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RE: is this fabulous volunteer Desert Marigold? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: fabaceae_native on 07.23.2012 at 01:51 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Looks a lot like brittlebush, Encelia farinosa. I don't think it's ever called desert marigold, but it sure is a fabulous volunteer at any rate. It carpets the roadsides in color after rains in the low desert, and was important as a source of incense in early Southwestern missions.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:36 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:36 pm

RE: lilac bushes?? (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: Chef919 on 04.08.2005 at 10:09 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Persian lilac or chinese lilac will grow in Vegas and phoenix and SHOULD bloom. I'm far from an expert on the topic but I know some people who have them and I just planted one myself. I don't believe it is a true lilac although i could be wrong about that but it looks exactly like one and does much better in the desert heat. give that a shot.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:34 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:35 pm

RE: New Mexico shaded veggie garden (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: rdr115 on 04.05.2012 at 08:52 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I'm near Albuquerque. It isn't the summer heat so much--and it gets brutally hot here--but the intense solar radiation combined with the heat and lack of humidity. The higher you go, the more intense the solar radiation, and at our latitude New Mexico is within the area of highest solar radiation in the United states. I don't shade everything in my vegetable garden, but I do use light shade for, among other things, the greens and for the tomatoes. And they do a lot better now than when I didn't. And, by the way, a lot of ornamentals that require full sun elsewhere, do better here with dappled shade or just a half day of full sun. I've noticed shading on backyard gardens in Albuquerque's north valley, too.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:32 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:33 pm

RE: Tomatoes in the Desert (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: rdr115 on 09.02.2012 at 04:13 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

One of the best I've found for desert growing is Punta Banda, originally from Baja California. Medium size fruit, great taste. As far as I know, not commercially available as plants, but J.L. Hudson sells seed. I save my own seed and have noticed that over the years the tomatoes are getting larger and larger even though they're grown in an isolated area where hybridizing shouldn't be a problem.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:30 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:30 pm

RE: Tomatoes in the Desert (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: lazygardens on 08.05.2012 at 02:01 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

1 - drip irrigation and heavy mulch for uniform moisture

2 - afternoon shade

3 - royal chico reportedly takes heat and matt's wild cherry is taking over my yard. Matt's is a tiny cherry tomato, grows in small clusters, sets fruit and ripens almost all year.

Most "heirlooms" are from moister, cooler climates and probably can't tolerate the heat.

If you want to experiment, find some roma tomatoes from mexico this summer and save the seeds. They aren't the true roma variety, they are a paste tomato developed to tolerate the heat of the sonoran coast.

Your other alternative is to grow the extreme short-season tomatoes developed for canada so you can get a crop in spring and fall, skipping the summer heat.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:28 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:28 pm

RE: Question about growing fruit in Las Cruces (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: Vanessa 7/8 (Guest) on 08.13.2008 at 02:52 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Hi All, In Las Cruces four months now. Experimented with several types of trees. Found that of the ones we tried the Apple trees, Plums, Peach, Pomegranate and fig are looking the best. Also planted some grape vines. THose are doing quite well. Although my husband wants to go back to Alaska in the spring now. Guess it's hard to stay gone from anywhere after living in a place so long. THis place will be our retirement castle. GOnna experiment in many new things in an equally difficult climate on the opposite end of the spectrum. :) Plant some tried and true varieties for Alaska and in some unknowns. GOnna buy a VERY large greenhouse and try some fruits in that. Thanks all for your advice. Maybe by retirement we will come to our "retirement castle" with these trees matured!

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:25 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:26 pm

RE: Question about growing fruit in Las Cruces (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: petzold6596 on 05.14.2008 at 08:31 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Welcome Vanessa, the NMSU Coop. Extension Service is right here. Google - it. Tucson has a very similar climate. The web is full of info. A friend of ours in the valley has a peach and apple tree that gets watered with the grass and the trees produce like zucchinis.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:24 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:24 pm

RE: Question about growing fruit in Las Cruces (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: desertlvr on 04.15.2008 at 05:36 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Hello Vanessa, welcome to desert gardening. Fig and pomegranite trees are fast growing and drought tolerant. Apricots grow well here, as do almonds, pistachios, and pecans. Try "Enchanted Gardens" on Avenida de Mesilla. Jackeye, the owner and plantswoman, is a wonderful resource. There are challenges to gardening here to be sure, but a long growing season makes up for them.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:23 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:23 pm

RE: Question about growing fruit in Las Cruces (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: lorna-organic on 04.14.2008 at 04:02 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Hello, Vanessa, I live about twenty miles south of Albuquerque, so we aren't in the same zone. However, I've been told peaches do very well here. I have an old apricot tree on my property. It produces a lot of fruit, but the fruit usually falls to the ground a few days before it is ripe enough to eat. A farmer told me to pick the unripe fruit, put it in a bucket, and cover it with plastic. He said it will soon ripen and be just fine. I haven't yet tried it.

I put in two almond trees, when I moved here five years ago. This year they are covered with buds. I've heard there is an apple orchard in this area, but I haven't seen it.

You do have to make sure your trees get sufficient water. If your area is windy, you will need to water more frequently. Water deeply. If winters are dry, I do a good soaking once a month. During summer I give young trees a good soaking once a week. If you mulch, it will help the soil to retain moisture.

Good luck!
Lorna

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:22 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:23 pm

RE: Vine for chain link fence (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: ExoticRGVNativesTy on 08.19.2012 at 07:59 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Drummond's Clematis would work well and cover the fence with white plumes. Roving Sailor (Maurandella antirrhiniflora), which has small purple flowers, is another good option. Both are native to the Southwest.

Ty

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:19 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:19 pm

RE: Raspberries in Albuquerque (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: rightwingback-1 on 03.05.2013 at 03:19 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

My take on berry bushes in Albuquerque. I know of some commercial Raspberries grown in the area, but I think these are in Zone A2-in mountain humus soils. In ABQ proper alkaline will keep you from either having fruit set, or it will stunt and die over time. Use a treated water to lower Ph to 4.0 Our H2O is even too alkaline.
Interesting that someone on the Front Range has been growing berries (Blueberries no less)in peet bales, and sinking the bales into the earth-with only puncture on top planting hole. It is how I now grow mine. Don't fail to wrap your twigs over winter with a warm cheese cloth-or suffer wind kill.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:05 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:06 pm

RE: anybody growing hardy citrus in abq or nm? (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: rdr115 on 04.21.2013 at 01:14 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Follow-up to my message of Spring 2012 re planting two Citrumelos in Los Lunas (20 miles south of Albuquerque). The trees were six years old, each about six feet high. As of this writing, one tree is dead, but one is alive and well and leafing out (as is the Citrus trifoliata, one of the Citrumelo's parents). Actually, the dead tree dropped its leaves and the bark turned brown last November as soon as the nightime temps were pretty consistently in the 20's. The remaining tree also dropped its leaves at the same time, but the bark remained green throughout winter. FYI January this year averaged 29F, daily average high was 42F and daily average low was 15F (seven nights in single digits with lowest at 4F). Three nights ago we had a sudden freeze here down to 24F which seriously scorched the emerging Mulberry and Ailanthus tree leaves, but the new Citrumelo leaves appear unaffected. I can only speculate that cold hardiness for Citrumelos may be variable which I remember was the case in lemon and orange groves in So. California when I lived there.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 08:00 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 08:00 pm

RE: anybody growing hardy citrus in abq or nm? (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: fabaceae_native on 02.17.2013 at 11:17 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

While Alamogordo is one of the warmer places in the state, it is still too cold for 'standard' citrus outside without protection. If I'm not mistaken they hit -18 there during our freak record freeze of 2011!

But there are (or were, I've not heard a report on how they weathered that freeze) lots of palm trees. And pomegranates, pistachios, and pecans, among other things, are grown there commercially. The 2012 Hardiness Zone Map calls it a solid 8a.

If I lived in Alamogordo I would totally experiment with hardy citrus a la Stan McKenzie. Anything hardy to around 10 degrees would be worth growing there (and protected during the rare big freezes like we saw in 2011).

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:59 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:59 pm

RE: anybody growing hardy citrus in abq or nm? (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: rdr115 on 02.19.2012 at 08:44 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Fabaceae: I have the trifoliate-orange cultivar 'Flying Dragon'--about 4 ft high so smaller than the regular plant, columnar habit, with very contorted and twisted stems and branches. And savage thorns (citrumelo has inherited those.) The fruit is less than golf-ball size with a thick, hard rind and almost no pulp, just seeds. I'm not into sugary foods so haven't made marmelade, but have grated rinds for zest which is very bitter. Flowers typical for Citrus, highly scented. Ripe fruits are fuzzy yellow, not orange. In my book very worth growing. It flowers fairly late in spring so avoids heavy frosts (so far). For fresh eating I have two Meyer lemon trees and some kumquats. These are outdoors in summer and in the house in winter. Very reliable. I've tried many other citrus with less than satisfactory results.

The citrumelos are in very large containers and have not flowered. Hopefully they will if they can get established in the ground. It'll be a learning experience. What citrumelo might do here is one thing--after 22 years here I have learned not to rely on horticultural information from "authorities" who have never gardened in the middle Rio Grande valley. This place lends new meaning to the whole shtick.

By the way, I see that the new Flora of China has transferred the trifoliate-orange to the genus Citrus, making Poncirus trifoliata a synonym of Citrus trifoliata.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:58 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:58 pm

RE: anybody growing hardy citrus in abq or nm? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: rdr115 on 02.10.2012 at 06:01 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I'm 20 or so miles south of Albuquerque in an infamous frost pocket and have had Poncirus trifoliata for ages. It weathered last February's subzero temps (lowest at -15F) with no apparent problem and as a matter of fact never flowered and fruited better than last summer. (And it's planted in adobe clay.) I have two very large 6-year old citrumelos that are going to have to be planted out this spring as they are too large to be hauled in anymore. Like the trifoliate orange they are deciduous, so I have hopes they'll last, though I won't hold my breath for any fruit.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:56 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:56 pm

anybody growing hardy citrus in abq or nm?

posted by: fabaceae_native on 02.09.2012 at 01:23 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

As a zone pusher, especially when it comes to fruiting plants, I have been researching hardy citrus hybrids for the last few years, without actually having taken the plunge into purchasing some. I've not found any evidence of anyone experimenting with these plants in NM, even though there are plenty of folks doing it in much colder zones.

Here is what I've discovered:
-- Zone7 growers in Oklahoma, the Carolinas, Maryland, etc., have had success with things like citrumelo (a trifoliate orange x grapefruit hybrid)
-- Citrange, yuzu, and citrumelo varieties are said by some to be subzero hardy.
-- The inedible trifoliate orange should be hardy to Zone6!
-- Some of the best-tasting conventional citrus, such as satsumas and various tangerines are hardy into the teens.

All of this is without protection, so with the kind of assistance some folks in ABQ have been giving their palm trees over the years, outside citrus could be doable. Let's not forget that Zone8 El Paso does have the odd orange tree! Oh, and according to the new 2012 USDA Hardiness Map, there are a few Zone9 spots in NM that should have no trouble with certain of the conventional citrus.

I'd love to hear anyone's anecdotes...

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:55 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:55 pm

RE: Honey Mesquite seed and Screwbean Mesquite seed (Follow-Up #23)

posted by: wintermantel on 06.05.2012 at 04:38 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Hello Everybody,

I have been seeking the seeds of Honey Mesquite. I'm from Hungary, and I would like to try this plant here for beekeeping. I tried every nurseries (not just in Hungary, but in other European countries) but couldn't find it. This tree is hardly known here.
If someone could help me, I would be very happy. Of course I would pay for delivery, postage or other costs.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:52 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:52 pm

RE: Honey Mesquite seed and Screwbean Mesquite seed (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: mikevanecek on 05.17.2008 at 03:13 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I'm also hunting for honey mesquite seeds. I'm not sure if what I have already is honey mesquite or a regular mesquite but I'd like to get a known variety growing for my honeybees. How many years does a seedling take to get to flowering maturity?

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:51 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:51 pm

RE: Honey Mesquite seed and Screwbean Mesquite seed (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: chris_sciarretta on 09.23.2006 at 10:56 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Jan,

Sorry for the late response... Basically the process for making flour from the pods is the following:
1) Collect the best-looking pods from the ground when they're ripe and golden.
2) Dry in sun or parch on low setting in oven for an hour to make the pods nice and brittle for better grinding.
3) Grind whole pods in hand mill, but the seeds will be too hard, they'll just slip out whole through the grinder. That's fine because the carbs are in the pod itself.
4) Sift flour multiple times and continue to grind courser material until it's the right consistency. I actually used a high-tech blender (VitaMix) that can also grind flour, for the last stages to get it really fine. A coffee grinder would probably work in a similar way. I've even heard that is a cooperative in Tucson that has a huge flour grinder specifically for mesquite. In this case I think the seeds end up as part of the flour because the machinery can handle it. But anyway, there are lots of people who are interested in using this wonderful local resource.

A bit more info:
It's also a good idea to chew on some pods as you harvest in order to make sure you're getting the good ones. You'll notice quite a variation from tree to tree, but the best ones are usually nice and thick. Also, if you don't want to pick them up off of the ground, you can pick them right off of the tree, but they won't be quite as dry so they'll require more parching, etc.

For all of this I loosely followed a whole bunch of sources, but the book American Indian Food and Lore by Carolyn Niethammer in particular is excellent, with detailed descriptions for processing mesquite and loads of other wild plant foods. It is beautiful as well as practical, and includes lots of recipes too. I imagine it's out of print, but is probably easy to get used online.

Hope this helps,

Chris

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:49 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:49 pm

RE: Honey Mesquite seed and Screwbean Mesquite seed (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: chris_sciarretta on 08.29.2006 at 04:43 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I've grown all kinds of things from seed, including honey mesquite and velvet mesquite. Leguminous trees are definitely some of my favorites to grow.

As far as mesquites go, you can expect very fast growth, at least when young and with plenty of water. A year from germinating you should have a cute little plant around three feet tall, and supposedly it can start producing pods a couple years later. Germination rates are also very good (around 100%), as long as you clean the seeds well, scarify them, and let them sit overnight in water before planting in soil. Make sure to protect the young plants from herbivores, which will eat the leaves and tender shoots, setting the growth back significantly.

Also, as regards to mesquite's edibility, yes I've tried it, and it's great! A couple years ago I gathered enough pods of velvet mesquite in Southeastern AZ to grind into about ten pounds of flour (with a hand grain mill). The grinding and sifting took much more time than the harvesting, which is very quick and easy. I'm still using the last of that batch of mesquite flour to mix with regular flour for pancakes, bread, etc. It's delicious and very nutritious.

I'd love to hear more about your plant adventures. Hope this was helpful,
Chris

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:47 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:47 pm

RE: Honey Mesquite seed and Screwbean Mesquite seed (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: randit on 07.10.2006 at 02:19 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I will try to get your Mesquite seeds in the mail tomorrow...Have fun with them. I hadn't a clue, that these seeds/pods were good for anything other than growing wonderful drought-tolerant shade trees...

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:45 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:45 pm

acacia willow

posted by: Hummingbird48 on 05.29.2013 at 06:20 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I have three acacia willows in my small backyard and they have adventitious roots that are sprouting up all over the yard. Can this be prevented or do I just keep cutting them off at ground-level?

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:42 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:42 pm

RE: Drought-Tolerant Privacy Hedge With Non-Invasive Roots? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: lazygardens on 06.23.2013 at 04:19 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Does Hop bush (Dodonea viscosa) grow in that area? It can be trimmed or sheared into a hedge, grows quickly and is drought tolerant when established.

Deep green color, dense growth and if you water it well it grows really fast.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:41 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:41 pm

RE: Anyone growing bamboo in the SW? (Follow-Up #21)

posted by: gladtidings on 08.20.2013 at 05:00 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Casa Grande AZ - I have these growing and all are doing well

Bambusa chungii Barbellata
Bambusa malingensis
Bambusa pervariabilis
Bambusa textilis gracilis page
Bambusa textilis Kanapaha
Bambusa textilis Mutabilis Emerald
Dendrocalamus minor amoenus 'angel mist'

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:34 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:34 pm

RE: Anyone growing bamboo in the SW? (Follow-Up #19)

posted by: fm54312 on 01.12.2011 at 05:29 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

gobi,

Is that the bamboo that they pulled out of encanto park? If it is there is some good news for you: that is a clumping bamboo and there is no need to try to contain it. It is just going to make a giant mass like the ones that they pulled out at the park. How is it doing now?

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:33 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:33 pm

RE: Anyone growing bamboo in the SW? (Follow-Up #17)

posted by: chagrin on 10.25.2007 at 04:02 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I grabbed a couple of bamboo culms from my sister's backyard in San Diego three years ago--my brother-in-law said it was named "Celestial something or other" (that's all he could remember). He said it would never be hardy where I live in New Mexico (Los Lunas, 20 miles south of ABQ). So I put the culms in a 12-inch plastic pot in regular potting mix and set it outside next to the house. Three years later it's still in the same pot and has stalks up to 10 ft high. And we've had down to zero fahrenheit several times. It's never been fed, but in summer I water it every other day as I do the entire garden. Last week I showed it to a visitor who lives a few miles down the highway, and she wasn't surprised at all, said a lot of people around here have true hardy bamboo--not cane grasses--and there is escaped bamboo near some of the irrigation ditches.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:32 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:32 pm

RE: Anyone growing bamboo in the SW? (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: kerrydee on 09.22.2007 at 12:47 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I was disappointed to hear jay2's Phyllostachys aureosulcata (yellow goove)were only 12' in 9 years. I live in las cruces and was going to try that species but I thought they were to grow into a 35' screen in a few years.. thats what im looking for. any suggestions?

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:30 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:31 pm

RE: Anyone growing bamboo in the SW? (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: freddie100 on 12.29.2006 at 12:14 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Been growing various types of bamboo with no problem in the Phoenix area. I just give it a little water and fertilize once in a while. My Old Hammi(?) timber bamboo has 4" shoots.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:30 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:30 pm

RE: Anyone growing bamboo in the SW? (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: dryndusty on 06.16.2006 at 01:46 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Several homes in Gisela, Arizona have substantial clumps of bamboo, about 15 feet tall. It all looks pretty ratty, but then, it's all exposed to full sun, full wind and zone 9 heat. When I work myself up to it, I'll ask for a start.

I visited the Black Mountain Lodge in Kingston, New Mexico, a few years back, and they have a healthy grove developing.
Norm

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:28 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:28 pm

RE: Anyone growing bamboo in the SW? (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: cochiseaz8 on 04.03.2004 at 12:54 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I have a variety of cane grass that is normaly called bamboo in this area and it is the most evasive, nasty , god rotting thing that I've put in the garden!! So far, it's respondsible for puttin out 2 walls, (1500.00 $) totally wreaking 2 vegie beds, and up-ending the hot tub (which now needs to be replaced) Bamboo is a grusome reality check, love darlene

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:26 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:26 pm

RE: Anyone growing bamboo in the SW? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: Jay2 on 07.07.2003 at 10:41 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Christine,
There are many species of bamboo that do fine in containers. I have one bamboo plant (golden) in an old whiskey barrel that does fine and golden has always been a good container bamboo. However, the container bamboos will never get as tall or full as bamboo planted in the soil. Part of the beauty of bamboo is having a grove of it. The soil around my house is very easy to dig, so it's easy for me to dig down about a foot to create a pit into which I can put the bamboo plants and then fill in the pit with peat moss, compost and leaf litter. Every plant of every species I've planted has survived, it is just that the southwest desert is a sub-optimal environment for bamboo, so it won't grow as well as in Alabama or Oregon. Nevertheless, I like to keep trying. Each plant is my "pet" so I like pampering them. Thanks for the link to the Tucson Botanical Gardens. However, I did't see anything about bamboo on it.
Jay

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:25 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:25 pm

Anyone growing bamboo in the SW?

posted by: Jay2 on 07.06.2003 at 03:24 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I have been growing bamboo in the middle Rio Grande Valley in New Mexico for several years. Anyone else out there in the south west trying to do the same? There are lots of challenges with the alkaline soil, little rainfall and dry air. However, I have about 100 plants of about 6 species of Phyllostachys, namely aureus (golden), aureosulcata (yellow goove), nigra (black), henon (gray), megurochiku (yellow with black stripes) and rubromarginata (red margin). The golden and yellow groove are the oldest (9 years) and are about 12 feet tall and 1 inch in diameter. All the other species were just planted this year. I dig pits about a foot or so down and then plant the bamboo in the pit and then fill in the pit with peat moss and compost. I then put leaf litter on the top. I water the pits once a week with a few inches of water per pit. Bamboo will not grow into dry ground, so the usual problems of "running" bamboo (all the Phyllotachys species) being hard to contain is not a problem in desert enviroments. For other bamboo (around 60 Ph. aureus plants) that are along a fence line, I have a soaker hose and let it run overnight once a week. I also add ironite to the soil to decrease the pH. I fertalize with lawn, slow acting fertalizer in the spring and early summer. This year I am going to try putting high phosphorus fertalizer on in the fall to stimulate root growth. The bamboo is very beautiful and gives our acre a tropical look. Of course, the bamboo stays green all year round. I buy the bamboo from the various on-line bamboo vendors. There is a bamboo forum on Gardenweb, where one can learn a lot about bamboo. I am particularly interested in people's experience with various species in the southwest and various ways of caring for bamboo in the southwest.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:24 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:24 pm

RE: Fragrant Plants for the Desert (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: Yvonne Santin 9 (Guest) on 05.25.2011 at 07:22 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Regarding planting lilacs here in Las Vegas It is best to plant them facing the north side of a wall with shade and also shade from the west side. If you plant them where they are exposed to the sun (which is what I did the first time) they will burn.I moved them to where they receive morning sun and have done quite well. I have 2 angel white lilac and 2 sensation lilac bushes. Good luck!

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:20 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:20 pm

RE: Fragrant Plants for the Desert (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: diggy800 on 12.12.2003 at 05:16 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Another highly fragrant flowering plant that enjoys sun is Pink Trumpet Vine. It grows very well here in Tucson (similar to Vegas?), attracts hummingbirds, and flowers for a long time summer through late, late fall.

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clipped on: 01.10.2014 at 07:16 pm    last updated on: 01.10.2014 at 07:16 pm

RE: Fragrant Plants for the Desert (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: Rolf_Jacobs on 11.23.2003 at 01:10 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Just bought a cultivar of Texas Ranger from a nursery in Tucson. Silver leaves and deep purple flowers. Extremely tough plant. Flowers smell like grape soda. The nursery is called "Desert Survivors". Well known. Do not know if they ship via mail. Also suggest you try Trichostema lanatum. Stunning plant. No other way to describe it. The flowers, while fantastic to look at, do not smell. Long lasting as a cut flower. The leaves have a scent to die for. Crush a few and you will fill the room with scent. They are native to San Benito County in CA and grow in poor soil on south facing slopes. Needs full sun and perfect drainage. Water every 2 weeks at most once established. 2 blooms per year if you are lucky. I have a 1/3 kill rate and that is down from 50%. Every time I plant one of these, people actually stop their cars in the street to check it out. Another tough plant for sunny areas is Artemsia tridentata and californicus. On a hot day when the sun vaporizes the volital oils in the leaves, you can smell the scent from several feet away. Both are native to CA high deserts. Have you tried Lavenders? They are pretty tough.

Good luck.

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RE: Fragrant Plants for the Desert (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: vegasrenie on 11.15.2003 at 12:21 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Hi Leslie,

Thanks so much for all the information. I really appreciate it! I'm considering planting Hall's honeysuckle along my backyard block wall. I know it's going to be a lot of work - it can grow crazy, but I do like the fragrance and the fact that it's pretty self-sufficient. I'm also considering bouganvillea, since my new neighbors seem to have it everywhere and I love the look even though there's no fragrance.

How does Mock Orange do here as a small hedge? I'm considering pulling out the one privet and replacing it with that, even though I know it has a limited blooming period.

Thanks for the tip on the moonflower. I'll look into it.

The homes in my division are placed at an angle on the lots, which means that there is shade during all hours of daylight, not only from the neighbors' trees but also from the block wall. It's an interesting configuration, but it was really a pretty clever way to make sure that the yards didn't always get beaten by the summer sun. With that in mind, the desire for evergreen tree is just due to laziness, lol, as I don't like raking in the fall/winter! My last home had a fruitless mulberry whose whole mission in life was to keep me raking throughout winter. My favorite evergreens or semi-deciduous trees are Texas Honey Mesquite (my favorite of the mesquites), Australian Willow, or African Sumac. I especially love the cinnamon-y look of the Sumac bark. I don't want any fruit trees unless I can figure out how to grow citrus trees here.

I will also look into the Alyssum. My walkway is very small and I would like to keep a constant array of nice, preferably fragrant plants there. I just removed a trailing lantana, as the foliage odor nauseates me and would fill my house with its smell. (small house).

Thanks again for all the info!

Irene

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RE: Fragrant Plants for the Desert (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: TomatoLadyInLasVegas on 11.14.2003 at 07:15 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

Hi Irene,

Alyssum is fragrant and lines a walkway nicely. It also acts as a living mulch and looks good under roses. Mix in some Dahlias, verbena, Oriental Lily, Iris or annuals for color. They all do better in the desert when planted in alyssum because alyssum shades the soil and keeps it moist and cooler. The plants love to grow in it. Broadcast seed in March. It comes back every year from seeds from the plants. Nice plant.

Gardenias don't like our heat or soil and are a disappointment in Las Vegas. They are a nice houseplant here because they require acid soil and cooler temps.

The jasmines have a short spring bloom season and I find them rangy, ugly and woody in the fall/winter. Plant anytime.

A beautiful fall and winter blooming vine (also comes as a shrub) is Cape Honeysuckle, bright orange flower and a lovely shiny dark green leaf. It has strong shoots and does not vine like jasmines. No fragrance. Plant anytime. Or try Passion Vine, Bower Vine,,, or Lady Banks rose, strong shoots, does not vine, white is fragrant & yellow is not, spring bloomer, tons of flowers. Plant anytime. The trick in Las Vegas is to keep the sun off the soil and this is where the alyssum works well.

Simplicity Hedge Rose grows quickly and there is a picture of them in the Test Garden section of the Gallery on my website. www.sweettomatotestgarden.com. It has no thorns so the pups will not get scratched. Plant anytime.

A good summer night bloomer, a highly fragrant flowered vine, annual and super fast grower, is Moonflower. Plant from seed directly into the ground after March. It can grow more than 6 feet per day with vines over 20 feet. It fills in pretty quick and only blooms on cloudy days and during the night.

All hanging baskets need to have afternoon filtered light and drip watering from a timer. The small amount of soil in the pots dries out here every few hours during the hot days. I hang my baskets on the north side of the porch and in the trees. Dark red, dark orange, geraniums do fine in the sun. I stay away from the pale flower colors in the desert for baskets, the pale pink, yellow and lilac shades don't seem to bloom as profusely in our heat. Verbenas, lantanas, grasses, heuchara (spelling?), alyssum, osteospermum and mini roses in the dark shades grow well in baskets. Add ivy if you have shade. There are lots more.

I can't help you with the trees, unless you like fruit trees. Pines and cypress are evergreen. Usually evergreens are planted away from the house as they block the warm sun in the winter. Deciduous trees are usually planted to shade the house from the summer sun and allow the sun to warm the house in the winter. This can save a lot of heat/AC costs. If you decide to plant a large deciduous tree, a full size apricot is easy to grow and the shape is pretty in the winter even without the leaves. The Royal Rosa variety is a super fast grower. Pretty red blossoms in the spring. I planted a 3 foot bareroot whip last Feb. and it has grown 4 more feet this season. It is now about 7 feet tall.

Leslie

Here is a link that might be useful: Sweet Tomato Test Garden

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Deciduous vine or evergreen? (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: Organic_Posterity on 10.09.2013 at 03:08 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

If the temp drops hard in the winter, then I guess deciduous like a hardy grape such as concord or another native cross. Wisteria is also a very hardy any monster grower once established. Hops is the money. Sambac Jasmine is slow growing and requires straps but smells and tastes so good(Grand Dukes especially).
If it's hot year around, passifora edulis, Honey suckles, and creeping fig is you want a battle.

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RE: vines to grow on pergola (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: bostedo on 09.22.2013 at 02:45 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

If you want evergreen, some of the native coral honeysuckles (lonicera sempervirens) should work in your zone. Though don't know if all improved cultivars, such as 'Major Wheeler', can thrive in 9.

For deciduous, one of the 'Madame' trumpet vine hybrids (campsis x tagliabuana) should work. The native campsis radicans would also work, but future owners may curse you.

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RE: Growing Blueberries in High Desert?? (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: fruitnut on 01.13.2011 at 12:38 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I've had very good luck in pots. Have had some plants in the same 15 gal pot for 6 years. They produce every year and need frequent pruning or they'd be way too big. Ave yield is about 5-8 lbs per plant.

Acid soil is the key and it's best to plant only after the pH is 5.5 or below. I use rainwater as alkaline well water will kill the plants in a year or so. For fertilizer the slow release type for acid loving plants works well. Ammonium sulfate, 21-0-0, is good in small doses.

A good starter variety in medium chill areas would be Star. It blooms late and matures early.

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RE: Growing Blueberries in High Desert?? (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: lorna-organic on 07.24.2007 at 08:16 pm in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I live on a mesa in central NM. I have a few potted blueberry bushes. I use peat and pine needles to provide the acid which all berries love. My blueberries are shaded from most of the hot afternoon sun.

I read about a person getting a government grant to try growing raspberriesin NM, a commercial venture. The person was very successful and has a working raspberry farm! I don't remember exactly where the person has their farm. I believe it is a mountain area.

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RE: Growing Blueberries in High Desert?? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: bigbear1 on 05.19.2006 at 08:40 am in Southwestern Gardening Forum

I am in an inland valley in So. Cal. where it gets quite hot, and have had no problem with southern highbush BB's. I have mine in containers, some are planted in 100% peat moss, others in a potting mix formulated for acid loving plants, which is available anywhere. I fertilize lightly usually 3 times a year. (They are sensitive to over fertiling.)During summer a couple of hours of afternoon shade wouldn't hurt, but I would judge it based on how your plants look. Where did you purchase your plants? That sounds like a great price.

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