Clippings by Danielle317

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RE: Emergency Orchid Rescue- need help (Follow-Up #16)

posted by: CharlieVonn on 08.29.2014 at 01:33 am in Orchids Forum

If light is an issue all you need is the cheapest 4 ft. fluorescent fixture you can find with one warm white and one cool white bulb (2700k and 6500k). Cost me around $15 (US) total. This will cover 4-6 square ft. This is more than enough light to bloom phals. and it will help supplement poor light for others. This isn't a complete solution and I'm no expert, but this worked great for me and it's an easy way to get started.
Also my fungicide of choice is physan but I've heard it kills orchids, too.

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clipped on: 08.29.2014 at 03:17 pm    last updated on: 08.29.2014 at 03:17 pm

Would you like some fries with your Catch-up?

posted by: hanzrobo on 07.21.2013 at 12:38 am in Cacti & Succulents Forum

These are fried. Mitrophyllum grande
Mitrophyllum grande SB1960 5 m n Aughrabies

Now for the catchup... There have been so many great things happening in the plant zone, I had to find some time to share some of it with yawl:)

Schwantesia ruedebuschii 'marlothii' - first bloom!
Schwantesia ruedebuschii 'marlothii' SH420 Aggeneys

Carruanthus caninus enjoying the summer
Carruanthus caninus blooms

Lithops lesliei cv 'Albinica'
Lithops lesliei cv 'Albinica'

Leuchtenbergia principa seedlings
Leuchtenbergia principa

Volunteer Echeveria
Volunteer Echeveria

Various Echeveria seedlings, threw many different hybrid seeds in this pot - thousands of seeds over a few weeks time.
Echeveria seedlings

Aloe cryptopoda overflow
Aloe cryptopoda overflow

Mixed Lithops pot
Lithops mixed pot

Lithops ruschiorum - Roessing Mine - 10 months old
Lithops ruschiorum - Roessing Mine

Lithops julii ssp fulleri v rouxii C215
Lithops julii ssp fulleri v rouxii C215

Lithops divergens v amethystina C270
Lithops divergens v amethystina C270

Lithops terricolor 'Speckled Gold'
Lithops terricolor 'Speckled Gold'

Lithops lesliei v hornii C15
Lithops lesliei v hornii C15

Lithops lesliei v venteri C1
Lithops lesliei v venteri C1

Lithops aucampiae 'Betty's Beryl'
Lithops aucampiae 'Betty's Beryl'

Muiria hortenseae!
Muiria hortenseae

and wash it all down with a cool beverage, Echeveria metallica.
Echeveria metallica
Echeveria metallica
Thank you and come again!

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clipped on: 04.10.2014 at 06:44 pm    last updated on: 04.10.2014 at 06:44 pm

RE: How old are the seedlings? Pinching. (Follow-Up #13)

posted by: ginger9899 on 11.05.2013 at 08:40 am in Adenium Forum

Chuy, the big one is 6 months old and the small one 7. The rest of my seedlings are mostly about 3 - 3 1/2 inches high, save for another couple fatties. I started using Dyna-Gro's Foliage Pro (9-3-6) at the advice of this forum (Al) because I transplanted them into gritty mix last month. I just use I think 1 tsp to a gallon once a week I think. Not sure if it is helping but they are growing new leaves. Now, if the caterpillars don't defoliate them....lol.

-Heather

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Fertilizer information for adeniums
clipped on: 11.07.2013 at 02:24 pm    last updated on: 11.07.2013 at 02:24 pm

RE: How old are the seedlings? Pinching. (Follow-Up #4)

posted by: greenclaws on 11.04.2013 at 03:14 pm in Adenium Forum

Hello and a warm welcome to the forum, I hope you find the info and friendship on here useful...I do!

As Rick says, the seedlings look fine to me too. I was however surprised to see that they were sold as one year olds, even mine here in the UK are bigger and are younger...but I guess it all depends on how they were grown.

Rick is also correct when he speaks about pinching them out as I too would wait till they have begun to grow strongly and have developed much more. You will find once spring arrives, they should put growth on, they may even start to branch on their own as some do. Adeniums can be pinched/pruned at most stages of growth, even mature plants respond well to severe pruning, but best to do it when they are actually 'in growth'.

I have pinched out a couple of my oldest plants when they were around 4 inches tall, they were ones that were not developing branches at that time. I personally don't like the look of one stemmed, tall lanky plants. I prefer them short, stocky and with lots of branches, so I nipped the growing points of 2 of them. They did go on to form several new sprouts, but they were a lot bigger than the small seedling stage yours are at now.

I have several 9mth old seedlings that I have to get through this coming winter, they won't go dormant as small ones rearely do for at least a couple of years I find (my largest ones went 4 yrs without a dormancy). I will keep them as warm as I can and in as much light as I can. They will therefore be watered when dry as mine keep growing even in the winter. I won't feed them till spring though. As long as they are WARM, and stay in leaf, water shouldn't be held back In my opinion.

Is that the mix they came in? As long as it drains almost instantly, and fully, not retaining 'perched' water, all should be fine. If it stays wet/heavy, and therefore possibly COLD, I would un-pot and re-pot in something more suitable.

I have never grown seedlings in multi-pots myself..but I'm guessing this is how you received them? They shuld be OK till spring as they are small, providing the mix is fast draining, but once the season arrives I woud certainly pot up individually else you may get a tangle of roots developing.

Adeniums, aka DR's (desert roses) put on most of their growth in their first years so adequate watering and feeding gives bigger plants with larger caudexes (generally) so once the desired max size is reached, giving less water and food slows growth down.
Just my thoughts and what has worked for me in the past.
Gill UK.

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clipped on: 11.07.2013 at 02:21 pm    last updated on: 11.07.2013 at 02:21 pm

RE: Lithops help (Follow-Up #1)

posted by: hanzrobo on 09.01.2013 at 01:44 pm in Cacti & Succulents Forum

Hello jkatz! Welcome to the wonderful world of mesembs! What you have there is an Argyroderma, a close cousin of Lithops. Now would be a perfect time to repot and I will tell you how.

1. Take the whole clump out of that pot - I'm sure it still has the original soil that it had when you purchased it, pretty sure I can see the peat nugget. Pull that whole thing out and drop it in a bowl of water with a light fertilizer and a dose of a B-vitamin mix like Superthrive. Let them sit in that for 3-5 hours. This will plump them back up and give them a charge before you disturb the roots.

2. Use the hose to spray away all old soil. When it's clean, use your fingers to lightly strip away the finer hairlike roots. They will be damaged by this process anyway. Let it dry before you repot. There's no need to let it sit for a day, just wait til it's dry.

3. Soil. Mesembs do not prefer a "gritty mix" as is described on the forum regularly. They really need that sand in the mix to grow properly. I'll attempt to explain my mix, (again, sheesh!)
-I start with MiracleGro Moisture Control mix because it has less bark than other mixes and just the right balance of well mixed ingredients. I sift it through a 3/16" grid to remove as much of the bark as possible and also smash up all the clumps as they enter.
-To this, I add a very decent amount of sand. I would call it about 6 parts potting soil to 4 parts sand - 60/40 - washed, all-purpose sand. NOT beach sand, NOT play sand.
-I then add a big scoop of fine vermiculite, maybe 10-15% of current ingredients. I like to mix up the fines at this point to make sure I have a nice amalgamated fine mix.
-Perlite. Now that you have your amalgamated fines, you can add about 40% Perlite to that. That's 6 parts fines to 4 parts Perlite.
-Pumice - I think you could probably get away with just Perlite but I like a bit of Pumice. I add about the same amount of pumice as vermiculite, maybe just slightly more pumice. The ratio of perlite to pumice is about 4/1.
 photo IMG_4867_zpsc5c3427b.jpg
That's it! Mix it up and you'll have something like this. I would use a 3-4" pot. Let it sit in the shade for a couple days with no water before you acclimate it into a sunny position. Give it some water on the day that you give it light. Argies love bright light, grow in quartz fields completely exposed to the South African sun. Their name means "silver skin" because that is the color they'll be with enough light. I can't pull it off here at the coast.

The brown/white spots are most likely scarring from mites or thrips which chew on the new growth before it emerges. Aesthetically, it will be gone when the plant splits again... but!... you probably need to treat it with a miticide now and then if you wish to avoid future scarring.

I'm not going to go into growing season and watering advice - too much. I'll put an informative link below. Good luck!

Here is a link that might be useful: Hammertime

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clipped on: 09.03.2013 at 02:01 pm    last updated on: 09.03.2013 at 02:01 pm

RE: Dying Lithops (Follow-Up #9)

posted by: hanzrobo on 08.27.2013 at 12:13 am in Cacti & Succulents Forum

I wish I had more time to help. The truth about Lithops and other mesembs is that it takes some study and some experience to grow them properly. If you can keep the plants alive for a full year, you will better understand their needs and signals.

#1! First! - SOIL - You cannot grow Lithops properly in what is known as "gritty mix". These plants need a fine soil that will hug and caress their delicate root systems. The soil is a mix of potting soil with the bark sifted out, all-purpose sand, vermiculite, perlite and pumice. It looks like this.
 photo IMG_4867_zpsc5c3427b.jpg

#2 - Light! You need bright light. Your brightest windowsill may be fine. If not, you're either going to need a greenhouse or play the rain-is-coming shuffle. In too bright of light, the plants will recede into the soil. In too much shade, the plants will stretch out like any other succulent. Fortunately, the self-renewing properties of the Lithops make this condition easily remedied.

#3 - Water... This is the part where it gets confusing for people. There's too much information going around that says to never water the plant except for once a year. That is BALONEY! They're plants. They need water. Most of the year, my Lithops get regular mist - every day or every other day, depending on the weather. In the summer they get more water, not less. Lithops will experience dormancy during the hottest part of summer. For me, it only lasts about 2 weeks in late July, early August. Hotter climates will experience a longer and more pronounced dormancy. Either way, under proper conditions, the plants like a good drink in early summer and a very good drink when they wake up in late summer. I just did my heavy watering a few days ago.

#4 - Watch for the signals. If your plant is shriveling or wrinkled, it wants some water. If your plant is cracking, too much water. If the leaves are not being absorbed and stacking, too much water.

#5 - Depth of pot - Lithops have semi-deep roots. They do not like being kept in shallow containers and will begin to atrophy over time. Use a 3.5" - 4" pot.

Myth- Do not water when splitting. The truth is, you need to watch them when they're splitting. When it first starts, a drink is safe - boosts growth. I usually hold back on watering until I see that absorption is imminent - leaves are on their way out, and then I give some water. The leaves cannot recover at a certain point.

Again, there's too much to say. I hope this is helpful.

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clipped on: 08.27.2013 at 05:48 pm    last updated on: 08.27.2013 at 05:48 pm

Anyone sowing lithops seeds at the moment?

posted by: Logan2 on 10.25.2012 at 11:52 am in Cacti & Succulents Forum

I read it's a good time to sow lithops seeds right now. I started my dish last week and they germinated after 2 days! I'm so happy because I never had a green thumb, and can't believe they germinated so quickly. Hope I'll continue to do the right things to keep them alive. See my lil green boogers?

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clipped on: 08.14.2013 at 04:14 pm    last updated on: 08.14.2013 at 04:15 pm