wide home dec fabric to make the valance. You will need an equal amount of lining fabric. If you choose to put trim on the bottom (it adds a lot to the treatment, IMO) buy 1 1/2 yards of trim to make sure you have enough to go across the length of your 54" wide fabric. If your fabric is wider than 54", buy enough trim to cover its width. Cut your valance fabric and lining to equal lengths. I always measure the side edges of my fabric and mark the length before cutting. It may have not been cut straight at the store, and you want to be sure that your left side is the same length as your right side. Pin the two rectangles of fabric together on all sides, with the RIGHT (front) sides of the fabrics inside, facing each other. Before putting the fabrics together, I mark lightly on the back which is the TOP of the print (if using a print) and which is the bottom, so your print will end up right side up! Depending on the type of rod you plan to use for the valance, you need to leave openings on each side that will become your rod pocket. Continental rods (the flat wide plain ones) need a 4" rod pocket. If you use a decorative rod, with finals on the end that screw off, I would recommend making your rod pocket 2" wide. For a small tension rod, I'd make the rod pocket 1.5" wide. You don't want to force your fabric onto the rod - allow room to make it easy for you. Measure down from the TOP of your pinned together fabric, and make a light mark with pencil on each side, the size of your chosen rod pocket, plus 1/2". That 1/2" is going to be the width of your top seam. You'll be making a mark on the left and right sides 4 1/2" down from the top if you use a Continental rod, for example. Stitch from these marks down each side to the bottom, using a 1/2" seam. You'll need to leave an opening in the top or bottom to turn your valance inside out when you're done stitching. I'd suggest a 4" - 6" opening for turning. If your rod pocket openings are 4", you don't need to leave another opening, you can use them to turn it inside out. Mark the opening you need to leave, then stitch across the top and bottom edges, using a 1/2" seam, leaving your opening...well...OPEN! Clip your fabric corners off OUTSIDE of your stitching. This is just a small triangle of fabric from each corner. This will allow you to get nice sharp edges on your corners when your turn the valance right side out, as it reduces the bulk of fabric there. Turn your valance right side out, pulling it through the opening you left. I use a wooden chop stick to push the fabric gently at the corners to make them nice and square, once I have turned mine right side out. Don't push too hard, or you may poke a hole through your valance! At this point, you should have a lined rectangle of fabric, with rod pocket openings near the top of each side. Close the opening you left for turning, either by folding and pressing the edges in and hand stitching it closed, or use 'stitch witchery' type of fusing tape to do it. You can also sew it closed with your sewing machine, but you want to do it right at the edge. You want to make this closure as 'invisible' as possible, so I always use fusible tape. Carefully iron your valance. Use your fingers to work the edges, so that you have your seam right in the middle of each edge, so you don't see the front fabric on the backside, and you don't see the lining from the front. Now, to stitch the rod pocket. You will be making one row of stitching across the front of your fabric from side to side. Measure down from the top edge, so you have the same length opening on each side. The size of the opening you left on each side was determined above by the type of rod you're using. You can lightly pencil on the line that you need to stitch across, or do what I do - Place the fabric on the sewing machine, and put the needle down on the place where you'll start stitching. Take a 4" (approx) length of masking tape, and lay it against the upper edge of the fabric, to the right of the needle, and stick it to the sewing machine base. You can use this tape edge as a guide to hold the top edge of your fabric against as you stitch across. It helps you make a straight, even rod pocket. My sewing machine has tape on it for all different widths of rod pockets! If you chose to put trim on the bottom of your valance, do it now. I use 'Aleen's OK To Wash-It' fabric glue that you can get at WalMart or a fabric store. If you use glue, just follow the directions on the bottle to glue your trim evenly to the front bottom of your valance. I lay my valance on my kitchen island, and let it set overnight, while the glue dries. You can also stitch your trim on, either by hand or by machine. I prefer the glue, because you see no stitching on the back side. (I'm anal.) Now to make the ties. You can simply buy ribbon (such as grosgrain) or use purchased cord (see my dining room silk ones in the link) or make them out of fabric. Use either the same fabric or a coordinating one. Here, you first need to decide if you are going to tie your valance up with bows, or do knots. Bows take longer ties. Allow yourself a MINIMUM of 36" long ties. You can always cut them shorter if necessary, but you can't make them longer. I suggest hanging your valance up and using string to tie them up temporarily to see how long you need to make your ties. (It's longer than you think!) Cut your strips of fabric approx 4" wide and the length you have decided on above for your ties. Fold and pin the strips in half the the short way, so you have a long strip of fabric that is 2" wide. Make sure the right sides are together, (inside) because you are going to turn them inside out after stitching. Stitch along the pinned edge of each strip, about 1/4" from the edge. Now the fun part - turn those narrow strips inside out. My chop stick comes in handy for this, but use whatever method you choose to accomplish this. Press the ties just as you did the valance rectangle, making sure your seam is even on the edge. I fold in the raw ends and use my fusible tape to close them, but you can machine stitch them closed or do it by hand - Your choice. Your valance is done! Put it on your rod, using the rod pocket. Hang it in your window. Now, take the ties, and simply drape them over the rod on each side, having half of the tie fabric strip hanging in front, and the other half of the tie hanging behind the valance. Now, gather up one side of the valance in your hands, and reach behind it it grab the dangling tie in back. Tie up the valance, by tying the front and back pieces of the tie together, either in a knot or a bow. Do the same with the other side, making sure your ties on each side are tied up at the same length. Now stand back and make sure your valance looks even at the bottom on each side. Use your hand to 'finger fold' and drape your fabric until the look is what you want. You'll be surprised at what a difference it can make in the look by spacing your ties closer together, or moving them further apart on the rod. Also by tying the ties higher or lower... This is where you need to play around until you get the look you want. On the HGTV message board, a woman made these and kept posting pics asking for advice - Higher? Lower? Move the ties apart or closer...It's really all up to you. Hers looked GREAT when she was done, and she was so pleased to have made her own custom valance. I hope you all feel the same way, if you try them!


NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 02.09.2011 at 02:59 pm    last updated on: 02.09.2011 at 03:00 pm

Madagascar gold granite - I fell in love (pic) & ?'s

posted by: natesgramma on 06.11.2007 at 08:13 pm in Kitchens Forum

I knew that I wanted light granite with lots of movement to go with my cherry cabinets. I think I found it. Does it mean yes when you get huge goosebumps? The only problem I find is that I can't find it online anywhere else. The highly recommended granite yard (1 of 3 my KD uses) said that this was a new stone that they've only had about 3 months, from India. It has a lot of whites, creams, golds, browns, rusts and grays. Think yummy ice-cream carmel sundae with chunks of butterfingers. They chipped off two pieces for me, one is almost all whites and the other has the colors listed above. I know I need to do some testing but not sure which to do. Lemon and wine? I'll do some searching for the tests but wondered if anyone had ever seen this. I know that these won't be the exact slabs we get but they have many in their yard when I'm ready. Any advice to try to find out more about this particular granite?
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

NOTES:

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clipped on: 06.21.2007 at 05:02 pm    last updated on: 06.21.2007 at 05:02 pm

RE: Florescent ceiling lights?? (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: lee676 on 05.26.2007 at 03:53 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Jane, depends on what you mean by "most realistic color". A light bulb with a 5000K (sunlight) to 6500K (daylight, like a slightly blueish overcast day) match the color of natural outdoor light. But many people find these lamps to be jarring when placed indoors, because they're used to incandescent bulbs lighting the way after dark, and incandescents give off a much "warmer" light - more yellow, less blue - about 2700-3000K in lighting parlance. Incandescent (and halogen) light bulbs do, however, do an excellent job of making colors stand out from each other, just like natural sunlight, even though incandescent lamps skew the entire color spectrum to the warm/yellow side. That's why if you turn on a typical table lamp with a white shade during daytime, it looks yellow compared to the ambient daylight in the room that's streaming in through the window.

The "dinginess" often associated with fluorescent lights is caused by a low "color rendering index" (CRI), not by their "color temperature" (i.e. 3500K). The former is an industry-standard measure of how well a light source disinguishes between different colors (or different shades of the same color), whilst the latter is a measure of the relative warmth or coolness of the light. The two do not correlate.

Sunlight provides the color-rendering standard by which artificial light sources are judged by. That is, natural sunlight has a CRI of 100, the best possible score. Incandescent and halogen light bulbs also have a CRI of 100. Have you ever been outside at night under a street lamp or outdoor security lamp that was plenty bright, but gave off a yellow/golden or pink/orange cast to everything it lit up, so you could barely tell what color your clothes were? Those are examples of lamps with a very low CRI (about 20). Fluorescents are somewhere in between. Traditional fluorescent tubes, the kind that used to be found in every office building and many kitchens and basements, had a rather low CRI of about 60, which accounts for the "dingy" light you speak of. I have some socks that are dark blue, dark brown, and dark charcoal/black, and under fluorescent light it's difficult to tell which color is which. I place the same socks under my halogen desk lamp and the colors become easier to differentiate.

The good news is that higher-quality fluorescent tubes can have better color rendering - Philips makes a warm-colored 95 CRI bulb I use frequently (3000K) as well as a 98 CRI, 5000K bulb that has a cooler, more daylight-like color. Both make colors stand out nearly as well as incandescent lamps or natural sunlight. They aren't quite as bright as most fluorescent bulbs (a good thing in your case, it sounds like). Or there's Sylvania's 86 CRI, 2700K flourescent tube that matches the yellowish incandescent glow, is very bright, and still has decent color differentiation. All of those will require T8 ballasts, the ones that accept the newer-style, thinner tubes (1" diameter). If you have the old-style T12 ballasts (with thicker, 1 1/2" diameter tubes) your bulb choices are more limited, but 3000K, 3500K, and 4100K bulbs with about 85 CRI are readily available from several brands, with somewhat dimmer 5000-6500K daylight-simulating bulbs with 89 to 94 CRI sold by Westinghouse and others.

Confusing, I know, but I deal with lighting specification frequently, so when asked which 4-foot fluorescent tube gives off the most "natural" light, it depends on what you mean by natural - there's color rendering/differentiaion (higher CRI number is better), and there's color temperature (generally from warm 2700K to cool 6500K, with 3500 being neutral). Generally, the cooler-colored bulbs, say 5000K, look best with pure white environments such as a kitchen with white cabinets, as well as garages and basements, or any room with skylights and/or large windows where blending in with natural daylight is important. If you're after a warm glow like you get from traditional table lamps, you still want the highest CRI available (to avoid dingy colors), but probably want a 2700K to 3500K bulb, which I find work best in rooms with earth tones, wood floors/cabinets/paneling, or ivory/beige carpets, such as most living rooms.

More than you ever wanted to know about light bulbs....

NOTES:

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clipped on: 05.26.2007 at 08:37 pm    last updated on: 05.26.2007 at 08:38 pm

My DIY is finally finished

posted by: bamaspice on 02.22.2007 at 12:04 pm in Kitchens Forum

Thanks to everyone on this board---Remember we had thermofoil laminate cabinets...I removed the laminate and then painted and glazed. We also had feet made for the cabinets. Thanks to everyone for all the support. Especially,thanks to Bill V for holding my hand. Everytime I look at the tile...I get tickled!! Who would have thought..I could do it myself :-)

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

NOTES:

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clipped on: 05.07.2007 at 03:41 pm    last updated on: 05.07.2007 at 03:42 pm

RE: Cattknap: (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: cattknap on 01.18.2007 at 08:07 pm in Home Decorating Forum

Here are a few inside shots - I will be taking new ones in the next few weeks.













NOTES:

<none>
clipped on: 01.18.2007 at 08:16 pm    last updated on: 01.18.2007 at 08:16 pm

RE: Photoshoppers- Can you PLEEEEASE turn my kitchen cabs white? (Follow-Up #19)

posted by: andreagb on 01.13.2007 at 11:24 pm in Home Decorating Forum

This is fun! Maggiepie, nice job!

so glad the suggestion of black is interesting. How about these possibilities:

1) black island, everything else stays oak; mullioned (oak) doors flanking sink and above microwave

2) black upper cabs ONLY, w/ mullioned (black) doors as above: island and bottoms stay oak

And I was thinking of a rubbed/aged finish on whatever you do paint, kind of like the piece in this link. (sorry, am technologically challenged, cannot figure out how to get pics into links for the life of me!)

Here is a link that might be useful: this is the kind of finish I was envisioning...

NOTES:

aged finish on cabinet
clipped on: 01.14.2007 at 09:39 am    last updated on: 01.14.2007 at 09:39 am

RE: Let's be practical (grin) (Follow-Up #12)

posted by: cattknap on 01.04.2007 at 11:36 am in Home Decorating Forum

I like to use antique chests, small tables, etc. in place of typical end tables.

This one is in a corner in the living room...if I were entertaining, I'd take the tea tray off and put the coasters out...

Another small antique table perfect for one person's use.

This is what is on the other side of the couch - the round table and small coffee table work well as places to put food/drinks and again, not your usual end tables.

I have several of these drop-leaf small tables that are great to use for drinks, etc.

NOTES:

note wall color and transferware
clipped on: 01.08.2007 at 05:48 pm    last updated on: 01.08.2007 at 05:49 pm