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RE: rating of online suppliers of plant (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: nhbabs on 03.08.2012 at 08:46 am in Perennials Forum

Magnoliasouth -

I am not Gardenweed, but here are companies I have been quite pleased with and would order from again. (As someone else mentioned, if I can get it locally, I try to, both to support local businesses and to save mailing costs, which allow me to get more or larger plants for the same $. I live in a rural area, though, so there often isn't the variety I would like.)

Lazy S's Farm Nursery www.lazyssfarm.com all types of ornamentals
Brushwood Nursery http://www.gardenvines.com/ many types of vines
Silver Star Vinery http://www.silverstarvinery.com/ clematis
Hummingbird Farm http://hummingbirdfarm.net/ clematis and herbs
Forest Farm http://www.forestfarm.com/ I've only bought woodies there, so don't know what else they carry
High Country Gardens http://www.highcountrygardens.com/ plants tolerant of dry situations, though they include many I can grow here
Avant Gardens http://www.avantgardensne.com/

I have also ordered from Bluestone http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/b/bp/index.html for this spring. While they had a lot of issues last fall with their new system of growing and shipping, they are a company that has been in business a long time and has great customer service and a guarantee. They have made modifications based on last fall's customer feedback, and unlike many companies with bad reviews on GWatchd*g I trust them to treat me well. With coupons, I found their prices quite reasonable compared to many mailorder & online nurseries.


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clipped on: 07.24.2012 at 05:27 pm    last updated on: 07.24.2012 at 05:27 pm

RE: Cleaning old wood furniture (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: cattknap on 02.03.2008 at 04:32 pm in Home Decorating & Design Forum

I have lots of antique mahogany furniture - I posted this process several years ago on HGTV Decorating forum and lots of people have tried it and had wonderful results - there was a recent thread with pictures.

1. Wash piece with Murphy's Oil Soap, thoroughly dry

2. Use finest grit steel wool and rub in the direction
of the grain of the wood - you will be removing
old wax not the finish. Go over every inch of the
wood with fine steel wool until you feel you have
gotten the old dirty wax off.

3. Wash again with Murphy's Oil Soap & let dry.

4. This is the most amazing of the steps - Use
Howard's Restor-a-Finish in Mahogany stain on
your piece - it will transform the wood.
Follow directions on the can. It will fill in
water stains and other imperfections - the patina
of the old wood will be intact, and your piece
will just glow.

5. Use Howards Feed N' Wax as a final step following
directions on the bottle.

I guarantee you will be amazed by who well this regimen works. Make sure you don't wax your furniture more than a couple times a year - otherwise, you end up building up wax and dirt. Just dust and buff lightly with a soft, dry cloth.

Here is a picture of a really horrible old chest I bought years ago - the wood was completely dead and dull looking - it was filthy and my husband could not understand why I bought it....after following the process listed above, here is how it turned out.

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Good luck!


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Cleaning dresser
clipped on: 07.19.2012 at 04:52 pm    last updated on: 07.19.2012 at 04:52 pm

Half bath reveal (pics) and a question about pedestal sinks...

posted by: joannemb on 07.06.2012 at 01:09 pm in Bathrooms Forum

This is our VERY tiny half bath---
Dh put in hardwood (goes throughout the entire first floor) and wainscotting. He built the cupboard in the wall and lined it with chicken wire (my idea---it was cheaper and easier than glass.) The faucet and sink are American Standard and the hooks on the wall/toilet paper holder are from Pottery Barn. Got the schoolhouse lights online, and the wall color (although it looks very washed out in the picture) is Comet Dust from Valspar.

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My question for those who have pedestal sinks is, do you have a problem cleaning the crease between the wall and the back of the sink? It gets kind of grimey back there after a while and is REALLY hard to get into that crease to clean. Any ideas?

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Keep for built-in storage.
clipped on: 07.09.2012 at 03:59 pm    last updated on: 07.09.2012 at 04:05 pm

RE: What about a 'shower pan' instead of tiled floors? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: weedyacres on 02.12.2008 at 08:31 pm in Bathrooms Forum

snowyshasta: We did that in our last bathroom. The tub already had tile, and we enlarged the shower, using swanstone pan and walls. Here's the finished product:

k&k: The pan is 60"x60" neoangle. We get plenty of water pressure running both shower heads (and sprays) at once. We do bump elbows a bit when we're both showering at the same time, but my DH likes excuses to "bump". :-)


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clipped on: 06.26.2012 at 05:20 pm    last updated on: 06.26.2012 at 05:20 pm

RE: What about a 'shower pan' instead of tiled floors? (Follow-Up #21)

posted by: weedyacres on 03.13.2008 at 10:10 pm in Bathrooms Forum

I'm going to open up my kimono here and give you close-ups of my shower frame. I have not washed it in 6 months; rather I squeegee and spray shower cleaner after each use. We have hard water (water softener is on DH's to do list).

The chair rail came from Lowe's. The faucets (both times, eagle eye) came from ebay. Hey, when it matches and it's only $100....


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Close-up view of shower pan
clipped on: 06.26.2012 at 05:14 pm    last updated on: 06.26.2012 at 05:16 pm

RE: What about a 'shower pan' instead of tiled floors? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: weedyacres on 02.10.2008 at 12:03 am in Bathrooms Forum

We used a shower pan for the reasons you mentioned above. We didn't go with a cheap acrylic one, we bought a solid surface pan from Onyx and tiled the rest. I think they look fine and don't detract from the look, if done right. But beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so you've got to make the call for yourself.

FWIW, the realtor that helped us buy our house a year ago stopped by today to see what we had done with it so far, and she raved (unprompted) about the shower. Here's what ours looks like:


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clipped on: 06.26.2012 at 05:07 pm    last updated on: 06.26.2012 at 05:07 pm

RE: Shower base--acrylic or cast iron? (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: startrekfan on 04.12.2011 at 09:02 am in Bathrooms Forum

Just purchased an MTI shower base. It is an acrylic base with a huge amount of support molded underneath. The slip resistant floor finish has a slight pebble feel not the tiny grooves that collect grime.. They make their bases in many more sizes than Kohler & Swanstone. I couldn't find my size any where else unless I went with custom solid surface which would have broke my budget. I did not find much online about them so I visited their manufacturing facility. I was extremely impressed. So size & cost drove my decision to go with acrylic.


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clipped on: 06.26.2012 at 05:02 pm    last updated on: 06.26.2012 at 05:02 pm

RE: Cast Iron Shower Receptors - worth it? (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: cat_mom on 02.21.2012 at 02:24 am in Bathrooms Forum

We had a Kohler cast iron shower receptor installed in our guest bathroom a few years ago. We had originally ordered what we thought was a fiberglass shower pan, but not only did it turn out to be acrylic, it had no non-slip grips. Back it went, and we got the Kohler cast iron pan instead (had originally read about them here on GW).

It's very solid, looks good, and will hold up well for a very, very long time--definitely durable. Our guest bathroom shower isn't used often, but DH and I used it daily while renovating our upstairs bathrooms two years ago. No complaints.

We think it looks great with our tiled shower walls. Tiled floors look beautiful, but we didn't want to spend what it would have cost to have one in that bathroom. The Kohler cast iron receptor definitely cost less. I don't know how a tile floor would have been with regards to cleaning, but the cast iron pan is very easy to clean.

Only disadvantage to ours is that it is cold when first stepping into the shower (our downstairs is on a slab), but it warms up quickly.

Here's a pic of ours:

View from doorway


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Bath - shower pan
clipped on: 06.26.2012 at 04:55 pm    last updated on: 06.26.2012 at 04:55 pm

RE: urgent ? re small pullout in half wall - beagles or anyone el (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: beaglesdoitbetter on 04.16.2012 at 05:48 pm in Bathrooms Forum

kirkhall here is the picture of my half wall that flyleft referenced. It is 12 inches wide. My cabinet maker built it and I believe (but am not 100 percent sure) that Rev-a-Shelf glides were used
2012-02-20 13.32.25


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Knee wall next to toilet in 1st floor bath?
clipped on: 04.17.2012 at 03:10 pm    last updated on: 04.17.2012 at 03:34 pm

Solid Shower receptors.

posted by: palimpsest on 03.31.2012 at 11:13 am in Bathrooms Forum

Does anybody use solid shower receptors anymore, (on Gardenweb, anyway)?

In my next house, there is a brand-new, terribly done bathroom (as in tile on green drywall, no waterproofing; probably tile on plywood underlayment).

I want to redo both bathrooms (one will have a bathtub) and add a bathroom in the basement. Companies that make terrazzo shower pans and companies like Swanstone and Americh all make a large variety of shower receptors, but most people seem to be doing tile shower floors.

The house is 1963, and I think a solid pan would look appropriate...but it seems like these are out of favor, at least around here. Comments?

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clipped on: 04.05.2012 at 03:07 pm    last updated on: 04.05.2012 at 03:09 pm

Need 3/4 bath in 4' x 10' space... HELP!

posted by: FrugalFarmhouse on 04.01.2012 at 01:11 pm in Bathrooms Forum

I'm trying to put a bathroom into a long, narrow space with a doorway on one end. This is the only bathroom in a cabin, so it must have usable shower,toilet and sink. The cabin sleeps 8, so it's going to get a lot of use. Must be durable, functional, and cheap! Any suggestions are appreciated.

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Similar issues to out remodel.
clipped on: 04.02.2012 at 04:31 pm    last updated on: 04.02.2012 at 04:41 pm

Bathroom Renovation complete on Budget ... lots of pics!

posted by: rufinorox on 03.11.2012 at 09:52 pm in Bathrooms Forum

It has been over 3 weeks since our Bathroom Renovation, but we are finally complete! Our renovation was right on budget at $3000.00. This was a DIY project, which took 5 days to complete, however last minute touches took a few more weeks. Following are before and after pictures along with item details. For those that have followed my post I'm happy to say I love the color! OR really I have no choice he will not re-paint for a 3rd time. I can live with it. I'm proud of my hubby and his friend - they did a great job.

Shower Tile - Home Depot - Topaz Ice
Glass Mosaic - Italian Foil - Home Depot
Floor Tile - Home Depot - Brazilian Slate
Vanity - Home Decorators.com
Kohler Recessesed Medicine Cabinet - Lowes
Tub - American Standard Americast Tub
Toilet - American Standard Cadet
Lighting - 3 light by Latitude
Kohler Mistos Shower/Bath Faucet in nickel
Kohler Mistos Sink Faucet in nickel
BM Paint - Sierra Hills

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I'm still hoping to find another picture or glass shelf to hang above the toilet as well as to the right of the medicine cabinet. I haven't found the right shower curtain either.

Any suggestions will be appreicated.

Thanks to all of you who gave me great suggestion especially helping out with color.

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$3k budget for Cher.
clipped on: 03.14.2012 at 04:04 pm    last updated on: 03.14.2012 at 04:12 pm

RE: HELP!!! What have I gotten myself into??? (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: karinl on 02.27.2012 at 02:28 pm in Old House Forum

It's been my mission to remove about 8 layers of paint from all of our trim, and it can be done to varying degrees in different ways. Search this forum for discussions of paint stripping; there have been lots. To answer your several questions I'll just describe our process:

Rough strip the thick layers: this can be done with a heat gun (inexpensive but may release lead fumes and can start fires), an infrared paint stripper (Silent Paint Remover, expensive but probably safer at least with respect to lead, but can also burn wood), or with various chemical methods. We've just gotten the IR stripper, but have previously used both the heat gun and chemicals. We're very pleased with the IR unit.

Of note here is whether you can work outdoors - that is to say, whether you have removed the trim to work on it or not. We removed almost all our trim and have done almost all that (outdoors), but finding the time/opportunity to work on the stuff we left up is.... eh, not happening. On the other hand, if you work outdoors it is seasonal work - fall and spring. Too cold in winter, too hot in summer. Another downside is that trim can be damaged by removal. But working flat rather than upright and trying to protect floors: for me, priceless.

Our chemical paint stripper of choice is EZ Way, something we found at a trade show years ago and that you have to mail order from Washington State. We like the liquid; the semipaste is awkward, I find. But other off-the shelf strippers do work for this stage, including those with methylene chloride, which is one ingredient I've avoided from the outset. I've also tried several of the friendly stippers, and they work too - eventually. You have to find one that will stick to vertical surfaces if you are working in place.

With the EZ way, I dip shop cloths in it, wrap it over the wood, cover it in plastic, and wait an hour or so. Other chem strippers too will benefit from being covered with plastic - but not all.

There is usually an interim stage of getting the bulk of the colour off, and then there is the final stage of getting it out of the pores. This is usually - apply stripper, wait, use 3m scrub pads and later cloths, and just keep going until it's all out. You need a LOT of pads and cloths - the aforementioned blue shop towels are good, and later just plain paper towels too, but strong ones.

A toothbrush is also a very useful tool at this stage, rather than your steel wool.

The reason we like the EZ Way is most evident at the end, which is where most strippers need a clean-up with a different rinse - water or I think paint thinner. EZ way needs no separate clean-up because it evaporates, and you can keep going with it until your pores are as clean as you like. Before we discovered EZ Way we adapted to still seeing traces of the paint! That's an acquired taste, and I'm here to say, you can live with it and it is still better than trim covered with the old paint.

It will happen that you strip wood and find it doesn't look that good (bad grain) or that you can't get the final colour out. In that case, you might decide to repaint and then I still find it worth stripping because the multiple layers of colour totally conceal the moulding profile, and in our case, old paint drips are all over the place and I can't stand them.

I think something called Kutzit might be similar to EZ Way but I'm not sure. Key point is to look for something that doesn't require water or other clean-up to get rid of stripper residue.

Plan to do this over a period, possibly of years. I am NOT going to tell you how many have elapsed for us! Maybe do one opening at a time, so that if you pause, it is bearable to look at for a while :-)

Oh, and sanding... I don't think we have ever sanded unless we have applied filler to the old nail holes or other damage. I assume it's all lead paint, for which sanding is contraindicated. It wouldn't be the patina so much as the profile I'd be afraid of damaging, and the wood was finished to start with so should not need it for smoothing. EZ way does not raise wood grain so that's another advantage.

Karin L


NOTES:

Info for possibly stripping kitchen window trim.
clipped on: 03.07.2012 at 10:39 am    last updated on: 03.07.2012 at 10:45 am

Small bath remodel on a modest budget. Finished!

posted by: girlcat36 on 11.11.2009 at 09:21 pm in Bathrooms Forum

My 5 x 9 bathroom was gutted March 1st, and it was a long haul, but it is finally finished and usable! I am very happy with the end result. I was going for a 'modern Bohemian' look; kind of eclectic.
I had a small budget, and except for the tile, most everything was purchased online.
I lived with the 'before' bathroom for 12 years(ugh), it was mildewed because there was no exhaust vent, the vinyl floor had been painted multiple times. It was the original builders 'budget special'.
Due to a severe mold allergy, it was time to properly vent and upgrade, finally!
I had a closet door moved to be accessed from inside the bathroom, and had a french pocket door installed; I covered the glass panes on the door with opaque window film.
The ceiling was bumped up and covered with white washed fir tongue and groove.
Before(oh, the horror):
BEFORE. Bad, bad bath.

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Reading this forum proved to be enormously helpful, as I was overwhelmed by having to make decisions!

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clipped on: 03.07.2012 at 09:50 am    last updated on: 03.07.2012 at 09:52 am

RE: To tile all the way or paint? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: biochem101 on 02.27.2012 at 08:22 pm in Bathrooms Forum

It depends how big the bathroom is, to me.
Ours is small and I noticed in photos where the tile stopped short
and the paint continued around the top of the room, the room looks bigger.
In other words, the wall color continues into the tub niche including it in the room.

Where the tub is totally tiled in, it appears to be a separate tiny room.
Besides, I do not embrace the idea of cleaning ceiling grout.

Not my bathroom, just an example:

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Bath inspiration for shower, toilet, and sink.
clipped on: 03.01.2012 at 04:55 pm    last updated on: 03.01.2012 at 05:36 pm

Finished budget guest bath

posted by: mtnfever on 01.14.2012 at 07:54 pm in Bathrooms Forum

We decided to put a jetted tub in the guest bath to help DH with his arthritis. Then the dominos fell: redo tub wall to allow 66" tub, remove tub tile surround, tile wainscot, tile floor, replace vanity top, faucets, lights, fan, heating, and oh yeah add a tv so he can watch football highlights in the morning while he soaks. And plaster the walls.

Here're the before pics. It was and is a small bath so pics were difficult.
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Caveats: I started out going for transitional contemporary (thanks again to Palimpsest for my house style!) and halfway through (DIY + retired = 8 months! Luckily master bath and powder rooms were available) realized it should be more rustic contemporary given the house's fireplace, beams, etc. If I end up doing a backsplash (haven't missed it so far), it may be a stone veneer to help with the rustic. The vanity is in really good shape and there are somewhere around 40-50 other golden oak cabs in the house so it stayed as is.

Here's the afters:
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and here're enough details to put everyone to sleep:
Tub: Hydromassage acrylic (Mystique? maybe is the model) made in Denver and ordered /shipped free from WI dealer. At the last minute DH had to have air in the addition to the jets, and those are the only thing I've had trouble keeping clean.
Surround: Onyx Collection Cappuchino--found due to people on this forum so thank you!! Very easy to clean. Heavy panels so DH needed a couple friends for the large back panel.
Train rack from Amazon for $15--again thanks to this forum! Fits the space and is nice though I would get a wider one if I had the space.
Shower set w/valve and sink faucet: Kohler Fairfax in chrome from FaucetDirect who provided great service. Handshower is Price Pfister (again with the budget!) A Kensington Brass diverter to switch between and Delta retrofit 6' hose to rinse the whole shower.
Vanity top/sink: Sesame gold (I'm sure it's an alias) granite with white undermount sink from Denver Granite Tile --both for $200! I sure didn't expect to get a solid surface and sink for that. They were cool too about doing a cut to fit our offset sink requirement for $10.
Vanity light: Progress Lynzie 3-light from FaucetDirect/ LightingDirect. Hard to install but you only do that once, right?
Walls: American Clay plaster in Sulfer Springs (behind door) and Nantucket Sand on other walls. The natural clay plaster helps absorb humidity and provides great texture and depth.
Floor: Trafficmaster Allure Ultra vinyl click flooring, $3sqft and waterproof-love it!
Underfloor heat: Carbonic heat mat--super thin and works great! *Love* it!! Thanks to stacyneil for her timely bath remodels, though we ended up not needing to do SLC.
Toilet: swapped white toilet from powder room to match white tub and sink --free! (Powder room now has matching Mexican Sand toilet and cultured marble sink, sigh)
Mirror frame: Moulding from Lowe's, stained by us and mounted with double-sided tape. More thanks to this forum. This frame made a much bigger impact than we ever thought it would, we were very surprised.
Fan: Broan ultra quiet with humidity sensor--another forum recommendation! It *is* very quiet. We wanted to be able to turn the fan on manually so needed to separately order a two-button switch.
Soap dispenser: Simplehuman works well and I like being able to use the soap color. Cleaning takes a bit to get used to without getting spit at.
Shower rod: Moen adjustable 66". I hadn't wanted adjustable since someone said that the curtain rings get caught in the middle and it's true argh. But a very small argh.
Towel holder: I hate clanking towel rings. The towel can just slip off of the Moen paper holder as needed.
Shower curtain: DH wanted to be able to sit on the tub edge so no tracks and I really didn't want to deal with any glass, or doors in such a small bath.
TV: Visio. There's a vent pipe smack between the two outlets above the toilet, or the whole thing would've been inset into the wall. I even had the granite piece from the vanity top trimming to use as the back of it :(. Bummer.

Everything has worked out very well. One regret is staying with 1/2'' plumbing instead of splurging for the 3/4'', but the valve was so much more for the larger size.

Many thanks to you contributors on the forum and those who perserved reading to the end!

cheers

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clipped on: 03.01.2012 at 04:57 pm    last updated on: 03.01.2012 at 05:33 pm

7 days bath renovation complete ... need paint color

posted by: rufinorox on 02.28.2012 at 10:42 pm in Bathrooms Forum

A week ago we tore our bath apart and this is where we are today. We still need our medicine cabinet and vanIty light installed, however picking a paint color has been a challenge. I'm hoping someone can help me decide. I'm not sure if I should go light or dark in the brown family.

Here are some pictures of before and after.

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clipped on: 03.01.2012 at 05:30 pm    last updated on: 03.01.2012 at 05:31 pm

finished! Green vanity, marble basketweave, hex niche

posted by: shanghaimom on 02.28.2012 at 07:48 pm in Bathrooms Forum

We just finished our bathroom/laundry room combo. I'm so happy to have a bathtub back! Our house was built in 1889 and I have tried to keep a vintage feel in the bathrooms.

I was able to answer most of my questions with a good search, but definitely used all of the beautiful "finished bath" photos for inspiration. I discovered that "shower niches" aka "shampoo niches" are a bugger to find good photos of, so I'm including a pic of that! I used some leftover kitchen backsplash tile and let the tile guy go to town.

Kohler Memoirs sink, toilet, and shower combo.
Hampton Carerra basketweave floor tile from the Tile Shop
Calacatta Gold vanity countertop
White subways, baseboard and wainscot trim also Tile Shop
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clipped on: 03.01.2012 at 05:29 pm    last updated on: 03.01.2012 at 05:31 pm