Clippings by Weedpuller1954

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RE: What do you think of these paint colors? (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: khallock on 06.25.2013 at 09:22 am in Kitchens Forum

Here is a picture taken at more distance.

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clipped on: 06.25.2013 at 11:45 am    last updated on: 06.25.2013 at 11:46 am

Novalis peel-and-stick vinyl planks -- feedback?

posted by: beedrew on 09.06.2006 at 11:02 am in Flooring Forum

Hello,

I'm new here and looking for good/bad feedback from anyone who has used the Novalis peel-and-stick vinyl planks available for about $1 each from Lowe's. I need an economical floor covering for a basement, going down over cement slab. It also must be a DIY solution as we are on a tight budget and this is a large space.

I saw some Pergo at HD for about the same price but was told not to buy Pergo-type unless I was willing to spend at least $4 sq ft. Plus it would be harder for me and my husband to do the install ourselves, as we're newbies.

Years ago I used peel-and-stick vinyl tiles in a condo that I owned, and it worked out GREAT -- looked wonderful and never peeled up. My neighbors bought it after seeing my floor. But I think it was an Armstrong product and they aren't making peel-and-stick vinyl planks anymore -- pretty much nobody is except Novalis. Plus I had no kids then and had the $$ for professional installation.

I brought home samples of the four available colors Lowe's has -- Golden Oak, Natural Oak, Gunstock Oak, and Summer Cherry. All of the Oak ones have an embossed pattern to them -- an attempt to look like wood grain. The Summer Cherry is more smooth, but it's somewhat dark for a basement and it looks like it will show dust more than the other ones.

So I am wondering, for those who might have used this product:

- How does it hold up? Any edges peeling up?
- Easy / hard to keep clean?
- Does it look "fakey" -- any more than Pergo sometimes does?
- How do you like the color you chose? Is the embossing a problem?

Any feedback at all would be most welcome.

Thanks,

Bee

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clipped on: 04.12.2013 at 09:12 pm    last updated on: 04.12.2013 at 09:12 pm

Best flooring for multiple areas?

posted by: Weedpuller1954 on 04.06.2013 at 11:55 am in Kitchens Forum

We will begin demolition for our kitchen renovation in a few weeks and need to make a decision soon on the type of flooring we will install. We have decided to replace flooring in our entry, hallway, dining room and laundry/mud/powder room at the same time, as these areas are all connected to one another. Entry/hallway is currently wood. Dining room is carpet. Kitchen, breakfast, laundry/mud/powder is sheet vinyl. We live in a semi-rural area near St. Louis, have dogs, a pool in the back yard that is accessed through the mudroom, and a new grandbaby that we love having to visit. We would like to replace all the flooring with the same material if possible. We would welcome ideas and pictures of your flooring solutions. Also, we are open to creative options that are not the standard hardwood or ceramic tile.

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clipped on: 04.10.2013 at 03:57 pm    last updated on: 04.10.2013 at 03:58 pm

Another retrofit: folding work surface

posted by: Bellsmom on 09.24.2012 at 12:10 pm in Kitchens Forum

I wanted to post one image of this for Marcolo, and decided to post more detail here.
When my kitchen was finished, there was no good place to sit for marathon cutting and chopping events like the aftermath of someone gifting me with a bushel of fresh corn.
This is my cheapo solution: it involves
1. Folding leg brackets, like on on a cardtable
2. Two stair spindles, $1 each from Habitat
3. One cabinet side panel, $1 from Habitat (maybe to be replaced by a real chopping block.
4. Two 1 x 1's to form a stabilizer over the front of the sink so the table doesn't slide.

Here are pics of the table, both folded and in working position, and my constant companion, an 80 pound rescue labradoodle that makes me smile 100 times a day:
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This is a really easy project, and for me, a perfect solution to sitting surface adjacent to sink and pull out trash.
Hope it is useful to someone.
And Bell and I thank you GWers for all the good ideas we have used over the last two years.
Sandra

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clipped on: 09.24.2012 at 10:31 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2012 at 10:31 pm

RE: Birch cabinetry (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: badgergal on 09.24.2012 at 08:24 am in Kitchens Forum

We used Bertch Legacy cabinetry in a condo that we previously owned. The cabinet wood was birtch. They did not have any glaze on them and as I recall they were a natural finish. We were pleased with the quality of the cabinets. My daughter and her roommates lived there. When we sold the condo 5 years later, the cabinets where still as good as new. Here are a couple slightly distorted pictures from the realtors listing.
Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos
Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

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clipped on: 09.24.2012 at 09:14 pm    last updated on: 09.24.2012 at 09:14 pm

Retrofitting supersusans in upper cabs--a (long) success story

posted by: Bellsmom on 09.15.2012 at 09:52 pm in Kitchens Forum

I know I will try your patience with this long and picture laden post, but I really want to share this with you. It is the kind of thing I have found here when I had a problem and could not imagine an answer as we remodeled. Maybe someone will find this useful. I hope so.

When we remodeled our kitchen about a year ago, I asked that the upper cabs be 15'' deep. Since I prep on the island and seldom on the perimeter under the cabs, and since I am fairly short (5' 2'') the deeper wall cabs cause no inconvenience, and they are GREAT for storage.

I knew at the time that I was creating a monster in the corner though. Here is the way the old corner looked. Pretty, but it was a storage nightmare. Items stored at the back were more than 2 feet behind the items in the front. Impossible to reach without emptying the whole shelf.
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I knew I wanted susans there, but the cabinet makers simply were not comfortable modifying them as I wanted. And I knew that, unlike base cabinets, it WAS possible to add susans to wall cabinets after the cabs were installed. So I waited. I had thought I could do this myself, but found that lifting the shelf and susan into place was beyond my strength, so this summer, a young contractor and I tackled the job.

There were three shelves, but I knew that after I modified them, I wanted four. I found a source for 24'' round Rev-a-shelf susans at less than $40 each and ordered 4 of them. I painted the edge so it would match the dark cherry cabs. They looked like this:
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I wasn't happy with the small bearing under them, nor with the wasted vertical space. Each susan with its 2'' rim, bearings, mounting plate, and the shelf below it took 3'' of vertical space--so four of them would eat up 12'' in my 40'' cabinet! So we started cutting and replacing. We cut off one inch from the tops of the rim and a slice of the front edge to make a D-shaped instead of a round susan. We added a new, straight edge across the cut. (I was unable to find 24'' D-shaped susans anywhere. I had played with the idea of making the whole thing, but at less than $40 each, this seemed the better way.) Here are the cut off tops and the bearings and original crude turn table which we replaced or eliminated:
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And here is a chopped and sectioned susan in position on the new shelf which we made to better use the vertical height provided by the more efficient bearings and the cut-down rim:
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I know this is long, but I want to share what I can store on two different shelves in this corner susan. Bear with me.
Here is the front of the bottom shelf.
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Storage is planned so that multiple identical items are arranged in front to back rows. Everything is accessible from the front. Here is the same shelf rotated about 45 degrees:
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And rotated another 45 degrees or more:
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All of the items on this shelf are used almost daily.

And one more shelf, This is the second one.
Front of shelf (I love teapots!)
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Rotated about 1/3 of the way:
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And rotated again:
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Those big nested mixing bowls were space gobblers on any shelf or in any drawer before. I am not sure they would even fit in 12'' deep cabs. They are perfect here. Easy to reach and remove.

I plan to use the two upper shelves for ''dead'' or seasonal storage because I can reach them only with a ladder.

Here is a flash photo of the way the corner looks now. Forgive the ugly shadows the dimpled glass casts under a photo flash.
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In summary: If you have limited storage space and every inch counts, consider 15'' deep uppers. If you do 15'' deep uppers, consider susans on the shelves. I strongly recommend retrofitting commercial susans or, better yet, having your cabinet maker custom make them to use every possible inch of vertical and horizontal space.

I like the new easy reach corner upper shelves a lot, but this holds SO much more that I would not change even if I could.

As a final image, I am going to post the bearings we used. I found them on Amazon. The shelves just coast with a slight spin. Brooks, my friend and budding contractor, was astonished at the difference they made:
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I have had an immense amount of fun with this project. And playing with organizing the storage has only begun. Next stop is toe kick drawers!!

Thanks for looking. And thank you, GWers, for teaching me that almost anything I can imagine is possible--and then helping me imagine it!

Sandra

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clipped on: 09.16.2012 at 09:45 pm    last updated on: 09.16.2012 at 09:46 pm