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What size pots for pepper plants?

posted by: LeafEricson on 02.17.2013 at 01:01 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Hi everyone, just wondering if anyone can help me out here? This year I want to try Al's 5-1-1 mix using grow bags. I already have like 50 pepper plants growing and another 100 on their way. So due to limited garden space (other vegies I am already committed to) I want to try out grow bags using drip irrigation and Al's mix. I am currently using a 3 gallon grow bag as a test for a tomato plant using just coir and liquid hydroponic nutes but I am not sure what gallon size grow bag I should use for pepper plants using Al's 5-1-1 mix.
Before I buy a lot of these grow bags I will ask the question..
What gallon size pots does everyone else use with Al's 5-1-1 mix?

Eric

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clipped on: 11.15.2013 at 12:25 am    last updated on: 11.15.2013 at 12:25 am

RE: Ottawapepper's 2012 peppers (pics) (Follow-Up #58)

posted by: PEPPERMEISTER1 on 08.13.2012 at 10:20 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Ottawapepper: Beautiful harvest! I also feel like we could all learn a lot from you but i can't find a giant pic of my face to really nail that point home. Looking forward to Part Deux.

That earwig damage looks like the damage on some of my neighbor's pods. What do you use to kill those bastards?

Fiery-er Regards,
Peppermeister

Here is a link that might be useful: PEPPERMEISTER! Hot Pepper Gardening, Recipes and Chile Info

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clipped on: 11.15.2013 at 12:19 am    last updated on: 11.15.2013 at 12:20 am

RE: Best and worst chiles for smoking (Follow-Up #19)

posted by: sjetski on 10.09.2013 at 09:29 am in Hot Pepper Forum

Agreed with others, different types of wood impart their own flavor, length of smoking time plays a part too. The thread linked below should provide some info.

Steve

Here is a link that might be useful: Preferred Wood for Smoking Peppers

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clipped on: 11.15.2013 at 12:14 am    last updated on: 11.15.2013 at 12:14 am

Using lacto-bacteria to ferment peppers

posted by: david52 on 08.24.2006 at 09:44 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

On another forum I mentioned using Kefir starter to ferment roasted Hatch chili and make some seriously good hot sauce, and they thought I should mention it here where the True Believers congregate. The idea came a few years ago from a poster from Germany who thought everyone else was crazy to let the fermenting bacteria, like when making sauerkraut, just sort of randomly pick themselves out of the air in your kitchen, when one could introduce something that would guarantee good, if not spectacular, results. This is sorta what they do with wine and beer, and it made sense. So I tried it.

I buy a box, which is 2.2 bushels, of hot, roasted chili. It's put in a bag, I let it sweat and cool for a couple of hours, and collect the juice that inevitably drips through the plastic. When its cool enough to handle, I open the bag up, pull off the stems, and start layering the flattened, roasted chili's in a crock, an inch layer followed with a healthy sprinkle of salt. The object here is two tablespoons of salt to 5 lbs of chili, but a bit more or less isn't going to change much.

I get Kefir starter off the internet, or through a local health food shoppe. I get the powdered stuff. Kefir is a bacteria that will convert milk into a thick, drinkable curd, picture Gengis Khan and his horde snorking the stuff out of those leather canteens as they pillage villages looking for some decent chili. These days, Yoga practitioners sip the stuff with raspberries to bump their calcium, and I use it to ferment vegetables.

Anyway, I take the warm chili juice and whisk in a box of kefir starter, and pour it into the chili-salt crock, stir it up with a steel spoon, and then set a doubled, plastic bag full of water on top to seal it off. I set the crock in a cool (70 - 80�F) spot, and I come back in 6 weeks. I run it through a food mill to mush it all up, and cut it with white wine vinegar so it pours a bit easier.

Its best like that. This is the 3rd year in a row I've done this, and its awesome. You'd have to try it to appreciate it, the smell alone will let you know that its very good stuff. It doesn't disappoint. Not surprisingly, it also corresponds when they slaughter hogs, so its pretty easy to make some awesome green chili pork for the freezer.

I will try, if I can, to use powdered yogurt starter in another batch this summer, and see if it works as well. I should also think that smaller quantities would do as well.

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clipped on: 11.15.2013 at 12:12 am    last updated on: 11.15.2013 at 12:13 am

Best Soil Practices for Peppers

posted by: Stormtruck2 on 10.06.2013 at 02:11 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

I have heard planting peppers in the same spot each year will add heat to them. I don't believe this but I know very little about growing peppers. I rotate my crops each year, planting high nitrogen need plants where I had plants that put nitrogen in the soil the year before. I strive for 100% organic in my garden. Year end I pile and burn all my garden debris then spread the ash through out the garden and till it in to over winter. I do not use any accelerates on the fire, so no chemicals are put on the ground. Should I plant the same peppers in the same ground year after year in order to increase heat? Also, I am open to any other best practices hints for the garden. Thanks.

This post was edited by Stormtruck2 on Sun, Oct 6, 13 at 17:58

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clipped on: 11.15.2013 at 12:12 am    last updated on: 11.15.2013 at 12:12 am

RE: Pod drop on trinidad scropion (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: woohooman on 07.15.2013 at 12:50 am in Hot Pepper Forum

Tony, I'm not totally sure, but I believe pepper weevils are more of southern latitude bug.

Hill: could be that those blooms/pods were part of a timing thing with your temp fluctuations while the other superhots that are doing fine had developed stronger fruit prior to the temps swaying. /shrug Dunno

Willard3 says these are the main reasons pods/blooms drop---

Flower drop probable causes:

1. Day temp too high >95F
2. Night temp too low <65F
3. Too much nitrogen fertilizer
4. Too much water
5. Low light levels (reduces fertility).
6. Very low humidity (reduces fertility)
7. Poor air circulation (air circulation contributes to pollination).
8. Lack of pollinating insects.
9. Size of pot
10. Too much mineral in feedwater.
11. Too much grower attention/anxiety.

Copy and paste... thanks willard3

Kevin

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clipped on: 07.16.2013 at 03:56 am    last updated on: 07.16.2013 at 03:56 am

Forum for Cucumber or Melons?

posted by: HillSeeker on 06.26.2013 at 11:39 am in Vegetable Gardening Forum

Looking for information on growing melons & cucumbers. I cannot find a dedicated forum for this or cucurbits. Can someone point me to the right forum where I can post my question?

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clipped on: 07.01.2013 at 02:16 am    last updated on: 07.01.2013 at 02:16 am

Fermented pepper sauce not fermenting?

posted by: Microphobik on 05.26.2013 at 12:46 am in Hot Pepper Forum

Hi,

I'm attempting my first vegetable ferment ever in the form of a hot pepper sauce. It's a pretty small batch. I basically ground up some jalepenos, Serranos, a bell and a clove of garlic to get a cup an a quarter of mash. I added a teaspoon of sea salt (unfortunately my scale decided to break in the middle of this so I had to wing it). I then added half a cup of salt water to cover the mash. Ratio was half cup water and 1tsp of salt and half cup water. I also stirred in a tsp of brown sugar. Then I collected a tsp of whey from yogurt that contains acidophilus and stored it in. I covered with a pretty pouris cheese cloth and left out over night. Today I covered with the mason jar lid with an airlock attached.

The problem is that 24 hours later I'm not seeing any activity. What might I have done wrong here? Am I just not waiting long enough or is it possibly too late for this batch?

I have a cheese making starter in the fridge, would adding that help?

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clipped on: 05.27.2013 at 12:47 pm    last updated on: 05.27.2013 at 12:47 pm

RE: 7 Pot Jonah seed from ottawapepper (Follow-Up #74)

posted by: habjolokia on 08.04.2012 at 12:38 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Peppernovice

1 bottle (the pepper is the star in the sauce)

10 peppers of your choice
1/2 cup Vinegar 5% acidity of your choice
1/2 lemon or lime fresh squeezed
1 teaspoon of sea salt
Any veg of your choice mix and match if you would like
Clove of garlic, onion, carrot or what ever you like. I don't recommend anything that holds a lot of water like tomato's

Any other spices you may want to add for flavor.

It's fun and the key is to make it your own by trying different things and combinations until you have your sauce.

You can cook any way you choose, the peppers and veggies to soften.
Blend ingredients
Bring ingredients to a boil
Boil bottle and cap for about 15-20 min

Place boiling sauce into hot bottle. you take the bottle out of the pot and immediately put the sauce in it, cap it. Let it sit 24 hrs then enjoy. If you can let it sit for 3-5 days the flavors have more time to blend. I just can't wait that long only did that once.

Bill I like you take on the gotta try it once, great story, Man I am slacking, not been on any radio or cooking station lol.

Mark

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clipped on: 05.04.2013 at 04:33 am    last updated on: 05.04.2013 at 04:33 am

Greenman's Peppers 2013

posted by: greenman28 on 02.28.2013 at 02:49 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

It's that time again, chile friends....

Starting with a crunchy seed-starting mix - screened fir bark, screened perlite, and screened turface.
On the left, a basket of 5-1-1 (with turface instead of peat); in the middle basket and in the bucket,
some Gritty Mix (1-1-1). For the slow-growing superhots, I used the gritty mix.

 photo DSCN2144.jpg

Planted my seeds: Red, Yellow, and Chocolate Bhut Jolokia, Trinidad Scorpion Morouga Blend, Datil,
and Douglah. Covered the cells with some plastic wrap and waited....

 photo DSCN2160.jpg

A week later, the Yellow Bhut sprouted....the first one up, just like last year.

 photo DSCN2179.jpg

Two weeks later, more seeds have sprouted....all but the Douglah, which I tried a second time, as well.
I guess it just isn't meant to be this year.

 photo DSCN2303.jpg

Two weeks after starting the superhots (and the Datil), I sowed my fast-growers - Thai, Hungarian, Monkey Face.
I also sowed Bonda ma Jacques with this batch, before I realized that Bonda is a chinense. C'est la vie, no?

Anyhow, I sowed these seeds in 5-1-1 mix to give it a try. The seeds took about a week, which is actually a bit
longer than usual, particularly for the Thai chiles. They are up now, and ready to be thinned (the Thai's at least).

 photo DSCN2302.jpg


That's the news from northern California :-)


Josh

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clipped on: 05.04.2013 at 04:18 am    last updated on: 05.04.2013 at 04:18 am

RE: Bhut Uses? (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: woohooman on 02.20.2013 at 06:34 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Bruce: I do the same thing to mayo AND ranch dressing. For a wimp in a cup of mayo?? Maybe 1-4... try making a small batch 1st with just one and go from there.

Here's another one that takes a bit more time, but is great using fresh Jalapenos and serranos-- a couple peppers, some onion, and garlic(all minced), saute in oil for a few mins., let cool a bit and whip into mayo or ranch. Great on a sandwich or salad.

Kevin

This post was edited by woohooman on Wed, Feb 20, 13 at 18:35

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clipped on: 05.04.2013 at 04:16 am    last updated on: 05.04.2013 at 04:16 am

RE: Past and Present :) - :( (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: nc-crn on 04.26.2013 at 09:24 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Sun shouldn't even touch the plants on the first few days unless it's semi-shade. Getting them used to the wind is enough stress on the leaves and water movement through them.

I harden off at 3 sets of leaves in a small 4x or 6x starter cell, but even then they don't see more than an hour the first day (unless they seem to be handling it well) and 2-3 hours for a couple days afterwards.

Once they get a bit of natural protection on the leaves, then they can taste some unfiltered sun under a "check every half hour" watch.

After 6-7 days of this (the first 3 being no or filtered sun) then they're generally good to go.

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clipped on: 04.26.2013 at 11:58 pm    last updated on: 04.26.2013 at 11:58 pm

Bark Chips or 5:1:1 Suitable for tomatoes?

posted by: HillSeeker on 04.19.2013 at 03:54 am in Hot Pepper Forum

I thought I would ask here as I bought too much bark to make the 5:1:1 mix. I need to fill up my existing greenhouse trays where the tomatoes will go and thought I'd mix in some bark. Anyone know if that will be a problem or not? How much would you suggest to add to general soil & compost? Trying to save from going back and spending more on soil as well.

Oh also what about sweet peppers. Do they like the 5:1:1 mix. I'm a total newbie (doing it the proper way this year with good results though thanks to all of you) so any advice I'd love. Thanks!

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clipped on: 04.19.2013 at 03:54 am    last updated on: 04.19.2013 at 03:54 am

RE: Water PH Problems (Follow-Up #3)

posted by: sleeplessinftwayne on 03.22.2013 at 04:13 am in Greenhouses & Garden Structures Forum

I agree there is some other problem. I would look more at the water temp, ambient temps and the soil temps. There are charts that tell you appropriate temps.

As for not being able to control the PH, have you checked the KH? KH is a measure of stability . If it is off then the PH can change rapidly. You can stabilize the KH with Bicarbonate of soda or make some slugs of Plaster of Paris that has no additional additives in it. Put one in the water and let it sit for a while. If the PH is whacked, the POP will gradually be consumed until the water is neutral. Once it is neutral, there will be no additional effect.

If you are using test strips, they can be inaccurate. The liquid tests are much more accurate.

How much light are the seedlings getting. When I had too little light, I used reflective mylar to increase the light. The difference was amazing. The closer to the mylar, the healthier the plant.

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clipped on: 04.10.2013 at 07:04 pm    last updated on: 04.10.2013 at 07:05 pm

Advice for a Novice Grower?

posted by: PepperGuy222 on 04.10.2013 at 05:12 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

So im new to this whole pepper thing and Ive only grown peppers for one summer but turnout wasnt the greatest. I also live in NW Ohio, weather is shaping up to be high 50's and better from now on. I was wonderng a couple things.

1st. Whats the deal with this mulch/bark mix, I see this in so many threads and really dont understand it.

2nd. I dont know what the difference between a soft white CFL light and a regular CFL light is.

3rd. I really dont know when to repot my plants. I started them all in those peat pods and now I dont know when the right time to transfer them to my planting pots that I bought.

This is the information that I really dont understand and some insight would be awesome from all of you pros out there. Thanks everyone.

Steve

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clipped on: 04.10.2013 at 06:51 pm    last updated on: 04.10.2013 at 06:51 pm

RE: What are these crystal like structures on leaves? (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: Edymnion on 04.07.2013 at 01:50 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

I saw something similar to this with sweet potatoes I was practicing on earlier in the year. I forget it's name, but basically its that the plant is getting more water than it can evaporate out through the leaves, and some of the cells are rupturing and their juicy innards are crystalizing out onto the leaf surface.

Caused by too much water + too much humidity.

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clipped on: 04.08.2013 at 01:05 am    last updated on: 04.08.2013 at 01:05 am

RE: Hardening off (sunburn) (Follow-Up #5)

posted by: esox07 on 04.07.2013 at 11:53 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

I dont really know of a hard and fast rule. Basically a few days of shade, then a few days of broken sun or filtered sun, then a few more days of full sun. But while you do this, you start with just an hour or two and work your way up in time per day. Don't put them out for 8 hours the first day, even in shade. Give them a couple hours the first day, then two, the three or four. Also, if conditions are not good (temps, wind, etc...) you can skip a day or two or three. What I do is try to give them increasing amounts of sun each time unless it I start to see signs of sunburn. Sunburn will usually show up as a grayish or discoloration on the lower level (older) leaves. A minor sunburn will not significantly hurt your plant. If anything, it will result in the loss of a few leaves. Here is a photo of some sunburn on a Ghost Pepper plant from two years ago.
Bruce

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clipped on: 04.08.2013 at 01:01 am    last updated on: 04.08.2013 at 01:01 am

RE: How to harden off while working full time? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: HillSeeker on 04.02.2013 at 01:08 am in Hot Pepper Forum

What about hardening off super hots in Canada? Not sure if it's different than the posts I've read. I have a greenhouse that is not heated but lost many tomato seedlings last year from not understanding this concept. Want to get them planted directly into the greenhouse first week or two of May, possibly earlier if the snow melts. Can anyone answer these questions?

-Overwintered Bhut & Hab: Can they have blossoms on them during hardening off or planting stage? They have tons I keep snipping.
-Do you harden off overwintered peppers any different than seedlings?
-Any other steps when moving overwintered plant to outside?

-Scorpion seedling starting to blossom. Do I cut them off until planted in the permanent container and can develop root system?
-Harden off in warmer greenhouse with little shade & direct sun or outside with more environmental factors and much cooler? Currently indoors at about 72 degrees with 8-10 hours fan, growlux bulbs supplemented by a south facing window. All lush green and healthy.
- When should I start to harden off? Daytime temps are supposed to be +7 to +12 in the next few weeks but still a foot of snow. Greenhouse will get much warmer than that, usually 5-10 degrees in spring.
-How much time outside, how do you increment and how often. Days, weeks? I really have no idea in our climate that will range from zero to +15 over the next month.

I don't want to loose these peppers. Thanks!

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clipped on: 04.02.2013 at 01:09 am    last updated on: 04.02.2013 at 01:09 am

RE: looks like sugar on leaves (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: woohooman on 03.03.2013 at 05:20 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Looks like a fungus. Are you sure you didn't spill anything? or maybe dust?

If not, try a weak solution of chamomile tea, some neem oil, or 3% peroxide.

Kevin

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clipped on: 04.02.2013 at 12:40 am    last updated on: 04.02.2013 at 12:40 am

RE: How to grow pepper plants from cuttings? (Follow-Up #6)

posted by: habjolokia on 04.01.2013 at 05:40 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

I would try teyo approach as I know water will not work or if it does it takes longer than I care to wait. See my post previous GW post.

Bruce was able to successfully root a cutting and have it grow. Maybe he can comment on the method he used.

Mark

Here is a link that might be useful: Clippings/Cuttings

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clipped on: 04.02.2013 at 12:35 am    last updated on: 04.02.2013 at 12:35 am

RE: How to grow pepper plants from cuttings? (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: teyo on 04.01.2013 at 04:43 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Most will root very easily. You just need to keep the humidity up and keep them out of direct sunlight. If you have a dome thingy, then just fill a cup with lightly moist whichever potting mix, stick the cutting in there and put under the dome. If not, take a soda bottle, cut in half, poke holes in the bottom half for drainage, poke a couple of small holes in the top for venting, fill bottom with moist mix, stick in cutting, cover with top of bottle (with the cap on). Place in light and warm place. They will show signs of growth in as soon as 3 days for some varieties.
They are really dead easy to root for me, but i didn't get half as good results with rooting in water though.

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clipped on: 04.02.2013 at 12:35 am    last updated on: 04.02.2013 at 12:35 am

RE: Pine Bark project (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: Bill_Missy on 03.30.2013 at 01:58 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

What I used for a sifter was a diamond grate with 3/4 x 1 1/2". Now to find something smaller.

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clipped on: 04.02.2013 at 12:28 am    last updated on: 04.02.2013 at 12:28 am

RE: YELLOW ghost pepper??? (Follow-Up #32)

posted by: Gh0stChili on 03.28.2013 at 06:33 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Locate flowers on one parent pepper plant that are nearly ready to bloom. They are easily distinguished by their unfurled sepals, or green outer petals, which reveal the flower’s inner petals. Use small scissors and latex gloves to cut away any bloomed flowers surrounding the unbloomed flowers, as they could pollinate them. Cut the bloomed flowers at least 1/4 inch down the stem leaving only the unbloomed flowers. Wash the scissors with rubbing alcohol and put on a new pair of latex gloves before proceeding.

2

Peel away the flower’s unbloomed inner petals with tweezers to reveal the interior of the blossom. You will see several stamens, the male organs of the flower. Use the small scissors to clip away the stamens, leaving only the pistil in the center of the flower. Wrap a twist tie around the stem of the emasculated flower to mark it and repeat with as many others as you would like. Wash the scissors and tweezers with rubbing alcohol and change into a new pair of latex gloves before proceeding.

3

Repeat the process of emasculation on the second pepper plant with at least one flower. Do not discard the removed stamens. Slice up the side of one stamen with a dissecting needle and use its tip to scoop out the pollen from inside. Apply the pollen to the top of the exposed pistil, known as a stigma, on one of the other parent pepper plant’s flowers. Repeat with the remaining harvested stamens and exposed pistils.

4

Watch the pollinated flowers. Within three to four days, the ovary, located below the pistil, will begin to swell. This is a sign of successful pollination. The resulting fruit and subsequent seeds are the crossbred pepper species. If the ovaries do not swell, the pollination was not successful. The most common cause of unsuccessful pollination is damage to the pistil during emasculation.

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clipped on: 03.29.2013 at 01:49 pm    last updated on: 03.29.2013 at 01:49 pm

RE: my superhots (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: kypepperman on 03.28.2013 at 03:05 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

I start them in my starting box, which is the green freezer, it is thermostaticly controled to 85 degrees, after germination they are moved to the grow box. it has two clfs per chamber. after the second set of leaves start i put them under a 400w metal halide for about a week or so to get them used to BRIGHT light and then transfer them to a 1000w hps, i run a 18 on 6 off cycle

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clipped on: 03.29.2013 at 01:44 pm    last updated on: 03.29.2013 at 01:44 pm

RE: Are BJs particularly susceptible to sunburn? (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: esox07 on 03.16.2013 at 05:11 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

DMForcier: I imagine that different varieties are more susceptible to sunburn than others. But what I do know is that "6 hours of direct sun yesterday, and again for today" is way too much unless they have been previously exposed to direct sun. Also, it may just take a little longer for the signs of sunburn to show on some of the other plants. What I noticed the year where I sunburned some plants is that it seemed to affect the older leaves much more than the newest growth. But, in the end, they all came through it with little lasting affect.
Bruce

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clipped on: 03.16.2013 at 06:53 pm    last updated on: 03.16.2013 at 06:53 pm

RE: Moldy soil (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: Edymnion on 03.12.2013 at 11:47 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

I have tried those mini greenhouse setups repeatedly. Some had tons of vents, some had none, all had the same results. Mold. If its effective enough to keep the warm air in, it will grow mold, I have not found any exceptions to that fact.

My advice would be to throw the cover out, or use it as a drip tray for pots. Should never be placed over actual soil.

In the mean time, spray what you've got down in hydrogen peroxide. That should kill the mold without harming your seeds/seedlings.

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clipped on: 03.16.2013 at 01:03 am    last updated on: 03.16.2013 at 01:03 am

How'd you know Al's 5:1:1 preparation is wrong?

posted by: chilliwin on 03.14.2013 at 03:18 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

How would you know Al's 5:1:1 preparation is wrong?

1. Water retentive?
2. Heavy?
3. Soil shrunk when dried?
4. Pine bark color too dark?

What it could be happened when we put excess doses of dolomite/garden lime and slow-release fertilizer? How do we know it is too much?

Caelian

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clipped on: 03.16.2013 at 12:59 am    last updated on: 03.16.2013 at 12:59 am

RE: Did I accidentally overwater? (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: rdback on 03.15.2013 at 05:28 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Hello ab.

Looks like over-watering to me, but could be a deficiency. Regardless, here’s what I’d do:

1) water only when dry
2) water from the bottom
3) start using fish emulsion at 25% rate and use every watering OR
4) start using fish emulsion at 50% rate and use EVERY OTHER watering
5) keep your lights close (1-2 in)
6) run lights 16 hr a day (i.e. 6am-10pm)
7) let plants rest in darkness for 8 hr (i.e. 10pm-6am)
8) run fan sporadically during the "day"

Try to create the outside environment they'll be living in inside, i.e. daytime and nighttime. Use the fan during the day because the wind doesn't usually blow at night *smile*. By the way most, but not all, fish emulsions also contain trace elements like calcium and magnesium, so look for those.

Also, quit taking your plants outside on nice days. It’s nice and relaxing for you, but it’s pretty stressful on the plants. If you’re really in Zone 6, your last frost date is what, sometime in May? Shoot I wouldn't look to hardening off your plants until a week before whatever that date is, give or take.

Anyway, that’s my 2c.

Best of luck buddy.

Rick

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clipped on: 03.16.2013 at 12:54 am    last updated on: 03.16.2013 at 12:54 am

RE: Did I accidentally overwater? (Follow-Up #8)

posted by: kypepperman on 03.12.2013 at 09:36 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

cant really tell if it is glare or not but if it is not glare on the douglah's then it is sunburn. Its best not to bounce them around from inside to outside.when you put them out let them stay out. just because it seems like the plants would like it they dont, that is why you have to break them in to the sun in the spring with shade. it stresses them, plus bringing them back inside you could bring insects with them,

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clipped on: 03.16.2013 at 12:51 am    last updated on: 03.16.2013 at 12:51 am

RE: ghost pepper ripening (Follow-Up #10)

posted by: Edymnion on 03.01.2013 at 11:06 am in Hot Pepper Forum

Yeah, in my experience it takes about a month after the pod stops growing before it starts turning, but once they start they'll flash over in about a week.

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clipped on: 03.04.2013 at 07:09 am    last updated on: 03.04.2013 at 07:09 am

RE: Fertilizing Hot Seedlings........ (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: ab2008 on 02.27.2013 at 01:58 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

The fertilizing I can't provide any input on, but the temperatures- I keep my guys 78-85 degrees constantly. Less and they seem to grow a little more slowly.

At nights temps can linger around 75-80, but not much less unless it's really cold outside (sub 40 deg.)

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clipped on: 03.04.2013 at 07:07 am    last updated on: 03.04.2013 at 07:07 am

RE: What is everyone’s watering ritual? (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: Edymnion on 03.01.2013 at 12:55 am in Hot Pepper Forum

I'm very low tech. I have a rain barrel, and I have my plants in dirt (yes, actual dirt). When the mature plants start to wilt, I water them. Thats really about all I do.

For the seedlings, I water whenever the top of the soil looks particularly dry, and just use some peroxide in a spray bottle to prevent damping off. Haven't lost a single plant to damping off since I learned that trick.

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RE: What is everyone’s watering ritual? (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: northerner_on on 02.28.2013 at 04:00 am in Hot Pepper Forum

My seedlings are in shallow pans under lights. I bottom water, using a very weak solution of chamomile tea. This (IMHO) keeps away fungus gnats, and prevents 'damping off'. I water when the soil seems to be drying out. Just lift one pot, and pour from a 2-litre pop bottle in which I keep my 'tea'. Refresh the tea weekly and if fertillizing, add a bit to that.

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Picture Thread - part Deux

posted by: habjolokia on 02.12.2013 at 05:37 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

I enjoyed the pic post but it has reached it's limit of 150 posts. here is the original post by Bill_Missy

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/pepper/msg0108473913384.html?150

Updated Ghost, Ghost with Stingers, and White Habs

Mark

Here is a link that might be useful: Original thread

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RE: Greenman's Peppers 2013 (Follow-Up #17)

posted by: greenman28 on 03.02.2013 at 03:44 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Bruce,
I've never ground up a Thai chile before, so I'll defer to Tsheets. I certainly think it would work with a hot variety of Thai...but be aware that these peppers are often quite seedy! Fresh, I tolerate a bit of seed....but dry, I make the effort to separate the seeds from the dried pepper. It'll be fun finding different applications this season :-)

My favorite and most simple use: Hmong "Pepper"
1. Crush red and green Thai chiles in a mortar
2. Add green onion, cilantro/culantro, lime juice, fish sauce, salt/MSG
3. Muddle the ingredients together in the mortar

Then, just dab your choice of meat into the mixture - it's not a sauce or a paste, just a dabbing condiment. When added to rice, you get a flavor explosion.

*It's official - the Bonda ma Jacques has sprouted (10 days). Thanks to Saint Ottawapepper for the seed!


Josh

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RE: Greenman's Peppers 2013 (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: greenman28 on 03.01.2013 at 10:34 am in Hot Pepper Forum

Thanks, Kevin! Yeah, just a select few varieties - with a couple new peppers each year. My traditionals would be the Hungarian Wax (in my opinion, better than Jalapeno, Serrano, Anaheim, et cetera), as well as the Thai chile (which, pound for pound, I use more than any other pepper). I really enjoy Poblano, but they just don't do well for me here in my somewhat shaded foothill garden.

I don't like Bells, Jalapenos, or most of the common peppers. The flavor just isn't there.

Bruce, you're right...I'm always looking for that "perfect" pepper, and when I find it I will add it to the list. The Yellow Bhut Jolokia made the list last year, and I envision it returning for many years to come.

Josh

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RE: Starting from seed is not easy! (Follow-Up #15)

posted by: ab2008 on 02.25.2013 at 12:54 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

TheMasterGardener1,

Here is a quote from http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/seed/2003044315027348.html

"Check baggies every few days, and remoisten as needed. Even if one doesn't appear to need remoistening, don't let them go over a week without opening them up for some fresh air. "

They take a little care to get going, and you do need to check up on them instead of just tossing them in a bag and coming back in 7-10 days to check.

It's really not difficult at all - put seed starting mix or whatever you prefer in anything even some people use yogurt cups. Moisten (not soak) the soil, put the seed in, cover lightly, and just keep it 70-85 degrees and eventually you'll see things sprout.

Another thing may be a batch of bad seeds. Have you seen any sprout at all? If you need any orange habanero seeds I still have quite a few if you'd like.

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RE: Fert choices - Four to chosse from (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: Bill_Missy on 03.03.2013 at 11:41 am in Hot Pepper Forum

Well guys and gals,

I just took the plung and fertilized the seedlings. I did a 1/4 strength. I used MG 24-8-16

1/4 Teaspoon in 1 Gal of warm tap water. First time they have had any ferts since they have been sowed.

Question, I have Epson salt for MG, what is the best thing to use for Ca?

Also, any recommendations for an one-in-one meter for Ph and soil nutriants?

As always, thank you all for the help and advice.

Bill

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Mini Sweet Peppers?

posted by: ab2008 on 02.28.2013 at 05:26 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Hey there, I know it's not hot peppers but I didn't see a sweet pepper forum and wanted to find out if anyone knew what types of peppers they were? The bag my mother had purchased was from pero family farms. All it had labeled on it was mini sweet peppers and they had an absolutely great taste, I just have no idea if they are just some plain mini variety or if they were a specific type.

Anyone able to provide any insight to these?

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clipped on: 03.04.2013 at 06:06 am    last updated on: 03.04.2013 at 06:06 am

Seed Exchange Etiquette

posted by: HillSeeker on 02.10.2013 at 11:20 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

I'm brand new to seed saving and exchanging but thought it worked on the honor system. I sent someone several seeds and haven't heard from him/her since, despite trying to contact. I understand packages are lost in transit, however a reply would have been appreciated. Truthfully do most people work on the honor system and send you what you agree to exchange? It's unfortunate as now I have few seeds to share to open up my collection. Unsure if I should continue swapping and how not to get scammed again.
Thanks to the few of you that trusted me and traded back. I appreciated it!

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clipped on: 02.10.2013 at 11:20 pm    last updated on: 02.10.2013 at 11:20 pm

WANTED: have & wanted - alberta

posted by: HillSeeker on 02.05.2013 at 02:19 am in Canadian Garden Exchange Forum

I have the following seeds for trade. All my peppers were subjected to open pollination this year. I've tested sprouting the seeds and have young healthy seedlings growing from them already. All plants were disease and bug free, grown in an organic setting.

Seeds I can Trade:
*Bhut Jolakia
*Bhut Jolakia - Chocolate
*Habanero
*Habanero - Chocolate

Looking For:
Red Savana Habanero
Any other Intering coloured habanero, Scotch Bonett, or Bhut varieties.
Thai Varities of peppers
Melon seeds. Preferably smaller varieties
Colored Indeterminate tomatoes

Thanks!

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clipped on: 02.07.2013 at 02:52 am    last updated on: 02.08.2013 at 01:55 am

Seed Exchange How To??

posted by: HillSeeker on 12.06.2012 at 02:35 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Hi,

I'm quite new to the board but have learnt tons of information this last summer from all these terrific pepper growers! My crop wouldn't have been nearly as successful without you all, so thanks!

I am trying to locate a few different seeds and am unfamiliar with how to go about posting or looking through the forum to find someone to exchange with. I've tried the seed exchange and Canadian exchange forum but I'm only specifically looking for spicy varieties of peppers. Can anyone help out?

I have the following seeds for trade. All my peppers were subjected to open pollination this year. I've tested sprouting the seeds and have young healthy seedlings growing from them already. All plants were disease and bug free, grown in an organic setting.

Seeds I can Trade:
*Bhut Jolakia
*Bhut Jolakia - Chocolate
*Habanero
*Habanero - Chocolate

Looking For:
Red Savana Habanero
Any other unfamiliar coloured habanero variety
Peppers with high heat levels like Bhut but that will grow in a Canadian greenhouse.

Thanks!
Carmen

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RE: chocolate habanero (Follow-Up #11)

posted by: scotty66 on 04.19.2012 at 07:25 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

I've seen a lot of good reviews for the "Jamaican hot chocolate" habanero... especially when dried and ground.

I think that is a pepper I will trying to locate for next years garden.

There are some really cool looking peppers on the NMSU website. I could see replacing the wife's flower garden, in front of the house, with a bunch of those peppers. But I don't think she'd feel the same though :)

Here is a link that might be useful: NMSU website (chile pepper institute)

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RE: What do you do with your super hots? (Follow-Up #7)

posted by: Edymnion on 05.08.2012 at 09:09 am in Hot Pepper Forum

I have also used them to get out of having to bring alcohol to parties. I have vodka that I put a bhut in until it turned white that I took to the last one of those. I was specifically told I was never allowed to bring alcohol of any kind to any party ever again.

Nuclear hot peppers are really freaking good at making "Gotcha!" infusions with. The capsaicin dissolves easily into alcohol so you can't taste it at first. After you swallow and your body heat makes the residue in your mouth evaporate and deposit cap, oh lordy lordy lordy!

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RE: Bhut Jolokias (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: esox07 on 06.03.2012 at 10:48 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Frankles:
They will set fruit when they are ready. My Nagas last year dropped blossoms by the dozens every day last summer and then all of a sudden, pods started appearing and they were all setting. The plants wound up with about 100 pods on them all at once. Here is a picture of the blossoms dropping.
Photobucket

If the plant looks other wise healthy, it is probably just not ready. It could be as simple as too much heat.

Flower drop probable causes:

1. Day temp too high >95F
2. Night temp too low <65F
3. Too much nitrogen fertilizer
4. Too much water
5. Low light levels (reduces fertility).
6. Very low humidity (reduces fertility)
7. Poor air circulation (air circulation contributes to pollination).
8. Lack of pollinating insects.
9. Size of pot
10. Too much mineral in feedwater.
11. Too much grower attention.

If you try to mess with all the possible causes, you may wind up making things worse. You have a long growing season in KY. Patience. In two months, you will probably have more Bhuts than you can use.
Bruce

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clipped on: 09.16.2012 at 04:22 am    last updated on: 09.16.2012 at 04:22 am

Pepper plant spacing

posted by: xFozzyx on 07.01.2012 at 02:32 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Hey I just put together an 8x10 greenhouse and am going to start growing some bhut jolokias and a few other varieties of hot peppers in a 5 gallon DWC recirculating system. I have 10+ buckets.

How far apart should each pepper/bucket be?

Anyone know some good hydro nutes/feeding schedule for hot peppers? Ive been using jungle juice for my other plants.

& how hot should I let the greenhouse get?

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RE: Ghost pepper help (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: ottawapepper on 07.16.2012 at 07:23 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

I'll describe what I do. I've added a link to a thread where willard3 illustrates the paper towel method.

I've started dozens of Bhut Jolokia the past few years.

Starting with properly stored fresh seed one or two years old:

1- use a soil less seed starting mix.
2- sink your seed 1/8 to 1/4 inch below surface.
3- keep soil moist - not wet. A dome or cover over your trays helps reduce watering.
4- soil temp of 85F is the sweet spot for me. I get 85% - 95% germination in 6 - 10 days. A seed heating mat and thermostat helps but is not necessary. You can sprout seed
in the 70s F but it will take longer and have a lower % germination rate.

Just my 2 cents.

Bill

Here is a link that might be useful: Paper towel link

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clipped on: 09.16.2012 at 02:48 am    last updated on: 09.16.2012 at 02:48 am

Greenhouse pepper grow list

posted by: avidgardener25 on 08.02.2012 at 05:33 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Well, we are near the finish of my greenhouse. I am planning on growing a good bit of peppers. These include:
Chocolate 7 pot/pod
Red mushroom
Bolivian rainbow
Corno di toro
Chimayo
Halloween
Serrano
Black Cuban
Hot cherry
Thai
Bhut jolokia
Chile pequin
Big Jim
Hungarian hot yellow wax
Chocolate habanero
Numex jalmundo
Ancho San Luis poblano
Beaver dam
Jimmy nardella
Peppadew
Orange habanero
Apple pepper
Red sheepnose
Rocoto
Long red cayenne
Cascabel
Explosive ember
Tobago
Zimbabwe bird
Black pearl
Medusa
Chocolate scotch bonnet
Congo brown
Masquerade
Bih jolokia
Orange bell/naga (bruce's mystery pepper)
Mini sweet bells
Early jalapeno
Numex twilight
Numex mirasol
Hot kil
Pasilla bajio
Surmeli
Yellow bell pepper
Sweet banana

Any favorites you recommend? Suggestions? Comments? I am all ears!

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clipped on: 09.16.2012 at 02:45 am    last updated on: 09.16.2012 at 02:45 am

Ghost Peppers (Bhut Jolakia)

posted by: HillSeeker on 08.30.2012 at 01:47 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Hi, I'm new to post in the forum but it has provided me with some pretty amazing recipes, tips and knowledge in regards to growing hot peppers. I'm growing several different types of habaneros as well as Ghost Peppers and one Chocolate Ghost Pepper. I have hundreds and wanted to start experimenting with sauces, rubs, marinades, condiments, pickling etc. Do you have any recipes to share that would work well for peppers that hot? I've found several of this forum's recipes tried and true so hoping a few of you out there can give me some good ideas.

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clipped on: 09.16.2012 at 02:17 am    last updated on: 09.16.2012 at 02:18 am

My first grow room!

posted by: richiebaker1245 on 08.30.2012 at 12:04 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Hi all, I decided to give up some homebrew space to make a chilli grow room. This was the brew room a few days ago...

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RE: Pruning peppers to make fruit ripen before first frost (Follow-Up #2)

posted by: Darylltx on 09.10.2012 at 05:48 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Hi I wanted to talk to you about the drying process and mold.
I have only found one way to avoid mold besides dehydrating in a dehydrater. Firstly unless you live in Arizona,new mexico or any other desert, your probably will mold. I either pickle my peppers, freeze them, or this technique. You must thinly slice all your peppers, and I mean thin slices and put them on plates or some cardboard say 24 pk cardboard dog food container and place them right in front of a window ac. within 24 hrs they will be about 90 dehydrated and another 24 hrs theyll be past any stage to mold. In about a week they will be flaky, dry where you could actually crush them like flakes or powder. once they are fully dry like 3 weeks or so, then you can store them in something airtight like zip lock bags and take all the air out.

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clipped on: 09.16.2012 at 02:02 am    last updated on: 09.16.2012 at 02:02 am

RE: Flavor difference of chocolote varieties? (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: ottawapepper on 09.10.2012 at 07:03 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

"What other varieties are there"

See link below for a few. Off the top of my head, ones missing from the list:

7 Pot Douglah
Chocolate 7 Pot
Chocolate Bhut Jolokia
Ethiopian Brown Berbere

I'm sure there are many others.

As for the Douglah I'll confess that it's the only pepper I sampled that I couldn't get into my mouth. I cut a small piece to sample and stabbed it with the point of my knife. As I was putting it into my mouth the piece fell onto my bottom lip. The second or two it was there was enough to set my face on fire, make my eyes tear up and caused my fight or flight instincts to kick in. I, without thinking chose flight. I ran for a tub of ice cream! I've been able to munch on Jolokias, 7 Pots, Scorpions, ButchTs and Morugas. The Douglah was the only one that slayed me.

Bill

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clipped on: 09.16.2012 at 01:58 am    last updated on: 09.16.2012 at 01:58 am

First powder

posted by: peppernovice on 08.06.2012 at 12:12 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

I harvested several orange habaneros and a few red savinas(thanks Bill) today. I want to try my hand at making powder. I know a lot of you guys make powder, so I thought I would ask for any advice you had to offer. I've read several post about it. I believe all I need to do is: 1. Cut pods in half. 2. Remove seeds if desired (not a necessity). 3. Smoke pods at about 175 to 200 for about 3 hours. 4. Dehydrate pods at lowest temp for 8 to 10 hours.( each dehydrator is different). 5. Grind seeds into powder.(outside or in a large space or you will be in pain). Does that sound right to you guys? I hope to get them started soon, so any advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks to romy6 (Jaime) for getting me hooked on the stuff! :) He sent me some samples and they were awesome. Here's a pic of what I will be working with.

Tim

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smoking and drying ghost peppers
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My First Pepper Jelly

posted by: cheezdoodle12 on 09.15.2012 at 10:12 pm in Hot Pepper Forum

Made my first Hot Pepper Jelly last weekend...

Not sure it came out right though. The procedure seemed to go as it was supposed to.. all of the jars made a "pop" sound as they cooled ..after sealing the jars. The only problem though, it looks like the consistency of thick syrup or honey rather than jelly even after a week. It tastes good on a cracker over cream cheese though.. Not sure if I should try to re-process or if that could make it worse.

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clipped on: 09.16.2012 at 01:07 am    last updated on: 09.16.2012 at 01:07 am

Ghost Peppers in Alberta

posted by: HillSeeker on 09.16.2012 at 12:58 am in Gardening in Canada Forum

I'm looking for someone that has successfully grown and fully ripened ghost peppers in Alberta. This is my first year growing them. The habaneros are ripening but the ghost peppers are not changing color what so ever. I was hoping to get some input on how long they may take to ripen so that I can decide if I should move the plants indoors or not.

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clipped on: 09.16.2012 at 01:00 am    last updated on: 09.16.2012 at 01:00 am